2011-2012 Course Catalog

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2011-2012 Course Catalog
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OCK CO
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A SS A C H
UNDERGRADUATE
AND gradUate
GRADUATECoUrse
COURSE
CATALOG
2011–2012
UndergradUate and
Catalog
2010
– 2011
Office of Admissions
Office of Admissions
200 The Riverway
200 The Riverway
Boston, MA 02215
Boston, MA 02215
(617) 879.2206
(617) 879.2206
(800) 734.5212
(800) 734.5212
[email protected]
[email protected]
www.wheelock.edu
www.wheelock.edu
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
NOTICE OF CHANGE
Wheelock College reserves the right in its sole judgment to make changes of any
nature in its programs, calendar, academic schedule, or fees whenever it is deemed
necessary or desirable, including changes in course content, the scheduling of classes
with or without extending the academic term, cancelling of scheduled classes, and
other academic activities and requiring or affording alternatives for scheduled classes.
The College Catalogue and the Wheelock College website (www.wheelock.edu)
contain current information regarding the calendar, admissions, degree requirements,
fees, regulations and course offerings. The policy of Wheelock College is to give
advance notice of change, whenever possible, to permit adjustment. However,
Wheelock reserves the right to make changes from this published information when
it is deemed advisable.
The Wheelock Catalog is published every one or two years. Copies may be obtained
from the Office of Academic Advising and Assistance or the Office of Enrollment
Management. Both of these offices can be contacted at:
200 The Riverway
Boston, Massachusetts 02215
Telephone: 617.879.2000
Toll Free: 800.734.5212
Web Site: www.wheelock.edu
2
Table of Contents
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
W heelock c ollege
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
2010-2011
Academic Calendar5
AcAdemic cAlendAr ...........................................3
Mission8
m
ission ...........................................................6
The Academic
Experience at Wheelock
17
Student
The Services26
AcAdemic experience AT Wheelock .............14
sTudenT services .......................................... 25
UNDERGRADUATE
PROGRAMS
U ndergradUate
P rograms
Undergraduate
Admissions
undergrAduATe
Admissions............................. 35 37
Undergraduate Financial Information
40
undergrAduATe FinAnciAl inFormATion.............. 39
Undergraduate
Academic Policies
49
undergrAduATe
AcAdemicProgram
policies ....................47
The General
Education
at
Wheelock
College53
The generAl
educATion progrAm AT
Departments
Undergraduate
Programs53 63
ollege
........................................
Wheelock c&
depArTmenTs And undergrAduATe progrAms .....57
GRADUATE
PROGRAMS
g radUate
P rograms
of I nstrUctIon
depArTmenTs And grAduATe progrAms........... 123
memBership: 2010–2011 ......................... 214
child liFe And FAmily sTudies ............... 123
oFFices oF The AdminisTrATion ........................217
eArly childhood educATion .................. 126
FAculTy ....................................................... 222
COURSES OF INSTRUCTION
Courses of Instruction
elemenTAry And speciAl educATion ........ 130
155
lAnguAge And liTerAcy ......................... 133
INSTITUTIONAL
INFORMATION
leAdership And policy.......................... 136
Corporation
and
Board
of
sociAl
Work
.......................................
138
Trustees Membership: 2011–2012
224
Offices of the Administration
227
Faculty233
Directions to Wheelock College
239
Campus Directory242
direcTions To Wheelock college .................. 227
cAmpus direcTory ....................................... 230
TABLE OF CONTENTS
c oUrses
Graduate
Admissions108
grAduATe
Admissions ................................... 102
courses oF insTrucTion ................................ 146
Graduate Financial Information
112
grAduATe FinAnciAl inFormATion .................... 106
Graduate Academic Policies
117 I nstItUtIonal I nformatIon
cAdemic
policies .........................
grAduATe Aand
Departments
Graduate
Programs 111 131 corporATion And BoArd oF TrusTees
3
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
Academic Calendar5
Mission8
The Academic Experience at Wheelock
17
Student Services26
4
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
ACADEMIC CALENDAR 2011-2012
AUGUST
1
15
Undergraduate tuition due for Fall
Graduate tuition due for Fall
FALL 2011
SEPTEMBER
All new students check in
All returning students check in
Fall orientation
Labor Day Holiday
Convocation
Fall Semester Begins (classes meet)
Last day to add full-semester Undergraduate courses
Last day to drop full-semester undergraduate courses
Spring and Summer 2011 Incomplete grades converted
OCTOBER
10
23
30
24–26
25
26
Autumn Holiday (no classes)
Undergraduate Mid-semester Evaluations begin
Undergraduate Mid-semester Evaluations end
Family Weekend
1st 7-week classes end (classes meet)
2nd 7-week Classes begin (classes meet)
NOVEMBER
7
8–10
11
14–18
16
22
23–25
26
28
Graduate Spring Course Registration begins
Undergraduate Spring Course Selection begins
Veterans’ Day (no classes)
Colleges of the Fenway Undergraduate Spring Cross-Registration Week
Last day to withdraw from full-semester undergraduate classes
Residence halls close for Thanksgiving break at 9 p.m.
Thanksgiving Holiday Break (no classes)
Residence halls re-open from break at 12 p.m.
Classes Resume
WHEELOCK COLLEGE
3
4
4–7
5
14
7
14
21
28
DECEMBER
15
16
16
17
19–20
20
23
Undergraduate and Graduate tuition due for Spring
2nd 7-week undergraduate courses end (classes meet)
Fall semester ends (classes meet)
Undergraduate Reading Day
Undergraduate examination period
Residence halls close for Winter break at 9 p.m.
Degrees Conferred
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WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
SPRING 2012
JANUARY
8
10
16
17
18
25
Residence halls re-open from break at 12 p.m.
Spring semester begins (classes meet)
Martin Luther King Jr. Holiday
Half-year Day (classes meet)
Last day to add full-semester undergrad courses
Last day to drop full-semester undergrad courses
FEBRUARY
1
20
28
Fall 2011-12 Incomplete Grade Conversion
President’s Day (no classes)
1st 7-week undergraduate courses end (classes meet)
WHEELOCK COLLEGE
MARCH
2
5–9
11
11
12
12
18
21
Residence halls close for spring break at 9 pm
Spring Break
Residence halls re-open at 12 pm
Undergraduate mid-semester evaluations begin
Classes Resume
2nd 7-week undergraduate courses begin (classes meet)
Undergraduate Mid-semester evaluations end
Last day to withdraw from full-semester undergraduate courses
APRIL
2
4
9–13
16
30
30
Graduate Summer and Fall Course Registration begins
Undergraduate Summer and Fall Course Selection begins
Colleges of the Fenway Undergraduate Summer and Fall
Cross-Registration Week
Patriot’s Day (no classes)
Spring semester ends (classes meet)
2nd 7-week undergraduate courses end (classes meet)
MAY
1
2–3
4
11
11
6
Undergraduate Reading Day (no classes may be held)
Undergraduate Examination Period
Residence halls close for non-graduating students at 5 p.m.
Commencement (11:00 am)
Residence halls close for graduating students at 5 p.m.
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
SUMMER I 2011
MAY
14
25–28
Summer Session ‘1’ Begins (classes meet)
Memorial Day Holiday (no classes)
JUNE
22
25
26
Summer Session ‘1’ Ends (classes meet)
Summer Session ‘2’ Begins (classes meet)
Summer Session ‘1’ Final Grades Due (10:00 am)
JULY
4
Independence Day Holiday (no classes)
AUGUST
3
10
20–30
Summer Session ‘2’ Ends (classes meet)
Degrees conferred
Summer Bridge Program
WHEELOCK COLLEGE
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WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
THE MISSION OF THE COLLEGE
Wheelock College’s mission is to improve the lives of children and families.
WHEELOCK COLLEGE
A private college with a public mission, Wheelock College is recognized as a national
leader in its professional fields–child life, educator preparation, human services, and
social work. Wheelock carries out its mission by providing a sound education in the
arts and sciences and in the professions. Historically, the College was founded as an
institution with a focus on early childhood education and is recognized nationally and
internationally as a premier institution that prepares early childhood, and special needs
educators at the undergraduate and graduate levels, and reading teachers through an
advanced master’s program. The mission has now expanded to meet the broader evolving
needs of children, families, and society. The College also offers outstanding professional
preparation in child life, social work, juvenile justice, parent education, community
leadership, communications and media. The Wheelock mission is sustained by the
College’s academic programs and by its involvement in the life of many communities.
Members of the Wheelock community are committed to the mission and practice its
meaning in their work. The community includes undergraduate and graduate students;
alumni; faculty members; administrators in on-campus, national, and international
programs; trustees, and members of the Corporation.
Wheelock’s undergraduate students all pursue a rigorous academic education in the
arts and sciences while preparing to be knowledgeable and caring professionals. A
curriculum with multicultural dimensions prepares students to work with all children
and families, to be responsible citizens, and to help to create a just society. Through
demanding and responsive teaching, faculty members inspire students to become
informed and actively engaged citizens.
The undergraduate arts and sciences program introduces students to social sciences,
humanities, visual and performing arts, math, and science, and offers arts and sciences
majors in related disciplines. A carefully conceived program of field placements
beginning in the first year gives students experience in schools, hospitals, and
community agencies, providing a foundation for the professional undergraduate majors
in Early Childhood, Elementary, or Special Education; in Social Work, Juvenile
Justice and Youth Advocacy or several minors.. Students who attend Wheelock College
come to see themselves as advocates for children and families in a global way. They
move from understanding the personal impact they can have in children’s lives to
understanding the societal forces that must shape their work and the effects they can
have on those forces.
Graduate programs are designed to honor the prior experience and knowledge of
graduate students, many of whom are working professionals. These students bring
intellectual independence to their studies at Wheelock. Graduate programs emphasize
human development within a cultural context, have a multicultural perspective, and
strengthen students’ research skills. Their Wheelock experience enables graduate
students to become leaders in their fields and advocates for children and families. The
graduate programs help extend the Wheelock mission into the working world.
Wheelock alumni remain devoted to the College’s mission long after they have
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WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
graduated. They carry the essence of the mission into their professional and private
lives. Whether or not they are working in the College’s traditional professions,
Wheelock alumni continue to express their commitment to an ethical and caring
society. They become leaders in their professions, and help shape national thought
about children, families, and society.
The Wheelock faculty and administration work continuously with the professional
community to reflect on its academic programs and its ethos in the multicultural
democracy of the United States. As an institution, Wheelock is committed to creating
a diverse learning community. The College accepts its obligation to prepare students
to live effectively in a world of unprecedented global connectedness. Wheelock seeks
to create lifelong learners and leaders who will bring informed and flexible ways of
thinking into complex situations where prior learning is not enough to solve problems.
THE WHEELOCK COMPACT
What you bring. You bring your passion and potential to lead and serve others. You
bring your values and your desire to shape your own path. You bring your commitment
to doing your best work, as you set your sights on changing the world.
What we offer. We offer an intimate, diverse teaching and learning community within a
dynamic urban setting. We provide the academic grounding and real-world experiences
you need in your chosen field. We are focused on social justice, engaged in the wider
world, and committed to your success.
What you will become. You will become a more confident, knowledgeable, capable
advocate for change, prepared to serve, lead and succeed in a variety of careers. You will
value learning, growth and opportunity as keys to a sustainable society. You will inspire
a world of good.
WHEELOCK COLLEGE
The Wheelock Compact is an expression of the common purpose shared between
the College and its students. It is an agreement we make with each other to engage,
connect and act in ways that will inspire a world of good.
HISTORY
In 1888, six students met daily to investigate the “new education,” as the kindergarten
movement in America was then known. The Wheelock School occupied a single
classroom at Chauncy Hall in Boston’s Copley Square. But its mission placed it at the
forefront of our nation’s efforts to understand and shape early childhood education.
This first class studied and trained under the direction of Lucy Wheelock, a pioneer
in the United States kindergarten movement, who founded the Wheelock School
to educate and train kindergarten teachers for public and private schools in the
surrounding communities.
From the beginning, a Wheelock education engaged individuals as students
and teachers. Readings in literature and the innovative field of psychology were
complemented by observation of children in classrooms and at play.
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WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
During her first 25 years as the School’s director, Lucy Wheelock explored the
implications and potential of early childhood education. She drew to her classrooms
educators, philosophers, and the working women and men who shared her inclusive
view of teaching as “the loving, watchful observation of one who wishes to know the
meaning of all she sees.” In 1914, the American kindergarten movement celebrated
Wheelock’s move to the Riverway and a building designed specifically for its use. With
this move, the future of Wheelock and its rightful place as an institution of higher
learning for teacher preparation were secure.
WHEELOCK COLLEGE
Over the next 25 years, Miss Wheelock broadened the scope of the educational
programs and sent students out to work with the children of recent Portuguese,
Filipino, and Italian immigrants and those of other newcomers. She developed courses
and invented programs to nurture the bonds between children and their families.
Her whole-child approach to education encouraged the cultivation of a dynamic
relationship with the civic community.
The School was incorporated as a nonprofit institution when Lucy Wheelock retired,
having completed her 50th year as the director. In 1941, the institution’s name was
changed to Wheelock College. The academic program was expanded to four years, and
the Commonwealth of Massachusetts authorized the College to grant the Bachelor
of Science degree. The curriculum was revised to respond to advances in educational
theory and scholarship in the Arts and Sciences.
Graduate degree programs at Wheelock date from 1952, when the Commonwealth
authorized the College to grant the Master of Science. The Wheelock Graduate School
extended the scope of the College’s mission, broadening its research and professional
programs, and integrating advanced scholarship and the contributions of working
professionals. In 1978, the Certificate of Advanced Graduate Study was created to
expand the opportunities for intensive research and certification at Wheelock.
Wheelock’s distinguished academic and professional programs have evolved from these
efforts to forge a comprehensive relationship between educated women and men and
the children, families and communities they serve.
PORTRAIT OF THE PRESENT
The Wheelock College community today includes over 850 undergraduates and over
300 graduate students on the Boston campus, with another 500 students completing
local, regional, and international off-campus programs. In their diversity, they reflect
our multicultural society, and their willingness to approach life in this community
cooperatively reflects a remarkable unity of spirit.
Most students who choose this College are motivated by a conscious idealism that
promotes service to others as meaningful work. Wheelock students intend to make
a positive difference in the communities where they engage. They are sensitive to
injustice, particularly when its victims are children. Wheelock students use their time at
the college to master skills that will enable them to do something purposeful with their
drive to help improve the lives of children, families, and society in general.
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WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
THE CAMPUS
The brick buildings, lawns and terraces of the Wheelock College campus are located
on either side of Boston’s Riverway, near the center of the city’s Emerald Necklace.
Wheelock’s Classroom Building, studios and residences are bordered by the nine-level
Wheelock College Library, the Student Center, the Administration Building and the
Lucy Wheelock Auditorium. The newest addition to the Boston campus is the CCSR,
the College Center and Student Residence, a brand new building, housing state of
the art dining services, post office, book store, residence hall, and meeting spaces. The
College has two additional buildings located on its campus that extends across city lines
into Brookline. Wheelock’s campus in Brookline is a multi-purpose facility used by the
entire Wheelock community.
The intimate campus community enjoys access to metropolitan Boston. Newly arrived
undergraduates are welcomed by experienced students who work with the College’s
student life professionals to plan introductory activities and orientation. The welcome
includes exploration of Boston’s cultural and social offerings as well as programs that
teach practical skills for safe and responsible enjoyment of life in Boston.
The personal and professional ties a student develops while living in Boston are
strengthened by the College’s longstanding cooperation with the schools, hospitals,
agencies and museums in the city and surrounding towns. Wheelock students are
directly involved in the life of the city and their ideals are put to work throughout
Greater Boston, creating a community context for students’ academic work. Based in
this context, the contributions of every student will endure long after graduation.
WHEELOCK COLLEGE
Among Wheelock’s immediate neighbors are the Museum of Fine Arts and the Isabella
Stewart Gardner Museum, the five other colleges and universities that, with Wheelock,
comprise the Colleges of the Fenway partnership, and the teaching, research and health
care facilities of a complex of hospitals and medical schools. Within a block or two of
the campus, subway stations and major bus routes connect Wheelock to downtown
Boston, Quincy Market and Government Center, the Children’s Museum and the
Museum of Science, the New England Aquarium and Harvard Square.
THE WHEELOCK FAMILY THEATRE
New England’s only Equity theatre dedicated to producing plays for family audiences
was founded at Wheelock in 1981. The Wheelock Family Theatre (WFT) is located
in the Lucy Wheelock Auditorium. Responding to a community need for professional
theatre at reasonable prices, the WFT is nationally recognized for innovations in
nontraditional casting (which transcends ethnic and cultural preconceptions), arts
access, and theatre education. For over 30 seasons, the WFT has staged productions
that draw together young people and adults, igniting their imaginations. Acclaim for
the WFT’s productions (which often include Wheelock students, both onstage and
backstage) is matched by the enthusiasm of audiences welcomed into this theatre by
a company determined to overcome traditional barriers to access. Wheelchair users
are comfortably accommodated. All productions are interpreted in American Sign
Language (ASL) for deaf patrons and audio-described for patrons who are blind or
visually impaired. WFT is the first Boston theatre to provide open captioning of all
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WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
performances for patrons who are deaf or hard of hearing and who do not use ASL.
A philosophy of the transformative power of live theatre animates WFT’s artistic,
community outreach, and educational programming. The Wheelock Family Theatre is
a dynamic force, continuing to extend its reach.
TOWNE ART GALLERY
WHEELOCK COLLEGE
The Towne Art Gallery presents four exhibitions a year highlighting the work of
professional artists in a variety of media. The gallery has a special interest in works
produced by artists from the New England region. It also presents special exhibitions
by organizations that support and nurture children’s endeavors in art. Twice a year the
gallery showcases the work produced by Wheelock students involved in the Visual Arts
Program at the college.
The Towne Art Gallery highly encourages student involvement ranging from gallery
sitting to show installations to gallery assistantships and special projects. Students and
the entire Wheelock Community are always invited and welcome to attend receptions
to meet and interact with the artists whose work is being shown. For more information,
please view the gallery website at www.wheelock.edu/art.
WHEELOCK AND BEYOND
COLLEGES OF THE FENWAY
Wheelock College is a member of the Colleges of the Fenway, a collaboration among
Emmanuel College, Massachusetts College of Art, Massachusetts College of Pharmacy
and Health Sciences, Simmons College, Wentworth Institute of Technology and
Wheelock College. Each college maintains its distinctive identity, while providing
students with access to academic programs and student services on all six campuses.
Wheelock undergraduate students can cross-register for courses at any of the other
participating institutions; students from the other colleges can enroll in courses at
Wheelock College. Each college reserves the right to limit access to certain courses.
The Colleges of the Fenway partners believe that by working together they can enhance
the student and faculty environments of their individual institutions while retaining
the unique qualities of each school. Moreover, they believe that through the economic
benefits of collaboration, they can slow the escalating cost of higher education
by sharing resources to end costly duplication, and by taking advantage of joint
purchasing arrangements. In collaboration, students and faculty continue to study, to
live and to teach in small college environments while enjoying the resources of a major
academic center.
