Lesson Study Glenna Petrine-Wyatt and Amanda Ellis Suzanne

Comentarios

Transcripción

Lesson Study Glenna Petrine-Wyatt and Amanda Ellis Suzanne
Lesson Study
Glenna Petrine-Wyatt and Amanda Ellis
Suzanne Skipper and Pamela Ferrante
Orange County Public Schools
9:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m.
July 19, 2013
Goals:
Teachers will be able to:
 understand and explain the rationale for Lesson Study
 understand and explain the Lesson Study process
 experience a virtual Lesson Study cycle
 apply knowledge of Lesson Study through discussion of instructional implications
Time
Activity
9:00
Opening Remarks: Dr. Rose Taylor, UCF
Opening Question: What do you want to know about Lesson Study?
High-Effect Strategies:
 Setting learning goals and scales
 Identifying critical information
 Organizing students to interact with new knowledge
9:30-11:00
Group Brainstorm- How did I learn as a student?
What did my teachers do that made information meaningful for me?
High-Effect Strategies:
 Tracking student progress
 Reflecting on learning
 Examining similarities and differences
 Providing opportunities for students to talk
about themselves.
Lesson Study Values
High-Effect Strategies:
 Organizing students to interact with new knowledge
 Previewing new content
 Chunking content into "digestible bites"
11:00-12:00
Focus the Group's Inquiry
High-Effect Strategies:
 Processing new information
 Recording and representing new knowledge
 Providing students with resources and guidance
Revisit the original, code the questions with the following symbols:
 Check mark- Question answered
 ?- still have the same question
 E- Edit (where they will either edit the original question or write a
new question)
12:00-12:30
Lunch
12:30-1:30
Lesson Study Demonstration Videos
High-Effect Strategies:
 Practicing skills, strategies, and processes
 Organizing students to practice and deepen knowledge
Watch video, select from cards one question to solve.
1:30-3:00
What Should You Expect from Lesson Study?
High-Effect Strategies:
 Tracking student progress
 Celebrating student success
 Reflecting on learning
 Revising knowledge
3:00
RTP3 Feedback Survey
Please complete the feedback form.
Leave your nametag and feedback form on the table as you leave.
7/10/2013
Lesson Study Overview for
RTP3 Mentors and Teachers
July 19 and 20, 2013
COMMUNITY BUILDER
Mandy Ellis
Glenna Petrine-Wyatt
Pam Ferrante
Suzanne Skipper
Learning Goal: I will understand and be able to explain the rationale for lesson
study and the process of lesson study as it applies to my professional
growth.
4
I can explain the rationale for lesson study and the process of
lesson study as it applies to my professional growth. I can
identify a future research theme and a common core standard as
the focus for a research lesson.
3
I can explain the rationale for lesson study and the process of
lesson study as it applies to my professional growth.
2
I can explain the rationale for lesson study and the process of lesson
study.
1
With prompting and support, I can explain the rationale for lesson
study and the process of lesson study.
What are you wondering about lesson study?
Agenda
• Today we will learn by:
Group processing
Brainstorming
Virtual lesson study cycle
Discussion
Group Brainstorming Instructions
• At your table, answer the following questions:
How did I learn best as a student?
What did my teachers do that engaged me as a learner?
1
7/10/2013
Making Connections
• Content Matters, pg. 25
• Which of the Principles of Learning are similar on your list? • Which are different?
JIGSAW
1’s: pg. 7, #1 Lesson Study Values Teaching, Teachers, and the Professional Teaching Community
2’s: pg. 9, #2 Lesson Study Provides an Important New Learning Structure
3’s: pg. 12, #3 Lesson study Values the Long‐Term Learning and Development of Students
4’s: pg. 13, #4 Lesson Study Fosters Teachers’ Motivation to Continue to Improve
5’s: pg. 14, #5 Lesson Study Builds a Knowledge Base for Teaching
Strategies
• Check for Understanding #1
What do you think are the characteristics of effective professional learning?
