great chefs! - Greenwich Hospital Foundation Home

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great chefs! - Greenwich Hospital Foundation Home
GRE AT CHEFS!
AARÓN SÁNCHEZ
DEBRA PONZEK
TOMATOES
The Saucy Truth
WEIGHT
LOSS
8 Top Tips to Keep it Off
CHRONIC
PAIN
How to Work it Out
PLUS
33 Great Chefs
Recipes
Source Book
Services and Programs
Provided by Community Health
at Greenwich Hospital
A Magazine to Benefit Community Health at Greenwich Hospital
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SAVE THE DATE
presents an evening
Benefiting the Pediatric Department
and Neonatal Intensive Care Unit
at Greenwich Hospital
Saturday, June 27, 2015
Co-Chairs:
Brooke Bremer and April Larken
For more information, please contact
the Greenwich Hospital Foundation
203-863-3865
[email protected]
www.greenwichhospital.org
| The Magazine for Greenwich Hospital
1
14
24
18
4 Welcome
28
9 Greenwich Hospital Social
A look back at 2014’s fabulous fundraisers
14 Profile: Chef Aarón Sánchez
Celebrity chef brings his Latin American flair to Stamford
18 Profile: Chef Debra Ponzek
Superstar chef in our own backyard
24 Managing Weight Loss
Why it’s so hard to keep it off
43
28 Exercise and Chronic Pain
Movement is key to long term relief
32 The Saucy Truth
about Tomatoes
The history and health benefits
behind this tasty fruit
32
35 Great Chefs’ Recipes
33 top chefs share their secrets with you
35
64 Community Health Source Book
A listing of Greenwich Hospital outreach services,
programs and support groups
Cover
Chefs Debra Ponzek and Aarón Sánchez
on location at Paloma, Stamford
Photograph by Kit Kittle
2
The Magazine for Greenwich Hospital
| www.greenwichhospital.org
35 RIVER ROAD, COS COB, CT 06807
SAKS FIFTH AVENUE
salutes
GREENWICH HOSPITAL.
GREENWICH, 205 GREENWICH AVE. 203.862.5300
151595_GREENWICH_HOSPITAL_8.5X11_JL.indd 1
2/9/15 12:46 PM
WELCOME
Dear Friends,
I have been inspired
by the outpouring of
generosity from our hospital
supporters who contribute
to the health and well-being
of all our neighbors
throughout Fairfield and
Westchester counties.
It is a great honor to be writing to you from the president’s desk at Greenwich
Hospital. While I have been a hospital administrator for more than three
decades, I have been at Greenwich Hospital for just eight months and at its
helm as the interim president since January. Yet, in my short time here, I have been
inspired by the outpouring of generosity from our hospital supporters who
contribute to the health and well-being of all our neighbors throughout Fairfield
and Westchester counties.
Greenwich Hospital’s Great Chefs event is a perfect example of charitable
businesses and individuals coming together for the good of our communities.
This year, we were fortunate to have had nearly 60 top chefs from restaurants
and catering companies and beverage distributors donate their time, talent and
resources to ensure the success of our annual culinary fundraiser. Along with
esteemed honorees, Chefs Aarón Sánchez and Debra Ponzek, this gifted group
of professionals provided a feast of food and drink for nearly 400 guests who
came out on March 6 to support the important work of Community Health at
Greenwich Hospital ([email protected]). It was a wonderful evening of dining and dancing
for a worthwhile cause.
Proceeds from Great Chefs help sustain and enhance hundreds of community
outreach initiatives. [email protected] touches the lives of more than 20,000 individuals
each year through such services as free health screenings, health education
programs for school children as well as adults, and support groups for individuals
and families coping with chronic illness. For countless individuals, [email protected] is a
vital link to wellness, providing such essential services as free health and nutritional
counseling, free mammograms and free prostate cancer screenings.
This year’s Great Chefs participants and guests were indeed vital components
of the evening’s accomplishments but much goes on behind the scenes as well.
The tireless efforts of co-chairs Jenni Salinas and Janet Delos and their committee,
the many businesses which sponsored the event and donated to our auctions,
and those that advertised in this magazine also deserve recognition and thanks.
Sincerely,
NORMAN G. ROTH
INTERIM PRESIDENT AND CEO, GREENWICH HOSPITAL
4
The Magazine for Greenwich Hospital
| www.greenwichhospital.org
Jim Wright
Vice President
Cynthia Catterson
Editorial Director
Stephanie Dunn Ashley
Director, Special Events
Katia Michailidis
Contributing Writer
Raina Cheikin
Associate, Special Events
Robin Loughman
Editorial Advisor
Andrea Guido
Associate, Special Events
Advertising Sales
John Strawbridge
Foundation Officer
Greenwich Hospital Foundation Staff
Sue Bradshaw Financial Analyst
Sheila Cameron Senior Officer, Stewardship and Donor Relations
Cynthia Catterson Senior Officer, Communications
Ginny Downer Database Coordinator
Ned Forster Foundation Systems Specialist
Jackie Hvolbeck Associate
Katia Michailidis Director, Major Gifts
Kathleen Minarik Director, Fund for Greenwich Hospital
John Strawbridge Foundation Officer
Kim Harke Sushon Web Specialist
The Magazine for Greenwich Hospital is a publication of Greenwich Hospital Foundation.
Greenwich Hospital Foundation would like to thank all our advertisers for their support.
All proceeds from this issue of The Magazine for Greenwich Hospital
benefit Community Health at Greenwich Hospital.
For more information about advertising opportunities, please contact us at:
Greenwich Hospital Foundation
35 River Road, Cos Cob, CT 06807
203-863-3865
[email protected]
6
The Magazine for Greenwich Hospital
| www.greenwichhospital.org
SALUTES THE 2015 GREAT CHEFS HONOREES,
AARÓN SÁNCHEZ AND DEBRA PONZEK.
Thank you for continually bringing your culinary expertise, as well as your
compassion, to our great community.
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Plus! Don’t miss our annual signature events, including Greenwich Wine + Food Festival,
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| The Magazine for Greenwich Hospital
7
We are proud to partner with
The Greenwich Hospital Foundation
in support of
Community Health at
Greenwich Hospital.
Flowers for shindigs big and small.
239 E Putnam Ave, Cos Cob, CT
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8
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GREENWICH HOSPITAL SOCIAL
2014 Ve n e z i a Ga l a
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4
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2014 Venezia Gala
Saturday, October 25 was a night of glamour and
celebration when Greenwich Hospital honored retiring President and CEO Frank A. Corvino with the
Chairman’s Award at the hospital’s annual gala fundraiser, Venezia. More than 550 friends, family members,
colleagues and guests joined in the festivities at this black
tie masked ball which benefited the hospital’s oncology
services. During the evening program, co-chairs
Melanie Urick Baschkin and Nisha Hurst each made
impassioned speeches about their personal experiences
with the talented and compassionate oncology staff.
The homage to Corvino included a moving tribute by
Daniel Mosley, chairman of the board of trustees, a
video retrospective of the numerous advances achieved at
Greenwich Hospital under Corvino’s 26-year leadership,
and a presentation by US Senator Richard Blumenthal.
The evening concluded with lively dancing to music of the
Billy Stone Band, Hank Lane Music. Greenwich Hospital
gratefully acknowledges the contributions of its sponsors:
Serendipity Magazine (main media sponsor) Acqua Panna,
Betteridge, The Dilenschneider Group, ENCON Indoor
Comfort and Energy Solutions, Greenwich Magazine,
NEBCO Insurance Services, LLC, Perrier, Richards of
Greenwich, Saks Fifth Avenue Greenwich, S. Pellegrino,
Tiffany & Co., Wadia Associates and Yale New Haven
Health System.
6
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1 Maura and Frank Corvino
2 L iz and David Boutry
3 Warren Lagerloef, Barbara and Henry Miller and Lisa Lagerloef
4 Margie and Bruce Warwick
5 Richard and Ellen Richman
6 Brian and Nisha Hurst, Missy and Laurance Baschkin
7 Michelle and John Binney, Julia and Tom Dunn
8 Alicia Joslin, Nancy Lynch and Pat McLaughlin
9 Decor by Renny & Reed, NYC
PHOTOS BY EL A INE UBIÑ A
www.greenwichhospital.org
| The Magazine for Greenwich Hospital
9
GREENWICH HOSPITAL SOCIAL
u n de r t h e sta r s 2014
2
1
4
3
5
Under the Stars 2014
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6
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1 Timothy and Willow Oberweger, Kathleen and Eric Janssen
2Reynold Jaglal, Drew Marzullo, Demetri, MD and Janet Delos
3Modestus Lee, MD, Danielle and Gregg Clark and Barry Witt
4 Brooke Bremer, Frank Corvino, Jessica Reardon, RN and Lauren O’Malley
5 Stephanie Stellwagen, Brenda Tananbaum, Kerry Gilden and Monica Garrido
6Amanda and Seth Miller, MD
7 Jeffrey Brown, MD, Sue Brown, RN, MS, and Stelios Theofanidis, MD
8 Kimberly Salib, Jessica Adams, JP and Ashley Bruynes and Mimi Citarella
9 Meredith Shames, Chris and Leigh Hansen
PHOTOS BY EL A INE UBIÑ A
10
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| www.greenwichhospital.org
Ships at anchor inspired the nautical theme of this year’s
Under the Stars event that raised funds for the Neonatal
Intensive Care Unit (NICU) and Pediatric Department at
Greenwich Hospital. The July 11 benefit, which took place
at Riverside Yacht Club, drew more than 300 guests from
Fairfield and Westchester counties. Greenwich residents
Brooke Bremer, Lauren O’Malley and Jessica Reardon,
RN, served as this year’s co-chairs. On this occasion,
Greenwich Hospital honored Sue Brown, RN, MS, senior
vice president of patient care services and chief nursing
officer. Brown was the driving force in transforming
the Maternity, Labor and Delivery department into
a multi-disciplinary service line that offers mothers
and mothers-to-be a level of comprehensive care
unparalleled in our region. Event attendees enjoyed
special signature SpikedSeltzer Mojitos with dinner and
dancing against the scenic backdrop of the Long Island
Sound. The evening also featured an exciting array of
silent, live and wine auction items. Serendipity Magazine
(main media sponsor), BMW of Greenwich, EBP Supply
Solutions, Greenwich Magazine/Moffly Media, NEBCO
Insurance Services, Nestlé Waters North America, Sail to
Sable, Sebass Events and Entertainment, SpikedSeltzer,
Turner Broadcasting and Vineyard Vines were corporate
sponsors of this event.
GREENWICH HOSPITAL SOCIAL
2014 g r e at c h e fs
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Hail to the Chefs!
More than 350 guests turned out for the 29th annual Great
Chefs event, an evening of divine dining and dancing in
support of Community Health at Greenwich Hospital.
Mary Jane and Peter DaPuzzo of Riverside, CT chaired
this event which celebrated the achievements of Honored
Chefs Rui Correia of DOURO Restaurant Bar in Greenwich, Christian Petroni of Fortina Restaurant in Armonk
and Adam Truelove of Napa & Co., in Stamford. Chefs and
participants from more than 50 of the finest restaurants
and catering companies in Connecticut and New York
dished up their specialties for area residents who gathered
on Friday, March 7, at Westchester Country Club in Rye,
NY. Wine and beverage distributors were also on hand to
pour samples of their choice libations. Much gratitude goes
to Serendipity Magazine (main media sponsor) and other
event supporters: Acqua Panna, Broken Shed New Zealand
Vodka, DIRT Floral, Equinox, Greenwich Magazine/Moffly
Media, Hearst Media Services, Jose Maria da Fonseca,
NEBCO Insurance Services, Perrier, Roam, S. Pellegrino,
Saks Fifth Avenue Greenwich, SpikedSeltzer, and Whole
Foods Greenwich.
6
7
8
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1 Samantha Cleaves, Diane and Rick Viton, Amy Carbone and Candace Smoller
2Senator Richard Blumenthal, Maura and Frank Corvino
3Janet and Demetris Delos, MD, Jenni and Eric Salinas
4 Chip and Pam Olney, Anne and David Juge
5 Chefs Christian Petroni, Rui Correia and Adam Truelove
6Mary Jane DaPuzzo, Kathy Carley-Spanier and Peter DaPuzzo
7 Luis Carranza, Anshu Viyarthi and George Escobar — Le Penguin
8 Table design by Dirt Floral
9 Conor Horton, Francois Kwaku-Dongo and Andrew Thomas — eleven14 kitchen
PHOTOS BY EL A INE UBIÑ A
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| The Magazine for Greenwich Hospital
11
The Greenwich Hospital
Auxiliary
“An Apple A Day…”
Commit to a Healthy Lifestyle
Support
COMMUNITY HEALTH
AT GREENWICH HOSPITAL
The Auxiliary
12
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| The Magazine for Greenwich Hospital
13
AARÓN SÁNCHEZ
Award-winning chef brings
Latin flair to Stamford
Celebrity chef Aarón Sánchez
is a familiar figure to fans
of cooking shows like Food
Network’s Chopped and
Cooking Channel’s Taco Trip.
However, his well-earned
place among America’s leading
Latin American chefs reflects
nearly three decades in the
kitchen cultivating a unique
fusion of contemporary cooking
techniques with traditional
Latin American cuisine.
14
The Magazine for Greenwich Hospital
| www.greenwichhospital.org
W
ith his newest restaurant, Paloma, which
opened in Stamford, CT in June 2014,
Sánchez drew upon his extensive travels
throughout Central and South America to
introduce a delicious diversity of dishes
from those regions. “This restaurant is my love letter to Latin
America,” he explained. “I don’t want it to be pigeon-holed as
just another Mexican restaurant because the foods of Central
and South America are about so much more than that.”
The result is a lively dining spot showcasing Sánchez’s
exciting blend of traditional multi-flavored recipes prepared
in new and unusual ways. Indeed, one would be hardpressed to find a commonplace burrito on Paloma’s menu.
Instead there is an array of raw bar specialties such as
Tuna Tiradito with Mango Aji-Amarillo Sauce and Louisiana
Caviar and Lobster Ceviche with a Passion Fruit Habanero Sauce.
Small plate highlights include Albóndigas with Chipotle Broth
and Mint, and Chorizo and Sweet Plantain Empanada with Mole.
Those who prefer larger, shareable plates have their pick of
such savory selections as Pollo Pibil – Whole Roasted Chicken
Marinated in Achiote Habanero Sauce with Pickled Salad and
Tomahawk Steak for Two with Chimichurri Sauce and Epazote
Béarnaise accompanied by a wild mushroom salad and bone marrow
and short rib enchilada.