ONLINE AND OFF-CAMPUS LEARNING
Wheelock College hosts masters and baccalaureate degree programs in local communities
throughout New England. In these regional programs students are able to earn a
Wheelock degree close to home, without their classes interfering with work schedules.
Our off-campus programs are cohort learning experiences. Students begin and often
complete their program together developing strong bonds as professional, academic,
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WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
and personal experiences are shared. Through collaborative work, strong support
networks are built among cohort members, faculty, advisors, and staff lasting well
beyond the academic program.
Students enrolled in an Online and Off-campus Learning program take a minimum
of two courses during each semester. Classes take place once a week in the evening, or
in a three-weekend format (approximately every other weekend) on Fridays from 4:30
p.m.–8:30 p.m. and Saturdays 8:30 a.m.–4:30 p.m.
DEGREE COMPLETION PROGRAMS
OFF-CAMPUS MASTERS DEGREE PROGRAMS
Wheelock College offers masters programs in a number of locations in Massachusetts
as well other New England states. These programs provide opportunities to enhance
professional skills through graduate study in human development, multiculturalism,
research, curriculum, and family studies. All off-campus offerings are conducted within
student cohort groups further enhancing the educational experience by allowing
students to form strong bonds with other professionals over time. All classes are held
either in evenings, on weekends, or through online offerings. These programs are
particularly convenient for people who are working full-time or who live some distance
from the Boston campus. Students complete their programs in approximately 2 years.
WHEELOCK COLLEGE
The Wheelock degree completion programs are designed for professionals with an
associate degree who are interested in earning a Bachelor of Science degree from
Wheelock College. Students complete an Arts and Sciences major A description of
these majors is included under Undergraduate Programs: School of Arts and Sciences
or School of Education, Social Work, Child Life and Family Studies. Selected courses
are at an advanced level courses are designed to add to the knowledge base students
have acquired through their associate degree program and often their professional and
life experience. The number of classes students take in the program will depend on
the number of credits that students transfer into Wheelock. Students can transfer in
a maximum of 67 credits. These programs are offered on the Boston campus, as well
as other off-campus locations. For specific information about current off-campus
offerings see the Wheelock webpage or email [email protected]
The curriculum focus of each masters program is dependent on the demand and
academic needs within the communities they are located. Programs currently offered
off campus are: Early Childhood Education with Initial PreK-2 Licensure or PreK/K
credential; Leadership and Policy in Early Care and Education.. Specific program
descriptions can be found in the graduate section of this catalog.
For start-up dates for each location, contact the Office of Online and Off-Campus
Learning at 617-879-2402 or [email protected]
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WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND CONTINUING EDUCATION
Dawna Burrus, Director
[email protected]
WHEELOCK COLLEGE
The College offers Professional Development Institutes (PDIs) in the summer and
during inter-sessions (in January and in May–August). The PDI offerings vary from year
to year, and are announced on the college website, through mailings and on Facebook.
Continuing Education and Professional Development courses also are provided through
cohort organizations within the academic, education and social services community
at-large. These courses are offered both on campus or at the cohort facility and are
conducted by Wheelock faculty. Generally, registration and participation is the
community courses is limited to the audience selected by the cohort. If a community
course is open to other parties, announcements will be listed on the Professional
Development and Continuing Education page of the College’s website.
Professional Development and Continuing Education courses and programs can
be taken for academic credit, Continuing Education Units (CEUs) or Professional
Development Points (PDPs).
CENTERS AND INSTITUTES
ASPIRE INSTITUTE--’BRIDGING COLLEGE AND COMMUNITY’
Jacob Murray, Senior Director
[email protected]
In 2008, Aspire Institute opened its doors with a vision of increasing knowledge and
advancing policies that ensure the success and well-being of children, families, and
communities. Aspire provides leadership or support for building partnerships that
advance interdisciplinary, holistic approaches that address complex issues of social and
educational concern facing children and families in our communities. By strengthening
and linking the internal resources of Wheelock with external groups and individuals
who serve children, families, and communities, we aspire to improve the long-term
capacity of schools and communities to successfully nurture and educate children from
birth through adolescence. Our work is currently focused on three areas that affect the
well-being of children, families, and communities: health and wellness, education, and
social and family systems.
THE CENTER FOR INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION, LEADERSHIP, AND INNOVATION
Dr. Linda Davis, Interim Director and Associate Professor
[email protected]
Wheelock College’s Center for International Education, Leadership, and Innovation
was established in 1992 to develop and deliver globally a range of academic degree
programs, innovative seminars, and professional development programs. The Center
coordinates all of Wheelock College’s global endeavors, including degree-granting
programs in Singapore and hosting of international students and visitors.
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WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
The Center contributes to the internationalization of the Wheelock College
community by coordinating all of the College’s global endeavors. This includes the
delivery of a range of culturally-responsive, state-of-the-art educational programs
abroad in collaboration with local education and health ministries, universities and
other educational institutions. Currently, the Center has the capacity to offer programs
leading to an Associate of Science, Bachelor of Science and Master of Science degrees.
The Center is also the home of the Presidential International Service Learning and
International Visiting Scholar Programs. These endeavors further augment the range
of global opportunities, experiences and research available for the benefit of Wheelock
College students, faculty and alumni and those of the Colleges of The Fenway.
For detailed information on programs offered internationally see p. 23 in the Academic
Experience section of this catalog.
THE CENTER FOR SCHOLARSHIP AND RESEARCH
The Center for Scholarship and Research (CSR) encourages, supports, and celebrates
faculty scholarship, research, and creative production in light of the college’s vision,
mission, values, and academic principles. In meeting this purpose, the CSR 1) provides
direct services and programs to support individual and collaborative faculty research,
scholarship, and creative production; 2) facilitates and supports faculty development
and interconnected initiatives in teaching and scholarship; and 3) engages with
mission-oriented partners in collaborative research efforts and through provision of
professional services.
In collaboration with Wheelock faculty, staff, and students, the CSR supports
Wheelock faculty as they contribute to the knowledge bases of their disciplines and
professions and provide professional services to its partner communities to improve the
lives of children and families through scholarship.
WHEELOCK COLLEGE
Dr. Janine Bempechat, Director
[email protected]
AREAS OF FOCUS
The Center for Scholarship and Research works collaboratively and inclusively through
three integrally related areas of focus:
ScholarlyWork. Support and promote faculty scholarship, research, and creative production
Teaching and Learning. Highlight, develop, and study excellence in teaching and
evaluation of learning outcomes while supporting initiatives connecting teaching,
learning, and research
Mission-Oriented Partnerships. Identify and support collaborations with community
partners through scholarship, research, evaluation, development and dissemination of
work products, and provision of professional services.
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WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
THE DOCUMENTATION STUDIO
The Documentation Studio at the Center for Scholarship and Research is a venue for
exhibiting and sharing artifacts of teaching and learning. The Documentation Studio
offers workshops, special exhibits and discussions for Wheelock faculty, students, and
area educators from toddlers to higher education. It is a place for educators to create,
display, and discuss artifacts of learning by students of all ages. Inspired by the work of
early childhood educators in Reggio Emilia, Italy, the tool of documentation includes
artifacts of learning such as student work (i.e. a drawing, a written story), photos
of students working in their classrooms, a transcript of a student’s words describing
what he has learned, a video clip of a teacher and students working together. The
Documentation Studio is located on the ground floor of the Hawes, Brookline campus
and is open and available to view on-going exhibits; contact the director for more
information and to be included on emails regarding future events.
WHEELOCK COLLEGE
THE NATIONAL CENTER FOR RACE AMITY
16
Dr. William H. “Smitty” Smith
[email protected]
The National Center for Race Amity (NCRA) was established in January 2010. It is
based at Wheelock College and receives its funding from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation.
A sustainable organization, NCRA’s programs generate income to support itself and
other programs benefitting first generation college students. The Center has three
primary initiatives, expansion of the Campus Conversations on Race model in a
national network of colleges that employ the strategy of training student co-facilitators
to guide peer group discussions on race and ethnicity; development of theater based
race amity education programs targeting middle school students; and research and
development of ‘The Human Being Curriculum; for national and international
dissemination.
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
THE ACADEMIC EXPERIENCE AT WHEELOCK
ACCREDITATION
Wheelock College is chartered by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and accredited
by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges (NEASC), the National
Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) and the Council on Social
Work Education (CSWE). Programs leading to state educator licensure issued by the
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (DESE) or used
by candidates to apply for an early care, preschool teacher or center director credential
issued by the Massachusetts Department of Early Education and Care (EEC) are further
recognized by the following national specialty professional organizations: National
Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC), Association for Childhood
Education International (ACEI, for review of Elementary Programs), Council for
Exceptional Children (CEC), and the International Reading Association (IRA).
ACADEMIC GUIDING PRINCIPLES
PREAMBLE
Wheelock College cultivates a passion for learning among all members of its
community. We are a diverse learning community whose members respect differences
among people, their ideas, and their ways of being in the world.
PRINCIPLE ONE
Wheelock College creates and sustains an environment of critical inquiry, creative
expression, and growth. Wheelock College students:
WHEELOCK COLLEGE
In order to shape and modify its curriculum in a manner consistent with the successful
implementation of its mission, faculty and administrators are informed by Wheelock
College’s Academic Guiding Principles*. They are as follows:
• Master content in the arts and sciences in sufficient depth and rigor to allow an
appreciation for the beauty and integrity of the disciplines;
• Develop expertise in the education and human service professions along a
continuum from entry level to advanced practice;
• Explore new ideas, experiences, and collaborative partnerships, and integrate
academic learning and community-based experiences;
• Apply multicultural and developmental perspectives to understand individual,
family, community, and societal growth.
PRINCIPLE TWO
Wheelock College develops reflective, responsive, and responsible world citizens who
are prepared to:
• Understand the broad social, cultural, political and economic contexts that
influence the lives of all children and families at the local, national, and
international levels;
• Engage, individually and collectively, in lifelong learning, embrace multiple
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perspectives, and participate within diverse communities;
• Realize their capacity for leadership that creates a more just world for all children
and families.
*Developed by the faculty and approved by faculty vote in May 2006.
GENERAL POLICIES
DIVERSITY POLICY AND INITIATIVE*
WHEELOCK COLLEGE
Wheelock College is committed to creating and sustaining a campus community that
accepts and honors the diversity of its members. Diversity is the understanding and
appreciation of all people regardless of ethnic origin and background, religion, age,
gender, sexual orientation, socio-economic status, or ability. The goals supporting this
commitment include the following:
• Promoting an institutional commitment to diversity;
• Creating and sustaining a campus climate that appreciates diversity;
• Increasing and supporting sustained opportunities for student experiences and
student learning from a diverse, equitable and
• Multicultural perspective;
• To make Wheelock College a place where persons of any age, race, color, national
or ethnic origin, handicapping condition, and gender or sexual orientation feel
welcome and respected.
Any person having inquiries or complaints concerning Wheelock College’s compliance
with the regulations implementing Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title IX of
the Education Amendments of 1972, Age Discrimination Act of 1975, Section 504 of
the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, or the Americans With Disabilities Act is directed to
contact President Jackie Jenkins-Scott at 200 The Riverway or telephone her at (617)
879-2161. The President has been designated by Wheelock College to coordinate
Wheelock College’s efforts to comply with the regulations implementing Title VI of
the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, Age
Discrimination Act of 1973, and The Americans with Disabilities Act
SEXUAL HARASSMENT POLICY STATEMENT*
All members of the College community, including students, faculty, administrators,
and staff, have a right to be free from sex discrimination in the form of sexual
harassment by any other member of the College community.
STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES*
In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and Section 504 of the
Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the College is committed to providing support services and
reasonable accommodations on an individual basis to students with disabilities (as defined
by law). Students requesting accommodations must submit appropriate documentation
verifying the need for accommodations and contact the Director of Academic Assistance
and Disability Services in the Office of Academic Advising and Assistance.
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WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
DRUG AND ALCOHOL AWARENESS POLICY*
The College is committed to creating and maintaining a campus environment that is
free of the use of illicit drugs and alcohol. The College is a member of the Coalition of
Boston area schools on underage drinking. This Coalition adopted a set of principles
and commitments to address problem drinking. In compliance with the Drug-Free
Schools and Communities Act Amendments of 1989, and other state and federal laws,
the College has developed the following Drug and Alcohol Awareness Policy.
CAMPUS COMPUTING POLICY*
SMOKE FREE ENVIRONMENT*
Smoking is prohibited on all Wheelock buildings, including residence halls and grounds.
CONFIDENTIALITY
The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 requires the College to
maintain the confidentiality of student educational records and is intended to
be a safeguard against unauthorized release of information contained in student
educational records. In compliance with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy
Act of 1974, students enrolled at Wheelock College and former students have
the right to review their educational records upon request. However, confidential
evaluations, recommendations placed in educational records prior to January 1, 1975,
and parents’ financial records and related materials may not be released to students or
former students.
WHEELOCK COLLEGE
Email is an official method of communicating at Wheelock College. The Office of
Information Technology creates and issues a Wheelock email account to each student
upon enrollment. Each student is notified, in writing, of his/her email address and
receives instructions for accessing his/her email account. The Wheelock College
Student Email Policy requires students to activate and utilize their Wheelock email
accounts. The Policy was developed to set standards for communications between the
College and its students, to ensure that all students have access to pertinent College
information, and to ensure that administration, faculty, and staff of the College have a
standardized method and a timely process for communications with students.
ACADEMIC HONESTY POLICY**
Wheelock College is committed to promoting intellectual growth in an environment
that honors academic integrity, ethical behavior and academic excellence. To that end,
an Academic Honesty System has been established to ensure that proper behavior is
recognized and that improper behavior is addressed in a fair, consistent, and timely
manner. Students are required to meet the College’s standards for academic honesty
which include producing original work, crediting non-original work and outside
sources, and behaving honestly in all academic endeavors.
ACADEMIC HONOR CODE
Central to the Academic Honesty System is the Academic Honor Code. Undergraduate
students must agree to be bound by the Code at the beginning of each academic
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WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
year. Graduate students must agree to be bound by the Code when they enter their
programs. All students must comply with the Academic Honor Code at all times while
they are enrolled at the College.
THE ACADEMIC HONOR CODE FOLLOWS:
As a citizen of the Wheelock College community, I am committed to acting honestly
and with integrity in all aspects of academic life. I pledge to conduct myself ethically
in my academic endeavors. I accept responsibility for what I write and what I say. In
the spirit of trust, I will not misrepresent my academic work. I will not cheat and I will
work toward creating a fair academic environment for all.
* For more complete information on these Wheelock College policies see the Wheelock College
Student Handbook online at http://www2.wheelock.edu/wheelock/Student_Life/
Student_Handbook.html.
WHEELOCK COLLEGE
** For more complete information on Wheelock College Academic Policies see the Wheelock
College website at www.wheelock.edu.
THE ACADEMIC EXPERIENCE AT WHEELOCK COLLEGE
Wheelock delivers a broad array of undergraduate and graduate programs through
three schools under the leadership of a Vice President for Academic Affairs. These
include the School of Arts and Sciences; the School of Education, Social Work, Child
Life and Family Studies and the School of Graduate and Continuing Studies.
The School of Arts and Sciences at Wheelock College is home to six academic
program areas; American Studies, Arts, Communications, Psychology and Human
Development, Humanities, and Math/Science. These programs provide students with
a strong liberal arts education, which encompass the knowledge and skills required
for a wide variety of career paths. Also, since it’s estimated that college students today
will likely have four or five careers–not just jobs–over their professional lives, a strong
liberal arts foundation provides you with the functional skills and flexibility to shift to
new careers over your professional life.
The School of Education, Social Work, Child Life and Family Studies embodies
Wheelock’s mission, to improve the lives of children and families, by offering a rigorous
educational experience and a range of professional career paths for students who wish
to become change agents in the lives of children, families, and communities. This
School is home to eight professional program areas; Elementary, Special and Early
Childhood Education, Language and Literacy Studies, Child Life, Juvenile Justice and
Youth Advocacy, Social Work and Leadership and Policy. The program portfolio of
undergraduate programs and graduate offerings in these areas support the needs of
early practitioners as well as advanced practitioners.
The School of Graduate and Continuing Studies oversees the delivery of a wide variety
of undergraduate and graduate programs and continuing education opportunities
for students on our campuses and close to where our students live and work. Our
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programs are offered at our Boston and Brookline campuses and at regional locations
in the U.S. Some programs are delivered in a cohort model through which students
participate in a program as a unified group, supporting each other through a clearly
defined curriculum. The School also delivers programs and course offerings at times,
locations and schedules that accommodate the professional and family demands of our
students. In addition to traditional on-campus programs, the School provides evening
and weekend programs and adds on-line components in spring 2012.
ACADEMIC DEGREE PROGRAMS
The College provides academic oversight of all undergraduate and graduate programs
through two Schools: (1) Arts and Sciences; and (2) Education, Social Work, Child
Life, and Family Studies.
UNDERGRADUATE DEGREE PROGRAMS
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE AND BACHELOR OF ARTS
BACHELOR OF SOCIAL WORK
Undergraduates who major in Social Work earn the Bachelor of Social Work
(B.S.W.) degree. In their program students acquire practical experience working
with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities in a variety of
social service settings, including child welfare and family service agencies, hospitals,
and schools. Social Work majors may pursue a second professional major in Juvenile
Justice and Youth Advocacy. All Social Work majors complete additional Arts and
Sciences coursework beyond General Education requirements. Students can complete
this requirement of additional Arts and Sciences coursework in one of three ways: by
completing a second major in American Studies, the Arts, Human Development, the
Humanities, or Math/Science; by completing a 16 credit minor in an Arts and Sciences
discipline or by completing 12 elective credits in the Arts and Sciences. Students in this
program who pursue a double major earn a BSW degree.
WHEELOCK COLLEGE
Students who major in Psychology and Human Development or Mathematics/Science
earn the Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree; those who elect American Studies, Arts,
Communication or Humanities majors are awarded the Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree.
In combination with one of the six Arts and Science majors students prepare for
professions by having a second major in one of the professions, Elementary Education,
Early Childhood Education, Child Life, or Special Education, . The professional majors
provide students with content knowledge and practical fieldwork experiences in their
chosen field, enable them to pass state or national exams and qualify for child life,
teacher credentials, and to meet other professional requirements.
UNDERGRADUATE MINORS
Minors in Child Health, Education, Juvenile Justice and Youth Advocacy, Sports Based
Youth Development, and Understanding Autism as well as in several arts and sciences
areas are available to Wheelock undergraduates. Minors are typically 16 credits.
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WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
GRADUATE PROGRAMS
POST-BACCALAUREATE LICENSURE AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS
Wheelock College’s School of Education, Social Work, Child Life and Family Studies
offers an undergraduate Human Services Certificate Program and a graduate level nondegree Parenting Education Certificate Program, is offered through the Department
of Child Life and Family Studies. The Leadership and Policy department offers a
certificate in Organizational Leadership. State approved advanced course clusters are
also offered in areas of English as a Second Language, Reading, and Special Education
to advanced Massachusetts teachers’ initial licenses to the professional level (see page
120) and for professional development purposes.
WHEELOCK COLLEGE
MASTERS DEGREE PROGRAMS
Masters of Science (M.S.) degree programs are offered in four areas of study leading to
a professional credential or license: 1. Child Life and Family Centered Care; 2. Early
Childhood Education; 3. Integrated Elementary and Special Education; 4. Reading.