• Organizing students to interact with new knowledge (Think Pair Share)
• Examining Similarities and Differences
• Providing opportunities to share experiences
• Chunking content information (Jigsaw)
Learning Goal: I will understand and be able to explain the rationale for lesson
study and the process of lesson study as it applies to my professional
growth.
4
I can explain the rationale for lesson study and the process of
lesson study as it applies to my professional growth. I can
identify a future research theme and a common core standard as
the focus for a research lesson.
3
I can explain the rationale for lesson study and the process of
lesson study as it applies to my professional growth.
2
I can explain the rationale for lesson study and the process of lesson
study.
1
With prompting and support, I can explain the rationale for lesson
study and the process of lesson study.
BREAK
2
7/10/2013
Phases of Lesson Study
•
•
•
•
•
Plan the lesson.
Teach the lesson.
Debrief the lesson.
Revise the lesson.
Reflect on practice.
Research Lesson: How Many Seats?
Research Lesson
Research Lesson
Research Lesson
Research Lesson
Unit
Unit
Research Theme
Check for Understanding #2
What do you expect are the challenges and benefits of lesson study, based on what you know now?
Where are you now?
Find your question on the chart.
√ My ques on has been answered.
? I still have my question.
E‐ I have edited my question or added a new one.
3
7/10/2013
Strategies
LUNCH
• Tracking student progress (notes on scale)
•
•
Processing new information (nonlinguistic)
Providing resources and guidance (common core standards)
How Many Seats? Revisited Misconceptions‐ What are they? What does it take to uncover them?
Virtual Lesson Study
 Segment 1: Planning and Study
While watching, note:
• how the group’s work is similar or different from your usual experiences of collaboration
• any opportunities you see for teachers to build their knowledge of mathematics or other professional qualities.
Independently solve the problem in the lesson How Many Seats?
Virtual Lesson Study
 Segment 2: First Teaching
• Collect as much data as you can on student understanding of the plus‐two pattern and how the pattern grows
• Share what your data reveal about student understanding. What data would you want to share in the postlesson discussion? What questions would you ask?
4
7/10/2013
Virtual Lesson Study
 Segment 3: First Postlesson Discussion
• What revisions did the team make to the lesson?
• What do you predict students will do the same or differently in the next lesson?
Virtual Lesson Study
 Segment 4: Second Teaching
• Observe and make notes on students, recording as much information as you can about their understanding of the plus‐two pattern and how the pattern grows.
Virtual Lesson Study
 Segment 5 and Segment 6: Second Postlesson Discussion and Final Reflection
• How do you think the future practice of these teachers might be affected by their participation in this lesson study cycle?
• How does lesson study shown in this video fit with or conflict with your ideas about good professional learning?
• During which part of the lesson study process do you feel you would need the most support?
Knowledgeable Other
• Role of the Knowledgeable Other
BREAK
What Should You Expect from Lesson Study?
• Read Chapter 6, pg. 65‐75. Highlight and make notes.
• Write one AHA, Oh No, or Wondering for each heading. Place on the chart.
• Find a partner. Visit the charts and read responses. What did you notice? What stands out?
5
7/10/2013
Learning Goal: I will understand and be able to explain the rationale for lesson
study and the process of lesson study as it applies to my professional
growth.
4
I can explain the rationale for lesson study and the process of
lesson study as it applies to my professional growth. I can
identify a future research theme and a common core standard as
the focus for a research lesson.
3
I can explain the rationale for lesson study and the process of
lesson study as it applies to my professional growth.
2
I can explain the rationale for lesson study and the process of lesson
study.
1
With prompting and support, I can explain the rationale for lesson
study and the process of lesson study.
Strategies
Check for Understanding #3
What are some burning issues
(challenges in your teaching) you
would like to investigate with your
colleagues?