PHOTO BY: COOKING CHANNEL
2015 GREAT CHEFS HONOREE
2015 GREAT CHEFS HONOREE
PHOTO BY: CLAY WILLIAMS PHOTOGRAPHY
Solid roots
Using fresh and pure
“My mainstay
A first-generation Mexicaningredients is a hallmark of
of customers has always
American, who spent his
Sánchez’s standards; even
been people from
childhood in El Paso, TX,
the tap water is filtered
Fairfield
and
Westchester
and New York City, Sánchez
through a state-of-the-art
developed a natural interest
water purification system.
who would come
in creating flavorful foods
Located in the redeveloped
into the city...”
from south of the border.
Harbor Point section of the
His
grandmother,
Aida
Gabilondo,
was a cookbook
city, the 250-seat Paloma offers ample indoor and outdoor
author, and his mother, Zarela Martinez, is widely regarded
dining overlooking Stamford Harbor. Its inviting space is
as the doyenne of authentic regional Mexican cuisine.
infused with an abundance of natural light and features
Sánchez started cooking at an early age, helping his mother
slatted mahogany accents, ceilings of Nubby Yucca Poles
prepare
food for her catering business. His introduction to
indigenous to the American Southwest and Central
a professional kitchen came at age 11, when his mother
America, and floating thatched reed canopies. Equally
opened the acclaimed Zarela Mexican restaurant in 1987 in
appealing, the second floor features a cozy private dining
New York City. From there he branched out to work at other
room, fireplace and landscaped terrace for al fresco dining.
restaurants and with other chefs.
With a number of New York City restaurants under his
His culinary education included a summer apprenticeship
belt, Brooklyn resident Sánchez is happy to be in Fairfield
at the age of 16 with his mother’s former mentor, Chef
County. For him, Connecticut offers the opportunity to
Paul Prudhomme, the Louisiana king of Creole cooking.
satisfy his customers away from the pressures of New York.
Following high school graduation, Sánchez returned to
“My mainstay of customers has always been people from
New Orleans to work with Prudhomme for a year. Treated
Fairfield and Westchester who would come into the city,”
as a member of the family, he learned firsthand the myriad
he noted. “I wanted to bring my food to them, and move
of details that go into the making of a great chef.
away from the cut-throat competition in New York and
Continued on page 16
the unhealthy lifestyle that goes along with it.”
www.greenwichhospital.org
| The Magazine for Greenwich Hospital
15
2015 GREAT CHEFS HONOREE
“What I learned under Chef
He regularly travels to
“There are so many
Prudhomme was more than
Argentina and Colombia to
extraordinarily talented
just about cooking,” Sánchez
film his Spanish language
chefs cooking today,
reflected. “I learned how
cooking series, FOX Life’s
and that continually
to taste and create multiple
3 Minutos con Aarón, and to
layers of flavor. He trained my
Mexico for Motochefs, where
challenges me to think of
palate to taste the herbs, the
he motorbikes to 26 Mexican
new ways of working within
soil and sea, and how flavors
cities in 26 days, uncovering
my own cuisine...”
change through cooking.”
top restaurants along the way.
Sánchez
also
credited
By his own account,
Prudhomme for the life lessons he considers essential to a
Sánchez spends between 200 and 250 days a year on
restaurant’s success. “He taught me about the importance of
the road, visiting his restaurants, filming for television,
working as a team and humbling oneself to the customers
endorsing his line of signature cookware and visiting
you serve.” Additionally, Sánchez noted the importance of
his 4-year old son, Yuma, who lives in California with
marketing and self-promotional acumen which catapulted
Sánchez’s ex-wife. His travels take him to Latin America
the larger-than-life Prudhomme into stardom well ahead of
at least four times a year, he said, either for business or
the crowded arena of celebrity chefs we know today.
pleasure, where he is on the lookout for new ways to prepare
Sánchez took the lessons to heart as he pursued his career,
the local food.
stopping first to study for a year at the culinary college at
“I draw my inspiration from the open markets and
Johnson and Wales University, and eventually opening
the older women who have been cooking their entire
restaurants in New Orleans, Baltimore and New York. In
lives,” said Sánchez. “They possess the oral history of Latin
addition to Paloma, Sánchez is co-owner of the Johnny
American cooking that you just can’t find anywhere else.”
Sánchez restaurants, popular farm-to-table taqueriás in
Back at home, his culinary imagination is stimulated by the
New Orleans and Baltimore.
creativity of his peers.
“There are so many extraordinarily talented chefs
cooking today, and that continually challenges me to think
of new ways of working within my own cuisine,” Sánchez
said. Despite the many demands on his time, Sánchez,
an avid music fan who writes poetry, has no intention
of slowing down anytime soon to rest on his laurels. “My
biggest fear is complacency,” he said.
PHOTO BY: FOOD NETWORK
A star is born
Sánchez’s television debut came at the age of 21 and he
has been a media presence ever since. Now, at age 38,
Sánchez is a regular judge on Food Network’s Chopped and
star of Cooking Channel’s Taco Trips, where he takes on
one city per episode in search of the best local taco shop.
Aarón Sánchez with Chopped host Ted Allen, and judges Marc Murphy and Maneet Chauhan
16
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17
2015 GREAT CHEFS HONOREE
PROFILE:
PHOTO BY: BOB CAPAZZO
CHEF
DEBRA
PONZEK
W
PHOTO BY: BOB CAPAZZO
When it comes to
finding work/life balance
while pursuing a
successful career,
award-winning chef
Debra Ponzek has created
the perfect recipe.
18
The Magazine for Greenwich Hospital
| www.greenwichhospital.org
ith Aux Délices foods by Debra Ponzek,
the thriving gourmet take-out and
catering business she co-founded with
her husband Gregory Addonizio 20
years ago, Ponzek established a culinary
niche that indulges her love of cooking fine foods and
allows time for life’s pleasures including mornings at the
gym, and home-cooked family dinners every night.
Indeed, Ponzek has come a long way since she made
the bold move out of the spotlight as the three-star chef at
New York’s trendy Montrachet restaurant in 1994. At the
time, the New Jersey native was enjoying a meteoric culinary
career where she was considered a peer among such superstar
chefs as Jean Georges Vongerichten, David Bouley and
Bobby Flay, to whom she was married for two years. After
seven years of long hours and high pressure in the kitchen,
however, Ponzek took stock of where she wanted to be in the
future and decided to make a change.
“A lot of people thought I left New York because I wanted
to have kids and write cookbooks, which I did as well, but
it was really because I had always been fascinated by the
concept of having a take-out gourmet food store where
2015 GREAT CHEFS HONOREE
Ponzek discovered
a love of cooking at
an early age by trying out
Betty Crocker
recipes on
family members.
people could get good quality
food without having to go to
a restaurant. I wanted to see
what I could do with the idea,”
she said.
Now the mother of three
and author of four cookbooks, Ponzek has built a solid
brand over the years. She has expanded the business from
her original shop in Riverside, CT to include locations in
downtown Greenwich, Darien and Westport, and added
corporate and home delivery services, a cooking school
and Aux Délices Events, a full-service catering and event
planning division.
From Betty Crocker to
culinary superstar
Ponzek discovered a love of cooking at an early age
by trying out Betty Crocker recipes on family members.
She didn’t consider a culinary career at first; instead she
pursued an engineering degree at Boston University. It was
when she helped cook at dinner parties with a few friends
who had graduated from the esteemed Culinary Institute of
America that she got hooked. She left Boston for Hyde Park
and graduated from the institute in 1984.
Her first big break came when she was hired by Chef
Dennis Foy to work in the kitchen of his New Jersey restaurant,
Tarragon Tree. Before long, Ponzek was named head chef at
Toto, another Foy restaurant. Foy was one of the early chefs
to build a following for his farm-to-table philosophy, and
although Ponzek described him as a passionate taskmaster,
she credited Foy for honing her talent and skill in freshly
prepared nouvelle French cuisine.
From Toto, Ponzek moved into Manhattan at a time
when the restaurant scene was undergoing a renaissance
that heralded the arrival of hot spots such as Union Square
Cafe, Gramercy Tavern and Jean Georges. Restaurateur Drew
Nierpont’s Montrachet was among these elite when Ponzek
arrived as sous chef. Ten months later she was appointed
head chef.
While at Montrachet, Ponzek earned numerous awards,
including consecutive three-star ratings from The New
York Times. She was selected as one of the “Ten Best New
American Chefs” by Food and Wine magazine and in 1990
was named “Chef of the Year” by the Chefs of America
Association. A year later, she
received the coveted “Rising
Star of the Year” award by
the James Beard Foundation
and was the first American to
win the prestigious “Moreau
Award” for culinary excellence from the Frederick Wildman
and Sons Company.
From concept to customers
Moving out to suburban Connecticut was just one of
the changes Ponzek had to make when she first opened
Aux Délices. She originally planned to adapt the kind of
food she had been preparing in New York for busy
gourmands on the go. But her new clientele surprised her
with a culinary challenge of an entirely different sort. Not
only did they come in to satisfy their inner foodie, they also
wanted choices that would appeal to their kids.
“We started out with things like pheasant on the menu,
but then customers would ask for things like lasagna, turkey
tetrazzini and chicken fingers,” Ponzek recalled. “I had never
made that type of food before.”
She quickly adapted to make Aux Délices a one-stop
prepared food shop that also included imported items
from France, Spain and Italy. That’s why on any given day,
entrées may include such epicurean choices as filet mignon
with horseradish crème fraiche, duck and pork cassoulet
and roasted salmon with pomegranate orange vinaigrette,
alongside panko crusted chicken tenders, lasagna Bolognese
with house-made pasta and crab cakes.
One thing that has never changed, however, is Ponzek’s
insistence on high-quality, fresh foods. “I decided that if
I was going to make lasagna, it would be the best lasagna
that it could be, using pasta made in the store, our own sauce
and the finest ingredients,” she said.
Food sold by the pound is made daily in the kitchens at
each Aux Délices location, while salads, soups, sandwiches
and microwavable dinners are prepared and packaged at a
larger commercial kitchen in Stamford. Pasta, pesto, salad
dressings and mayonnaise are just some of the ingredients
freshly prepared in-house.
Planning menus, updating the website – www.
auxdelicesfoods.com – and visiting the Aux Délices kitchens
Continued on page 20
www.greenwichhospital.org
| The Magazine for Greenwich Hospital
19
2015 GREAT CHEFS HONOREE
are just a few of the daily tasks of this chef and savvy
businesswoman who said she works as hard as she did in
restaurants, but the pressures and pace are not as grueling.
Plus, with her husband as business partner and capable staff,
Ponzek enjoys a certain degree of flexibility in her schedule
to share special moments with her children. And it gives her
the opportunity to participate in popular community events
like the Greenwich Town Party and Greenwich Hospital’s
Great Chefs benefit, where this year she was the esteemed
honoree along with chef Aarón Sánchez.
“I still work long hours, but each day is different with new
challenges,” she said. “I love what I do. I never expected it to
be this much fun.”
Moving out to
suburban Connecticut
was just one of the
changes Ponzek had
to make when she first
opened Aux Délices.
20
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23
WEIGHT LOSS
The key to
Reasons can be complicated, say leading experts in
weight loss management. Emotional, environmental and
physiological forces can undermine efforts to sustain a
leaner physique. Only when we understand these forces and
counter them with proven strategies can we win the battle of
the bulge once and for all.
As anyone who
has lost weight and
regained it knows,
shedding pounds is
just half the battle.
Maintaining a
trimmer self is
equally challenging
and all too often
a goal unmet.
Set point theory
Sometimes, personal biology works against you in your
quest to stay slim. According to set point theory, everyone
has a certain weight range, or set point, that their body is
biologically predisposed to maintain in order to function
properly. When that set weight is challenged by weight
loss, the body will biochemically compete to return to its
preferred range.
A person’s set point can change at different points
throughout life, however. For women, pregnancy and
menopause are the most common times for this to occur.
Medical conditions such as hypothyroidism and polycystic
ovarian syndrome can also redirect set points. Extreme
weight gain over a prolonged period of time can adjust set
points to a heavier weight range.
Fortunately, losing weight and maintaining the loss for
several years seems to alter a person’s set point to a lower
level. This helps to explain why short-term diets tend to
fail, while long-term lifestyle changes that lead to slow and
steady weight loss are more successful.
Keeping
it Off
24
The Magazine for Greenwich Hospital
| www.greenwichhospital.org
By some estimates, the single predictor of the risk of regain
is the amount of time weight loss has been maintained.
According to the National Weight Control Registry, which
studies characteristics of successful weight loss maintenance,
people who manage to maintain significant weight loss for
at least two years reduce their risk of subsequent regain by
50 percent.
Overcoming obstacles
Psychological and environmental factors further
complicate the task of maintaining lost weight, according
to Joshua Hrabosky, PsyD, a clinical psychologist and
manager of Greenwich Hospital’s successful Weight Loss &
Diabetes Center.
Some people run into problems once they’ve achieved their
desired weight, he said. “Without the positive reinforcement
of losing one or two pounds each week, people can lose
their motivation once they reach their goal,” Dr. Hrabosky
noted. Unrealistic expectations about how losing weight
could change their lives can also zap the motivation and
focus it takes to keep off the pounds.
“Maintaining a lower weight requires the same kind
of vigilance and self-awareness that it takes to lose it,” he
explained. “You need to be mindful of what you eat and
your level of daily physical activity. You also need to be on
the lookout for old unhealthy eating habits and emotional
triggers that lead to overeating.”
Environmental factors and personal circumstances can
also compete for attention, he added. Caring for a sick family
member, for instance, or a change to a more sedentary job
or one that requires a longer commute can often lead to
regaining lost weight. For some, a single relapse is all it takes
to give up the weight management program altogether.
“I counsel my patients to accept that at one point or
another there will be a period of relapse because situations
come up to oppose the weight loss process. It’s a natural part
of life,” Dr. Hrabosky said. “Relapse is part of the process, not
failure. It’s how you recover from a relapse that’s important.”
To get back on track, he advises patients to return to
strategies that worked for them in the past, such as keeping
a food log and wearing a pedometer to track the number of
steps walked in a day.
Rye, NY resident Anthony R. Russo, 72, turned to
Dr. Hrabosky and the hospital’s Weight Loss & Diabetes
Center a year ago. As someone whose weight has fluctuated
between 165 and 254 pounds all through adulthood, Russo’s
health concerns convinced him to find a new and lasting
approach to weight management.