The College also offers a Masters of Social Work (MSW) program. The College offers
two non-licensure programs in Education that have more flexibility for self-design:
Language and Literacy Studies and Educational Studies.
INTERNATIONAL DEGREE PROGRAMS
The Wheelock College Center for International Education, Leadership and Innovation
(see p. 11) delivers of a range of culturally-responsive, state-of-the-art educational
programs abroad in collaboration with local education and health ministries,
universities and other educational institutions. Currently, the Center has the capacity
to offer programs leading to an Associate of Science, Bachelor of Science and Master of
Science degrees. Each degree program leads seamlessly from one level to the next. These
programs are offered to international students only. The current programs offered are
as follows:
MASTER OF SCIENCE IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION
This program, offered in collaboration with the SEED Institute in Singapore, applies
current knowledge and theory in the fields of child development and early education
to teaching in early childhood and primary grades. This Master of Science program
provides an excellent model to educate professionals for leadership, management,
parent educators, teacher education, and policy-making positions in early childhood
education in Asia and globally.
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION
The Bachelor of Science in Early Childhood Education degree is designed to
prepare learners to continue to pursue a career in education and satisfies the degree
requirements of Wheelock College. Graduates of this program are prepared to assume
multiple roles as educators, administrators, and directors of programs.
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WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATIONAL STUDIES AND
LEADERSHIP
This program is specifically designed for Ngee Ann Polytechnic’s Early Childhood
Education and Child Psychology and Early Education Diploma graduates who are
lifelong learners committed to improving the quality of life for children and families
globally. The program helps graduates prepare for successful careers as education
leaders, educators, entrepreneurs, administrators or specialists for inclusive and
speciation education.
For a complete description of the international academic programs visit the Wheelock
College website at www2.wheelock.edu/ wheelock/Academics/ International_Programs.html
SPECIAL PROGRAMS
HONORS PROGRAM
THE POLICY FELLOWS PROGRAM
WHEELOCK COLLEGE
The Wheelock Honors Program offers a challenging course of study to undergraduates
who seek to distinguish themselves by meeting high academic expectations. Students
in the Honors Program complete eight honors courses and then undertake an
independent project under the mentorship of a faculty member. Each semester, honors
students additionally participate in a forum on a special topic of their choosing.
Honors courses at the College are open to all students who seek to immerse themselves
in a demanding intellectual experience, but students are admitted to the Honors
Program through successful application or by meeting GPA and SAT requirements.
Entering first-year students are automatically eligible for admission into the program
if they have a high school GPA average of 3.5 or higher and an SAT score (combined
Critical Reading and Math Sections) of at least 1100. For more information about the
Honors Program and how to apply, please visit the College web site at http://www.
wheelock.edu/honors/
The Policy Fellows Program offers a unique opportunity for undergraduate and
graduate students to work side by side with high level decision makers, including
elected and appointed public officials. Students attain leadership skills that support
their having a positive impact on policy direction and advocacy through exposure to
the process of policy development. The fellowship program incorporates a 16 hour/
week legislative placement and concurrent bi-weekly seminar.
JUMPSTART
Wheelock College has been a Jumpstart site since 2005. This national program brings
College students together with pre-school children, who may be at-risk academically,
for one-to-one mentoring relationships to build the language, literacy, and social skills
necessary to succeed in school. Wheelock undergraduates are invited to participate
in this program during their first and sophomore years. Students in the Jumpstart
program are required to participate in a service-learning class.
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WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
THE PRESIDENTIAL INTERNATIONAL SERVICE LEARNING PROGRAM
The Presidential International Service Learning Program is currently coordinated
by the Center for International Education, Leadership, and Innovation. This crosscultural initiative is designed to promote global understanding and literacy, and
an international educational experience among faculty, learners, and alumni in the
greater Wheelock College community. Under this program, Wheelock College faculty
members design short-term international travel experiences for students and alumni
that include a significant community engagement component. Each service learning
experience is linked to a credit-bearing on-campus course that prepares the students to
focus in on the subjects, cultures, and issues being studied during the travel experience.
The number and location of trips varies each academic year. Information about
available Presidential International Service Learning Programs is posted on the
Wheelock College website.
WHEELOCK COLLEGE
STUDY ABROAD
24
Study abroad is possible and encouraged for interested undergraduate students.
Assistance in the selection of a study abroad program is available in the Office of
Academic Advising and Assistance.
MSPP
Wheelock College and the Massachusetts School of Professional Psychology (MSPP)
have an educational partnership that fast-tracks students entering the growing field
of mental-health counseling. Wheelock students may complete their undergraduate
education at Wheelock within three years, and then earn a two-year masters degree
from MSPP. Both programs qualify their graduates to pursue licensure in Massachusetts
as Licensed Mental Health Counselors (LMHC) in as little as five years.
Accepted students receive early admission to MSPP and must successfully complete
their Wheelock requirements and maintain a 3.3 grade point average at Wheelock.
Wheelock students majoring in any non-licensure undergraduate curricula can enroll
in the program, which has its own set of required courses. Students may then choose
to enter one of two graduate degree programs at MSPP: Counseling Psychology or
Forensic & Counseling Psychology. (See the department of Psychology and Human
Development, p.90 for more information.)
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
PEACE CORPS MASTER’S INTERNATIONAL PROGRAM
Wheelock College is proud to partner with the Peace Corps to offer the Master’s
International (MI) Program at Wheelock. This program gives passionate, idealistic
people who are interested in Peace Corps service an opportunity to get a master’s degree
from one of the country’s premier teacher preparation institutions while also fulfilling
their commitment to international service.
Selected students can earn a Master of Science in Educational Studies from Wheelock
while integrating Peace Corps service into their studies.
Graduates of the MI Program will be well-equipped for a range of positions focusing
on work with and for families and children in a variety of settings, including schools,
afterschool programs, international agencies, community agencies, publishing
companies, advocacy agencies, museums, government offices, and international
nongovernmental organizations. The program welcomes students who are interested in
learning more about education, have an education background and/or teaching license,
or wish to enter the education field. However, the program does not lead to teacher
licensure.
WHEELOCK COLLEGE
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WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
STUDENT SERVICES
In keeping with the College’s commitment to students, to provide the academic
grounding and real-world experiences students need to be successful in their chosen
field, Wheelock offers a full range of programs and services for its students
ACADEMIC ADVISING AND ASSISTANCE
Mary McCormack, Associate Vice President for Academic Services
Email: [email protected]
WHEELOCK COLLEGE
The Office of Academic Advising and Assistance (OAAA) provides academic advising,
academic support programs and resources to help students achieve their educational,
personal, and professional goals. OAAA coordinates all aspects of academic advising
and academic support services for students. Through this office undergraduate students
are assigned faculty advisors who assist them in planning their academic programs. The
staff also provide academic advising and academic counseling on a walk-in basis, as well
as by appointment.
ACADEMIC SUPPORT SERVICES
OAAA also provides academic support services for students. Students who seek to
improve their academic performance are encouraged to contact the Office. Among the
support services provided by this office are peer tutors, writing consultants, academic
counseling, study skills workshops, and services for students with disabilities.
Peer Tutors are available free of charge to all students who need one-on-one
academic assistance. Some tutors focus on broad skills (such as organization and time
management) while other specialize in content areas. (see http://www2.wheelock.edu/
wheelock/Academics/Academic_Services/Peer_Tutoring.html)
Massachusetts Test for Educator Licensure (MTEL) advising, resources, and support
for students’ test preparation are available. (see http://www2.wheelock.edu/wheelock/
Academics/MTEL.html)
The Study Lounge is located in the Library. The Study Lounge offers all students a
comfortable place to study with access to peer tutors, writing consultants, academic
resource materials, and computer technology.
THE WHEELOCK COLLEGE WRITING PROGRAM
Jenne Powers, Director of the Writing Center
Website: http://www2.wheelock.edu/wheelock/Academics/Academic_Services/
Writing_Program.html
Email: [email protected]
The Writing Program consists of composition courses, support services, and literacy
testing, all designed to assist Wheelock students with the writing they will be doing
while at Wheelock and to prepare them for writing in both their careers and their roles
as advocates for children and families. Elements of the writing program:
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WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
WHEELOCK COLLEGE COMPOSITION PROGRAM
Scott Votel, Director of Composition Programs
Email: [email protected]
The Composition Programs aim to provide students with the necessary literacy
instruction and support to succeed in academic, professional, and civic environments.
In addition to managing the introductory composition classes, the Program coordinates
the Wheelock Literacy and Communication Exam (the WLCE), a literacy exam that is
a basic college requirement. To assist students with all their writing needs, the Program
offers a number of academic supports, including the Writing Center, WLCE tutoring,
and individual professional tutoring through the Writing Coach Program.
WRITING CONSULTATIONS
THE WHEELOCK LITERACY AND COMMUNICATION EXAM (WLCE)
The WLCE is a literacy test developed by the faculty to measure the reading and
writing skills necessary to enter into academic, professional, and civic discussion. The
exam for college and career success, and is part of a college-wide commitment to help
every student write clearly and effectively. The exam consists of four sections: Spelling,
Grammar and Mechanics, Summary, and Essay. Once a student has passed passes a
particular section, the student has completed that section and does not need to ever
take it again.; If a student needs to pass sections of the exam after completing ENG
111, she or he needs to take RWS 099 or RWS 100 to complete the failed portions
of the exam. Please contact Scott Votel, Director of Composition Programs, for
information about WLCE tutoring.
WHEELOCK COLLEGE
Peer writing consultants are available in the Study Lounge (Library 205) to work
with students on the writing of essays, projects, and other papers. Students can focus
on any stage of the writing process, including generating ideas, pre-writing, drafting,
and polishing, as well as on specific writing skills such as organization, development,
mechanics, and opening and closing the paper. This service is free to all undergraduate
and graduate Wheelock students.
DISABILITY SERVICES
Paul Hastings, Director Academic Assistance and Disability Services
Website: www.wheelock.edu/oaaa.
Email: [email protected]
The mission of the Disability Services Program at Wheelock is to ensure that all qualified
students with disabilities can participate appropriately in the college’s programs and
services, to provide and coordinate the support to facilitate this participation, and to
increase the level of disability awareness among all members of the college community.
In compliance with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans
with Disabilities Act of 1990, the College is committed to providing support services
and reasonable accommodations on an individual basis to qualified students with
documented disabilities. Auxiliary aids and services including, but not limited to,
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WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
priority registration, modifications in examination proctoring, alternative format
textbooks, note taking assistance, and tutoring may be provided. Students requiring
these services are encouraged to contact the Coordinator of Disability and Support
Services in Office of Academic Advising and Assistance.
OFFICE OF FINANCIAL AID
Roxanne Dumas, Director
Website: http://www.wheelock.edu/finaid
Email: [email protected]
The Office of Financial Assistance is a student-centered office dedicated to helping students
understand the financial aid process, their financial aid package and alternative financing
options. The office administers all types of federal, state, and institutional funding.
WHEELOCK COLLEGE
STUDENT LIFE
Barbara Morgan, Dean of Students
Website: http://www2.wheelock.edu/wheelock/Student_Life.html
Email: [email protected]
The Division of Student Life encompasses the Office of Athletics, the Counseling
Center, the Office of the Dean for Student Life, the Office of Residence Life and the
Office of Student Activities. Student Life is your connection to the myriad of fun,
engaging, enriching and intellectually stimulating opportunities available throughout
the Wheelock community.
ATHLETICS
Diana Cutaia, Director
Website: http://www.wheelockwildcats.com
The goal of Wheelock College’s Department of Athletics is to create an environment
that fosters athletic success, enhances the academic experience, and empowers athletes
to strive for excellence in all they do. The college is committed to each and every
student-athlete’s academic and athletic goals. Goal-setting and positive coaching is
integrated into all of our varsity sport programs. In the 2011-2012 academic year,
students will be able to participate in the following sports:
Men’sWomen’s
Basketball Basketball
Cross Country
Cross Country
TennisField Hockey
SoccerSoccer
Lacrosse Lacrosse
Softball
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WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
COUNSELING CENTER
Eileen Thompson, M.S.W., LICSW, Director
Website: http://www2.wheelock.edu/wheelock/Student_Life/Health_and_Wellness/
Counseling_Center.html
Email: [email protected]
The Wheelock Counseling Center, located in the Student Center, is dedicated to
addressing the psychological needs of all students. The Counseling Center staff
recognizes the college years as a time of intense development and growth, both
academically and emotionally. The staff is available to help students clarify their needs
and concerns and find ways to make healthy life choices.
The Counseling Center plays an integral role in fostering the mission of the college by
providing the environment to explore oneself and one’s relationship to family, friends,
partners, the college community and the world that surrounds. As personal growth
flourishes, so will professional growth and success.
HEALTH SERVICES
Website: http://www2.wheelock.edu/wheelock/Student_Life/Health_and_Wellness.html
Email: [email protected]
The Wheelock College Student Health Program, located at the Harvard Vanguard
Medical Associates, 133 Brookline Avenue, Boston, provides routine primary and
gynecological care to Wheelock undergraduate and resident graduate students.
WHEELOCK COLLEGE
Students may be seen for a few appointments or for a longer period of time, as
their needs dictate. When appropriate, students may be referred to other qualified
professionals. All interviews are strictly confidential. Counseling Center services are
available without charge to all undergraduate and graduate students. For more details,
contact the Student Life Office.
While routine primary and gynecological care is covered by the Wheelock College
Student Health Program, the Commonwealth requires students enrolled three-quarters
time or more to be covered by a qualifying health insurance program. Any student
who does not submit proof of enrollment in a qualifying program before registering
for classes will automatically be enrolled in a program through the College and the
charge will be added to the student’s account. No refunds or exceptions will be granted.
Students who are not covered by a qualifying program may obtain coverage through
an alternative program arranged by the College. This insurance plan does not duplicate
the care provided by the Wheelock College Student Health Program at BIDMC. If
specialty care is needed, students must use health insurance.
Students are invited to attend educational health and wellness programs throughout
the academic year. Qualified professional staff speak on various topics, including street
safety, relationships, addictions, safer sex, healthy eating and women’s health. The
Student Life Office schedules and promotes these events.
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WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
RESIDENCE LIFE
Darcy Dubois, Director
Website: http://www2.wheelock.edu/wheelock/Student_Life/Residence_Life.html
Email: [email protected]
The Office of Residence Life is committed to creating a residential community that
supports a vibrant learning and living experience at Wheelock College. The Residence
Life staff lives and works with students to build a community that engages in learning
both in and out of the classroom; is respectful of all forms of discourse; welcomes all
backgrounds, thoughts, and beliefs; challenges assumptions; fosters growth; and provides
space for friendship and fun. One of the most important roles of the staff is to serve as a
guide for students as they navigate the transitions and challenges they face at college.
WHEELOCK COLLEGE
Some of the services that our Resident Assistants (RAs) and our Resident Directors
(RDs) provide are: social and academic programming for each floor and building,
clear explanation and enforcement of the college’s policies and procedures, roommate
conflict mediation, a sympathetic ear, and more.
Wheelock’s six residence halls–Longwood House, Peabody Hall, Pilgrim House,
the Campus Center Student Residence (CCSR) building, Riverway House, and
Colchester House–offer unique living environments. They vary in size, types of
rooms, designations as coeducational or single-sex halls, and traditions. Each living
environment is headed by professional Resident Directors and student Resident
Assistants who represent and enforce the general philosophies and policies of the Office
of Student Life. The unique characteristics of the halls are ensured through residence
self-government, which allows house members to determine rules and regulations for
their own community.
Rooms are either singles, doubles, triples, or quads, and each room in the residence
halls is equipped with the following: a twin bed, a desk with a chair, dresser, blinds on
the windows, an overhead light, smoke detectors, closet space (limited), and hook ups
for cable TV. Each residence hall has some wireless connectivity--Riverway and the
CCSR are entirely wireless, while the remaining residences have wireless connectivity in
the common areas but require wired connection to the college network in the rooms.
Each residence hall is smoke-free and has vending machines, television lounges with
microwave ovens, and computer rooms. Laundry facilities are located in Peabody Hall,
Riverway House, Pilgrim House (for residents of Pilgrim and Longwood), CCSR, and
Colchester.
PUBLIC SAFETY
Website: http://www.wheelock.edu/wheelock/Student_Life/Safety _and_Security.html
The mission of the Department of Public Safety is to provide a safe and secure
environment in which Wheelock College students, faculty, staff, and guests may learn,
work, and live. The department offers a number of services and systems, and operates
24 hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year. The campus emergency phone
number is (617) 879.2151.
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WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
PERSONNEL
All public safety personnel receive extensive training; are certified in first aid, CPR, and
the use of automated external defibrillators (AED); and are very knowledgeable about
the campus and Wheelock.
THE COMMUNICATIONS CENTER
The Public Safety Dispatch Center, located just inside Peabody Hall, 210 The
Riverway, is staffed 24 hours a day by a trained communications professional. An access
control system manages the various security devices located throughout the College
and alerts the dispatcher to situations that require further attention. The dispatcher can
direct immediate response for any breach of security or safety.
BUILDING ACCESS POLICIES
Academic and other non-residence buildings are open during regular business hours.
On weekends and holidays, faculty, staff and students may be asked to check in
with the dispatcher at the Dispatch Center located in Peabody Hall and show their
Wheelock College identification card.
CARD ACCESS SYSTEM
An access control management system is installed throughout the campus. The system’s
primary function is to enhance the physical security of the buildings. Card readers are
located at the front entrance of each residence hall and are accessed by students using
their Wheelock College identification cards. Video surveillance is also part of card
access at all main entrances and on the perimeter grounds of campus.
WHEELOCK COLLEGE
Residence Halls are locked 24 hours a day. Access is gained only by authorized
personnel using their Wheelock College identification card in the card reader at the
front entrance of each residence hall. All guests must be signed in at the Dispatch
Center located in Peabody Hall and be escorted into the residence hall by their host.
Escort policies vary during the school year according to schedules set up by the Office
of Residence Life.
EMERGENCY PHONES
Exterior phones are located at the front entrances of each residence hall and at various
locations throughout the campus. These phones may be used to dial any Wheelock
College extension. Each phone also has an “Emergency” button that automatically dials
the Dispatch Center when activated. The emergency phone system displays the exact
location of the origin of the call to the Communications Officer who then dispatches a
patrol unit to the scene.
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WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
REGISTRAR
Michelle Ormerod, Interim Registrar
Website: www.wheelock.edu/wheelock/Academics/Academic_Services/Academic_
Records_and_Registration.html
Email: [email protected]
The Registrar is responsible for course registration, production of course schedules,
issuing transcripts, verifying enrollment, processing grades, monitoring the degree
status of students, evaluating transfer credits, issuing diplomas, supervision of
Veterans Affairs, processing of I-20 forms for international students, establishing
the academic calendar, acting as a liaison for the College of the Fenway Consortium
Cross-Registration Program, maintenance of permanent student academic records, and
implementing academic policy as determined by the faculty of the College.