Exit Slip
• Practicing skills (video clips)
• Organizing student to practice (pairs)
• Tracking student progress
What did we do today with lesson study that will support your learning of how to ensure increased student learning?
6
Learning Goal:
I will understand and be able to explain the rationale
for lesson study and the process of lesson study as it
applies to my professional growth.
4
I can explain the rationale for lesson study and the process of lesson
study as it applies to my professional growth. I can identify a future
research theme and a common core standard as the focus for a research
lesson.
3
I can explain the rationale for lesson study and the process of lesson
study as it applies to my professional growth.
2
I can explain the rationale for lesson study and the process of lesson study.
1
With prompting and support, I can explain the rationale for lesson study and
the process of lesson study.
Domains, Components, and Elements of the Framework for Teaching
Domain I: Planning and Preparation
Domain 2: The Classroom Environment
Component 1a: Demonstrating Knowledge of Content Pedagogy
Component 2a: Creating an Environment of Respect and Rapport
• Knowledge of content and the structure of discipline
• Teacher interaction with students
• Knowledge of prerequisite relationships
• Student interactions with other students
• Knowledge of content-related pedagogy
Component 1b: Demonstrating Knowledge of Students
• Knowledge of child and adolescent development
• Knowledge of the learning process
• Knowledge of students’ skills, knowledge, and language
proficiency
• Knowledge of students’ interests and cultural heritage
• Knowledge of students’ special needs
Component 2b: Establishing a Culture for Learning
• Importance of the content
• Expectations for leaning and achievement
• Student pride in work
Component 1c: Setting Instructional Outcomes
• Value, sequence, and alignment
• Clarity
• Balance
• Suitability for diverse learners
Component 2c: Managing Classroom Procedures
• Management of instructional groups
• Management of transitions
• Management of materials and supplies
• Performance of noninstructional duties
• Supervision of volunteers and paraprofessionals
Component 1d: Demonstrating Knowledge of Resources
• Resources for classroom use
• Resources to extend content knowledge and pedagogy
• Resources for students
Component 2d: Managing Student Behavior
• Expectations
• Monitoring of student behavior
• Response to student misbehavior
Component 1e: Designing Coherent Instruction
• Learning activities
• Instructional materials and resources
• Instructional groups
• Lesson and unit structure
Component 2e: Organizing Physical Space
Component 1f: Designing Student Assessments
• Congruence with instructional outcomes
• Criteria and standards
• Design of formative assessments
• Use for planning
•
•
Safety and accessibility
Arrangement of furniture and use of physical resources
Domains, Components, and Elements of the Framework for Teaching (continued)
Domain 3: Instruction
Domain 4: Professional Responsibilities
Component 3a: Communicating with Students
Component 4a: Reflecting on Teaching
• Expectations for learning
• Accuracy
• Directions and procedures
• Use in future teaching
• Explanations of content
• Use of oral and written language
Component 3b: Using Questioning and Discussion Techniques
• Quality of questions
• Discussion techniques
• Student participation
Component 4b: Maintaining Accurate Records
• Student completion of assignments
• Student progress in learning
• Noninstructional records
Component 3c: Engaging Students in Learning
• Activities and assignments
• Grouping of students
• Instructional materials and resources
• Structure and pacing
Component 3d: Using Assessment in Instruction
• Assessment criteria
• Monitoring of student learning
• Feedback to students
• Student self-assessment and monitoring of progress
Component 4c: Communicating with Families
• Information about the instructional program
• Information about individual students
• Engagement of families in the instructional program
Component 3e: Demonstrating Flexibility and Responsiveness
• Lesson adjustment
• Response to students
• Persistence
Component 4e: Growing and Developing Professionally
Component 4d: Participating in a Professional Community
• Relationships with colleagues
• Involvement in a culture of professional inquiry
• Service to the school
• Participation in school and district projects
•
•
•
Enhancement of content knowledge and pedagogical skill
Receptivity to feedback from colleagues
Service to the profession
Component 4f: Showing Professionalism
•
•
•
•
•
Integrity and ethical conduct
Service to students
Advocacy
Decision making
Compliance with school and district regulations
Figure 1.1 from Danielson, C. (2007). Enhancing professional practice: A framework for teaching 2nd ed. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and
Curriculum Development (ASCD).