The center’s program, which promotes slow, steady weight
loss with group support and psychological and dietary
counseling, gave him the information and confidence he
Getting back on track
Regaining lost weight, or “weight relapse,” doesn’t
have to mean failure. It’s considered part of a life-long
weight maintenance process, as long as you get back
on track as soon as possible. Learn how with these
tips from Dr. Joshua Hrabosky of Greenwich Hospital’s
Weight Loss & Diabetes Center.
1.Accept that relapse happens.
2.Understand why the relapse has occurred.
3.Slowly implement healthy strategies that
have worked in the past.
4.Have patience with your ability to recover.
5.If the relapse was because you lost focus,
reintroduce food records to regain self-awareness.
6.Create small, reasonable daily or weekly goals.
7.Reintroduce exercise at a low intensity for
short periods of time, then gradually increase.
8.Enlist support from friends, family members or
a professional.
Strategies for success
Despite the many difficulties in successful weight
maintenance, it can be done. The National Weight
Control Registry studies common characteristics
of individuals who have succeeded at long-term
weight loss. The average weight loss in the study
group was 66 pounds. Below are six key strategies
participants all had in common.
• Engage in a high level of physical activity daily.
• Eat a diet low in calories and fat.
• Eat breakfast.
• Weigh yourself at least once a week.
• Maintain a consistent eating pattern seven
days a week.
• Catch any relapse before it turns into larger gains.
sought to lose weight and keep it off. Strategies for grocery
shopping, selecting foods in social situations and keeping
physically active have all contributed to his progress.
A firm believer that a healthy lifestyle is key to weight
loss, Russo is in sync with the experts, cautioning, “If you
don’t change your habits, you’ll gain it back.”
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25
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27
Working Your Way
Out of
Chronic Pain
For people debilitated
by chronic pain,
exercise may be the
last thing they want to do.
However, a growing
body of research suggests
that physical activity
may be the most
effective way to reduce
ever-present discomfort
and regain quality of life.
28
The Magazine for Greenwich Hospital
| www.greenwichhospital.org
Like many chronic pain sufferers, Jeanne Temple longed
to reclaim the life she had lived before she developed
unbearable nerve damage in her left leg. For Temple, enduring
the gnawing pain from one day to the next consumed all her
physical and emotional energy, overwhelming every aspect
of her life. As someone who had always been physically
active, Temple mourned the loss of her athletic self. Back in
those grim days leading up to October 2010, Temple could
never have imagined that she would compete in a triathlon
just a few years later.
The secret to success, Temple said, was exercise. With help
from the Sackler Center for Pain Management at Greenwich
Hospital and the hospital’s weekly support group for those
with chronic pain, she learned how to keep her pain at bay
by slowly rebuilding her strength and endurance through
an adaptive program of physical activity. As her mobility
Getting Started
Start slowly, with a little extra walking,
for example. Experts suggest gradually increasing
your activity by as little as five minutes one or two days
per week until you can build up to four times a week. Then
you can slowly increase the length of your exercise time
over the course of several weeks or months.
Consult with your doctor, physical
therapist or personal trainer about
which type of exercise is best suited for your condition.
Swimming, aqua-aerobic classes and riding a stationary
bike are all good sources of gentle aerobic exercise.
Stretching, yoga, Pilates, tai chi, and breathing exercises
are helpful because they increase blood supply and
nutrients to the joints, reduce stress to the muscles and
improve coordination and balance.
Listen to your body. While some fatigue and
soreness is normal when starting an exercise program,
ramp down your activity or switch it altogether if
it increases your fatigue or any of your symptoms.
Conversely, don’t let a feeling of well-being lead you to
overexertion. Although it’s tempting to do so, experts
warn, you’ll only risk aggravating your pain.
increased, so did her energy and sense of well-being
and empowerment to take on new challenges.
“Chronic pain can rob you of your life force,” said the
55 year old Rye, NY resident. “Exercise sets it aside for a while
and allows you to focus on taking care of yourself.”
An estimated 100 million Americans suffer from some
degree of chronic pain. Unlike acute pain, which is triggered
by an injury to the body that can be repaired, chronic pain
results from a hyperactive nervous system that sends
continuous pain signals to the brain even if there is no injury.
It can affect any and all parts of the body, although the lower
back, neck, shoulder and knee are most commonly afflicted.
Prolonged pain often leads to depression, anxiety and loss
of sleep. For some, the intensity and unrelenting nature of the
pain makes it difficult to think of anything else. Relationships
suffer and productivity at work declines, if it is possible to
work at all. People with chronic pain are often afraid to move
too much out of fear that they will make the pain worse, which
leads to weight gain, muscle atrophy and loss of mobility.
Ironically, experts say, inactivity exacerbates pain, while
physical movement helps to alleviate it.
According to Christian Whitney, DO, director of
interventional pain management at Greenwich Hospital’s
Sackler Center for Pain Management, regular exercise
is an effective pain management tool because it releases
endorphins, brain chemicals that improve mood and act as
natural pain killers. Exercise provides the additional benefits
of increasing a person’s mobility and range of motion. It
strengthens muscles and reduces the risk of injury.
Dr. Whitney’s multi-modal treatment plan for chronic
pain sufferers often begins with the administration of a nerve
block and medication to help get the pain under control.
Continued on page 30
www.greenwichhospital.org
| The Magazine for Greenwich Hospital
29
After that has been achieved, regular activity is prescribed to
maintain the improved pain threshold.
“Once a patient gets initial pain relief, their body begins
to heal on its own and they can incorporate a physical
program as an ongoing treatment plan,” he explained. “Our
overall goal is to improve the patient’s ability to function and
move with ease. Physical activity plays a vital part in achieving
that goal.”
Dr. Whitney and others stress that patients should discuss
with their doctors which forms of exercise would be most
appropriate for their individual circumstances. It is crucial,
they say, to begin at a slow, adaptive pace that may begin with
simple stretching exercises, a short walk or a few strokes in
a pool.
“I try to get patients to focus on the things that they can do,
rather than dwell on what they can’t,” said Joanne Mortimer,
LMHC, a psychotherapist who specializes in pain and stress
management and facilitates the Chronic Pain Support Group
at Greenwich Hospital. “When you begin to exercise, you have
to sneak up on your system. You can’t expect to immediately
return to a peak level of fitness. It’s a slow process that proceeds
in small increments.”
Despite chronic pain, Jeanne Temple competed in a triathlon.
Not everyone can or should expect to ultimately compete
in a triathlon as Jeanne Temple did, but any level of physical
activity has benefits and is better than doing nothing at
all, explained Mortimer. “When people see that they can begin
to do things in an adaptive way, they don’t feel trapped in their
bodies anymore. The quality of their lives improves and they
begin to feel emotionally empowered to face the bad days.”
While exercise can reduce and control chronic pain, in most
cases it doesn’t completely eliminate it. “The pain is never
really gone,” noted Temple, “but exercise helps minimize it so
I can get on with my day.”
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31
The Saucy Truth About
Tomatoes
By Katia Michailidis
Ah, the tomato! We love it on
pizza, in sauces, soups and
cocktails, sliced with mozzarella
and basil, and just plain with
a dash of salt. It comes in all
shapes and sizes and colors,
including pink, purple, black,
yellow and white.
B
y some estimates, the world consumes more than
60 million tons of tomatoes each year. That’s quite
an achievement, considering their humble origins
and the long journey across time and terrain
that it took for this voluptuous fruit to become a
modern dietary staple.
Called “xitomati” (plump thing with a navel) by the
Aztecs who first started cultivating the plant in 700AD,
yellow tomatoes were first introduced to European society
in the 16th century by Spanish conquistadors returning
from Mexico and South and Central America. Europeans
initially prized the fruit for its decorative beauty but
considered it poisonous to eat, partly because it resembled
the lethal belladonna plant.
There was another reason high society shunned it as a
health hazard. While the leaves of a tomato plant are indeed
toxic, the main danger was the tomato’s acidity, which
32
The Magazine for Greenwich Hospital
| www.greenwichhospital.org
leached lead from the gentry’s pewter cutlery into their food,
causing poisoning and even death. Peasants, who ate with
their hands or with utensils made of wood, were not at risk.
Thus, the tomato became known first as peasant food.
It took more than 300 years for the tomato to gain real
popularity with its use in a newfangled culinary invention
called pizza. The pie made its debut in Naples in the late
1880s, and Italian immigrants are largely credited with
its introduction to America along with a broader tomatobased cuisine.
It was in Italy, too, that tomatoes became known as “pomi
d’oro” (pomodoro) or “golden apples,” most likely because of
their yellow color. The French called them “pommes d’amour”
or “love apples,” a term with two linguistic threads, both
adding flavor to the tomato’s saucy history. Tomatoes, along
with the mandrake plant, are nightshades – a varietal known
for its aphrodisiac quality. This alluring connotation is
Roasted Tomato Basil Soup
compounded by the Hebrew name for mandrake, “dudaim,”
which also translates to “love apple.”
These erotic associations eventually became so
overwhelming to the early church that the Church of Rome
banned consumption of the luscious treat, deeming it too
scandalous a food to do the soul any good. Its plump, juicy
flesh, they thought, would lead to moral corruption, and so it
was called “the devil’s fruit.”
A perhaps more mundane but no less exotic linguistic
possibility is that “pommes d’amour” relates to the Moors
of Spain, who introduced tomatoes to North Africa on
their travels to Morocco. The fruit’s debut in that part of the
world gave rise to the name “pomi dei mori,” or “apple of the
Moors.”
Aside from potentially awakening the libido, tomatoes are
also highly regarded for their positive health effects. Their
rich concentration of lycopene delivers multiple antioxidant
benefits, boosting bone health, for example, and helping
lower total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol and triglycerides.
Researchers have also identified some unusual
phytonutrients in tomatoes that protect the heart and act
against the aggregation (clumping together) of platelet cells.
Diets that include tomatoes have also been linked with
reduced risk of some neurological diseases and, in a few
studies, with helping to stave off obesity. Unlike most other
fruits, and vegetables for that matter, the nutritional benefits
of a tomato are at its peak when it is cooked.
And now, the age-old question: Is the tomato a fruit or
vegetable? The definition dilemma is said to date back to 19th
century America, where a tariff act placed a 10 percent tax on
imported vegetables, but not fruits. Not wanting to pay the
fee, an importer argued all the way to the Supreme Court that
the tomato was not a vegetable but rather a fruit, and as such,
was exempt from tax.
With the status of tomatoes a matter of legal importance,
the Court ruled that tomatoes were to be considered
vegetables (taxable). The decision was based on the popular
definition that classified vegetables by use: They are usually
served with dinner, not as dessert. However, the courts did
not reclassify the tomato botanically. It is a fruit – indeed, a
very large berry.
Modern day controversies concerning the tomato continue.
Is it ok to add sugar to your tomato sauce? (Answer: not if
you’re an Italian.) Are canned tomatoes even worth
considering? Should a tomato ever see the inside of a
refrigerator? Does eating tomatoes when they are out of
season make any culinary or nutritional sense?
Responses to these and other vexing questions fill the
pages of gourmet magazines. Let it be. This devilishly good
berry is healthy and delicious any way you slice it.
By Roseanna DiStasio, chef/manager,
Garden Cafe at Greenwich Hospital
3 pounds fresh plum tomatoes
2 cups large diced onion
2 cups large diced celery
6 cloves fresh peeled garlic
½ cup olive oil
1 ½ quart vegetable broth
½ cup fresh basil
Preheat oven to 450°F.
Place plum tomatoes, onions, celery, garlic and olive oil in
larger roasting pan and cook until soft and darkly colored –
about 45 minutes to an hour. Puree mixture in a blender
with vegetable broth and basil. Season to taste with salt
and pepper and serve.
Note: This soup can be served both hot or cold.
One cup of heavy cream may be added at the end for
increased depth of flavor.
Tomato Tidbits
•China is the largest producer of tomatoes, followed
by the United States, Turkey, India and Egypt.
•By some estimates, there are 25,000 varieties
of tomatoes grown around the world.
•According to the Guinness Book of World Records,
the heaviest tomato weighed in at 7 lbs., 12 oz. and
was grown by G. Graham in 1986, Oklahoma, USA.
•According to the USDA, Americans eat 22-24 pounds
of tomatoes per person, per year. About half of that
comes in the form of ketchup and tomato sauce.
•The scientific name for the tomato is Lycopersicon
lycopersicum, which means, “wolf peach.”
•It is believed that the ubiquitous Margherita pizza
was first created by a restaurateur in Naples, Italy to
celebrate the visit of Queen Margarite, the first Italian
monarch to do so since Napoleon conquered that
country. The creative chef made the pizza from three
ingredients that represented the colors of the
new Italian flag: tomato sauce for
red, mozzarella cheese for
white, and basil for green.
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| The Magazine for Greenwich Hospital
33
We would like to express our sincerest thanks
to the talented chefs and event participants
who make this such an exciting event.
A huge thank you to the entire Great Chefs
Committee for your commitment and dedication
to such a great cause.
We also would like to thank all of the sponsors,
donors, underwriters and attendees.
Without their donations and services
this event would not be possible.
Lastly, a great big
thank you to our
esteemed honorees
Aarón Sánchez and
Debra Ponzek.
Janet Delos and Jenni Salinas
Great Chefs 2015 Co-Chairs
34
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!
u
o
Y
Thank
In particular, we would like to
express our gratitude to
Stephanie Dunn Ashley,
Andrea Guido, Raina Cheikin,
Jim Wright and the entire
Greenwich Hospital
Foundation team for
their expertise and
ongoing support.
| www.greenwichhospital.org
GREAT CHEFS RECIPES
2015
Great Chefs Recipe Book
Chefs Aarón Sánchez and Debra Ponzek
shared the spotlight as honorees at the
30th Annual Great Chefs benefit for Community Health at Greenwich Hospital.
Greenwich Hospital or Greenwich Hospital Foundation are not responsible for the outcome of any recipe
you prepare with instructions from this magazine. While we try to review each recipe carefully, you may not always
achieve the results desired due to variations in ingredients, cooking temperatures, typographical errors,
omissions, or individual cooking abilities. Please always use your best judgment when cooking with raw ingredients.
PHOTOGR APHY BY KIT KIT TLE
www.greenwichhospital.org
| The Magazine for Greenwich Hospital
35
GREAT CHEFS RECIPES
2015 honor e e s
Paloma – Chef Aarón Sánchez
Albóndigas al Chipotle (Meatballs in chipotle sauce)
Servings: 8
Preparation:
Ingredients:
Mix pork, beef, egg, masa
harina and water mixture,
and 4 finely mashed garlic
cloves. Knead well, adding
about 1 teaspoon salt and
½ teaspoon black pepper as
you knead. Set aside.