WHEELOCK COLLEGE
STUDENT RECORDS
The Registrar’s office maintains the academic transcript of each student. Academic
transcripts are available to students upon written request. An official transcript bears
the seal of the College and the signature of the Registrar. A transcript issued directly to
a student is designated “Issued to Student.” To obtain a copy of his or her transcript,
a student must complete the Transcript Request form available on the Wheelock
College website or by submitting a request online through the National Student Loan
Clearinghouse and paying the appropriate fee for each transcript requested. To obtain
an official transcript, a student must also have satisfied his or her financial obligations
to the College.
A file for every student is maintained in the Office of Academic Records and
Registration and in the Office of Academic Advising and Academic Assistance.
Students may inspect these files upon request.
THE CENTER FOR CAREER AND PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT (CCPD)
Website: http://www.wheelock.edu/ccd
Email: [email protected]
Because of Wheelock’s outstanding reputation, U.S. and international employers seek
Wheelock’s graduates for positions in education, social work, human development,
juvenile justice and youth advocacy, the liberal arts, and child life.
By cultivating an environment of critical inquiry, reflective decision-making and
integrity, the Center for Career and Professional Development promotes the
exploration of co-curricular, educational, and professional opportunities consistent
with interests, abilities, and values, in order to meet individual learning objectives,
and empower undergraduates, graduate students, and alumni to make informed
career decisions. The Center strives to support students and alumni as they engage
in their personal development as experts in their field, responsible world citizens and
community leaders, to create a more just world for all children and families.
The CCPD serves all current students enrolled in undergraduate and graduate degree
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WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
programs, as well as undergraduate and graduate alumni. The hallmark of the Center
is an integrated, collaborative approach to the delivery of professional career services
and resources by various constituencies, including alumni, faculty, administrators,
and employers. In addition to traditional career services, including individual
counseling, resume and cover letter reviews, mock interviews, and graduate school
advising, the Center also provides access to online employment opportunities to
students and alumni that range from work study to part-time and full-time openings,
as well as internship and volunteer opportunities. A resource and technology area
is also available to students and alumni so that they may access career materials in
hard copy form, view online job listings through Wheelock Works, and prepare job
search materials. The CCPD, in collaboration with a variety of faculty in different
departments, also organizes and implements several programming initiatives, including
career development workshops conducted right in the classroom setting. In addition,
all current undergraduate, graduate students, and alumni are invited and strongly
encouraged to network and begin making vital connections in person with employers
on the Wheelock College campus by participating in annual Spring Career Fairs.
Moira Mannix, Director
Website: http://www2.wheelock.edu/wheelock/Academics/Academic_Services/Field_
Experiences.html
Email: [email protected]
A hallmark of a Wheelock College education is intensive and rich fieldwork.
Undergraduate students do their field work primarily in the Boston, Brookline and
Cambridge communities in more than 280 schools, hospitals, community agencies
and programs. Graduate students have a wider geographic area for placements. All
placements reflect the College’s historic involvement in the communities in which
the college is located and the faculty’s belief in the importance of dynamic integration
between theoretical and practical knowledge. Sites include infant and toddler settings,
after school programs, public schools, independent schools, hospitals, community
health centers, substance abuse programs, special needs programs, early childhood
centers, senior centers and district court and social services settings. From a student’s
undergraduate first year through graduate work, Wheelock emphasizes learning
about many cultures and affirming the strengths and collective wisdom that we all
bring to the human tapestry. Consistent with our Academic Guiding Principles, the
College utilizes diverse and inclusive settings that build students’ capacity to become
professionals who work effectively with all children and families.
WHEELOCK COLLEGE
FIELD EXPERIENCE
Massachusetts requires certain agencies serving children and the elderly to conduct a
Criminal Offender Record Inquiry (CORI) background check on all volunteers and
staff. Students should be aware that schools, hospitals, community service agencies
and other placement sites will most likely run a CORI, Department of Social Services
(DSS) and sometimes a Sex Offender Record Inquiry (SORI) background check on
everyone working and volunteering at their site. Due to the nature of Wheelock’s
curriculum and its requirements for placements at such sites, students should expect to
go through the CORI process.
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WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
WHEELOCK COLLEGE LIBRARY
Brenda Ecsedy, Director of Academic Resources and Library Services
Email: [email protected]
Website: http://www2.wheelock.edu/wheelock/Library.html
WHEELOCK COLLEGE
The Wheelock College Library houses several major specialized collections, and offers
online access to numerous resources and services via the Library’s website at www.
wheelock.edu/library. The Library’s collection of more than 84,000 items supports all
disciplines in the College curriculum, with particular emphasis on children, families,
human development, education, and cultural diversity. In addition, the Library’s digital
library collections provide online access to over 75,000 ebooks. The Library offers
full-text access to thousands of journal titles online that are accessed through more than
40 subscription databases.. Wheelock College Library also provides access to the ERIC
collection of education-related documents in electronic and microfiche formats.
Items in all of the Library’s collections may be located using the online catalog, found
on the Library’s website. The website also provides on-campus and remote access to
subscription databases and full-text resources, and offers bibliographies, research guides,
and selected Internet links. Interlibrary loan services may be used to request materials
outside the Library’s collections. Reference staff are available to assist Library users
and answer questions in person, by telephone, and via email or instant message, and
appointments for assistance may be made through the online research request form on
the Library’s website.
Students enrolled in regional, national, international, or online programs have access
to the Library’s online resources, and are are also encouraged to consult with Wheelock
librarians by telephone, email, or instant message. Distance learners also have
borrowing privileges at academic libraries in their local areas.
LIBRARY CONSORTIUMS
The Wheelock College Library is a member of two library consortiums. Fenway
Libraries Online (FLO) is a group of ten area academic and museum libraries who
share an integrated online catalog of their respective holdings. All of the member
libraries collections are accessible through the FLO catalog on the Wheelock Library’s
website. The Fenway Library Consortium (FLC) is a group of fifteen libraries in the
Fenway area (including the ten FLO libraries) that grants students, faculty, and staff
walk-in borrowing privileges. For more information go to the Library website.
COMPUTER CLASSROOMS/LABS
The Library’s two computer laboratories, which also serve as computer classrooms,
are located on the lower level of the Library building and are open during scheduled
Library hours. Printer/copiers and computers (PC and Macintosh) are available for
use by the College community. All have Internet access as well as a selection of word
processing, database-management, spreadsheet, statistical, and educational software
programs. The Library also provides wireless Internet access.
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WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
THE RESOURCE CENTER
Email: [email protected]
Website: http://www2.wheelock.edu/wheelock/Academics/ Academic_Services/
Resource_Center.html
The Wheelock College Resource Center is an educational workspace to explore, work,
create, and connect your college coursework to your field experience. The materials and
space provide opportunities to explore and construct activities and manipulatives for
active learning and meaningful play, and to present workshops and demonstrations.
All workshops are open to the entire college, undergraduate and graduate students,
faculty, alumni, and cooperating practitioners.
The Resource Center’s collections include more than 600 circulating items in the areas
of child life, social work, early and elementary education, and math and science; a
multicultural literature collection for early childhood and young adults; and a variety of
manipulatives and kits.
WHEELOCK COLLEGE
35
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS AT
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
Undergraduate Admissions37
Undergraduate Financial Information
40
Undergraduate Academic Policies
49
The General Education Program at
Wheelock College53
Departments and Undergraduate Programs
63
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WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
UNDERGRADUATE STUDY AT WHEELOCK COLLEGE
UNDERGRADUATE ADMISSIONS AND FINANCIAL INFORMATION
UNDERGRADUATE ADMISSIONS
Admission to Wheelock College is based on the whole person, not just the numbers
submitted with a student’s application. Wheelock seeks interesting people from diverse
backgrounds who see them-selves as agents of change. In the admissions process the
College looks for scholastic achievement, strong academic evaluations, and dedicated
involvement in co-curricular and community activities. In the selection process
admissions staff look for four years of high-school english, three years of math, two
to three years of so-cial studies, and two to three years of science. Studying a foreign
language and taking courses in the arts are helpful but not required.
Students may enter Wheelock in either the fall (September) or spring (January)
semester. Applications received after the dead-lines will be considered on a space
available basis. Wheelock has rolling admissions and each applicant is notified one
month after receiving a completed application, beginning January 1 for fall applicants
and September 1 for spring applicants.
PRIORITY DEADLINES FOR UNDERGRADUATE ADMISSIONS
Fall Semester:
First-Year Early Action
First-Year Regular Decision
Transfer Regular Decision
Spring Semester:
First-Year Regular Decision
Transfer Regular Decision
December 1
March 1
June 1
December 1
December 1
APPLYING AS A FIRST YEAR STUDENT
UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS
DEADLINES
First year applicants must submit a completed application. Wheelock College
is an exclusive user of the Common Application for our traditional on-campus
undergraduate students. Applicants need to submit the Common Application (on-line
or paper version) by the priority deadlines listed above. You may access the Common
Application from the Wheelock College website at this link: http://www2.wheelock.
edu/wheelock/Admissions/Undergraduate/First-Year_Application_Process.html or you
may go directly to Common Application at www.commonapp.org. In addition to the
completed application applicants must also submit:
• A graded writing sample or college essay.
• Secondary school report to be filled out by your guidance counselor.
• One academic recommendation to be filled out by an english, math, history,
science, or foreign language instructor.
• Official transcripts from your high school.
• Official SAT scores or ACT scores. Wheelock’s SAT CEEB code is 3964.
Whelock’s ACT code is 1934.
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WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
• TOEFL score if English is not your native language. Wheelock’s minimum TOEFL
scores required for admission are: 500 paper based, 173 computer based, and 61 IBT.
• Application fee of $15 for the paper application (Application Fee is waived for the
on-line application)
EARLY ACTION PROGRAM
If Wheelock is among a student’s top-choices, he or she can receive an early admission
decision through the Early Action pro-gram. The application deadline is December 1,
and decision notification is in late December. Early action candidates have until May 1
to indicate their intention to enroll.
UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS
The applications of students who are not accepted under the Early Action program are
automatically resubmitted for consideration with the other candidates applying under
the College’s rolling ad-missions plan.
ADVANCED PLACEMENT CREDIT
Students who have completed college-level courses in secondary school and have earned
qualifying scores on the Advanced Placement Examinations of the College Entrance
Examination Board may receive college credit. A score of three is the minimum score
considered for credit at Wheelock.
DEFERRED ADMISSION
Any student who has been accepted by the College and submitted the required
nonrefundable deposit may defer enrollment until the following semester or the
following academic year by making a written request for deferral by July 1 for the fall
Semester or January 1 for spring Semester. A student may defer for one year only. After
that, the student must reactivate the application through the Office of Admissions.
REACTIVATED APPLICATIONS
Students who apply to Wheelock but do not attend the College, and students who are
not accepted for admission, may reactivate their applications within a period of two
years. This means they do not have to repeat the entire application process. Typically,
these students must request a reactivation form and complete it; write an essay; and
provide additional and updated information. To learn more about reactivating an
application, contact the Office of Admissions.
APPLYING AS A TRANSFER STUDENT
At Wheelock, we value the experience and maturity that transfer students bring
with them. Wheelock is committed to providing a smooth and supportive transfer
experience. We enroll transfer students from a variety of two- and four-year private
and public colleges. If applicants have earned nine or more college credits at an-other
accredited post-secondary college or university. Wheelock will consider them transfer
students. Transfer students are encouraged to apply for one of our degree programs,
but those students who have been out of school for a few years and want to ease
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WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
back into the college experience can take up to twelve credits as a non-matriculated
undergraduate student before officially applying to one of our programs. Course
schedules may be arranged on a part-time or full time basis.
Transfer applicants should have good academic records at the colleges they previously
attended. A minimum GPA of 2.0 is required. The best preparation for students planning
to transfer into Wheelock is a liberal arts program or general education courses.
Transfer applicants must submit a completed application. Wheelock College
is an exclusive user of the Common Application for our traditional on-campus
undergraduate students. Applicants will need to submit the Common Application
(On-line or paper version) by the priority deadlines listed above. Applicants can access
the Common Application from the Wheelock College website at this link: http://
www2.wheelock.edu/wheelock/Admissions/Transfer/Transfer_Application_Process.
html or go directly to Common Application at www.commonapp.org.
CREDIT EVALUATION
The Admissions staff can informally evaluate the transcripts of all incoming students
during the interview. Transfer credits are re-viewed on an individual basis, and students
may be asked to supply catalog course descriptions and must supply official transcripts
from all former institutions to facilitate the evaluation of transfer credit.
UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS
In addition to the completed application applicants must also submit:
• A graded writing sample or college essay.
• One academic letter of recommendation from a college professor.
• Official high school transcripts.
• Official transcripts from all colleges attended.
• TOEFL score if English is not your native language. Wheelock’s minimum
TOEFL scores that are required for admission are: 500 paper based, 173 computer
based, and 61 IBT.
• Application fee of $15 for the paper application (Application Fee is waived for the
on-line application)
The acceptance of a student’s credits from prior institutions is also affected by the
choice of an academic program. The transfer credit evaluation process is not completed
until after the student enrolls and declares a program of study.
Wheelock’s transfer credit evaluations apply students’ prior course work to their Wheeock
programs in a flexible manner within the framework of the College’s academic standards.
Courses from accredited institutions in which a student has earned a grade of “C” or
better are considered for transfer credit. In some cases, students may be eligible for
exemption from a required course. Information on applying for exemptions is available
from the Office of the Registrar. All transfer students must complete at Wheelock a
minimum of half the credits required for the Bachelor of Science, the Bachelor of Arts, or
the Bachelor of Social Work to earn a Wheelock degree.
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WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
EXEMPTIONS
Wheelock recognizes that many transfer students have studied education and human
services at other colleges or universities and have had substantial work experience with
young children as part of these studies. These students are offered the opportunity to
apply these experiences towards electives in professional programs. Exemptions are not
granted for students enrolled in a program leading to teacher licensure, which they
must complete at Wheelock.
Some transfer students and returning scholars have had extensive supervised work
experience with children beyond their academic programs. These students, too, may apply
for elective credit. Inquiries should be directed to the Academic Deans of their program.
UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS
CLEP AT WHEELOCK
Applicants over 25 years of age or who have been out of school for three or more years
may submit for credit consideration the results of College Level Examination Program
(CLEP) exams in certain academic areas. The Registrar evaluates CLEP results and
may grant up to 32 credits for Wheelock approved exams. Candidates for admission
who are interested in taking these exams may con-tact the Office of Admissions or the
Office of the Registrar for additional information.
CREDIT FOR PRIOR LEARNING
Accepted students who have had extensive supervised work experience with children,
or students who have taken seminars, participated in workshops, or gained knowledge
through programs other than courses in schools and colleges, may apply for credit for
prior learning. Students must apply during their first semester of full-time enrollment
or during the semester after they have earned at least 12 credits at Wheelock.
To comply with accreditation standards set by the Council on Social Work Education,
the social work programs cannot grant credit for life experience or prior work experience.
UNDERGRADUATE FINANCIAL INFORMATION
An excellent undergraduate education is a major investment. The Financial Aid Office
works with all students and their families to develop realistic plans for financing this
lifelong investment in personal and professional development.
Wheelock is committed to identifying sources of grant, loan, and work assistance for
qualified students, a commitment that endures throughout students’ undergraduate
years. Wheelock annually awards more than $10 million in financial assistance.
Additional assistance is distributed by the College from federal and state sources.
TUITION AND FEES
All costs and fees cited here are for the 2011-2012 academic year. Changes in fee
structures or expenses are reported directly to all prospective students by the Office of
Financial Services.
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WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
Tuition and Room and Board:
Resident
Tuition $28,990
Room and Board $12,370
General Fee $960
Student Activities Fee $105
Total Average Cost $42,425
Tuition for courses taken in addition to the full-time, full year academic program, and
for courses taken on a part-time basis, are determined on a per credit hour basis at
$910 per credit hour. Some courses may require additional lab or materials fees.
First year students will be billed an orientation fee of $250 for pro-grams and activities
arranged by the Student Development Office.
A late fee of $100 will be assessed to any student registering and/or paying after the
specified date. A fee of $25 will be assessed for any check returned to the College by its
bank. Past-due accounts are subject to interest at 18% and any reasonable collection
expenses incurred. Official transcripts are not issued to or for students whose financial
accounts are not in good standing.
HEALTH INSURANCE
Massachusetts law requires all full-time students and part-time students registered for
75% of a full-time curriculum to have health insurance. Wheelock College is required
to either enroll students in the school sponsored health insurance plan or to require the
student to complete a health insurance waiver verifying comparable cover-age.
HOUSING FEES
A room damage deposit of $100 is due on the first billing date be-fore a student
begins dormitory residence. Wheelock will hold this deposit while the student lives on
campus, typically for four years. Any unused portion of the room-damage deposit is
refunded when the student terminates campus residency.
Students assuming residency status at the beginning of or during the academic year are
subject to the room charge for the remainder of the year, except under the following
circumstances:
1. Withdrawal
2. Fractional-year arrangement (such as early graduation) approved by the Office of
Student Development prior to the assumption of residence.
3. Participation in any off-campus, Wheelock sponsored pro-grams, not including
independent studies. Students will not be subject to fees for room and board
during their absence from residence. The College retains the right to the use of the
student’s room during the period, unless arrangements are made by the student to
pay a room fee.
4. Change in status to “off-campus” for Semester I for students who have paid the
room-retainer fee. Students eligible to move off campus will not be subject to the
room and board charge for Semester I if application to change residency status,
accompanied by a $200 penalty charge, is received by the Office of Student
UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS
ADDITIONAL FEES
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WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
Development prior to Au-gust 1 and is approved. Students who move off campus
Semester I without notification to the Office of Student Development by the
August 1 deadline will be subject to a penalty charge of $400.
5. Change in status to “off-campus” for Semester II for students assuming residency at
the beginning of Semester I. Students eligible to move off campus will not be subject
to the room and board charge for Semester II if application to change residency
status, accompanied by a $200 penalty charge fee, is received by the Office of
Student Development prior to November 1 and is approved. Students who move off
campus Semester II without notification to the Office of Student Development by
the November 1 deadline will be subject to a penalty charge of $400.
UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS
REFUND POLICY
To qualify for a tuition refund, students must file a written notice of course withdrawal
and forward it to the Office of Academic Re-cords and Registration. Notification of
non-attendance or withdrawal to faculty alone does not constitute official withdrawal,
and a tuition credit cannot be allowed on that basis. Tuition credit will be granted only
on the basis of the date appearing on the course withdrawal form, which is the last day
of attendance. General fees, student activity fee, registration fees and room-retainer fees
are not refundable.
As defined, “net refundable fees” paid (tuition, room and board fees less registration
fees, and room-retainer fees) will be refunded under the following refund schedule
which is available upon re-quest through the Office of Financial Services. Room and
board fees usually are inseparable, but for purposes of refunds the board portion is
considered to be 25% of the total room and board fee.
Students who receive institutional aid (grants, scholarships and loans) will have these
forms of aid refunded in the same percent as the refund of tuition and fees. For
students receiving federal aid under Title IV, that is Federal Pell Grants, ACG, FSEOG,
FFELP loans or Perkins Loans, the federal refund policy (known as Return of Title IV
Aid) applies and determines the amount of aid for which a student is entitled to retain
for the period of enrollment. For students receiving state grants or scholarships, refunds
are processed according to each state’s own individual guidelines.