Mathematics Lesson Plan for Grade 4
1. Title of Lesson: Discovering the Relationship Between A pattern And Its Rule
2. Goal: Students will
• Discover a pattern;
• Represent the pattern with numbers and symbols;
• Begin to understand what a mathematics rule is;
• Be introduced to the idea of representing a rule in an equation; and,
• Be curious about future explorations of patterns and rules.
3. Relationship of the lessons in the California Mathematics Standards
Grade Two
1.2 –Relate problem situation to number sentences involving addition and subtraction
Grade Three
2.2-Extend and recognize a linear pattern by its rules (e.g. the number of legs on a given
number of horses by counting by 4s or by multiplying the number of horses by
4).
Grade Four
1.1-Using letters, boxes or other symbols to stand for any number in simple expressions
or equations (i.e. demonstrate an understanding and the use of the concept of a
variable).
1.5-Understand that an equation such as y=3x+5 is a prescription for determining a
second number when a first number is given.
Grade Five
1.0-Students use variables in simple expressions, compute the value of the expressions
for specific values of the variable, and plot and interpret the results.
1.5-Solve problems involving linear functions with integer values; write equation; and
graph the ordered pairs of integers on a grid.
4. What do students already understand about this topic? We assume students will have had
many experience with looking for patterns and verbalizing patterns. They won’t have had
much or any experience with writing a rule from a pattern or using a variable. They will
have seen and use a T Chat before but we don’t think they will the words “Input” and
“Output”.
What more do we want to them to understand? We want students to begin to see that
recognizing a pattern enables them to determine a rule that can be used in an equation.
This leads to being able to solve equations with unknown variables.
Lesson question: Can pattern help us find an easy ways to answer the question: How
many seats fit around a row of triangle tables?
5. Lesson Description:
Student Activities
•
•
•
Students will listen
and participate in
introduction.
Students complete
first part of
worksheet with
teacher
Students finish
Worksheet A on
their own or with a
partner. They then
write about the
patterns.
Teacher Support
Anticipated students responses
• Teacher poses problem:
I have a narrow classroom
and I want to put my
triangle tables together in a
line. How many seats will I
have around 1 triangular
table? Two tables? Three
tables?
• Teacher encourages
student response by
asking them to show
their answer with their
fingers.
• Teacher will use large
magnetized triangles to
demonstrate how the
triangles must be placed
and how to count the
seats.
• Teacher shows
Worksheet A and
demonstrates how to
complete for 1-3 triangle
tables.
After you have complete the
numbers of seats for up to 6
triangle tables, look carefully at
the table and write about all the
patterns you find.
• Teacher individually
encourages students
who are done early to
confer with others at
their table to learn more
Points of Evaluation
Are all students able to
respond to the questions?
Do students arrange
triangles in other than
linear fashion?
Can they complete the
table accurately? Do they
count triangle sides that
are touching?
Is this too easy and
therefore students are
done soon and wanting to
play with blocks?
about the pattern.
Students might create nonlinear triangle shapes. Teacher
might say, “You are only
adding the new triangle to one
side.” Teacher offers cut strip if
needed.
Students might count inside
sides: Teacher will remind them
that we are counting seats and
seats can’t fit inside tables.
Whole Group Discussion
1. Teacher gathers
students’ attention to
front white board and
writes down student
responses to discovered
patterns.
Students will say the numbers
go up by one; one starts at 1
and the other starts with 3. They
might see that if you go from
left to right the number goes up
by two.
•
•
Students share
patterns they
discovered.
Students respond
by raising their
hands.
Teacher guides students’
attention to horizontal
pattern if students
haven’t discovered it
and possibly rewrites it
horizontally.