1 pound lean ground pork butt
1 pound lean ground beef
1 large egg
1 cup corn flour (masa harina)
mixed with ¾ cup warm water
4 garlic cloves, finely mashed
Salt and pepper
3 pounds very ripe
unpeeled tomatoes
5 garlic cloves
4 tablespoons vegetable oil
½ cup chopped onion
2 tablespoons instant
chicken bouillon granules
1 teaspoon ground cumin
Purée the tomatoes with
5 garlic cloves and strain,
pushing mixture through
sieve or large strainer with
the back of a wooden spoon
until only the seeds are
left. Set aside.
Heat oil in a Dutch oven
or deep kettle that has a
tight-fitting lid and sauté
the chopped onion over
medium heat, stirring, for
2 minutes. Do not brown.
3 canned chipotle chiles,
pureed in a blender with
1 cup cold water
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Add strained tomato
purée and cook, covered,
over medium heat, for
about 5 minutes, stirring
often. Add the bouillon
granules and cumin.
Cook 2 more minutes.
form balls the size of
ping-pong balls. Roll each
one in the moistened palm
of your hand and drop them
into the simmering sauce.
Raise the heat and bring
sauce back to a boil.
Correct seasoning – it may
require more salt, but add
sparingly. Regulate the
heat to keep the sauce at a
simmer (you should have
about 6 to 8 cups of sauce;
if not, add water or pure
tomato juice).
Cover and cook the
meatballs without stirring
for 3 minutes. Lower the
heat to a simmer and
continue cooking for 30
minutes. With a spatula,
turn the meatballs once
while cooking, using caution
so as not to break them.
Strain puréed chipotle chiles
into sauce a teaspoon at a
time, and taste as you stir.
Add the cumin and stir.
To shape meatballs, moisten
hands and squeeze out
enough meat mixture to
Serve warm with corn
tortillas or hot buttered
corn bread or corn muffins
(not sweet ones). White
rice goes well, and so does
green rice.
GREAT CHEFS RECIPES
2015 honor e e s
Aux Délices – Chef Debra Ponzek
Braised Beef Short Ribs
Servings: 4
6 sprigs fresh thyme
Ingredients:
2 bay leaves
2 tablespoons canola oil
2 sprigs fresh oregano
4 pounds bone-in beef short ribs
1 sprig fresh rosemary
Salt and freshly ground
black pepper
1
4 ribs of celery, cut into
1 inch long pieces
2 carrots, cut into
1 inch long pieces
2 onions, diced
6 whole garlic cloves
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
2 tablespoons tomato paste
2 cups red wine
2 cups beef stock,
preferably homemade
/3 cup chopped flat-leaf parsley
Preparation:
Preheat oven to 350˚F.
Arrange the oven racks so
that one is right in the center
and there will be enough
room for a Dutch oven.
Heat the oil in a large
Dutch oven or similar
pot over high heat. Season
the short ribs with salt
and pepper and sear them,
turning several times
until browned on all
sides. You will have to
do this in batches; do not
crowd the pot. Transfer
the ribs to a plate when
they are browned.
Bring to a boil and then
return the ribs to the pot.
Add the thyme, bay leaves,
oregano and rosemary,
cover, and transfer to the
center rack of the oven.
Add the celery, carrots,
onions, and garlic to the
pot and cook over mediumhigh heat, stirring often.
Take care not to let the
garlic burn.
Braise for about 2 ½ hours
or until meat is very tender
and easily separates from
the bone. Remove the meat
and bones from the pot and
arrange on a serving platter.
Add the flour and tomato
paste and cook for 1 to 2
minutes longer, stirring
constantly. Add the wine
and stock, scraping the
bottom of the pot with a
wooden spoon to scrape
up any browned particles.
Strain the sauce through a
colander or large sieve into
a large saucepan or bowl,
pressing on the vegetables
to extract as much liquid
as possible. Bring to a boil
over medium-high heat,
skimming off any fat that
accumulates on the surface.
Reduce the heat to
medium and cook for about
15 minutes or until the
sauce is slightly thickened
and its flavors intensify.
Season to taste with salt
and pepper.
Pour the sauce over the
ribs, garnish with chopped
parsley, and serve.
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37
GREAT CHEFS RECIPES
Appetizers,
Sides Dishes
and Cocktails
Roasted Beet Salad with Red Vein Sorrel,
Walnut and Parsley Gremolata by Back 40 Kitchen............................................. p. 39
“Creamless” Creamed Spinach by Benjamin Steakhouse ........................................ p. 39
The Broken Flower by Broken Shed Pure New Zealand Vodka................................. p. 40
Black Truffle-Salsify Soup by Cafe of Love .......................................................... p. 40
Don Julio Smokey Margarita by Tequila Don Julio................................................... p. 41
Castle Crab Cakes by Equus Restaurant............................................................... p. 41
Iberian Cranberry Punch by Evaton, Inc................................................................ p. 41
Lobster Panzanella Salad by Garden Cafe at Greenwich Hospital............................. p. 42
Tuna Sashimi by Good-LifeGourmet..................................................................... p. 42
Harvest Bruschetta by little pub.......................................................................... p. 43
Roasted Sunchoke Soup with Poached Lobster by Mill Street................................. p. 44
Taboulé Quinoa Salad by Myrna’s Kitchen............................................................. p. 44
Bella's Apricot Orange Sriracha Wings by Prima Dolce Company............................. p. 45
Honey Figs with Goat Cheese and Pecans by Red Bee Honey................................. p. 45
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GREAT CHEFS RECIPES
a p p e t i z e r s, si de di sh e s a n d coc k ta i ls
Back 40 Kitchen – Chef Pete Lines
Roasted Beet Salad
with Red Vein Sorrel, Walnut and Parsley Gremolata
Servings: 4
Preparation:
Ingredients:
Preheat oven to 400°F.
6 large beets, washed
Place beets, salt, 2 cloves
of garlic, bay leaf and
fresh thyme in an oven
safe container, cover with
aluminum foil. Roast for
45 minutes to 1 hour, or
until knife easily penetrates
a beet. (Cooking time may
vary depending on the size
of the beets).
1 small bunch of
red vein sorrel, washed
1 teaspoon salt
3 cloves garlic
½ small shallot, peeled and
finely chopped
1 bay leaf
1 bunch fresh thyme
¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil
2 tablespoons toasted walnuts,
chopped well
1 bunch fresh parsley, washed
and dried, finely chopped
While warm (not hot), wrap
beet in a paper towel and
rub to remove skin. Peel all
beets and set aside to cool
completely. Once cooled,
slice into bite-sized pieces.
1 lemon, zested
Gremolata
Preparation:
Chop walnuts, parsley
leaves and peeled shallot.
Zest lemon and then chop
½ the remaining garlic clove.
Add all together and mix.
Add extra-virgin olive oil
and season to taste with sea
salt and cracked pepper.
In bowl, place cold roasted
beets and red vein sorrel
then sprinkle with walnut
and parsley gremolata.
Kosher salt
Black pepper
Benjamin Steakhouse – Chef Arturo McLeod
“Creamless” Creamed Spinach
Servings: 8
Preparation:
Ingredients:
For the clarified butter and
the roux:
5 pound bag of frozen,
chopped spinach
1 tablespoon flour
3 tablespoons
clarified butter
3 tablespoons chicken base
Salt
White pepper
Place the butter in a heavy
saucepan and melt slowly
over low heat.
Remove the pan from
the heat and let stand for
5 minutes.
Skim the foam from the
top, and slowly pour into
a container, discarding the
milky solids in the bottom
of pan.
Add the flour and stir in
quickly to allow the butter
to thicken.
Spinach
Preparation:
Add frozen, chopped
spinach to a pot of boiling
water. Bring back to a boil.
After 7 to 10 minutes of
boiling, drain the spinach,
reserving two cups of the
boiling water in another pot.
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Add chicken base, salt
and white pepper to 2 cups
of the remaining water
and bring to a boil.
Once boiling, lower the
flame and stir in roux to
tighten (make it thicker).
Combine this mixture with
the spinach, stir and enjoy!
| The Magazine for Greenwich Hospital
39
GREAT CHEFS RECIPES
a ppe t i z e r s, si de dish e s a n d coc k ta i ls
Broken Shed Pure New Zealand Vodka – Elizabeth Marks and Andrew Pite
The Broken Flower
Servings: 1
Preparation:
Ingredients:
Broken Shed Vodka
One part Broken Shed
Vodka
Club soda (unflavored)
One part club soda
Elderflower liqueur
Splash, per serving,
of Elderflower Liqueur
Cucumber, peeled and sliced
Rocks glass
Ice
One peeled and sliced
cucumber per serving
Pour into the rocks glass
over ice.
"If it ain't Broken,
don't drink it."
Cafe of Love –
Executive Chef Leslie Lampert, Chef De Cuisine Hector Coronel
Black Truffle-Salsify Soup
Servings: 8
Preparation:
Ingredients:
In large stock pot, add
oil and heat over mediumhigh heat. Add onions,
parsnip, celery and sauté
for 8 minutes.
2 tablespoons olive oil
3 pounds salsify, peeled and
roughly chopped
1 Spanish onion, chopped
1 Russet potato, peeled and diced
Add salsify, potatoes,
stock and herb sachet.
Bring to a boil then reduce
heat and simmer for
one hour.
1 parsnip, peeled and chopped
Add truffles.
7 cups vegetable stock
Puree with immersion
blender until smooth.
1 clove garlic, minced
1 stalk celery, chopped
1 spice sachet (parsley stems,
black peppercorns, bay leaf
and thyme sprig wrapped
in cheesecloth)
3 ounces black truffles, shaved
Season with salt and pepper,
then drizzle with truffle oil.
Thin soup, if desired, with
cream or additional stock.
½ ounce truffle oil
Salt
Pepper
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Cafe Of Love
GREAT CHEFS RECIPES
a p p e t i z e r s, si de di sh e s a n d coc k ta i ls
Diageo – Tequila Don Julio
Don Julio Smokey Margarita
Servings: 1
Preparation:
Ingredients:
Combine the ingredients in
a cocktail shaker over ice.
Shake well. Pour into a glass
and enjoy!
1 ¾ ounces Don Julio Blanco
¼ ounce Del Maguey Vida Mezcal
¾ ounce fresh lime juice
½ ounce agave syrup
Equus Restaurant – The Culinary Team
Castle Crab Cakes
Servings: 16
(for 4 ½ ounce portions)
Crab Cake
Ingredients:
3 pounds lump crab meat
3 eggs
2 teaspoons cayenne pepper
1 tablespoon old bay seasoning
½ cup celery, diced
Extra-virgin olive oil
Mango Aïoli
Ingredients:
1 cup mango purée
1 cup mayonnaise
2 tablespoons Dijon mustard
Crag Cake
Preparation:
1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
Preheat oven to 375°F.
3 tablespoons lemon juice and zest
Sweat off onion, peppers
and celery.
1 cup panko bread crumbs
1 ½ cup mayonnaise
2 teaspoons tabasco
½ cup onion, diced
½ cup red pepper, diced
Mix all ingredients
together, except for the
crab and panko.
Add the wet mixture to
the crab meat and gently
fold in the panko.
Mold into shape (4 ½ ounce
portions) and cover with
more panko, freeze until
slightly firm.
Coat pan with extra-virgin
olive oil and heat to medium
high. Sear cakes on both
sides then place in oven for
3 minutes to ensure the
inside is cooked.
Serve immediately with
mango aïoli.
Mango Aïoli
Preparation:
Mix mango purée and
mayonnaise together.
Season to taste.
Evaton, Inc.
Iberian Cranberry Punch
Servings: 1
Preparation:
Ingredients:
Shake on ice.
1 part Offley Ruby Port
Garnish with cranberries
and orange.
2 parts cranberry juice
3 drops of Black
Walnut Bitters
Serve.
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41
GREAT CHEFS RECIPES
a ppe t i z e r s, si de dish e s a n d coc k ta i ls
Garden Cafe at Greenwich Hospital – Chef Manager, Roseanna DiStasio
Lobster Panzanella Salad
Servings: 6
Salad
Ingredients:
2 cups cooked lobster
meat diced ½ inch
4 cups ½ inch diced
country style bread
¾ cup olive oil
2 pints heirloom cherry
tomatoes, quartered
½ cup fresh basil, julienned
½ cup shallots, thinly sliced
12 ounces fresh mozzarella
cheese, ½ inch diced
½ cup red wine vinaigrette.
Salad
Preparation:
Toss diced bread with ½ cup
olive oil, salt and peppers to
taste and toast in 300°F oven
until golden brown, about
15 minutes. Remove from
oven and cool.
While bread is toasting mix
cherry tomatoes, shallots,
fresh basil and remaining
¼ cup olive oil with salt and
pepper to taste. Set aside.
Gently toss lobster, toasted
bread, marinated tomatoes,
mozzarella cheese and
red wine vinaigrette in a
large bowl.
Allow to set for a few
minutes before serving so
that the bread can soak up
the juices. Plate on a bed
of mixed greens or alone
if desired.
Red wine
vinaigrette
Ingredients:
1 teaspoon dried oregano
½ teaspoon dried basil
½ teaspoon dried thyme
2 tablespoon Dijon mustard
2 tablespoon honey
1 cup red wine vinegar
4 cups olive oil
2 cloves fresh garlic, minced
Salt and pepper to taste
¼ cup onion, chopped
Red wine
vinaigrette
Preparation:
Blend all ingredients except
oil in a blender until smooth.
Slowly add oil while
machine is running until
completely emulsified. Add
salt and pepper to taste.
Dressing may be stored
in the refrigerator for up to
two weeks.
¼ cup fresh parsley, chopped
(or 1 tablespoon dried parsley)
Good-LifeGourmet – Chef Eric Korn
Tuna Sashimi
Servings: 24
Preparation:
Ingredients:
Slice tuna into 1-inch
long thin strips
(about ½-inch thick).
Set aside.
1 pound of sushi-grade tuna
¼ cup soy sauce
2 oranges
1 Thai chili pepper
½ teaspoon fish sauce
1 tablespoon rice vinegar
1 tablespoon honey
1 bunch of scallions, chopped,
as garnish
Juice and zest the two
oranges. Dice the chili
pepper (Please note: Chili
peppers are very hot.