REFUND SCHEDULE
Semester Period
Amount of Refund
Before classes begin
100% of net refundable tuition, fees, and
room and board
From the day classes begin
through the 7th calendar day thereafter 100% of net refundable tuition, plus a
prorated portion of refundable board and
board
From the 8th day through the 14th
calendar day after classes begin 50% of net refundable tuition, plus a
prorated portion of refundable room and
board
From the 15th calendar day
after classes begin 25% of net tuition, plus a prorated
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WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
portion of refund-able room and board
After the 21st calendar day
after classes begin prorated portion of refund-able room and
board only
POLICY FOR RETURN OF TITLE IV FUNDS
This policy applies to students who withdraw, are approved for a leave of absence for
longer than 180 days, or are academically dismissed from the institution.
A STUDENT’S WITHDRAWAL DATE IS:
• The date the student began the institution’s withdrawal process or officially
notified the institution of intent to withdraw; or
• The midpoint of the period of enrollment for a student who leaves without
notifying the institution;
DETERMINING THE AMOUNT OF TITLE IV FUNDS TO BE RETURNED:
• The amount of Title IV funds to be returned will be based on the number of
days in attendance in proportion to the number of days in the term or period of
enrollment, up to the 60% point in the semester. There are no refunds after the
60% point in time, as the federal regulations view the aid has been “100% earned”
after that point in time. A copy of the worksheet used for this calculation and
examples can be requested from the Wheelock College Financial Aid Office.
• In accordance with federal regulations, the return of Title IV funds is paid in the
following order:
• Unsubsidized FFEL Stafford Loans
• Subsidized FFEL Stafford Loans
• Federal Perkins Loans
• FFEL PLUS
• Federal Pell Grant
• Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant
• Other Title IV assistance
UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS
The term “Title IV Funds,” which refers to the federal financial aid programs
authorized under the Higher Education Act of 1965 (as amended) and for students
enrolled at Wheelock College, includes the following programs: subsidized FFEL
Stafford Loans, unsubsidized FFEL Stafford Loans, FFEL PLUS loans, Federal
Perkins Loans, Federal Pell Grant, Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity
Grant (SEOG), Federal Academic Competitiveness Grant (ACG) and other Title IV
programs (not including Federal Work-study).
INSTITUTIONAL AND STUDENT RESPONSIBILITIES IN REGARD TO THE RETURN
OF TITLE IV FUNDS:
• Wheelock College’s responsibilities include:
• Providing each student with the information given in this policy;
• Identifying students who are affected by this policy;
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WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
• Completing the Return of Title IV Funds calculation for students who are subject
to the policy; and
• Returning the Title IV Funds that are due the Title IV pro-grams.
• The student’s responsibilities include:
• Contacting the Office of Academic Support Services (email: [email protected]
wheelock.edu; phone: 617-879-2267) for details on procedures for withdrawing or
requesting a leave of absence;
• Notifying the Financial Aid Office (email: [email protected]) immediately of
a pending withdrawal or leave, as federal refunds must be made within 30 days of
the date of withdrawal or leave; and
• Returning to the Title IV programs any funds that were disbursed directly to the
student and for which the student was determined to be ineligible via the Return
of Title IV Funds calculation.
UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS
Students have the right to obtain a final calculation of the Return of Federal Funds.
The procedures and policies listed above supersede those published previously and are
subject to change at any time.
UNDERGRADUATE FINANCIAL AID
Students and their families assume the primary responsibility for planning and
financing an undergraduate education. Wheelock College offers assistance to the
student whose financial need exceeds the family’s ability to pay.
Wheelock’s funds are administered in accordance with nationally established policy
and philosophy, which ensure equity. Criteria established by Congress and Wheelock
College are used in evaluating applications. Size of family, number of children in college,
income, and assets are analyzed to compute the family contribution. This contribution is
deducted from the education costs to determine a student’s financial need.
Eligible applicants may receive assistance from institutional, federal and state funds. The
amount and type of aid a student receives depends on the level of need and the available
funds at the time of application. A financial aid package may include one or more of the
following: a grant or scholarship that does not have to be re-paid; a loan that must be
repaid; a work-study award earned by the student as wages for part-time employment.
APPLYING FOR AID
While planning to meet college costs, the family should consider current tuition, room
and board (for resident students) and the health fee. Additional expenses, including
approximately $880 for books, and travel costs ($510), should be used to calculate the
total cost of education. You are encouraged to investigate local, high school, civic and
other private sources of funding.
To receive consideration for Wheelock funds, Federal Pell Grants, Federal Supplemental
Educational Opportunity Grants, Federal Perkins Loans, Federal Work Study awards and
Federal Stafford Loans, applicants must complete the steps outlined below:
44
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
INCOMING FIRST-YEAR STUDENTS
Submit the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) on-line by the February
15th priority deadline. Indicate Wheelock’s federal school code number – 002228.
In addition to submitting the FAFSA, the Financial Aid Office may ask you and your
family to submit signed copies of your own and your parents’ income tax forms by
February 15. Students are notified of financial aid decisions starting in mid-March.
TRANSFER STUDENTS
RETURNING STUDENTS
Submit the Free Application for Federal Student Aid Students (FAFSA) online by the
April 15 priority deadline. On the FAFSA, indicate Wheelock College’s federal school
code 002228. In addition to submitting the FAFSA, the Financial Aid Office may ask
you and your family to submit signed copies of your own and your parents’ income tax
forms within two weeks of notification. If you or your parents will not be filing a tax
return, the proper sections of the Wheelock College Verification Worksheet must be
completed; listing all sources of income. Returning students who submit their FAFSA
by April 15th will receive their financial aid packages starting in June.
FINANCIAL AID AWARD PACKAGES
The Financial Aid Office will determine a student’s eligibility for assistance and make
an award to all students who have a valid, processed FAFSA and any other required
documents on file. Awards for new students are mailed starting in March for fall and
will continue on a regular basis. Awards for new students who enter the College for
the spring semester are mailed once all necessary documents are received. Awards for
returning students are mailed starting in June and will continue on a regular basis.
UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS
Submit the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) on-line by the April
15th priority deadline. If you are transferring for the spring and have already filed
with another school’s financial aid office for the same academic year, you will need to
go online and make a correction to your FAFSA and add Wheelock College’s federal
school code 002228. In addition to submitting the FAFSA, the Financial Aid Office
may ask you and your family to submit signed copies of your own and your parents’
income tax forms by April 15 for fall or December 1 for spring. Transfer students will
be notified of decisions regarding their financial aid applications starting in May for the
fall semester.
APPEAL PROCEDURES
If a student or family’s circumstances change (such as unemployment, illness, reduction
of income) after submitting the FAFSA, please inform the Financial Aid Office
immediately. Submit a writ-ten letter of appeal requesting reconsideration of your
current aid decision. Your letter should provide specific information about a change in
your family financial situation or extenuating circumstances (such as unemployment,
reduction of income, and unusually high uninsured medical expenses) and include
appropriate documentation. Please submit a signed copy of your and your parents’ U.S.
45
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
Income Tax Return, including W-2s and verification of any untaxed income.
Any student who is declared ineligible for financial aid for not maintaining satisfactory
academic progress may appeal in writing to the Director of Financial Aid within
one month of the date of notice of ineligibility. The student should describe any
extenuating circumstances that have compromised satisfactory academic progress.
UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS
MINIMUM ACADEMIC REQUIREMENTS
Federal and state regulations require that students receiving financial aid maintain
satisfactory academic progress. Once a year, following the spring semester the
cumulative grade-point average and number of credit hours attempted and earned
by each financial aid recipient will be reviewed. Students who apply for financial aid
by May 1 will be notified in writing by the Office of Financial Assistance during the
month of June if they have lost eligibility for aid due to failure to meet these standards.
Late applicants will be notified when they submit a Free Application for Federal
Student Aid (FAFSA) or a Federal PLUS Loan application.
Incompletes, failures, or withdrawals are not considered earned credit hours and
repeated courses are not counted as either at-tempted or earned credit hours. Transfer
credits and Colleges of the Fenway credits are counted as earned credit hours.
A student must successfully complete the number of credit hours and maintain the
minimum cumulative grade-point average listed on the chart below by the end of each
successive academic year. This chart differentiates among full-time, three-quarter-time
and half-time students, and is based on the maximum attempted credits federal policy
which states that a student may only receive federal aid for up to 150% of the standard
length of time that it takes a student to complete their program of study. For instance,
if your degree requires 120 credit hours, you may not attempt more than 180 credit
hours to achieve this degree.
FINANCIAL AID SUSPENSION
Undergraduate students who have not met the standards for satisfactory academic
progress are placed on financial aid suspension and are not eligible to receive aid,
students will be notified of their status at their permanent address. The student is
responsible for paying his/her own expenses, such as tuition, fees, books, supplies,
etc. and will not be reimbursed for period(s) of financial aid suspension. Students on
suspension status who improve their academic performance to the required completion
rate and cumulative GPA without exceeding maximum attempted credits will return
to good standing and are eligible for financial aid consideration. Students who enroll
for fall without the benefit of aid who regain eligibility for the spring should contact
the office to be reviewed. Students exceeding the maximum attempted credits for their
pro-gram immediately enter financial aid suspension status and may no longer receive
financial aid for the declared program of study.
FINANCIAL AID SUSPENSION APPEALS
Students with significant and documented extenuating circumstances may appeal to
regain aid eligibility within thirty days of receipt of the aid decision. The appeal must
46
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
yEAr
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Minimum
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90
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112
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45
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UNDERGRADUATE INSTITUTIONAL AID
grants and Scholarships
• Wheelock
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GRANTS
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Wheelock college 2010-2011
47
UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
48
and SAT scores that are on file at the time your admissions decision.
• Wheelock College Loans. Funds are loaned at a 5% interest rate to needy students.
These loans must be repaid within ten years of graduation.
• State Funds and Scholarships
• Students who are applying for Wheelock funds are required to apply for their state
scholarships, if available. Scholarship and grant funds currently are available in
Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island,
and Vermont. Each state regulates its own application deadlines and procedures.
New students should contact their guidance counselors or financial aid office for
additional information.
• Federal Financial Aid Funds
• Federal Pell Grants are gift funds administered directly by the federal government
to students who demonstrate exceptional financial need. These funds do not have
to be repaid.
• Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants (FSEOG) are funds that
are awarded to students with great financial need; Federal Pell Grant recipients
receive priority. These funds do not have to be repaid.
• Federal Perkins Loans are long-term, low-interest (5%) federal loans advanced
by Wheelock. These funds must be repaid, but no interest or repayments are due
until the expiration of the grace period after the borrower ceases to be enrolled at
least half-time. A nine-month grace period precedes loan repayment. Upon taking
this loan, the borrower is advised of her or his rights and responsibilities regarding
repayment.
• The Federal Work-Study Program provides eligible students the opportunity
for employment that will give job training and help meet the costs of college
education. A student selects her or his job from positions offered by on-campus
academic and administrative departments, as well as off-campus employment. The
amount of the work-study award is determined by the Financial Aid Office and
does not appear as a credit on the student’s bill.
• Federal Subsidized and Unsubsidized Stafford Loans provide federally insured
funds of up to $5,500 for freshmen, $6,500 for sophomores, and $7,500 for
juniors and seniors. All students must demonstrate financial need as one of
the requirements of eligibility for a subsidized loan. Both loans accrue interest
while the student is enrolled, but in the subsidized pro-gram interest is paid by
the federal government until the student begins repayment. The interest rate is
determined annually July 1st. Repayment begins six months after the student
graduates or ceases enrollment of at least half-time.
• The Federal PLUS Loan Program enables parents of dependent students to borrow
the cost of education minus financial aid. PLUS loan borrowers have the option to
begin repayment within 45 days after receipt of the loan or the parent can choose
to defer payment while the student is enrolled at least half time. The interest rate
is fixed at 7.9%. Eligibility is based on the borrower’s creditworthiness. If parents
are denied the Federal PLUS Loan, the student becomes eligible for additional
Unsubsidized Stafford loan funds. Graduate students can borrow money through
the PLUS Loan program to pay for their own education.
• Alternative Student/Family Loan Programs. Wheelock participates in other
student/family loan programs, for ways in which to find alternative financing
please visit the financial aid web-site at http://www.wheelock.edu/finaid.
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
UNDERGRADUATE ACADEMIC POLICIES
This section of the College Catalog briefly describes certain key academic policies of
Wheelock College. These policies ought not be considered all-inclusive. A complete
description of the College’s Academic Policies can be accessed online at www.wheelock.
edu. In addition to the policies described here, there are requirements for students
enrolled in various professional academic programs. Questions about academic policies,
procedures, or requirements should be directed to an academic advisor, Academic
Dean, and/or the Vice President for Academic Affairs. Finally, the academic policies
described in this catalog and on the college website may refer to other documents (e.g.,
handbooks and pamphlets) that explain certain policies, procedures, or requirements
more fully and may be obtained from the Registrar’s office.
ATTENDANCE AND ABSENCES
It is the student’s responsibility to communicate with his or her instructors regarding
absences. The student is expected to complete whatever work is necessary to make up
for absences.
ABSENCES FOR RELIGIOUS BELIEFS
The College complies with Massachusetts law (G.L. c. 151C, § 2B) which provides, in
relevant part, that:
Any student in an educational institution, who is unable, because of his religious
beliefs, to attend classes or to participate in any examination, study, or work
requirement on a particular day shall be excused from any such examination or study
or work requirement, and shall be provided with an opportunity to make up such
examination, study, or work requirement which he may have missed be-cause of such
absence on any particular day; however, that such a makeup examination or work shall
not create an unreasonable bur-den upon such school. No fees of any kind shall be
charged by the institution for making available to the said student such opportunity.
No adverse or prejudicial effects shall result to any student because of his availing
himself of the provisions of this section.
UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS
Regular class attendance is expected of all undergraduate and graduate students. Each
instructor must clearly explain his or her attendance policy in the course syllabus. The
course syllabus must clearly indicate:
• whether class attendance is a factor in the final grade
• what constitutes “excessive” absences
ACADEMIC APPEALS
A Wheelock College student (and a student from any of the Colleges of the Fenway
institution taking a course at Wheelock) has a right to appeal a final grade or academic
dismissal. A student may appeal a final grade or academic dismissal to the Academic
Appeals Board. Undertaking such an appeal is an extraordinary matter. For a complete
explanation of the appeals process see the Academic Policy Section of the Wheelock
website at http://www.wheelock.edu/wheelock/Documents/Catalog/Catalog_
Academic_Policies_0910.pdf.
49
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
GRADING POLICY
UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS
For undergraduate students, Wheelock College uses a system of letter grades that are
equivalent to the following numerical quality points.
Letter Grade
A
A-
B+
B
B-
C+
C
C-
D+
D
D-
F
P
Quality Point Equivalent
4.00
3.67
3.33
3.00
2.67
2.33
2.00
1.67
1.33
1.00
0.67 Minimum passing
0.00 Failing
0.00 Passing
In addition, a transcript may show the following statuses in the grade column:
I
0.00 Incomplete
WD
0.00 Withdrawal
AU
0.00 Auditing
An “Incomplete” (I) may be submitted by the instructor only when a student fails
to complete the requirements of a course by the date grades are due, as a result of
documented medical emergency or illness or other extraordinary circumstances, such as
a death in the family. (See full description of the policy on Incompletes below.)
“Withdrawal” is the status recorded by the Registrar’s Office when a student officially
leaves a course before the withdrawal deadline published in the academic calendar and
fills out a withdrawal form that is submitted to the Registrar’s Office. Only a student
can submit a request for withdrawal; a faculty member does not submit such a request.
PASS/FAIL OPTION
Each semester, an undergraduate student may elect a total of four credit hours to be
taken under the Pass/Fail option. During a four-year course of study, no more than
thirty-two credit hours may be taken under this option, though the restriction does not
apply to courses offered only on a Pass/Fail basis, such as some practica and fieldwork.
A grade of “P” (Pass) does not affect a student’s cumulative grade-point average, but a
failing grade of “F” (Fail), whether it is awarded under the letter grade system or the
Pass/Fail option, is computed in the cumulative grade-point average.
The following restrictions apply to the election of the Pass/Fail option:
• Students must receive letter grades in courses that they select to fulfill General
Education requirements or in their arts & sciences and professional majors,
excluding practica.
50
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
• Only one course in a student’s minor may be taken under the Pass/Fail option.
• Students on probation must take all courses (except courses offered only on a Pass/
Fail basis) for letter grades.
• For full-semester courses, students must declare their choices of the Pass/Fail
option before the fourth class meeting. For seven-week courses, the Pass/Fail
option must be declared before the second class meeting. After these deadlines,
neither students nor instructors may change the grading election.
DEAN’S LIST
DECLARATION OF ACADEMIC PROGRAM
By the end of the fall semester of sophomore year, every under-graduate student must
declare an academic program, by submitting a completed Declaration of Program form
to the Office of Academic Advising and Assistance. Students wishing to enter the Child
Life major must submit an application to the coordinator of the program for the BA or
BS and MS dual degree program.
WHEELOCK LITERACY AND COMMUNICATION POLICY
The Wheelock Literacy and Communication Exam (WLCE) is a part of a Collegewide commitment to help every student write clearly, effectively, and correctly. Every
undergraduate must take and pass the WLCE before entering practice courses specified
by each professional program. The WLCE consists of five sections: Spelling, Grammar,
Mechanics, Summary, and Essay.
UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS
The Dean’s List is a recognition of academic achievement for undergraduate students
during an academic term. A student is eligible when he or she meets the following
academic standards at the time the Dean’s List is compiled:
• Earns a minimum semester grade-point average of 3.8 (on a 4.0 scale); and
• Successfully completes a minimum of twelve credit hours during the semester
which are graded on a ‘letter grade’ basis; and
• Does not carry any Incomplete grades (‘I’) or Failing grades (‘F’) for the semester
at the time the Dean’s List is determined.
Note: A student enrolled in 20 credits where 19 credits earn grades of ‘A’ and 1 credit
earns a grade of ‘F’ will have a term GPA of 3.8.
READING AND WRITING SEMINAR POLICY
The College has developed a system of writing courses and re-sources to support
students as they prepare for and pass the WLCE. These courses include reading and
writing seminars which are taken in the sophomore year by students who must satisfy
the WLCE requirement. A student who has not passed the WLCE by the beginning
of his or her second year at Wheelock must take and pass at least one semester of a
reading and writing seminar and pass all four sections of the WLCE before entering
practice courses specified by each professional program. Students who complete the
WLCE during their first year are not required to take these seminars.
51
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
ACADEMIC STATUS-UNDERGRADUATE FULL-TIME
UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS
To complete degree requirements in four years, full-time under-graduates normally
carry a course load of between sixteen to eighteen credit hours per semester. For the
purposes of financial aid, on-campus housing, and eligibility for the Dean’s List, a
course load of twelve credit hours per semester is considered full-time. During his or
her first semester at Wheelock College, a student may enroll in courses totaling no
more than eighteen credit hours. Thereafter, except during a semester when he or she is
enrolled in a practicum, a student may enroll in courses totaling no more than twenty
credit hours. During a semester in which a student is enrolled in a practicum, he or she
may enroll in courses totaling no more than sixteen credit hours unless he or she has
received prior approval from the Scholastic Review Board. To obtain such approval,
a student must complete and submit to the Scholastic Review Board a Request to
Overload form, which is available at the Office of Records and Registration.