Do we add 2 seats each time we
add a triangle table?
•
Teacher polls the class.
In math when you always do
the same thing (i.e. add to the
number of tables) we call that
rule. Mathematicians look for
the patterns so they can make a
Students see the vertical
patterns of +1, but can
they find the horizontal
pattern of +2?
rule. After they make a rule
they test it to be sure it is true.
This worksheet will help us test
our rule to see if it is true. First
let’s record our rule up at the
top of the worksheet. The
number of triangle tables +2
equals the total number of seats.
•
Teacher reviews the
directions for adding
triangle tables and
counting seats.
Students will start to “add 2” to
the # of tables. Teacher will ask
them how they can prove they
are right.
Whole Group Discussion
•
•
Students complete
Worksheet B to
test the rule. They
experiment with
making larger
triangle rows.
What did you discover? Is our
rule always true? Did anyone
find a time when it wasn’t true?
•
Students communicate
their discoveries.
Teacher gathers
students’ attention.
Are students building
triangle rows for each
line or do they start to use
the rule of add two to the
# of triangles?
Teacher records student
responses and explores
any mistakes.
Wrap up
• Revisit question-Did we
answer the question?
Does anyone disagree
with our conclusion?
Teacher writes conclusion and
equation on charter paper.
Students respond to the
hatsumon. Students write
equation on their
worksheet.
If appropriate, teacher will
introduce the idea of a variable.
Possible use of worksheet
to check for student
understanding. Assign
homework and gather
papers next day.
6. Evaluation: Our lesson goal evaluation will be comprised of team observation and
students responses on both worksheets and in whole class discussion. At the end of the
lesson we will observe whether students seem eager to further explore patterns and rules.
7. Data points during the lesson observation:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
How many students were not creating linear triangle shapes?
Were students able to complete worksheets correctly?
Were students able to see the “add 2” pattern?
Are students able to express their thinking about the pattern they see?
How many students abandoned the manipulative and used the rule when completing
worksheet B?
How quickly did students stop using manipulatives when determining the total number of
seats?
Did students seem motivated to further explore relationships between patterns and rules
again?
We have a long skinny room and triangle tables that we need to arrange in a row
with their edges touching, as shown. Each side can hold one “seat”, shown with a
circle. Can patterns help us find an easy way to answer the question: how many
seats can fit around a row of triangle tables?
What patterns do you see?
______________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
Marzano Art and Science of Teaching Framework
Learning Map
Domain 1: Classroom Strategies and Behaviors
Domain 1 is based on the Art and Science of Teaching Framework and identifies the 41 elements or instructional categories that happen in the classroom. The 41
instructional categories are organized into 9 Design Questions (DQ) and further grouped into 3 Lesson Segments to define the Observation and Feedback Protocol.
Lesson Segment
Involving Routine Events
Lesson Segment
Addressing Content
Design Question 2
What will I do to help students effectively
interact with new knowledge?
Design Question 1
What will I do to establish and
communicate learning goals,
track student progress, and
celebrate success?
6. Identifying Critical Information
7. Organizing Students to Interact with New
Knowledge
8. Previewing New Content
9. Chunking Content into “Digestible Bites”
10. Processing of New Information
11. Elaborating on New Information
12. Recording and Representing Knowledge
13. Reflecting on Learning
1. Providing Clear Learning Goals
and Scales (Rubrics)
2. Tracking Student Progress
3. Celebrating Success
Design Question 6
What will I do to establish or
maintain classroom rules and
procedures?
Design Question 3
What will I do to help students practice and
deepen their understanding of new
knowledge?
4. Establishing Classroom Routines
5. Organizing the Physical Layout of
the Classroom
14. Reviewing Content
15. Organizing Students to Practice and Deepen
Knowledge
16. Using Homework
17. Examining Similarities and Differences
18. Examining Errors in Reasoning
19. Practicing Skills, Strategies, and Processes
20. Revising Knowledge
Note: DQ refers to Design Questions in
the Marzano Art and Science of
Teaching Framework. The nine (9) DQs
organize the 41 elements in Domain 1.