We suggest wearing gloves).
Combine the two with soy
sauce, fish sauce, vinegar,
and honey. Mix well. Let sit
for 15 minutes to marinate.
Slice scallions extremely
thin. Hold in ice water.
When ready to serve,
remove scallions from
water and pat to dry
with a paper towel.
To serve, arrange tuna in
miniature hors d’oeuvre
spoons or place carefully
on skewers. Coat lightly
with sauce.
Add scallions to garnish.
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GREAT CHEFS RECIPES
a p p e t i z e r s, si de di sh e s a n d coc k ta i ls
little pub – Chef Tim Passaro, Jr.
little pub Harvest Bruschetta
This popular little pub appetizer combines sweet and savory flavors.
Servings: 40 pieces
Candied Squash
Apple Ragout
Ingredients:
1 butternut squash, peeled,
seeded and cut in 1 inch cubes
4 granny smith apples, peeled,
cored, and cut into 1 inch cubes
1 stick of butter, cut into
8 tablespoons
½ cup packed brown sugar
¼ cup maple syrup
1 tablespoon salt
1 teaspoon cracked black pepper
1 teaspoon cinnamon
Toasted Crostini
Ingredients:
1 French baguette
Extra-virgin olive oil
Salt
Pepper
Optional
ingredients:
Sweet balsamic syrup
Chilled white wine
Candied Squash
and Apple Ragout
Preparation:
Preheat oven to 400°F.
Rosemary-Garlic
Goat Cheese
Ingredients:
10 ounces goat cheese
1 teaspoon chopped rosemary
¼ teaspoon sea salt
¼ teaspoon cracked black pepper
¼ teaspoon granulated garlic
Pour the chilled white
wine into a wine glass.
Take a sip and set aside.
Revisit as necessary.
Place squash and apple
cubes on a baking sheet.
Top with the butter, brown
sugar, maple syrup, salt,
pepper and cinnamon.
Bake for 15 minutes, remove
pan from oven and use a
spatula to turn ingredients,
return pan to oven and continue baking for another 15
minutes until caramelized.
Crostini
Preparation:
Preheat oven to 350°F.
Slice baguette into ¼ inch
thick slices and arrange
on a baking sheet. Drizzle
with olive oil.
Season with sea salt and
cracked black pepper.
Bake for 5 - 7 minutes until
golden brown. If you only
have one oven, crostini can
be prepared first and kept
at room temperature until
ready to serve.
Assemble Harvest
Bruschetta
Preparation:
Spread the rosemary garlic
goat cheese on the crostini.
Top with caramelized
squash and apple ragout.
Drizzle with sweet balsamic
syrup (optional).
Serve warm.
Refill wine glass if necessary.
GREAT CHEFS RECIPES
a ppe t i z e r s, si de dish e s a n d coc k ta i ls
Mill Street – Chef Geoff Lazlo
Roasted Sunchoke Soup with Poached Lobster
Servings: 8-10
Preparation:
Ingredients:
Heat a large, heavy gauge
pot to smoking point, add
4 tablespoons olive oil, add
sunchokes and cook until
slightly browned.
1 pound washed
sunchokes (skin on),
cut into 2 inch pieces
2 quarts water
2 cloves garlic
1 small yellow onion, diced
1 bay leaf
2 tablespoons aged sherry vinegar
6 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
1 ½ pound lobster
2 tablespoons butter
2 tablespoons toasted
sunflower seeds
1 Granny Smith apple, diced
Kosher salt
Black peppercorn
Then add the onion and
garlic and cook everything
down until the sunchoke
skins are deep brown/
orange color and then season
generously with kosher salt
and black pepper. Continue
cooking until tender.
Add 2 tablespoons of sherry
vinegar and bay leaf, reduce
until dry.
Add water to cover by 1 inch
and simmer for 30 minutes.
Puree in a high-speed
blender until smooth
(remove bay leaf first).
Myrna’s Kitchen – Chef Pierre Lahoud
Taboulé Quinoa Salad
Servings: 4
Preparation:
Ingredients:
Combine chopped tomatoes,
scallions, mint and parsley.
1 cup quinoa
3 bunches fresh parsley,
finely chopped
4-5 plum tomatoes, chopped
1 bunch scallions, chopped
¼ bunch fresh mint, chopped
3-4 tablespoons extra-virgin
olive oil
Fresh lemon juice (from 2-3 lemons)
Soak quinoa, rinse and
cook for 10-15 minutes,
then set aside and cool.
Once cool, combine the
quinoa with the tomato
and herb mixture. Then
add lemon, sea salt and
olive oil to taste. (Some
people like it with less
lemon and more salt or
more lemon and less salt).
Enjoy!
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Slowly drizzle 2 tablespoons
olive oil into blender,
strain through a fine mesh
sieve, adjust seasoning
with salt/pepper/vinegar
to your liking.
Cook lobster in a large pot
of boiling water (3 minutes
for the tail, 5 minutes for the
claws). Remove lobster from
the shell and keep warm in
a pan of melted butter.
Garnish soup with lobster,
apple and sunflower seeds.
GREAT CHEFS RECIPES
a p p e t i z e r s, si de di sh e s a n d coc k ta i ls
Prima Dolce Company – Chef Lisa Sorbo
Bella's Apricot Orange Sriracha Wings
Servings: 4
Preparation:
Ingredients:
Preheat oven 425˚F.
1 dozen chicken wings
Line a sheet pan with
foil. Place wings on sheet
pan and season with salt,
pepper and drizzle olive
oil over wings. Bake 45
minutes then turn wings
over and bake 15 to 20
minutes, or until done.
½ cup Bella’s Apricot
Orange Compote
¾ cup Sriracha hot chili sauce
1 tablespoon soy sauce
6 tablespoons butter
Salt
Pepper
Olive oil
Sesame seeds (optional)
Lime wedges (optional)
In a sauce pan heat together
butter, Bella’s Apricot
Orange Compote, Sriracha
hot chili sauce and soy sauce
until the butter has melted
and ingredients are heated
and blended together.
Place sauce mixture in a
large bowl, add cooked
wings and toss to coat.
Serve as is, saucy. Or, to
set the sauce on the wings,
replace the old foil with
new foil on the sheet pan
and place the wings back
on the pan.
Optional, broil for 3 to 5
minutes, moving the pan as
needed under the broiler.
Or place the wings back
in the oven at 425˚F for
5 to 8 minutes.
Sprinkle with sesame
seeds and serve with lime
wedges and/or with Bella’s
Apricot Orange Compote
as a sweet dipping sauce.
Enjoy!
Red Bee Honey – Marina Marchese, Honey Sommelier
Honey Figs with Goat Cheese and Pecans
Servings: 6
Preparation:
Ingredients:
Place the finely chopped
pecans in a shallow dish.
Season with salt and pepper.
1 goat cheese log (6 ounces)
1 cup pecans, chopped
¾ cup Red Bee Honey
Roll the goat cheese log in
the pecans to evenly coat.
12 fresh figs, Calimyrna or
Black Mission, halved
Refrigerate log until firm,
then cut evenly into rounds.
Coarse salt
Divide figs evenly between
6 dessert plates and then
top the figs with a round of
pecan crusted goat cheese.
Drizzle 2 tablespoons of
honey over each serving.
Freshly ground pepper
Serve immediately.
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| The Magazine for Greenwich Hospital
45
GREAT CHEFS RECIPES
Entrées
Spring Lamb Casserole with Parsnip/Carrot Purée by Bistro Versailles.................... p. 47
Caldo Verde by Douro Restaurant Bar.................................................................. p. 47
Spaghetti with Lemon, Pecorino and Sesame by Fortina........................................ p. 48
Seared Montauk Sea Scallops by Parallel Post...................................................... p. 48
Trenette Arragosta by Gabriele’s Italian Steakhouse............................................... p. 49
Roasted Vegetable Rice Bowl by Green & Tonic..................................................... p. 49
Tomato Scented Medallion of Lamb by Greenwich Hospital..................................... p. 50
Tagliatelle al Cinghiale Ragù by Golden View Firenze............................................... p. 51
Shrimp “Gnocchi” by NoMa Social........................................................................ p. 52
Roasted Chicken by Sonora................................................................................ p. 53
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GREAT CHEFS RECIPES
entrées
Bistro Versailles – Chef Erik Erlichson
Spring Lamb Casserole with Parsnip/Carrot Purée
Servings: 4
1 bunch haricot verts
Ingredients:
Bouquet garni (a bundle of
bay leaf, thyme, peppercorn,
clove, parsley stems)
2.2 pounds (1 kilogram)
boneless lamb shoulder meat,
cubed and seasoned
3-4 tablespoons neutral oil
for searing
2-3 tablespoons flour for thickening
(gluten-free flour may be used)
4 ripe tomatoes, chopped
1-2 tablespoons minced garlic
12-15 pearl onions
12 baby carrots
12 baby turnips
20 new potatoes
1 cup fresh green peas
Salt
Cayenne pepper
Preparation:
Sear meat in neutral oil
and drain.
Whisk flour into remaining
fat in your casserole. Return
meat to casserole and cover
with water. Lamb stock is
even better for more intense
flavor. Simmer for one hour
and remove meat.
Once sauce is consistent,
return meat adding
remaining vegetables except
peas and haricots verts.
These may be added for the
last 10 minutes of cooking.
Add garlic, tomato and
bouquet garni.
When meat is tender the
dish is ready.
Poach chopped carrots and
parsnips in salted water.
Once soft, strain, purée and
season with salt and a touch
of cayenne pepper to taste.
Douro Restaurant Bar – Chef Rui Correia, 2014 Great Chefs Honoree
Caldo Verde
Servings: 8
Preparation:
Ingredients:
Start with boiling water,
chourico and peeled
potatoes. Boil until
potatoes are fork tender.
3 pounds Russet potatoes, peeled
1 pound Portuguese chourico
1 bunch collard greens
1 bunch kale
Olive oil
White pepper
Table salt
4 quarts water
While potatoes and
chourico are boiling,
thinly slice kale and
collard greens.
Mash potatoes and add
back to cooking liquid,
season, also adding in
kale and collard greens.
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47
GREAT CHEFS RECIPES
entrées
Fortina – Chef Christian Petroni, 2014 Great Chefs Honoree
Spaghetti with Lemon, Pecorino and Sesame
Servings: 1
Preparation:
Ingredients:
Boil spaghetti until al dente
in salted water. Pasta water
should be salted until it
tastes like the sea.
Spaghetti (as desired
for 1 person)
3 tablespoons butter
1 teaspoon sesame
seeds, toasted
1 teaspoon lemon zest
Salt
Fresh cracked
black pepper
Pecorino cheese
In a separate pan on low
heat add butter, sesame
seeds, lemon zest and a
pinch of salt.
Once pasta is cooked,
add it to pan with other
ingredients and ½ cup of
pasta water.
Once ingredients are
combined with pasta,
grate pecorino into pan
and toss again.
EST. 2012
Once all ingredients have
been combined with pasta
and sauce has thickened so
that it all sticks to spaghetti,
remove from pan and place
in bowl.
To toast sesame seeds
place them in a pan on
medium heat until color
turns slightly brown.
Finish dish with more
pecorino, toasted sesame
seeds and black pepper.
Parallel Post – Executive Chef Chris Molyneux
Seared Montauk Sea Scallops
with Sea Island Red Peas, Benton’s Bacon Ragout, Parsley and Tarragon Purée
Servings: 3
Lemon
Ingredients:
Salt to taste
12 U/10 sea scallops
White pepper to taste
1 cup of Sea Island red peas
1 sprig thyme
2 ounces Benton’s bacon
2 ounces onions, fine diced
Preparation:
2 ounces fennel, fine diced
Bring 3 cups of vegetable
stock or water to a boil and
add Sea Island red peas.
Season water with salt and
cook until al dente.
2 ounces blended oil
2 ounces whole butter
3½ cups of water or vegetable stock
1 bunch parsley
1 bunch tarragon
1 cup grape-seed oil
48
Sauté the peas with the
diced fennel and onions,
then add the Benton’s
bacon, salt and pepper
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to taste. Add 5 cups of
vegetable stock or water.
Cook for 5 minutes and
fold in the butter.
Take the fresh U/10 scallops
and clean and pat dry.
Add salt and white ground
pepper on both sides. Then
sear in blended oil on both
sides and finish with whole
butter and thyme.
Gather fresh parsley,
tarragon and juice from
half a lemon in a blender
with salt and pepper.
Blend it and add ¼ cup
of oil. Salt and pepper
to taste.
GREAT CHEFS RECIPES
entrées
Gabriele’s Italian Steakhouse – Chef Carmine Paglia
Trenette Arragosta
Servings: 5
Salt
Ingredients:
White pepper
1 ounce unsalted butter
Fresh sage
2 ounces white truffle oil
Fresh parsley
10 ounces fresh black truffles
1 cup heavy cream
Preparation:
3 ounces shredded fontina cheese
3 ounces mascarpone cheese
Sear lobster tails in truffle
oil. Add butter and shallots
until shallots are clear.
1 ounce very finely chopped shallots
Deglaze pan with cognac.
5-4 ounce lobster tails
Add heavy cream and bring
to slow boil.
20 ounces fresh trenette pasta
1 ounce cognac
Add cheeses, salt, pepper
and pinch of sage.
Simmer on low flame until
lobster is cooked throughout. Set lobster aside.
Cook trenette pasta and
toss into sauce pan.
Divide pasta into five equal
portions, garnish with
lobster tail, parsley and
fresh sliced truffles.
Enjoy!!!
Green & Tonic
Roasted Vegetable Rice Bowl
Ingredients:
Dressing
Ingredients:
4 cups short grain brown rice,
cooked (2 cups uncooked)
(yields ½ cup):
2 tablespoons lemon juice
¼ pound Portobello mushrooms
(about 3 pieces)
1 tablespoon champagne vinegar
Servings: 2
1 pound button mushrooms
2 red bell peppers (12.7 ounces)
2 leeks (1.3 pounds)
¼ cup sun dried tomatoes (1 ounce)
½ cup parsley
½ cup toasted walnuts
1 cup kale
3 teaspoons thyme
2 tablespoons hazelnut oil
Garlic
Pinch sea salt
Pinch black pepper
Extra-virgin olive oil
1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
¼ cup garlic mushroom oil
green & tonic:Jan2015
¼ cup hazelnut oil
Preparation:
Slice 5-7 cloves of garlic into
thin slivers. Cut portobello
stems into slices. Place both
in 1 ¼ cups of extra-virgin
olive oil in a fry pan. Let
simmer until garlic starts to
turn brown then turn heat
off and let cool. After cooled,
strain and use oil in the
dressing recipe.