ACADEMIC STANDARDS
A 2.0 (C) cumulative grade-point average is the minimum accept-able standard for
all undergraduate students. An undergraduate student must maintain this standard
to graduate from the College and to enter a practicum. Also, all undergraduates must
attain a grade of C or higher in the professional studies courses and the pre-professional
courses required for the professional program in which they are enrolled. (This policy
does not apply to foundation courses in Arts and Sciences.) In addition, a student
must demonstrate during prepracticum courses a strong likelihood that he or she will
be able to complete successfully the requirements of an Arts and Science major and/or
professional major. The Scholastic Review Board monitors an undergraduate student’s
academic progress.
HONORS PROGRAM MINIMUM GPA
Students in the Honors program must maintain a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.3.
Students falling below this average will receive a warning from the Honors Committee
immediately after the semester during which the GPA average appears on the
transcript. Students have two semesters subsequent to the warning to raise their GPA
to the required minimum. Students will be removed from the program if their GPA
should fall below 3.3 again in any subsequent semester.
RESIDENCY REQUIREMENT
An undergraduate student must complete a minimum of 67 credits at Wheelock
College to receive a Bachelor’s degree. A student’s final semester must be completed
at Wheelock. Under special circumstances a student may request an exception to this
policy. However, students cannot complete more than 8 final credits out-side Whelock.
The undergraduate residency requirement is effective as of fall 2009.
INDEPENDENT STUDY
Independent Study offers students an opportunity to do self-directed, advanced work
in an area of academic interest with the guidance of a faculty member. The topic of
the independent work goes beyond the scope of courses offered in any discipline area.
52
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
Students initiate the planning of an Independent Study in consultation with a faculty
member. The academic work is usually completed in one semester. Independent Study
carries a 400 course number and the designation of the academic discipline. Students
must complete an Independent Study Proposal form, available in the Office of Records
and Registration, before beginning the course work. An Independent Study typically
does not apply to General Education requirements; to use an Independent Study to
satisfy a requirement, the student must petition the Scholastic Re-view Board.
SELF-DESIGNED MAJOR
GENERAL EDUCATION PROGRAM
Wheelock College’s general education program prepares graduates to be engaged,
life-long learners, able to draw upon a broad range of disciplinary and interdisciplinary
ways of knowing. The skills and habits of mind gained in General Education courses
will en-able graduates to enrich their personal lives, adapt to a variety of professional
situations, advocate for children and families, and act responsibly in a diverse and
changing world.
THE GENERAL EDUCATION PROGRAM AT
WHEELOCK COLLEGE
*Additional or more specific requirements apply to professional and arts and sciences majors
and programs. Students should check with advisors to determine if special requirements
related to general education apply to their particular program of study.
UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS
In very special circumstances, a student may work with advisors to propose an
Individualized Program of Study. This is a comprehensive, independent learning
experience designed to take the place of a Professional Studies major or Arts and
Sciences major. Students who wish to pursue this option must submit, in consultation
with a faculty member in the appropriate academic area, a proposal and a detailed
academic map to the Scholastic Review Board for approval. For additional information,
contact the Office of Academic Advising and Assistance.
General education courses enable Wheelock graduates to:
• use inquiry and critical thinking to recognize, investigate, analyze, and solve
problems and to value the process of that discovery;
• bring wide-ranging disciplinary knowledge to their lives and professions, and
pursue a lifetime of intellectual growth;
• communicate effectively using written, oral, and digital means and appreciate the
creative and practical functions of language;
• comprehend and employ scholarly and scientific problem-solving methods,
including quantitative concepts, to gather, interpret and critically evaluate data, to
investigate and answer questions, and to understand the value of such research;
• engage intellectually and creatively with the fine and performing arts, and
appreciate creative expression;
• examine, develop and defend moral and ethical judgments, and understand and
53
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
Wheelock College General Education Program (Total Credits: *40-48)
UndergradUatePROGRAMS
Programs
UNDERGRADUATE
52
Wheelock college 2010-2011
54
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
value the judgments of others;
• connect and synthesize disparate information and ideas, and adapt to personal,
intellectual and professional challenges;
• understand human development in its multiple and varied con-texts;
• gain an informed understanding of race, class, religion, gender, sexual orientation,
ethnicity, and disability, and use that under-standing to live and act responsibly in
a diverse world.
Students develop these competencies and habits of mind in courses that provide
“Foundations of Knowledge and Inquiry” and “Ways of Knowing.” In addition,
students deepen their understanding through cross-curricular courses fulfilling
requirements in Perspectives on Diversity and Upper Level Writing, and make
connections among ways of knowing in an interdisciplinary General Education
capstone seminar.
Foundation courses focus on developing skills and habits of mind essential to succeed
as a student, and to meet Wheelock College’s definition of an educated person. These
courses allow students to master skills in reading, writing, speaking, mathematics and
information literacy, to learn about human growth and development, to develop an
understanding of diverse cultures and the influence of race and ethnicity on human
beings, and to become empowered critical thinkers.
FIRST YEAR SEMINAR/CRITICAL THINKING (4 CREDITS)
Critical thinking is important to academic, personal, and professional success. It helps
us distinguish between facts, theories, and opinions, research and evaluate information,
solve problems effectively, and convey ideas clearly. Students select their first year
seminar course from a variety of different offerings, all of which also fulfill a “Ways of
Knowing” requirement.
READING, WRITING, AND SPEAKING (4-8 CREDITS)
Understanding written texts and communicating in written, visual, oral, and electronic
form is critical to every academic discipline and profession, and to success in private
and public life. Students take a one or two course sequence (ENG 110 and/or ENG
111) de-pending upon placement exam results.
UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS
FOUNDATIONS OF KNOWLEDGE AND INQUIRY
QUANTITATIVE REASONING AND MATHEMATICAL THINKING (4 CREDITS)
The capability to reason quantitatively and to engage in mathematical thinking and
problem solving is important to personal and professional success. In the core courses
students develop the ability to use and critically evaluate numerical information and to
understand and solve problems in a variety of contexts demanding quantitative literacy.
Particular course sequences apply to specific programs of study.
HUMAN GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT (4-8 CREDITS)
Understanding human development over the life span is important for personal and
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WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
professional growth and to Wheelock’s mission of improving the lives of children and
families. In these core courses (HGD 120/121 and HGD 122/123) students examine
patterns of physical, cognitive, social, and emotional development, and compare and
contrast major theoretical frameworks which explain those patterns. In addition,
students observe and analyze children’s behavior in a field placement setting.
WAYS OF KNOWING
Courses enable students to recognize, employ and understand the ways of knowing
central to the major academic disciplines. They provide opportunities for students to
explore diverse ideas and methodologies, to gain knowledge in specific fields, and to
become adept and flexible thinkers, capable of appreciating and applying different
disciplinary perspectives to situations in their personal and professional lives.
UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS
SELF AND SOCIETY (4 CREDITS)
The relationship between self and society is a fundamental human question. Courses
in this category focus on understanding individual and group identity in the context
of experiences, theories, institutions, and values that shape and inform human thought
and behavior. They allow students to explore the physical, emotional and cognitive
dimensions of identity development, as well as the impact of societal beliefs, cultures
and systems on human beings. Self and Society courses are located largely in the social
sciences, but may be based in topics and approaches of other disciplines, from biology
to literature.
LANGUAGES AND LITERATURE (4 CREDITS)
Languages and literature are vital to expressing and understanding ourselves and others.
Through language, we express and experience the creativity and diversity of human
thought, experience and culture. Courses in this category focus on language and how we
use it in practical and imaginative ways to convey what it means to be human. Courses
may examine the origin or structure of language, or involve reading and interpreting
literary texts, the study and practice of one or more languages, or creating language-based
works. Courses in Languages and Literature might be found in a number of disciplines,
but are usually located in Linguistics, Literature, and Foreign Languages.
CREATIVITY AND THE ARTS (4 CREDITS)
Creativity is central to humans, and as such is essential to all that we do. Courses
in this category encourage students to explore their own creativity, and to appreciate
artistic expression and how and what it communicates. Students may develop
understanding of creativity and the arts through direct engagement in the creative
process or through the study of the creative work of others. Courses may involve actual
performance or production, teach skills, concentrate on artistic history, or discuss the
role of the arts in society. Courses in Creativity and the Arts are typically based in fine
and performing arts disciplines such as Studio Art, Art history, Theatre performance,
and Music performance or history.
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WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVES (4 CREDITS)
Learning about the past is crucial to becoming an educated, civically engaged person,
and to professional preparation. Historical perspectives and methods of historical
inquiry help us understand what has happened in the past, and give us tools and
perspectives for analyzing the present, and responding to the complex challenges of
the future. Courses may be focused on a particular historic moment or topic, span
time and cultures, and/or examine questions and processes related to how we gather,
interpret, and pass on knowledge of the past. Historical perspectives courses in-crease
students’ knowledge and understanding of the past and the methods historians use to
develop questions, gather information, and verify and interpret their findings. Courses
include those with a History designation as well as those in other fields which place
emphasis on learning about and interpreting the past.
INVESTIGATIONS IN SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY (4 CREDITS)
ETHICS AND SOCIAL JUSTICE (4 CREDITS)
Thinking about and defining the “good” and moral life is a central feature of human
existence. Such examination is central to leading an engaged and ethically empowered
life. Courses in this category focus on ethical or moral dilemmas and questions
commonly con-fronted by individuals, groups, and nations. Such courses may also
focus on exploring the meaning of a just community, society, or world. Courses come
from a range of disciplines, including philosophy, anthropology, political science,
religion, psychology, science, and may include a service learning experience.
UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS
Having an understanding of basic science concepts, the nature of scientific thinking
and practices, and the connections between science and technology is critical for
appreciation of the natural world and active participation in issues of public and
personal concerns. Courses in this category focus on understanding the basic
elements of science inquiry and central components of scientific thinking as well as
fundamental concepts in one or more fields of science. The courses engage students in
direct experience with phenomena requiring the use of tools of scientific research and
processes of experimental design. Courses are usually based in such life and physical
sciences as astronomy, biology, botany, chemistry, earth science, ecology, engineering
and physics. They may also include interdisciplinary courses which have a strong
science and technology component.
INTERDISCIPLINARY AND CROSS-CURRICULAR
INTERDISCIPLINARY CAPSTONE SEMINAR (4 CREDITS)
Thinking about the world from a variety of perspectives, and making connections
between ways of knowing is critical to learning and living in the 21st century. Courses
in this category enable students to bring together perspectives from the different ways
of knowing, and use them to explore specific topics and demonstrate what they have
learned in their general education program. Courses could be located in any two
disciplines or majors offered by the College. Students must have completed at least 80%
of their requirements in General Education before registering for the cap-stone seminar.
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WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
PERSPECTIVES ON DIVERSITY
The ability to understand and interact with people from diverse cultures, backgrounds
and experiences is essential to thinking critically and creatively and to living and
working in local, regional, and global communities. Wheelock defines diversity broadly
to include culture (i.e., national origin, language, ethnicity, and religion) as well as race,
gender, social class, age, sexual orientation, and disability. Courses in this category may
examine concepts of race and relations of power among cultures, and/or engage with
the beliefs, history, experiences, artistic or literary expressions, and traditions of people
whose experiences and cultures are outside of the Western tradition.
UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS
UPPER LEVEL WRITING
Writing skills are vital component of success; the ability to communicate one’s
ideas clearly and effectively is critical to professional and personal growth. Courses
that fulfill this requirement ensure that students continue to work on their written
communication skills beyond their first-year composition courses. Students must have
successfully completed ENG 111 before taking their ULW course.
LICENSURE AND CERTIFICATION INFORMATION
CHILD LIFE SPECIALIST/CHILD LIFE PROFESSIONAL CERTIFICATION
Certification as a Child Life Specialist is available through the Child Life Council
(CLC). To become a Certified Child Life Specialist (CCLS) students must pass
an examination that is administered by the CLC two times per year in May and
November. To be eligible to take the examination, the student must have received a
baccalaureate degree or be in the final semester of study towards a baccalaureate degree.
All eligibility requirements must be completed by the time of application to take
the examination. Once eligibility is approved, the student may take the certification
examination. The student may take this examination as many times as he or she needs
to pass it, as long as the current eligibility requirements are met. For more information
on Child Life Certification requirements, contact the Child Life Council at Child Life
Council, Inc., 11820 Parklawn Drive, Suite 240, Rockville, MD 20852-2529, or via
their web site at www.childlife.org, or call 301-881-7090.
EDUCATOR LICENSURE/MASSACHUSETTS DEPARTMENT OF ELEMENTARY AND
SECONDARY EDUCATION LICENSURE
Wheelock students who complete a baccalaureate degree program that is approved
for Initial Educator Licensure in Massachusetts (including passing state licensure
examinations), are eligible for institutional endorsement for that license in
Massachusetts. Undergraduate state-approved and nationally recognized (accredited)
teacher preparation programs offered at Wheelock lead to institutional endorsement for
the Massachusetts Initial Teacher License in three areas:
Early Childhood: Teacher of Students With and Without Disabilities (PreK-2)
Elementary Teacher (Grades 1-6)
Teacher of Students with Moderate Disabilities (PreK-8)
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Once a teacher is employed in a position that requires the Initial License, the license is
activated and valid for employment in Massachusetts for up to five consecutive years.
Within five years after the license is activated, it must be advanced to a Professional
level. The Professional license can be renewed every 5 years indefinitely. Requirements
for Professional Licensure include three years of teaching in the field and age/grade
level of the Initial License after being eligible for that license; mentoring in the first year
of teaching with the license; 50 hours of supervised experience beyond the first year of
mentoring; and a masters degree that meets state requirements for the advancement of
a specific license. A masters degree in any area qualifies for licensure advancement if
augmented by a 12-credit advanced course cluster approved by the MA Department
of Elementary and Secondary Education for a specific licensure area. Wheelock offers
state approved masters program in Reading, and approved 12-credit clusters to advance
initial licenses in Early Childhood, Elementary, ESL/ELL, and Moderate Disabilities
(see page 120 for more information).
Wheelock graduates of baccalaureate and post-baccalaureate Early Childhood programs
can use courses and supervised practica from their programs to apply for lead teacher and
director credentials issued by the Department of Early Education and Care.
The Massachusetts Department of Early Education and Care (DEEC) has established
prerequisite educational and job experience requirements for individuals working in child
care centers, nursery schools and private kindergartens. The DEEC credential indicates
that an individual meets these criteria and, therefore, is eligible to be employed in specific
roles within child care settings. Wheelock College has individual courses and programs
that meet the requirements for the DEEC credentials required for the following positions:
Teacher:
Must be at least 18 years of age or have a high school diploma or equivalent AND
have 3 credits or 4 CEU credits in Child Development (birth to 8 years of age) and 9
months of supervised work experience or one practicum with children under 7 years
of age, three months of which must be with infants or toddlers for Infant/Toddler
Teacher, and with preschoolers for Preschool Teacher.
UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS
EARLY CHILDHOOD CREDENTIAL REQUIREMENTS/MASSACHUSETTS
DEPARTMENT OF EARLY EDUCATION AND CARE (DEEC)
Infant/Toddler Lead Teacher:
B.S. or B.A. or advanced degree in ECE or related field of study; 12 credits or
equivalent CEUs in early childhood or a related field of which 3 credits or equivalent
CEUs must be in either curriculum, program planning or classroom management,
and 3 credits or equivalent CEUs must be in a course in child development (birth to
8 years) and 3 credits or equivalent CEUs must be in a course related to the care of
infants and toddlers; and 18 months of super-vised work experience with children
under 7 years of age, six months of which must be with infants and toddlers.
Preschool Lead Teacher:
B.S. or B.A. or advanced degree in ECE; PreK-2 licensure from the Massachusetts
Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (DESE), or in a related field of
study; 12 credits in early childhood or a related field of which 3 credits or equivalent
CEUs must be either curriculum, program planning or classroom management, and 3
credits or equivalent CEUs must be in a course in child development (birth to 8 years);
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and 18 months of supervised work experience with children under 7 years of age, six
months of which must be with preschoolers.
Director:
Must meet the requirements of lead teacher; have 6 months of work experience after
meeting lead teacher qualifications; and must have at least 6 additional credits or
equivalent CEU credits in courses covering either day care administration, business or
management.
UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS
DEFINITION OF A PRACTICUM FOR EEC CREDENTIAL
Completion of 150 hours, over an 8-week period, of direct work with infants/toddlers
or preschoolers, supervised by personnel from an institution of higher learning, with at
least three site visits, and placement with at least a Lead Teacher qualified staff member.
One practicum may substitute for 9 months of work experience. The practicum must
be verified on the Verification of Work Experience form and listed on a transcript.
Verification may be from the placement or the institution of higher learning.
For more information about credentials for child care providers and center directors
certification, or to receive an updated listing of the current child care certification
requirements, see the Department for Early Education and Care web-site at www.eec.
state.ma.us or contact them at 51 Sleeper Street, 4th Floor, Boston, MA 02210. You
may also call the DEEC at (617) 988-6600; fax at (617) 988-2451; and TTY at (617)
988-2454.
SOCIAL WORK/SOCIAL WORKER LICENSURE: MASSACHUSETTS BOARD OF
REGISTRATION OF SOCIAL WORK
Social Work is a legally regulated profession in Massachusetts and in most states. The
nature of the regulation varies somewhat from state to state. The most common form,
as in Massachusetts, is licensure, although some states have certification. Technically,
what is usually regulated is practice under the title of “social worker.” Not all states have
all levels, and the terminology varies. Some states license only more advanced clinical
practice. In Massachusetts, the licensing levels are as follows:
• LSWA. Licensed Social Work Associate. Associate level (associate degree in human
service field or baccalaureate degree in any field).
• LSW. Licensed Social Worker. BSW-Basic level (baccalaureate degree in social
work plus passing LSW licensing exam).
• LCSW. Licensed Certified Social Worker. MSW-Intermediate level (masters degree
in social work plus passing LCSW licensing exam).
• LICSW. Licensed Independent Clinical Social Worker. Advanced level (masters
degree in social work plus two years of LICSW-supervised post-masters degree
practice experience plus passing advanced licensing exam). This is the level that is
most likely to be recognized by insurance companies as eligible for reimbursement
for professional services.
Students should always investigate the specific licensure regulations in the state in
which you intend to practice. Contact the National Association of Social Workers at
www.socialworkers.org or the Association of Social Work Boards at 1-800-225-6880 or
www.aswb.org.
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WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
MASSACHUSETTS LICENSING REGULATIONS FOR SOCIAL WORK
To practice social work, persons must be licensed in the state of Massachusetts. In
addition, all others who have the title “social worker,” or who refer to themselves as
practicing social work, must be licensed unless they are county, state, or municipal
employees. Practicing social work without a license is punishable by fine and/or
imprisonment, as is performing functions reserved for a higher licensing level. For
more information on these licensing requirements, please visit www.naswma.org.
MTEL POLICY AT WHEELOCK COLLEGE
According to Massachusetts law and regulations, to obtain an Initial License to teach in
Massachusetts public schools, candidates must complete a state approved program of
study and pass the Massachusetts Tests for Educator Licensure (MTEL). The tests are
license-specific and the purpose of these exams is to ensure that each licensed educator
has the knowledge and skills essential to teach effectively in Massachusetts public schools.