The final Design Question,
Design Question 10: What will I do to
develop effective lessons organized into
a cohesive unit? is contained in Domain
2: Planning and Preparing.
Design Question 4
What will I do to help students generate and
test hypotheses about new knowledge?
21. Organizing Students for Cognitively Complex
Tasks
22. Engaging Students in Cognitively Complex Tasks
Involving Hypothesis Generation and Testing
23. Providing Resources and Guidance
©2011 Robert J. Marzano. Can only be digitized in iObservation.
iObservation is a registered trademark of Learning Sciences International®
Lesson Segment
Enacted on the Spot
Design Question 5
What will I do to engage students?
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
31.
32.
Noticing When Students are Not Engaged
Using Academic Games
Managing Response Rates
Using Physical Movement
Maintaining a Lively Pace
Demonstrating Intensity and Enthusiasm
Using Friendly Controversy
Providing Opportunities for Students to Talk about Themselves
Presenting Unusual or Intriguing Information
Design Question 7
What will I do to recognize and acknowledge adherence and
lack of adherence to classroom rules and procedures?
33. Demonstrating “Withitness”
34. Applying Consequences for Lack of Adherence to Rules and
Procedures
35. Acknowledging Adherence to Rules and Procedures
Design Question 8
What will I do to establish and maintain effective
relationships with students?
36. Understanding Students’ Interests and Background
37. Using Verbal and Nonverbal Behaviors that Indicate Affection for
Students
38. Displaying Objectivity and Control
Design Question 9
What will I do to communicate high expectations for all
students?
39. Demonstrating Value and Respect for Low Expectancy Students
40. Asking Questions of Low Expectancy Students
41. Probing Incorrect Answers with Low Expectancy Students
Page 1
www.MarzanoEvaluation.com
Marzano Art and Science of Teaching Framework
Learning Map
Domain 2: Planning and Preparing
Planning and Preparing
Planning and Preparing for Lessons
and Units
42. Effective Scaffolding of
Information with Lessons
43. Lessons within Units
44. Attention to Established Content
Standards
Planning and Preparing for Use of
Resources and Technology
45. Use of Available Traditional
Resources
46. Use of Available Technology
Planning and Preparing for the
Needs of English Language Learners
47. Needs of English Language
Learners
Domain 3: Reflecting on Teaching
Reflecting on Teaching
Evaluating Personal Performance
50. Identifying Areas of Pedagogical
Strength and Weakness
51. Evaluating the Effectiveness of
Individual Lessons and Units
52. Evaluating the Effectiveness of
Specific Pedagogical Strategies
and Behaviors
Developing and Implementing a
Professional Growth Plan
53. Developing a Written Growth
and Development Plan
54. Monitoring Progress Relative to
the Professional Growth and
Development Plan
Domain 4: Collegiality and Professionalism
Collegiality and Professionalism
Promoting a Positive Environment
55. Promoting Positive Interactions
with Colleagues
56. Promoting Positive Interactions
about Students and Parents
Promoting Exchange of Ideas and
Strategies
57. Seeking Mentorship for Areas of
Need or Interest
58. Mentoring Other Teachers and
Sharing Ideas and Strategies
Promoting District and School
Development
59. Adhering to District and School
Rules and Procedures
60. Participating in District and
School Initiatives
Planning and Preparing for the
Needs of Students Receiving Special
Education
48. Needs of Students Receiving
Special Education
Planning and Preparing for the
Needs of Students Who Lack
Support for Schooling
49. Needs of Students Who Lack
Support for Schooling
©2011 Robert J. Marzano. Can only be digitized in iObservation.
iObservation is a registered trademark of Learning Sciences International®
Page 2
www.MarzanoEvaluation.com

Documentos relacionados