Cook short grain brown
rice in boiling water until
tender, then rinse to cool.
After cooled, drizzle on
hazelnut oil and salt and
pepper then mix so it coats
the rice.
Slice mushrooms and
leeks and cut red bell
peppers into ½” squares.
Toss in extra-virgin olive
oil with salt and pepper.
Roast in the oven at 375˚F.
The mushrooms and leeks
should roast for 20 minutes
and the red peppers for
about 30 minutes.
www.greenwichhospital.org
Chop walnuts and toast in
the oven for 10 minutes,
until aromatic.
Wisk dressing ingredients
together.
Chop sun dried tomatoes
small, rip kale small and
toss all ingredients together
except rice, adding thyme
and chopped parsley
Place about a cup of brown
rice in a soup bowl and
about a cup of roasted
vegetable salad on top and
¼ cup of the dressing.
| The Magazine for Greenwich Hospital
49
GREAT CHEFS RECIPES
entrées
Greenwich Hospital – Executive Chef Stephen V. Mandracchia
Tomato Scented Medallion of Lamb
with White Truffle and Porcini Mushroom Polenta Canapés
Servings:
Yields approximately
12 - 14 canapés
Ingredients:
One piece boneless New Zealand
lamb loin (10 – 12 oz.)
3 ounces imported
Mutti tomato vinegar
1 teaspoon fresh rosemary,
finely minced
2 teaspoons unsalted whole butter
1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
2 cups low sodium chicken stock
1 quart milk
2 teaspoons sea salt
2 cups yellow corn meal
½ teaspoon white truffle oil
½ cup porcini mushrooms, finely
chopped (re-hydrated if dry with
liquid reserved for another use)
¼ cup parmesan cheese, grated
1 teaspoon fresh parsley,
finely minced
Sea salt and cracked pepper
to taste
Polenta
Preparation:
In a large sauce pan bring
stock, milk and 2 teaspoons
of the salt to a boil. Reduce
heat to a slow simmer.
Slowly pour in the cornmeal,
whisking continuously to
avoid lumps. When all the
corn meal has been added,
continue cooking and stir
with a wooden spoon.
Add the chopped porcini
mushrooms and continue
cooking for about 20
minutes while stirring.
Add the truffle oil, cheese
and parsley and stir till
incorporated. Cook approximately 10 more minutes.
Pour the polenta into a
9” x 13” greased baking
pan or small cookie sheet.
Smooth with a spatula
and chill until firm.
When firm, cut out small ½
dollar size rounds using a
small cookie cutter.
Place rounds on a
parchment lined baking
sheet and hold for assembly.
In a small non-stick skillet
over medium- high heat,
gently sear loin on all sides.
Note: The polenta rounds
may be fried or baked prior
to assembly if desired and
served warm.
Deglaze pan with butter
and tomato vinegar, remove
loin and place in a small
oven proof dish and roast
at 350˚F until rare. (About 8 10 minutes)
Lamb Medallions
Preparation:
Lightly coat the lamb with
olive oil, season with salt
and pepper and evenly
sprinkle rosemary over
all sides.
Remove and let rest for
5 minutes, then slice in even
¼ inch slices and place on
top of the warm polenta.
Garnish if desired with
finely minced chive or
rosemary blossom.
Thank You!
Many thanks to our 2015 Great Chefs honorees,
Aarón Sánchez and Debra Ponzek,
co-chairs Jenni Salinas and Janet Delos,
and volunteers, participants, sponsors, donors,
advertisers and guests for
making our event a great success.
50
The Magazine for Greenwich Hospital
| www.greenwichhospital.org
GREAT CHEFS RECIPES
entrées
Golden View Firenze – Chef Francesco Casu
Tagliatelle al Cinghiale Ragù
Servings: 8
tomatoes
Pasta
Ingredients:
Olive oil
Salt
5 egg yolks
Pepper
3 whole eggs
25 ounces 00 Caputo Flour
Pasta
Preparation:
Ragù
Ingredients:
Fold eggs into flour and
mix for 3-5 minutes.
2 pounds wild boar (or any meat
with a good fat content can be used
as a substitute)
Cover in plastic wrap and
let rest for a minimum of
30 minutes. It will keep for
3-5 days, if refrigerated.
1 pound mirepoix
(a mixture of chopped, medium-cut,
celery, onions, and carrots)
6 ounces tomato paste
16 ounces white wine
34 ounces (or 1 liter) whole peeled
Using a pasta machine, roll
out into thin sheets about a
foot in length. Then use a
knife until ready to cook.
Boil water and cook for
only 2-4 minutes. It will
then be ready to serve.
Ragù
Preparation:
Deglaze using the
white wine.
Hand-cut meat into small
cubes (or pass through a
meat grinder).
When the wine is
evaporated, fold in tomato
paste. Then add the whole
peeled tomatoes and
cook on low heat for about
2 hours.
Sweat mirepoix with olive
oil in a large pot or pan,
caramelizing over medium
heat for about 25 minutes
or until golden brown.
Add meat, stirring while
cooking for 30-45 minutes,
creating a nice foundation.
Add salt and pepper
to taste.
Buon Appetito!
After12 successful
years in the heart
of Florence we bring
our Mediterranean
kitchen to Greenwich
for an authentic
Italian experience
G
lden View
FIRENZE
Lunch Hours:
Mon- Sat 11:30am - 3pm
Dinner Hours:
Mon- Sat 5:30pm-10:30pm
Sundays:
5pm- 8:30pm
249 Railroad Ave | Greenwich, CT | 203.817.0919 | www.gvfct.com
www.greenwichhospital.org
| The Magazine for Greenwich Hospital
51
GREAT CHEFS RECIPES
entrées
NoMa Social – Executive Chef Bill Rosenberg
Shrimp “Gnocchi”
Servings: 4
¼ cup unsalted butter
Gnocchi
Ingredients:
Salt
1 pound jumbo shrimp (21/25 count),
peeled and deveined
1 egg white
1 cup heavy cream
1 bunch chives, finely minced
Salt
Pepper
Sauce
Ingredients:
2 shallots, sliced thin
1 teaspoon olive oil
1 cup peas
1 cup shrimp, diced
1 cup shrimp stock
3 tablespoons fines herbs
(chives, tarragon, parsley)
52
Pepper
Shrimp Gnocchi
Preparation:
Place shrimp, salt and
pepper into a food
processor, puree shrimp
until smooth.
Next add the egg white
and, while the machine is
running, add the heavy
cream slowly and process
for a minute until all is
incorporated. Next fold in
the chives.
Cool in refrigerator for an
hour or overnight.
Bring a large pot of water
to a boil add 5 tablespoons
of salt.
The Magazine for Greenwich Hospital
Place shrimp gnocchi
mix into a pastry bag and
get a paring knife ready.
You are going to squeeze
pastry bag and cut gnocchi
with a pastry knife at
one inch intervals into
boiling water.
Once they float to the top of
water, take out and place in
an ice water bath to cool.
Sauce Preparation:
Warm olive oil and add
shallots to sweat until there
is no color.
Add shrimp and sauté
until pink and then add
shrimp stock, and reduce
to half its volume.
Add herbs, butter and
gnocchi and toss everything
together to coat well.
Then add peas to
warm through and
adjust seasonings.
Enjoy.
| www.greenwichhospital.org
GREAT CHEFS RECIPES
entrées
Sonora – Chef Rafael Palomino, 2010 Great Chefs Honoree
Roasted Chicken
with Chardonnay Peanut Sauce
Servings: 6
One of my favorite
comfort foods, roasted
chicken is always a
great party dish! The
Chardonnay Peanut
Sauce blends beautifully
with the marinated
chicken.
Ingredients:
3 boneless free-range chickens,
3 ½ pounds each, split in half
Chardonnay
Peanut Sauce
Ingredients:
4 cups Chardonnay
1 tablespoon shallot, minced
2 tablespoons creamy peanut butter
2 cups coconut milk
¼ cup cream of coconut
2 cups chicken stock, or canned
low-salt chicken broth
6 slices manchego cheese
Garnish
Ingredients:
Marinade
Ingredients:
1 tablespoon chives, chopped
1 ½ cups chicken stock or
canned low-salt chicken broth
½ cup julienned dry-packed
sun-dried tomatoes, soaked in hot
water for 20 minutes
1 teaspoon olive oil
1 cup red onion, minced
1 tablespoon roasted garlic
½ teaspoon annatto powder
1 teaspoon paprika
¼ cup fresh cilantro, chopped
1 ear of corn, roasted, or 1 cup
frozen corn kernels
Kosher salt
Freshly ground black pepper
1 tablespoon plum tomato,
diced and seeded
1 tablespoon chopped
roasted peanuts
Marinade
Preparation:
Pour the chicken stock into a
medium saucepan. Combine
the sun-dried tomatoes with
the olive oil. Add both to the
saucepan, along with the
onion, rosemary, and garlic.
Stir in salt and pepper to
taste, annatto, and paprika,
bring to a boil and cook
for 5 minutes.
Let cool and add the cilantro
before pouring into a food
processor fitted with a steel
blade or blender; process
until smooth.
Coat the chicken with the
marinade. Cover and
refrigerate for 8 hours
or overnight.
Sauce
Preparation:
While the chicken is
roasting, in a medium
saucepan, over mediumhigh heat, cook the wine,
roasted corn, and shallot
until reduced by half,
10 - 12 minutes.
Add the peanut butter,
coconut milk, cream of
coconut, and chicken stock.
Chicken
Preparation:
Preheat oven to 450°F.
In a medium sauté pan
over medium-high heat,
sear the chicken halves
on all sides until golden,
about 5 minutes per side.
Immediately place the
chicken on a baking sheet
and roast in the oven
until cooked through,
12 - 15 minutes.
Bring to a boil, whisking
frequently. Cook until all
the ingredients are well
blended. Use immediately.
Set a chicken half on each
plate. Sprinkle the chives,
tomato, and peanuts on top.
Drizzle the chicken with
sauce and serve!
Preheat the broiler, place a
slice of manchego cheese on
top of each half, and broil
the chicken, in batches if
necessary, until the cheese
melts, about 30 seconds.
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| The Magazine for Greenwich Hospital
53
GREAT CHEFS RECIPES
Desserts
Diane’s Chocolate Mousse Shots by Blue Tulip Chocolates...................................... p. 55
Cheese Cake by Greenwich Staffing.................................................................... p. 55
Irish Soda Bread by Grade A ShopRite.................................................................. p. 56
Bomboloni by Morello Italian Bistro...................................................................... p. 57
Coconut Cake by Sweet Lisa’s Exquisite Cakes..................................................... p. 57
Caribbean Bananas Foster by Whole Foods.......................................................... p. 58
Family Style Tiramisu by Tarry Market.................................................................. p. 59
54
The Magazine for Greenwich Hospital
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GREAT CHEFS RECIPES
de sse rt s
Blue Tulip Chocolates – Chef Diane A. Holland
Diane’s Chocolate Mousse Shots
Servings: 48 shot glasses
Chocolate Mousse
Ingredients:
3 cups heavy cream
½ cup sugar
6 large egg yolks, room temperature
11 ounces 70% dark chocolate,
finely chopped
5 ounces 35% milk chocolate,
finely chopped
Mousse
Preparation:
Beat egg yolks in small
bowl and set aside.
Put finely chopped
chocolate in a large bowl
with a strainer on top.
Mix 1 cup cream, espresso
and sugar and heat until
boiling, then take off heat.
Add yolks with heated
mixture and return to low
heat until thickened (1 - 2
minutes). Stir constantly.
Fold whipped cream
into chilled chocolate until
thoroughly combined.
Assembly:
Strain mixture
over chocolate.
Pipe mousse into
shot glasses.
You will need several bowls, a
kitchen torch, thermometer, and
shot glasses (can be plastic)
Fold ingredients until all is
incorporated and cover with
saran wrap (touching pudding) until cool.
Meringue
Preparation:
Pipe meringue on top of
mousse, going 1 inch over
top of glasses.
Swiss meringue
Ingredients:
Make whipped cream by
whipping 2 cups of cream
and vanilla together in a
mixer, set aside.
1 ounce espresso, room
temperature
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
Valrhona Les Perles Craquantes
Chocolates
6 large egg whites, approximately
6 ounces
Mix and heat egg whites
and sugar over bain-marie
until 140°F.
Sprinkle 10 - 12 Craquantes
on top of mousse
Use a kitchen torch until the
meringue is light brown.
Enjoy!
Whip until shiny and
firm and immediately put in
piping bag with star tip.
14 ounces sugar
Greenwich Staffing – Chef Sharon Sweeney Steffann
Cheese Cake
Servings: 8 - 12
Preparation:
Crust Ingredients:
Beat eggs and sugar.
Add cheese and vanilla and
beat until smooth.
30 graham crackers, crushed
¼ cup grated walnuts
¼ pound butter, melted
Fold in sour cream.
dash of cinnamon
Put in spring-form pan,
lined with crumb mixture.
crushed Zwieback (optional)
Bake at 375˚F for 35 minutes.
Filling Ingredients:
Shut heat off, leave
in overnight.
1 pound cream cheese
Delicious!
1 cup sugar
3 eggs
2 teaspoons vanilla
3 cups sour cream
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| The Magazine for Greenwich Hospital
55
56
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GREAT CHEFS RECIPES
de sse rt s
Morello Italian Bistro – Chef Amanda Atkinson
Bomboloni
Servings: 30
Preparation:
Ingredients:
In the bowl of a stand
mixer, add milk, eggs,
egg yolks, vanilla extract,
yeast and melted butter.
Whisk thoroughly until
yeast dissolves.
1 ½ cups whole milk
2 whole eggs
3 egg yolks
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
2 ounces fresh yeast
¼ pound unsalted butter, melted
½ cup + 1 tablespoon sugar
5 cups all-purpose flour
¾ cup bread flour
1 ½ teaspoons kosher salt
Sugar, for coating
Parchment paper
Pan-coating spray
Canola oil for frying
Dark Chocolate
Sauce Ingredients:
12 ounces heavy cream
2 ounces whole milk
8 ounces dark chocolate,
good quality
Remove whisk and add dry
ingredients. Set bowl onto
stand mixer and fit with
dough hook. Mix on low
speed for approximately
10 - 15 minutes until the
dough appears homogenous.
The dough will be very
sticky. Turn dough into a
greased bowl and cover with
plastic wrap. Proof for about
an hour or until doubled
in bulk.