Students in a graduate educator licensure-only program not leading to a masters degree
are required to pass all required MTEL exams prior to entrance into the program with
one exception. A passing score on the Foundations of Reading exam is required prior to
entering the capstone course.
MTEL TEST PREPARATION RESOURCES
The College has developed an extensive system of review sessions and support courses
specifically for MTEL preparation support. A sequence of courses, including writing
courses, is identified that should enhance students’ ability to perform well on the exams
if additional content knowledge is needed, in addition to test taking preparation or
general content review. Wheelock students have an obligation to work with faculty
members and advisors to develop an MTEL preparation plan and to fully utilize the
College’s re-sources. Additional information about the MTEL and Wheelock’s support
system is found on the College website at www.wheelock.edu. Wheelock MTEL
preparation support is also available to the public on a fee basis.
UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS
Students entering a post-baccalaureate or masters program leading to a Massachusetts
teacher license must pass the Communication and Literacy Skills exam and the
appropriate subject exam(s) prior to entering their capstone or portfolio course as
designated by their program. It is recommended that students take the MTEL as
ad-vised, and as early as possible in their program. For graduate students, only the
Foundations of Reading Test should be delayed until related course work is completed.
2009-2010 PROGRAM COMPLETER INFORMATION
The following table summarizes the MTEL pass rates for the pro-gram completers
in academic year 2009-2010 as reported in the 2011 Annual Institutional Report.
Program completers are defined as individuals who have completed all the requirements
of a state-approved teacher preparation program.
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PASS RATES:
UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS
Basic Skills: Communication and Literacy
Reading 100%
Writing 100%
Aggregate 100%
Academic Content Areas
Early Childhood
100%
Foundations of Reading 100%
General Curriculum
100%
Aggregate 100%
Teaching Special Populations
Aggregate 100%
Summary Pass Rate*
100%
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* The Summary Pass Rate represents the percent of program completers who have
passed every portion of the test they have at-tempted. Students may take each section
of the test as many times as necessary to obtain a passing score.
The faculty and administration of Wheelock College are committed to preparing
exemplary classroom teachers. Wheelock allows students (depending on their
individual program requirements) to enter education degree programs without having
first passed the MTEL, but all candidates must pass the required examinations by
specific points within their preparation programs, as articulated in the institutional
MTEL policy in place since fall 2001 for under-graduate programs and since fall 2002
for graduate programs. Wheelock faculties believe that successful passage of the test
is only one measure of a potentially successful teacher. The course-work students will
complete and the test support system the College has in place are designed to help
students achieve their goals. While a student’s success on the MTEL is only one part of
becoming a classroom teacher, it is an important and necessary part, and the College
supports students in numerous ways to help them be successful.
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
DEPARTMENTS AND UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS
DEPARTMENT OF AMERICAN STUDIES
Gail Dines, Chair and Professor
Susan Owusu, Instructor and Coordinator of the Communications Major
Joyce Hope Scott, Associate Professor
Eric Silverman, Associate Professor
Available Programs of Study:
B.A., American Studies
B.A., Communication and Media Literacy
B.A./AMERICAN STUDIES MAJOR WITH A PROFESSIONAL MAJOR /36-40 CREDITS
• Students develop an individualized focus that allows for a flexible program of
study. Suggested areas of focus include; Popular Culture and Representation, Race
and Ethnic Studies, and Women’s Studies.
• An arts and sciences major that may be combined with a professional major in
Juvenile Justice and Youth Advocacy, Early Childhood Education, Elementary
Education, Special Education, or Social Work
• American Studies is also available as a minor.
• You may choose American Studies for your undergraduate major as part of
Wheelock’s five-year dual degree program leading to a master’s in Child Life.
Course Requirements36 credit option
AST 160
American Identities
4 credits
HDS 106
Sociology of Minority Groups
4 credits
UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS
The American Studies major is an interdisciplinary program that permits students to
combine interests in sociology, history, literature, political science, art and psychology.
American Studies, with its focus on the ways historically oppressed groups have fought
for social justice and helped shape American Society, offers students a multicultural
lens that complements professional preparation for the fields of teaching, social work,
juvenile justice and youth advocacy, and child life.
Select One*4 credits
AST 150
Introduction to American Government
AST 256
Gender and Politics
HIS 165
America Through the Civil War
HIS 167
America Since the Civil War
HIS 245
Women in America
LIT 215
Survey of American Literature
LIT 245
Native American Literature
LIT 246
African-American Literature
PHL 230
American Philosophy
Select one* (Intermediate courses)4 credits
AST 215
Political and Social Change in America
AST 220
Coming to America
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WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
AST 257
Race in America
AST 258
Religion in America
*Courses used to meet this requirement may not be counted toward the individualized
focus area.
UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS
Select One (Advanced courses)4 credits
AST 285
Children and Families in American Society
AST 403
Senior Seminar in American Studies
AST 410
Internship in American Studies
Or, an advanced course at one of the Colleges of the Fenway (to be decided with an
advisor)
64
Individualized focus area16 Credits
Select One (Introductory Courses)
4 credits
AST 140
Media and Race in American Society
AST/HDA 225 Boys and Men in America
HDS 103
Women, Culture and Society
HDS 105
Sociology of the Media
HIS 165
America Through the Civil War
HIS 167
America Since the Civil War
HIS 215
Africa and Its Global Encounters
LIT 180
Film and Fiction
MUS 130
American Popular Music
Select at least one (Intermediate Courses)4-8 credits
AST 215
Political and Social Change in America
AST 220
Coming to America
AST 256
Gender and Politics
AST 257
Race in America
AST/HDA
258 Religion in America
COM 255
Media Literacy for Children and Youth
AST 265
Studies in American Popular Culture
AST 290
History, Culture and Spirituality of West Africa
HDP 282
Children and the Media
HIS 245
Women in America
HIS 269
The Sixties
LIT 215
Survey of American Literature
LIT 225
African Literature
LIT 226
Literature and History of the Caribbean
LIT 230
African-American Women Writers
LIT 245
Native-American Literature
LIT 246
African American Literature
MUS 230
African-American Music
MUS 240
World Music Traditions
PHL 205
Philosophies of Social Justice
PHL 230
American Philosophy
PHL 240
Great Ages and Ideas of the Jewish People
THE 238
African-American Theatre
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
VIS 265
Women, Art and Society
Select at least one (Advanced Courses)4-8 credits
AST 285
Children and Families in American Society
AST 365
Studies in American Popular Culture
COM 440
Media as a Tool for Social Change
HDS 32
Feminist Theories
HIS 402
Advanced Studies in History
LIT 388
Advanced Studies in the Novel
THE 305
African and Caribbean Theatre
AMERICAN STUDIES MAJOR WITHOUT PROFESSIONAL MAJOR /40 CREDITS
Students opting to major in American Studies without a second major should follow
the requirements for the 36-credit major as listed above and add the following, for a
total of 40 credits:
Sample Course Sequence for the American Studies–40 credit major
FIRST YEAR AST 160
American Identities 4 credits
HDS 106
Sociology of Minority Groups
4 credits
Successful completion of the WLCE
SECOND YEAR
AST 258
Religion in America
4 credits
PHL 230
American Philosophy
4 credits
JUNIOR YEAR
2 courses in focus area
8 credits
*If completing the 40 credit major, take one additional required course
4 credits
SENIOR YEAR
2 courses in focus area (8 cr.)
AST 403Senior Seminar in American Studies 4 credits
COMMUNICATIONS MAJOR/ B.A. DEGREE/36-48 CREDITS
The Communications major combines a foundation in the Arts and Sciences with
a theoretical and practical framework for under-standing communications, media
development, and production. Students learn theories of how media shapes society
and a set of skills for creating and implementing media literacy programs for
children, youth and adults. This major offers students a unique perspective on how
to communicate in both traditional and digital contexts. Students learn to critically
analyze, craft, and deliver in-formation using a variety of media—print, TV, radio, and
the web. Students will then build on this foundation through one of two focus areas.
UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS
Select One:
An additional advanced course in American Studies
An internship if not already completed as an advanced course
An advanced course in either the Humanities or Art History
STUDENTS CHOSE FROM ONE OF TWO FOCUS AREAS:
• The Media Literacy focus is for students interested in careers working with
children and families, where it will useful to educate youth to be media-literate.
• The Production focus is for students who aspire to a communications career
requiring strong hands-on skills in content development and production for print,
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WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
video, and digital media. Offers internships for practical experience and access to
the job market.
COMMUNICATIONS MAJOR WITH A PROFESSIONAL MAJOR/36 CREDITS
Course Requirements: 20 Credits
Introductory 12 credits
COM 150 Communication, Persuasion & Propaganda 4 credits
COM 101
Introduction to Media Production
4 credits
UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS
Choose One4 credits
HDS 105
Sociology of Media
AST 140
Media and Race in American Society
HDP 282
Children and the Media
Media Literacy (Choose One)*
COM 255
Media Literacy for Children and Youth
COM [new] Global Perspectives in Media Literacy
4 credits
Advanced (Choose One)*4 credits
AST 403
American Studies Senior Seminar
*Courses used to meet this requirement may not be counted towards other major requirements.
FOCUS AREAS/16 CREDITS
The Media Literacy focus (16 credits) is designed to be combined with one of the
professional majors. This focus is for students interested in careers in professions such
as schools, libraries, and non-profits. Students choosing this focus will:
• Be theoretically grounded and digitally literate.
• Have courses that provide both the theoretical basis and the practical expertise for
developing media education/literacy pro-grams for children and youth.
• Be provided with an intellectually critical view of the world that complements
professional preparation for the fields of teaching, social work, juvenile justice and
youth advocacy, and child life.
The focus is also recommended for students interested in pursuing a graduate degree in
related areas.
Introductory Courses (Choose one) 4 credits
COM 255
Media Literacy for Children and Youth
4 credits
COM [new] Global Perspectives in Media Literacy
4 credits
HDS 105
Sociology of the Media
4 credits
LIT 180
Film and Fiction
4 credits
AST 140
Media and Race in American Society
4 credits
THE 123
Public Speaking4 credits
Intermediate Courses (Choose one)
MUS 279
Music for Children
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4 credits
4 credits
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
THE 277
VIS 278
HDP 222
HDP [new]
HDP 282
COM 210
COM 222
Movement and Drama for Children
Art for Children
Languages and Culture
Global Perspectives in Media Literacy
Children and the Media
Video Production I
Designing the Digital Image
4 credits
4 credits
4 credits
4 credits
4 credits
4 credits
4 credits
COMMUNICATIONS MAJOR WITHOUT A PROFESSIONAL MAJOR—48 CREDITS
Students must complete the 20 credits of core requirements listed above for the 36
credit major and the 28 credit Media Production Focus.
MEDIA PRODUCTION FOCUS (28 CREDITS)
The Media Production focus designed for students without one of the professional
majors, opting to pursue careers requiring strong hands-on skills in content
development and production for print, video, and digital media. This focus offers
internships for practical experience and access to the job market and delivers a strong
foundation in industry-standard software. Students choosing this focus will:
• Gain hands-on experience in a range of traditional and alternative media including
production, graphic design, video production, animation, and motion graphic.
• Gain the skills necessary to create various forms of communications, including
print, video, and digital and electronic applications.
• Complete an internship, gaining professional experience and mentoring.
UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS
Advanced Courses (Choose two )
8 credits
HDP 362
The Meaning and Development of Play
4 credits
RDG 558
Multicultural Children’s Literature
4 credits
THE 374
Children’s Theater4 credits
COM [new] Media, Violence and Sexualization
4 credits
AST 265
Advanced Studies in Pop Culture
4 credits
COM 410
Video Production II
4 credits
COM [new] Animation and Motion Graphics
4 credits
COM 440
Media as a Tool for Social Change
4 credits
COM [new] Internship
Choose 7 4 credits each
COM 222
Designing the Digital Image
COM 210
Video Production 1
COM [new] Writing for Media
COM [new] New Media Production I
COM [new] Animation and Motion Graphics
COM 410
Video Production 11
COM [new] Storytelling for the Digital Age
COM [new] New Media Production 11
COM [new] Internship
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WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
SUGGESTED COURSE SEQUENCE- 36 CREDIT WITH PROFESSIONAL MAJOR
FIRST YEAR
COM 150
Communication, Persuasion and Propaganda
SECOND YEAR
COM 101
Introduction to Media Production
AST 140
Media and Race in American Society
JUNIOR YEAR
HDP 282
Children and the Media
COM 255
Media Literacy for Children and Youth
COM 224
Designing the Digital Image
AST 403
Senior Seminar in American Studies
SENIOR YEAR
COM 440
Media as a Tool for Social Change
COM [new]
Internship
UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS
SUGGESTED COURSE SEQUENCE-48 CREDIT WITHOUT PROFESSIONAL MAJOR
FIRST YEAR
COM 150
Communication, Persuasion and
Propaganda
SECOND YEAR
COM 101
Introduction to Media Production
AST 140
Media and Race in American Society
COM 210
Video Production I
COM [new]
Global Perspectives in Media Literacy
JUNIOR YEAR
COM 224
Designing the Digital Image
COM 410
Video Production II
COM [new]
Writing for Media
COM [new]
Animation and Motion Graphics
SENIOR YEAR
COM 440
Media as a Tool for Social Change
COM [new]
Internship
DEPARTMENT OF ARTS
Marjorie Hall, Chair and Associate Professor
Marianne Adams, Instructor
Leland Clarke, Associate Professor
Gregory Gomez, Associate Professor
Susan Kosoff, Professor and Director, Wheelock Family Theatre
Erica Licea-Kane, Instructor and Coordinator, Towne Art Gallery
Jane Staab, Instructor
AVAILABLE PROGRAMS OF STUDY:
B.A., Arts-Performing
B.A., Arts-Visual
Minors, Community Arts, Music, Theatre, Visual Art
(Studio), Art History
ARTS MAJOR/B.A. DEGREE/36-48 CREDITS
The Arts major offers programs in the Performing Arts (Music, Theatre, and Dance)
and the Visual Arts (Studio and Art History). Students participate in the creative
process, acquire theoretical tools for evaluating their own and others’ work, and study
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WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
the history and literature of their chosen discipline. The Towne Art Gallery and the
Wheelock Family Theater offer a variety of on-campus Arts programming, and provide
opportunities for student involvement at many levels.
The Arts major, in addition to supporting the interests of individual students, the
major complements professional preparation in teaching, juvenile justice and youth
advocacy, Social Work, and child life. The arts have always provided people with a
means of communicating ideas and reflecting on human experience. Students who
have explored and developed their own creative processes are in an excellent position to
nurture creative potential in the children with whom they work. Skills in performance
and studio art can be a vital tool for practitioners in learning and therapeutic
environments. Knowledge gained in studying the history and literature of the arts can
have a direct impact on the richness of curriculum offered in the early childhood and
elementary grades.
Visual Arts Focus
VIS 125 Introduction to Design VIS 130 Drawing One Art History course AMT 254 Aesthetics Three studio art electives Two advanced studio art courses* ^
AMT 449
Arts Major Portfolio
4 credits
4 credits
4 credits
4 credits
12 credits
8 credits
0 Credits
UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS
Course Requirements: Arts Major with Professional Major
36 credits
Performing Arts Focus
One introductory level course (100 level) in music, theatre, or dance 4 credits
Two history or literature courses, one from each of two different
art forms 8 credits
2 electives in music, theatre, or dance 8 credits
THE 277 Movement and Drama for Children 4 credits
or
MUS 279
Music for Children
AMT 254 Aesthetics 4 credits
Two advanced courses in music, theatre, or dance* ^ 8 credits
AMT 449
Arts Major Portfolio
0 Credits
* Only one independent study can be applied to the advanced course requirement.
^AMT 412 Internship in the Arts (4 credits), a 150-hour placement in an arts
organization, may be substituted for one of the advanced courses, or may be taken in
addition to the 36 credit major.
ARTS MAJOR WITHOUT PROFESSIONAL MAJOR/48 CREDITS
Students opting to major in the Arts without a second major should follow the
requirements for the 36-credit major as listed above and add the following, for a total
of 48 credits:*
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WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
One art elective
One additional course in the focus
One additional advanced course in the focus
*48-credit majors must include AMT 412: Internship in the Arts as one of the
advanced focus courses.
UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS
SUGGESTED COURSE SEQUENCE–VISUAL ARTS 36-CREDIT MAJOR
FIRST YEAR
SECOND YEAR
JUNIOR YEAR
SENIOR YEAR
VIS 125 Introduction to Design
VIS 130 Drawing
Successful completion of the WLCE
VIS – Studio Selective
VIS – Art History Selective
VIS – Studio Selective
AMT 254 Aesthetics
VIS – Studio Selective
VIS – Advanced Studio
Semester for full-time practicum (if paired with a professional major)
VIS – Advanced Studio
AMT 449 Arts Major Portfolio
SUGGESTED COURSE SEQUENCE–PERFORMING ARTS 36-CREDIT MAJOR
FIRST YEAR
SECOND YEAR
JUNIOR YEAR
SENIOR YEAR
THE or MUS 126
THE or MUS Selective
Successful completion of the WLCE
THE – Dramatic Literature MUS – Music History Selective
THE or MUS – Selective
AMT 254 Aesthetics
THE or MUS – Advanced
THE 277 Movement and Drama for |
Children or MUS 279 Music for Children
Semester for full-time practicum (if paired with a professional major)
THE or MUS – Advanced
AMT 449 Arts Major Portfolio
DEPARTMENT OF CHILD LIFE AND FAMILY STUDIES
Paul Thayer, Chair and Associate Professor
Dinny Coleman, Instructor
Suzanne Graca, Instructor
Carolyn Kurker-Gallagher, Instructor
Stefi Rubin, Associate Professor
Claire White, Assistant Professor
Available Programs of Study:
Certificate, Community Based Human Services
Minor, Child Health
Dual Degree Program, BA/BS and Master of Science, Child Life and Family Centered Care
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WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
CERTIFICATE PROGRAM IN COMMUNITY-BASED HUMAN SERVICES/16 CREDITS
The Certificate Program in Community-Based Human Services is a 16-credit program
designed for juniors or seniors who plan to complete an Arts and Science major without
a professional major or for students with a professional major, in consultation with
their advisor. The program allows students to explore new professional directions that
might lead to employment after graduation or to continued studies in graduate school.
It consists of an Introductory course (CFS 340 Introduction to Community-Based
Human Services), a practicum and seminar in human services (CFP 420 Practicum and
Seminar in Human Services), and an additional 8 credits of selective courses. Courses
used as selectives for this program may not count toward other degree requirements.