Turn dough out onto lightly
floured parchment paper.
Dust a rolling pin with flour
and lightly flour the surface
of the dough. Gently roll out
the dough to ¼ inch thickness. Freeze the dough for
about 20 minutes. Remove
from the freezer and cut
with a 2 ½ inch biscuit cutter
or any shape you desire.
Set cut pieces of dough
onto oil-sprayed parchment
or waxed paper. Cover
donuts with another sheet
of greased parchment, cover
tray tightly in plastic wrap
and refrigerate.
Let donuts rise in refrigerator for about 30 minutes to
an hour. They should be soft
to the touch, almost doubled
in height, but will still hold
their shape.
Meanwhile, preheat oil in a
heavy bottomed skillet
to 320˚F.
Fry in batches for about
6 - 8 minutes, turning often.
They should be golden
brown. Drain briefly on
paper towels and then toss
in sugar to coat.
Serve warm with dark
chocolate sauce for dipping.
Dark Chocolate
Sauce Preparation:
Chop chocolate into small
pieces and place into a dry
mixing bowl.
Boil water in a pot, turn off
heat and set chocolate over
the pot of hot water to melt.
In a separate pot, bring
milk and cream to almost
simmering.
Remove from heat and
pour over chocolate. Let
rest for about five minutes.
Slowly stir with a whisk
or spatula until mixture is
well combined and smooth.
Serve warm.
Sweet Lisa’s Exquisite Cakes – Chef Lisa Maronian, 2013 Great Chefs Honoree
Coconut Cake
Servings: 12
Icing Ingredients:
Cake Ingredients:
1 pound cream cheese
12 ounces unsalted butter
8 ounces unsalted butter
14 ounces sugar
½ teaspoon vanilla
6 eggs
½ teaspoon coconut extract
2 teaspoons vanilla
1 pound 10X sugar
15 ounces all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
½ teaspoon baking soda
½ teaspoon salt
8 ounces milk
4 ounces coconut, shredded
Cake Preparation:
Preheat oven to 350˚F.
Cream the butter and
sugar. Add eggs slowly,
add vanilla.
Combine dry ingredients
and add alternately with
milk. Fold in the coconut.
Line the bottom of a
3”x 8” or 2”x 9” pan
with parchment and
grease the sides.
Bake for approximately
35 - 40 minutes.
Icing Preparation:
Whip all ingredients together.
Fill cake layers and ice.
Decorate with additional
shredded coconut.
YUMMY!
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| The Magazine for Greenwich Hospital
57
GREAT CHEFS RECIPES
de sse rt s
Whole Foods
Caribbean Bananas Foster
Servings: 6
Preparation:
Ingredients:
Melt butter, brown sugar,
lime juice, rum, allspice
and salt in large sauté pan
over medium-low heat.
1 stick unsalted organic butter
(8 tablespoons)
½ cup dark brown sugar
2 tablespoons fresh lime juice
3 tablespoons dark rum
(we suggest Gosling’s Black Seal
from Bermuda)
½ teaspoon ground allspice
¼ teaspoon kosher salt
Add bananas and pineapple,
sauté until tender, but not
soft (about 2 minutes).
Serve banana mixture over
scoops of vanilla ice cream
and garnish each serving
with coconut.
2 ripe organic bananas,
sliced into 1 inch chunks
1 ½ cups diced fresh
organic pineapple
Vanilla ice cream
¾ cup shredded organic coconut,
lightly toasted
VALUES
MATTER
58
The Magazine for Greenwich Hospital
| www.greenwichhospital.org
WHOLEFOODS.COM/VALUESMATTER
Greenwich
90 E. Putnam Ave.
Greenwich,
Connecticut
06830
Port Chester
575 Boston Post Road
Port Chester,
New York
10573
America’s Healthiest Grocery Store
GREAT CHEFS RECIPES
de sse rt s
Tarry Market – Chef Colbert Dasilva
Family Style Tiramisu
Servings: 12
Preparation:
Ingredients:
Whisk mascarpone and
heavy cream until smooth.
Place egg yolks, Marsala
wine and sugar in a
stainless steel bowl and
heat over a Bain-Marie until
the sugar is dissolved.
Pot of sweetened black coffee
2 packages of lady fingers
Dusting of cocoa powder
8 ounces mascarpone
8 ounces heavy cream
1 tablespoon gelatin powder,
bloomed in ice water per
package instructions
3 eggs separated into yolks
and whites
2 tablespoons granulated sugar
¼ cup Marsala wine
Remove from heat and add
the bloomed gelatin. Fold
into the mascarpone/heavy
cream mixture.
In a separate bowl, whisk
the egg whites and fold
them with the rest of the
mixture to form a mousse.
Lightly soak the lady fingers
in the coffee. In a 9”x 13”
pyrex pan, build a bottom
layer with the soaked lady
fingers. Spread a layer of the
prepared mousse over the
lady fingers.
Repeat these three steps to
make an additional layer of
lady fingers and mousse.
Refrigerate the tiramisu for
at least six hours.
www.greenwichhospital.org
Before serving, finish the
tiramisu with a dusting
of cocoa powder.
Cut into 12 servings.
Tutti a tavola!
| The Magazine for Greenwich Hospital
59
Great Chefs 2015
Participants
Amore Cucina & Bar
921 Hope Street
Stamford, CT 06907
203-357-0836
Amorerestaurantct.com
Broken Shed Vodka
Pure and Premium
New Zealand Vodka
Brokenshed.com
Cafe of Love
38 East Main Street
Mount Kisco, NY 10549
914-242-1002
Cafeofloveny.com
Aux Délices
1075 East Putnam Avenue
Riverside, CT 06878
203-698-1066
Auxdelicesfoods.com
3 West Elm Street
Greenwich, CT 06830
203-622-6644
25 Old King's Highway North
Goodwives Shopping Center
Darien, CT 06820
203-662-1136
1035 Post Road East
Westport, CT 06880
203-557-9600
Back 40 Kitchen
107 Greenwich Avenue, Rear
Greenwich, CT 06830
203-992-1800
Back40kitchen.com
Deutsch Family Wine & Spirits
914-251-3276
Deutschfamily.com
Douro
363 Greenwich Avenue
Greenwich, CT 06830
203-869-7622
Dourorestaurantbar.com
Eder Bros.
203-934-8381
Ederbros.com
Benjamin Steakhouse
610 West Hartsdale Road
White Plains, NY 10607
914-428-6868
Benjaminsteakhouse.com
Equus
400 Benedict Avenue
Tarrytown, NY 10591
914-631-1980
Castlehotelandspa.com
Bistro Versailles
339 Greenwich Avenue
Greenwich, CT 06830
203-661-6634
Versaillesgreenwich.com
Evaton
914-968-8220
Evaton.com
Blue Tulip Chocolates
137 Purchase Street
Rye, NY 10580
914-481-4840
Bluetulipchocolates.com
60
Cask Republic
191 Summer Street
Stamford, CT 06901
203-348-2275
Caskrepublic.com
The Magazine for Greenwich Hospital
Eventi Café
914-960-1487
Famous Greek Kitchen
10 North Water Street
Greenwich, CT 06830
203-531-6887
Famousgreekkitchen.com
| www.greenwichhospital.org
Fjord Fish Market/Catering
158 East Putnam Avenue
Cos Cob, CT 06807
203-325-0248
Fjordct.com
Fortina
17 Maple Avenue
Armonk, NY 10504
914-273-0900
Fortinapizza.com
Rye Ridge Shopping Center
136 South Ridge Street
Rye Brook, NY 10573
Free & Co. Kitchen
203-622-5102
Freeandcokitchen.com
freshii
1 Main Street
Westport, CT 06880
203-222-3599
freshii.com
1499 Post Road
Fairfield, CT 06824
203-504-2933
Gabriele's Italian Steakhouse
35 Church Street
Greenwich, CT 06830
203-622-4223
Gabrielesofgreenwich.com
Golden View Firenze
249 Railroad Avenue
Greenwich, CT 06830
203-817-0919
Gvfct.com
Good-Life Gourmet
108 Main Street
Irvington, NY 10533
914-478-8080
Good-lifegourmet.com
Grade A ShopRite
360 Connecticut Avenue
Norwalk, CT 06854
203-299-5737
Shoprite.com
Green & Tonic
7 Strickland Road
Cos Cob, CT 06807
1-855-Go-GandT
Greenandtonic.com
Mina Foods Inc.
100 Research Drive
Milford, CT 06460
203-996-8595
Winesbymina.com
Rizzuto's Catering & Events
540 Riverside Avenue
Westport, CT 06880
203-221-1002
Rizzutos.com
Greenwich Hospital
Food Services
5 Perryridge Road
Greenwich, CT 06830
203-863-3665
Greenwichhospital.org
Morello Bistro
253 Greenwich Avenue
Greenwich, CT 06830
203-661-3443
Morellobistro.com
Sonora Restaurant
179 Rectory Street
Port Chester, NY 10573
914-933-0200
Sonorarestaurant.net
Myrna's Bistro
1234 East Main Street
Stamford, CT 06902
203-348-1400
Myrnaskitchen.com
Sweet Lisa's Exquisite Cakes
3 Field Road
Cos Cob, CT 06807
203-869-9545
Sweetlisas.com
NoMa Social
1 Radisson Plaza
New Rochelle, NY 10801
914-576-4141
Nomsocial.com
Tarry Market
179 North Main Street
Port Chester, NY 10573
914-253-5680
Tarrymarket.com
Old Post Tavern
1418 Post Road
Fairfield, CT 06824
203-292-8631
Oldposttavern.com
Tea-rrific! Ice Cream
PO Box 1169
Norwalk, CT 06856
203-415-2743
Tearrificicecream.com
Paloma
15 Harbor Point Road
Stamford, CT 06902
Palomagrill.com
Tequila Don Julio
Donjulio.com
Greenwich Staffing LLC
PO Box 1252
Greenwich, CT 06836
203-921-7172
Greenwichstaffing.com
Le Fat Poodle
20 Arcadia Road
Old Greenwich, CT 06870
203-715-1515
Lefatpoodle.com
Le Penguin
61 Lewis Street
Greenwich, CT 06830
203-717-1200
Lepenguinbistro.com
Le Rouge Handmade
Chocolates by Aarti
190 Main Street
Westport, CT 06880
203-293-6106
Lerougebyaarti.com
Little Gourmet Shop
2777 Summer Street
Stamford, CT 06906
203-323-0000
Littlegourmetshop.com
little pub
531 East Punam Avenue
Cos Cob, CT 06807
203-717-1147
Littlepub.com
LobsterCraft
284 Tokeneke Road
Darien, CT 06820
203-655-5400
Lobstercraft.com
Mill Street
230 Mill Street
Greenwich, CT 06830
Parallel Post
180 Hawley Lane
Trumbull, CT 06811
203-380-6380
Parallelpostrestaurant.com
Picante! Fresh Mexican Grill
148 Bedford Street
Stamford, CT 06901
203-595-5490
Picantefreshmexicangrills.com
Prima Dolce Company
PO Box 1094
Greenwich, CT 06836
203-542-0771
Primadolce.com
Red Bee Honey
77 Lyons Plain Road
Weston, CT 06883
203-226-4535
Redbee.com
The Capital Grille
230 Tresser Boulevard
Stamford, CT 06901
203-967-0000
Thecapitalgrille.com
The Ginger Man
64 Greenwich Avenue
Greenwich, CT 06830
Gingermanct.com
Westchester Country Club
99 Biltmore Avenue
Rye, NY 10580
914-967-6000
Wccclub.org
Whole Foods Market
Greenwich
90 East Putnam Avenue
Greenwich, CT 06830
203-661-0631
Wholefoodsmarket.com/stores/
greenwich
List as of February 6, 2015
www.greenwichhospital.org
| The Magazine for Greenwich Hospital
61
DR. ROSEMARY RYAN
DR. TIFFANY CHRISTENSEN
ARE PROUD TO SUPPORT
GREENWICH HOSPITAL
4 Dearfield Drive • Greenwich, CT 06831
(203) 869-2044
greenwichbraces.com
A Proud Supporter of Greenwich Hospital
Construction Management
& General Contracting
Delivering client satisfaction for over half a century
203.865.6043
petraconstruction.com
62
The Magazine for Greenwich Hospital
| www.greenwichhospital.org
The Greenwich Hospital Foundation
Gratefully Acknowledges
2015
Great Chefs
GIFTS-IN-KIND DONORS and EVENT SPONSORS
Acqua Panna
Katie Fong
Old Post Tavern
Amore Cucina & Bar
Fortina
Paloma
Aux Délices
FRED
Parallel Post
Back 40 Kitchen
Freshii
Perrier
Bella Nonna
Gabriele’s Italian Steakhouse
Picante! Fresh Mexican Grill
Ben Larrabee Photography
The Ginger Man
Debra Ponzek
Benjamin Steakhouse
Golden View Firenze
Pound Ridge Wines & Spirits
Bistro Versailles
Good-Life Gourmet
Prima Dolce Company
Blue Tulip Chocolates
Grade A ShopRite
Pure Barre Studios LLC
Bradford Renaissance Portraits
Grand Prix New York
Red Bee Honey
Broken Shed New Zealand Vodka
Green & Tonic
Regency Limousine, Inc.
Café of Love, Ladle of Love,
Love on the Run
Greenwich Dance Studio Petite
Rizzuto’s Catering & Events
Calypso St. Barth
Greenwich Medical Laser Spa
Rodan & Fields, LLC
Greenwich Staffing LLC
S. Pellegrino
Greenwich Magazine
Saks Fifth AvenueGreenwich
Kerri and Andrew Gruss
Jenni and Eric Salinas
Hearst Connecticut Media Group
Aarón Sánchez
The Hermitage Club
School of Rock
Jeffrey Shaw Portraits
Serendipity Magazine
Landsberg Jewelers
Simon Pearce
Le Fat Poodle
Smart Playrooms
Le Penguin
Sonora Restaurant
Le Rouge Handmade
Chocolates by Aarti
SoulCycle
Letarte Swimwear
Stamford Symphony
Cape Grace Hotel
The Capital Grille
Kathy Carley-Spanier
Carol and Dr. Stephen Carolan
Carolina Cue To-Go
Cask Republic
Classic Kids Photography
Claudine Cohen and David Rabins
Clay Health Club & Spa
Community Health at
Greenwich Hospital
Cook and Craft
Delamar Greenwich Harbor
Janet and Dr. Demetri Delos
Deutsch Family Wine & Spirits
Diageo – Johnnie Walker
Diageo – Tequila Don Julio
Douro Restaurant Bar
Eder Bros.
Elizabeth Karmel
Empire City Casino at
Yonkers Raceway
Equinox
Equus
Evaton
Eventi Café
Fairfield County Look
Famous Greek Kitchen
Fjord Fish Market/Catering
Stamford Museum & Nature Center
Little Gourmet Shop
Sweet Lisa’s Exquisite Cakes
Little Pub
Tarry Lodge
LobsterCraft
Long Island Wine Academy
MalaMala Game Reserve
Mike’s Organic Delivery
Mill Street
Tarry Wine
Tea-rrific! Ice Cream
Total Wine & More
Travel Sommelier
Mina Foods Inc.
Vilebrequin
Morello Bistro
VINCE.
Music Together
Warren Tricomi
Myrna’s Bistro
Westchester Country Club
Nespresso
Nestle Waters North America
New York Football Giants
New York Rangers
Nichols MD of Greenwich
NoMa Social
Tarry Market
Whole Foods Market Greenwich
Wilderness Safaris
Yale New Haven Health System
List as of February 4, 2015
www.greenwichhospital.org
| The Magazine for Greenwich Hospital
63
PROOF THAT ADVANCED MEDICINE
AND HUMAN COMPASSION GO HAND IN HAND.
Life doesn’t stand still. Life is ever changing. As is health care. At Greenwich Hospital, we believe
in the promise of health care’s future. And as part of one of the country’s most advanced health
systems, Yale New Haven Health, we bring you that future with more resources and more advanced
technology. It’s one of the reasons Greenwich Hospital is recommended by patients more than any
other acute care hospital in the Tri-State Area.* But with all that technology offers, we will always
be a hospital where care, compassion and understanding bring as much to healing as science.
THAT’S THE GREENWICH HOSPITAL EXPERIENCE. greenwichhospital.org
* Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers
and Systems (HCAHPS)
64
The Magazine for Greenwich Hospital
| www.greenwichhospital.org
COMMUNITY
HEALTH
at Greenwich Hospital
Chronic conditions, addictions, the loss of a loved
one and other burdens can be lightened with
compassionate support. Greenwich Hospital
offers a variety of resources to help you cope.
BEHAVIORAL
HEALTH CENTER
Greenwich Hospital offers a variety
of programs for those who suffer
from emotional distress and other
behavioral health issues. Our Adult
Treatment Program addresses the
entire range of psychiatric disorders
to enable optimal functioning. Child
and Adolescent Programs help with
sleep and appetite disturbances,
anxiety and mood disorders, learning
disabilities, family transitions and
major psychiatric illnesses. We also
treat after-effects of psychological and
physical trauma.
For more information,
call (203) 863-3316. Fee.
Save the Date!
MENTAL HEALTH
FIRST AID
Wednesdays, May 6 and May 13
A training course for family
members and professionals.
Three-year certification at completion
of both dates. Registration required.
For more information,
call (203) 863-4444. FREE.
New!
MENTAL HEALTH
SUPPORT GROUP
Families of individuals affected
by severe mental illness may feel
less alone at this support group
facilitated by trained volunteers
from the National Alliance for the
Mentally Ill. Held the third Thursday
of every month, 6:30 - 8 pm, in the
Cafeteria Conference Room.
For more information, call
Claudia at (203) 428-6864. FREE.
LYME DISEASE
SUPPORT GROUP
Get information and assistance with
issues concerning tickborne diseases,
as well as guidance for coping with
Lyme disease. Facilitated by Angela
La Manna, LCSW. Sponsored by the
Greenwich Dept. of Health, Greenwich
Hospital and Lyme Research Alliance,
Inc. Meets first Thursdays, 7 - 8:30 pm,
at Greenwich Town Hall.
For more information,
call (203) 969-1333. FREE.
SLEEP APNEA
SUPPORT GROUP
For patients with sleep apnea who
may be having problems with their
CPAP therapy or are just looking for
more information. Meets every other
month, third Mondays, 7:30 - 8:30 pm
in the Noble Conference Center.
Next meeting: March 16.
For more information,
call (203) 863-3167. FREE.
LUPUS SUPPORT GROUP
Meet new people, hear updates on
lupus and learn ways to stay healthy.
Guest speakers will be announced.
For dates, times and locations, call
(914) 438-1997 or (914) 490-2990. FREE.
MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS
EDUCATION SERIES
This series offers patients and
caregivers opportunities to expand
their understanding of multiple
sclerosis and share strategies for
coping with its effects. Facilitated
by a healthcare professional.
Next meeting: May 12.
For more information,
call (203) 863-4444. FREE.
www.greenwichhospital.org
| The Magazine for Greenwich Hospital
65
GREENWICH HOSPITAL
BEREAVEMENT GROUP
This group is open to anyone who
has experienced the loss of a loved
one. It is designed to offer comfort,
coping strategies, and support to
those who are grieving. The group
meets once a week for 90 minutes in
an 8-week session.
Session enrollment closes after the
first meeting. The discussion is
facilitated by Andrea Raynor, MDiv,
Greenwich Hospital Home Hospice
Spiritual Counselor.
Join others in an atmosphere of
mutual support to understand
the symptoms of grief, what is
“normal,” and how to cope with
losing someone you love.
Preregistration is required.
Call (203) 863-3892 for information
and registration. FREE.
BEREAVEMENT
COUNSELING
Individuals and families who are
grieving the death of a loved one
often find comfort from counseling.
Sessions are facilitated by an
experienced psychotherapist at
the Greenwich Hospital campus
of Smilow Cancer Hospital,
77 Lafayette Place.
For more information,
call (203) 863-3704. FREE.
PERINATAL
BEREAVEMENT
SUPPORT GROUP
For families who have suffered a
perinatal loss through miscarriage,
stillbirth or neonatal death. Meets the
second Wednesday of each month,
7:30 - 9:30 pm, at Greenwich Hospital.
For more information,
call (203) 863-3417. FREE.
THE DEN FOR
GRIEVING KIDS
This safe, caring environment helps
families cope with the loss of a parent,
sibling, grandparent or close friend.
Children ages 3 - 17 and their parents
or adult caregivers are grouped
according to age or type of loss. Initial
appointment required. A program of
Family Centers, Inc., in cooperation
with Greenwich Hospital. Held
Monday and Wednesday evenings,
twice a month, 6:30 - 8:30 pm.
For more information,
call (203) 655-4693. FREE.
New!
HOME HOSPICE
CAREGIVER SUPPORT
GROUP
This is a “drop-in” group for
caregivers currently caring for loved
ones admitted to the Greenwich
Hospital Hospice program. Participants are welcome to attend as their
schedules allow. A member of the
Greenwich Hospital Home Hospice
team will lead the group. This group
will meet the first and third Tuesday
of every month. Walk-ins welcome.
For more information,
call (203) 863-3892. FREE.
HOME HOSPICE
CARE AND BEREAVEMENT
PROGRAMS
Greenwich Hospital’s Home Hospice
Program allows patients who are in
the last stages of life to receive care in
the comfort of their homes. The goal
is to enhance the quality of life for
terminally ill patients and provide
emotional support to their families.
Home hospice continues after the
death of a loved one, with personal
bereavement visits and follow-up for
family members.
For more information,
call (203) 863-3882.
PARKINSON’S
SUPPORT GROUP
Weekly education, support,
exercise and social activities for
people with Parkinson’s, their
families and caregivers. Meets
Tuesdays, 1:30 - 3 pm, at the
Eastern Greenwich Civic Center,
90 Harding Rd., Old Greenwich.
Tuesday, March 10
Ken Dolan will demonstrate mixing
Tai Chi and Qigong movements
Tuesday, March 17
Exercise with Miriam Shaw, RPT;
Caregiver Support
Tuesday, March 24
Exercises with Miriam Shaw, RPT;
Caregiver Support
Tuesday, March 31
No Meeting
Tuesday, April 7
Exercises with Miriam Shaw, RPT;
Caregiver Support
Tuesday, April 14
Depression and Parkinson’s: “How
to Deal with Depression” with
Luann Murphy from the Outpatient
Behavioral Health Department
Tuesday, April 21
Exercise with Miriam Shaw, RPT;
Caregiver Support
Intensive Outpatient Program
is an ideal step down from inpatient
care or stand-alone treatment for
active addictions. Using the Matrix
model, it focuses on changing
behavior to prevent relapse. Meets
four days a week. Morning and
evening groups available.
12-STEP PROGRAMS
Greenwich Hospital’s Addiction
Recovery Center and other substance
abuse professionals acknowledge,
appreciate and believe in the use of
the 12-Step Program of Alcoholics
Anonymous (AA) and other self-help
groups based on AA principles.
Outpatient Program offers
members the opportunity to share
struggles common to the recovering
addict/alcoholic. This treatment
phase is crucial to maintaining
long-term abstinence while dealing
with real-life issues. Individual
treatment plans are developed to
meet the needs and goals of each
patient. Meets twice a week.
The following programs meet
weekly at Greenwich Hospital.
For more information, call
(203) 863-4444. FREE
Continuing Care Group helps
develop skills that promote personal
growth and continued abstinence
in those who are firmly established
in recovery. Meets once a week. Morning and evening groups available.
ADDICTION
RECOVERY CENTER
Evidence-Based Treatment at
Greenwich Hospital
Family Group supports loved
ones whose lives are often placed on
hold because of the patient’s illness.
Meets once a week.
Our Addiction Recovery Center
offers a variety of options to people
seeking high-quality alcohol and
substance abuse treatment. These
include Matrix, an intensive outpatient
program shown to achieve higher
completion rates and significantly
greater incidences of longer-term
abstinence from drugs and alcohol.
ARC’s continuum of care includes
initial stabilization, early recovery
skills, individual therapy, continuing
care, family education and counseling.
Program counselors are graduatetrained and licensed in substance
abuse, social work and family therapy.
Medication Consultations are
available to help treat psychiatric
and/or addictive disorders in
current patients of the Addiction
Recovery Center.
Tuesday, April 28
Learn & Share:
Tips for Everyday Living
These are fee-based programs.
For more information,
call (203) 863-HOPE (4673), or visit us
online at greenwichhospital.org.
Alcoholics Anonymous
Held Sundays, 1 pm,
Cafeteria Conference Room.
No registration needed.
For more information,
call (203) 869-5221, or visit
aa.org or ct-aa.org. FREE.
AL-ANON
Meets Thursdays, 8 pm,
Cafeteria Conference Room.
No registration needed.
For more information,
call (888) 825-2666,
or visit ctalanon.org. FREE.
ALATEEN
Meets Thursdays, 8 pm,
Pemberwick Conference Room.
No registration needed.
For more information,
call (888) 825-2666, or visit
al-anon. alateen.org/for-alateen. FREE.
DA (Drugs Anonymous)
Meets Saturdays, 6:30 pm, back of
Cafeteria. No registration needed.
For more information,
call (203) 863-4673. FREE.
LifeRing
Meets Wednesdays, 7:30 pm, and
Sundays, 4 pm, Cafeteria Conference
Room. No registration needed.
For more information,
call Mona, (917) 539-9927,
or visit lifering.org. FREE.
www.greenwichhospital.org
| The Magazine for Greenwich Hospital
67
Directory of
Advertisers
Bella Baby Photography...................................................20
Greenwich Radiological Group......................................26
Best Plumbing Tile & Stone.............................................27
Greenwich Water Club.....................................................23
Connecticut Community Bank........................................22
Kit Kittle Photography.....................................................13
CLAY Health Club & Spa....................Inside Front Cover
little pub.............................................................................43
CuisinArt Resort....................................Inside Back Cover
NoMa Social.......................................................................52
Delos and Salinas Thank You..........................................34
Northeast Tent...................................................................31
Dirt Floral.............................................................................8
Orthopaedic and Neurosurgery
Specialists PC.....................................................Back Cover
Epstein, Becker & Green, P.C...........................................23
Famous Greek Kitchen.....................................................59
FUJIFILM Medical Systems U.S.A., Inc.........................26
Glenville Medical Associates...........................................21
Golden View Firenze........................................................51
Grade A ShopRite..............................................................56
Greenwich Braces LLC.....................................................62
Greenwich Cosmetic Dentistry.......................................31
Greenwich Hospital..........................................................64
Greenwich Hospital Auxiliary........................................12
Greenwich Magazine...........................................................17
68
The Magazine for Greenwich Hospital
| www.greenwichhospital.org
Petra Construction Corporation.....................................62
Redniss & Mead................................................................27
Saks Fifth Avenue................................................................3
Serendipity Magazine..........................................................7
Slam Collaborative, Inc....................................................21
Under the Stars 2015 Save the Date..................................1
Whitby School....................................................................22
Whole Foods Greenwich..................................................58
Yale New Haven Health System.......................................5
YWCA Greenwich.............................................................30
The Caribbean’s Most Beautiful Beaches
Anguilla’s Premier Resort, CuisinArt
• Spacious Accommodations • Award Winning Luxury Spa • Hydroponic Farm
• Gourmet Cuisine: Le Bistro at Santorini, Tokyo Bay, Café Mediterraneo and Italia
• Greg Norman Signature Design18-Hole Golf Course
CuisinArt Golf Resort & Spa is delighted to have been selected to host the 4th Great Golf
Resorts of the World annual meeting in November 2016, following the meeting at Pebble Beach
Resorts™ in 2013 and planned meetings at The Gleneagles Hotel and The Broadmoor in 2014 and
2015. The annual directory is distributed through PGA professionals to their members and guests
at 1,000 leading golf clubs across North America, Europe, Asia, Africa and South America.
CuisinArt Golf Resort & Spa is one of only three Caribbean resorts selected for membership.
Reservations and information 800.943.3210 or 264.497.4900
www.CuisinArtResort.com
15-008
COMPARE US.
hen it comes to selecting a doctor, training and experience make all the difference. Compare the credentials
of the ONS physician team to their counterparts’ anywhere, then you be the judge. With 23 sub-specialty
trained physicians in orthopedics, neurosurgery, sports medicine and physical medicine, rehabilitation, ONS is the
most comprehensive and advanced practice of its kind in the region.
ONS participates with
Aetna
Medicare
Oxford
United Healthcare
Other Insurances
For questions about insurances accepted, visit ONSMD.COM.
ORTHOPAEDIC & NEUROSURGERY SPECIALISTS, PC
6 GREENWICH OFFICE PARK, 40 VALLEY DR. (OFF US1)
GREENWICH, CT
203.869.1145