Course Requirements
CFS 340 Introduction to Human Services (fall only)
4 credits
CFP 420
Practicum and Seminar in Human Services (spring only) 4 credits
UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS
Selective courses8 credits
JJA 201
Intro to Juvenile Justice and Delinquency/4 cr
HDP 214
Violence in the Lives of Children and Families/4 cr
HDP 221
Family Theories /4 cr
HDP 223
Abnormal Psychology/4 cr
HDP 290
Children with Special Needs/4 cr
HDP 301
Counseling Psychology/4 cr
HDP 366
Adolescent Development/4 cr
HDP 379
Emotional Problems of Children/2 cr
HDP 380
Seminar in Emotional Problems of Children/2 cr
HDS 101
Introduction to Sociology/4 cr
HDS 106
Sociology of Minority Groups /4 cr
HDS 343
On Being Different: Sociological Perspectives/4 cr
PRO 275
AIDS and Addiction/2 cr
PRO 314
Child Neglect and Abuse /2 cr
PRO 342
Child Welfare /2 cr
PRO 344
Crisis Intervention/4 cr
SWK 345
Human Behavior and Social Environment/4 cr
MINOR IN CHILD HEALTH/16 CREDITS
The Child Health Minor is a 16 credit minor that is open to all students, including
social work students interested in medical social work, and education students interested
in health education. The child health minor provides students with an understanding of
the healthcare needs and issues of children and their families. The child health minor is
required of students enrolled in the dual degree child life program.
Course Requirements
CLF 210
Child and Family Health Systems
CLF 255
Children with Special Healthcare Needs (pre-requisite CLF 210)
CLF XXX
Family Centered Healthcare 4 credits
4 credits
4 credits
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WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
Child Health Selective (Choose one) HDS 225
Cross-cultural Perspectives on Health and Illness
HDP XXX
Health Psychology CFS 240
Helping Children Cope with Grief and Loss
4 credits
4 credits
4 credits
4 credits
DUAL DEGREE PROGRAM/CHILD LIFE SPECIALIST/78 CREDITS
UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS
The Child Life dual degree program combines a BS or BA degree in the Arts and
Sciences, a child health minor, and a Master of Science degree in Child Life and
Family-Centered Care. The Child Life program prepares child life specialists to work in
inpatient, outpatient and community-based health care settings. Through the use of play
and other forms of communication, the child life specialist functions as a member of
the professional health care team to help reduce the stress of hospitalization, illness and
health care procedures. Sensitivity to the emotional and developmental needs of children
and families of diverse backgrounds is stressed as an important concern of this field.
General Requirements
• Must be a current Wheelock student
• After meeting with the Coordinator of the Undergraduate Child Life program,
students apply* during the spring semester of their sophomore year for admission
to the program.
• Students are eligible to apply to enter the program after successful completion
of both semesters of Human Growth and Development (HDP 120/121 and
122/123 or HDP 125/127) ) with a grade of B- or better, successful completion
of the Child and Family Health course (CLF 210) with a grade of B- or better,
successful completion of all sections of the WLCE, and a minimum GPA of 2.67.
*Entry into the child life program is competitive and is by application only. Acceptance
into the college does not guarantee admission into the child life program. Students
in the dual degree pro-gram must complete 134 undergraduate credits required for
graduation from the college, including 16 credits to complete the child health minor,
and an additional 30 graduate credits for completion of the MS degree.
**Students may be able to complete the program in only five years, but may elect to
finish the program in six years. Students should work carefully with their advisor to
plan a course of study that best meets their needs.
*** Minimum GPA—Students in the dual-degree program must maintain a minimum
cumulative GPA of 2.67 (B-).
Undergraduate Course Requirements
Support Courses (20 credits)
LSC 153
Human Biology or
LSC 302
Human Diseases
MAT 120
Quantitative Reasoning
MAT 170
Statistics for Behavioral Sciences
HDP 362
Meaning & Development of Play
4 credits
4 credits
4 credits
4 credits
Research Selective4 credits
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WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
Minor in Child Health (16 credits)
CLF 210
Child and Family Health Systems
CLF 255
Children with Special Healthcare Needs (pre-requisite CLF 210)
CLF XXX
Family Centered Healthcare 4 credits
4 credits
4 credits
Child Health Selective (choose one) 4 credits
HDS 225
Cross-cultural Perspectives on Health and Illness
4 credits
HDP XXX
Health Psychology4 credits
CFS 240
Helping Children Cope with Grief and Loss
Professional Courses8 credits
CLF 350
Role of the Child Life Specialist
4 credits
CLF 421
Child Life Methods and Materials
4 credits
EDU 331
Multicultural Picture Books 2 credits
EDU 332
Multicultural Chapter Books 2 credits
CFS 240
Helping Children Cope with Grief and Loss 4 credits
CLF 355
Hospitalized Child in England 4 credits
HDP 371 Humor and Child Development 4 credits
PRO 417
Welcoming LGBT Families in Education & Human Services 4 credits
MASTER OF SCIENCE IN CHILD LIFE AND FAMILY CENTERED CARE/30
GRADUATE CREDITS
Required graduate coursework
CLF 670
Clinical Issues in Child Life3 credits
CLF 770
Child Life Program Development and Administration 3 credits
UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS
Selectives 4 credits
The selective requirement may be fulfilled by completing any course in Human
Development (HD), Child and Family Studies (CFS) or Professional Studies (PRO),
including the following suggested courses, provided the course has not been used to
fulfill any other requirement.
Research selective
3 credits
Human Development Selectives (choose two) 6 credits
HDF 501
Lifespan Development I: Birth-Adolescence
3 credits
HDF 502
Infant and Toddler Behavior and Development 3 credits
HDF 521
Children’s Cognitive Development
3 credits
HDF 560
Risk and Resiliency in Infancy
3 credits
Multicultural selective (choose one)3 credits
CFS 632
Cross Cultural Perspectives on Grief
3 credits
PRO 517
Welcoming LGBT Families in Education & Human Services 3 credits
CFS 608
Multicultural Perspectives on Family 3 credits
Professional Internship Courses 9 credits
73
UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
74
CLP 671
Child Life Internship/Seminar I
6 credits
CLP 673
Clinical Experience & Seminar II: Child Health & Development
3 credits
Graduate Selective (choose one)3 credits
CFS 504
Assessment of Development in B-3/3 cr
CFS 514
Curriculum Development B-3/3 cr
CFS 606
Family Support: Children with Special Needs/3 cr
CFS 614
Perspectives on Parenting/3 cr
CFS 617
Bereavement Care/3 cr
CFS 618
Contemporary Issues in Child and Family Stud-ies/3 cr
CFS 622
Issues in Death and Dying/3 cr
CFS 630
Helping Children Cope with Stress/3 cr
CFS 634
Families and Chronic Illness /3 cr
EDU 531
Learning & Teaching Through the Arts/3 cr
CLF 674
The Hospitalized Child in England/ 3 cr
CFS 737
Working with Parents/3 cr
SWK 670
Spirituality of Children & Families/3 cr
Suggested Course Sequence
FIRST YEAR HDP 120/121 and 122/123 Human Growth and Development
8 credits
LSC 153
Human Biology 4 credits
MAT 120
Quantitative Reasoning 4 credits
SECOND YEAR
Fall Semester
CLF 210
Child and Family Health Systems Research Selective 4 credits
MAT 170 Statistics for Behavioral Sciences 4 credits
Spring Semester
CLF 255 Children with Special Healthcare Needs 4 credits
Apply for acceptance into 5-yr program
JUNIOR YEAR
Fall Semester
CLF XXX
Family Centered Healthcare
HDP 362
Meaning of Development and Play
Spring Semester
Child Health Selective 4 credits
Research Selective4 credits
SENIOR YEAR
Fall Semester
CLF 350
Role of the Child Life Specialist 4 credits
Spring Semester
CLF 421
Child Life Methods and Materials
Summer Semester
CLF 355
The Hospitalized Child in England 4 credits
FIFTH YEAR
CLF 670
Clinical Issues in Child Life
3 credits
CLP 671
Child Life Internship/Seminar I
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
CLF 770
CLP 673
Child Life Program Development Clinical Experience & Seminar II:
Child Health & Development 3 credits
3 credits
DEPARTMENT OF EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION
AVAILABLE PROGRAM OF STUDY
Major in Early Childhood Education with a specialty in one of the following:
Preschool-Grade 2 Specialist: Inclusive Classroom Teacher
Birth-5 Specialist, Preschool-Kindergarten Focus
Birth-5 Specialist, Infant/Toddler Focus
All students in Early Childhood Education must also have a Liberal Arts/Sciences
Major leading to a BS or BA in that Major.
MAJOR IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION. PRESCHOOL-GRADE 2
SPECIALIST: INCLUSIVE CLASSROOM TEACHER (44 CREDITS)
The Inclusive Classroom Teacher specialty focuses on comprehensive education
and care of children birth to 8-years old and professional work with their families
and communities, with focus on preprimary and primary grades (through grade
2). Emphasis is placed on responding to the developmental, cultural and racial
uniqueness of each child as students learn to design, implement and evaluate
learning environments and curricular activities. Completion of this degree leads to
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Early Childhood Teacher of
Students with and without Disabilities, Pre K-2 licensure (with MTEL passage) and/
or the Massachusetts Department of Early Education and Care (DEEC) Certification.
For information on teacher licensure, please refer to the Professional Certification and
Licensure section of this catalog on page 14.
UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS
David Fernie, Chair and Professor
Cheryl Render Brown, Associate Professor
Catherine Donahue, Associate Professor
Ellie Friedland, Associate Professor
Lucinda Heimer, Assistant Professor
Patricia Hnatiuk, Instructor
Debby Keefe, Instructor
Diane Levin, Professor
Amy Phillips Losso, Associate Professor
Karen Murphy, Associate Professor
Bobbi Rosenquest, Associate Professor
Susan Shainker, Instructor
Susan Zoll, Instructor
Required Support Courses* 16 credits
MAT 130/131 or 140/141 Concepts and Processes 8 credits
HDP 120/121 and 122/123 or HDP 124/125 and 126/127
Human Growth and Development 8 credits
75
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS
*These support courses may also apply to requirements for General Education or for
the student’s Liberal Arts & Sciences Major.
Course Requirements
EDU 201 Orientation to Education Programs EDU 250 Supporting Young Children with Special Needs
EDU 255 Racial and Cultural Identities (Fulfills General
Education Ethics/Social Justice requirement) EDU 305 Principles of Inclusive Early Childhood Education
in a Diverse Society
EDU 320 Mathematics for Young Children
EDU 327 Teaching Reading to Young Children EDU 367
Foundations of Communication and Collaboration
with Families, Professionals and Communities
EDU 464 Seminar Policy Advocacy and Leadership ECE
EDU 465** Capstone: Early Education Initial L or
EDU 462
Capstone: Inclusive classroom teacher non-licensure 0 credits
2 credits
4 credits
4 credits
4 credits
4 credits
2 credits
1 credit
1 credit
1 credit
Integrated Practicum I*12 credits
EDP 436 Teaching and Learning in the Primary Grades 4 credits
EDP 437 Early Childhood Practicum & Seminar Gr. 1 & 2 6 credits
EDU 328 Reading, Writing, and Understanding 2 credits
EDU 341 Assessment of Young Children with or without
special needs (B-8)2 credits
Integrated Practicum II8 credits
EDP 457
Early Childhood Practicum and Seminar (B-6)
4 credits
EDP 456 Teaching and Collaboration in Diverse Early/
Childhood Settings (B-6)4 credits
Other Requirements
*Students seeking Massachusetts Licensure must pass the Communications and
Literacy Skills Tests of the MTEL prior to entering Integrated Practicum I.
** Students seeking Massachusetts Licensure must pass the Early Childhood Education
Subject Matter and the Foundations of Reading Tests of the MTEL prior to taking EDU 465.
Suggested Course Sequence–Preschool-Grade 2 Specialist: Inclusive Classroom Teacher
FIRST YEAR
MAT 130/131 or MAT 140/141 Concepts and Processes
8 credits
HDP 120/121 and 122/123 or HDP 124/125 and 126/127
Human Growth & Development I & II or Human Growth and
Development I & II intensive
8 credits
Successful completion of the WLCE
For students seeking Massachusetts Licensure: Successful completion of MTEL
Literacy & Communication Skills Test
SECOND YEAR
Semester 1
76
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
Optional 3rd practicum:
EDP 467
Kindergarten/Early Childhood Internship
(150-300 contact hours; 2-4 cr)
UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS
EDU 201
Orientation to Education Programs
0 credits
ACD 306
MTEL Preparation: For students seeking MA Licensure 0 credits
EDU 255
Racial and Cultural Identities 4 credits
Semester 2
EDU 305
Principles of Inclusive Early Childhood Education 4 credits
EDU 320
Mathematics for Young Children 4 credits
EDU 367
Foundations of Communication and Collaboration
with Families, Professionals and Communities
2 credits
JUNIOR YEAR
Semester 1
EDU 327
Teaching Reading to Young Children 4 credits
EDU 250
Supporting Young Children with Special Needs
2 credits
Semester 2
Integrated Practicum I
EDP 436
Teaching and Learning in the Primary Grades 4 credits
EDP 437
Early Childhood Practicum and Seminar Grades 1 or 2 6 credits
(for students seeking Massachusetts Licensure)
EDU 341
Assessment of Young Children with or without
Special Needs (B-8) 2 credits
EDU 328
Reading, Writing, and Understanding 2 credits
For Massachusetts Licensure: Successful completion of MTEL Foundations of
Reading Test and Early Childhood Education Subject Matter Test
SENIOR YEAR
Semester 1
Integrated Practicum II
EDP 457
Early Childhood Practicum and Seminar (B-6)
4 credits
EDP 456
Teaching & Collaboration in Diverse EC Settings (B-6) 4 credits
Semester 2
EDU 464
Seminar in Policy, Advocacy and Leadership in ECE 1 credit
EDU 465
Capstone – Early Education Initial Licensure
1 credit
Or
EDU 462 Capstone: Inclusive Classroom Teacher non-licensure 1 credit
MAJOR IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION: BIRTH-5
SPECIALIST, PRE-SCHOOL-KINDERGARTEN (44 CREDITS)
Birth-5 Specialist, Preschool-Kindergarten provides a variety of options for students
interested in working with children in early childhood care and education settings,
such as child care centers, museums, publishing firms and resource and referral
agencies. Students interested in teaching in private kindergarten, pre-school and early
care settings may use courses and experiences in this program as they apply to the
Massachusetts Department of Early Education and Care (DEEC) for Lead Teacher
credential. Students complete two practica with children birth to 5-years old. The full
time practicum is in a preschool or kindergarten setting. Students follow the same pre-
77
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
practicum preparation required for all Early Childhood Education majors.
Students must major in Human Development with a Developmental Psychology focus
as their Liberal Arts/Sciences Major.
UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS
Required Support Courses* 16 credits
MAT 130/131 or 140/141 Concepts and Processes
8 credits
HDP 120/121 and 122/123 or HDP 124/125 and 126/127
Human Growth and Development
8 credits
*These support courses may also apply to the General Education Requirements or
requirements for the Human Development Major with Developmental Psychology Focus.
78
Required Support Courses taken as part of the Human Development major with
Psychology focus. (8 credits, within the requirements for the Major).
HDP 227
Language Development
4 credits
HDP 362
Meaning and Development of Play 4 credits
Major Course Requirements:
EDU 201
Orientation to Education Programs 0 credits
EDU 250
Supporting Young Children with Special Needs
2 credits
EDU 255
Racial and Cultural Identities 4 credits
(Fulfills General Education Ethics/ Social justice requirement)
EDU 305
Principles of Inclusive ECE in a Diverse Society
4 credits
EDU 320
Mathematics for Young Children in a Diverse Society 4 credits
EDU 327
Teaching Reading to Young Children
4 credits
EDU 341 Assessment of Young Children w/ & without Special Needs 2 credits
EDP 367
Foundations in Communication and Collaboration 2 credits
EDU 420
Advancing Communication and Collaboration 2 credits
EDU 464
Seminar in Policy Advocacy and Leadership ECE
1 credit
EDU XXX
Capstone: Preschool-Kindergarten
1 credit
Integrated Practicum I10 credits
EDP XXX Early Childhood Practicum and Seminar I: Preschool-K 6 credits
EDP 456 Teaching & Collaboration in a Diverse EC Setting 4 credits
Integrated Practicum II8 credits
EDP XXX
EC Practicum & Seminar II : Infants/Toddlers
4 credits and
EDU XXX
Curriculum and Program Development for
Infants & Toddlers 4 credits
or
EDP 467
Kindergarten/Early Childhood Internship 4 credits and
EDU 427
Childcare Management and Administration 4 credits
or
EDP XXX
Part time Practicum: Specialization (Children’s Museum, WGBH
Children’s Programming, etc.) 4 credits and
Choice of selective course supporting this practicum 4 credits
(Requires permission of ECE Chair or ECE Advisor)
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
Optional course work EDP 467 Kindergarten/Early Childhood Internship (150- 300 hr)
2-4 credits
UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS
Suggested Course Sequence
FIRST YEAR MAT 130/131 or MAT 140/141 Concepts and Processes
8 credits
HDP 120/121 and 122/123 or 124/125 and 126/127
Human Growth & Development I & II
8 credits
Successful completion of the WLCE
SECOND YEAR
Semester 1
EDU 201
Orientation to Education Programs
0 credits
EDU 255
Racial and Cultural Identities
4 credits
HDP 227
Language Development 4 credits
Semester 2
EDU 305
Principles of Inclusive ECE in a Diverse Society 4 credits
EDU 250
Supporting Young Children with Special Needs
& Their Families 2 credits
EDU 320
Mathematics for Young Children in a Diverse Society
4 credits
JUNIOR YEAR
Semester 1
HDP 362
Meaning and Development of Play 4 credits
EDU 327
Teaching Reading to Young Children 4 credits
Semester 2
Integrated Practicum I
EDP XXX
Early Childhood Practicum and Seminar I:
Preschool-Kindergarten6 credits
EDP 456
Teaching and Collaboration in a Diverse
Early Childhood Setting 4 credits
EDU 341
Assessment of Young Children with or
without Special Needs (B-8) 2 credits
EDU 367
Foundations of Communication and
Collaboration with Families, Professionals
and Communities 2 credits
SENIOR YEAR
Semester 1
Integrated Practicum II
EDP XXX
Early Childhood Practicum & Seminar II:
Infants/ Toddlers 4 credits and
EDU XXX
Curriculum and Program Development for
Infants and Toddlers 4 credits
or
EDP 467
Kindergarten/Early Childhood Internship 4 credits and
EDU 427
Childcare Management and Administration 4 credits
or
EDP 465
Practicum: Specialization (Children’s Museum,
WGBH Children’s Programming, etc) 4 credits and
79
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
EDU 420
Semester 2
EDU 464
EDU XXX
Choice of selective course supporting practicum 4 credits**
Advancing Communication and Collaboration
with Families Professionals and Communities 2 credits
Seminar in Policy, Advocacy and Leadership in ECE 1 credit
Capstone Prek –K 1 credit
UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS
Optional 3rd practicum:
EDP 467
Kindergarten/Early Childhood Internship (150-300 contact hours; 2-4 cr)
**requires permission from ECE Advisor or Department Chair
MAJOR IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION:
BIRTH-5 SPECIALIST INFANT/TODDLER (44 CREDITS)
Birth-5 Specialist, Infant/Toddler provides a variety of options for students interested
in working with very young children in early child care, family day care, and other
ECE settings, such as museums, publishing firms, and resource and referral agencies.
Students interested in teaching in early care settings may use courses and experiences in
this program as they apply to the Massachusetts Department of Early Education and
Care (DEEC) for the Lead Teacher credential. Students complete two practica with
children birth to 5-years old. The full time practicum is in an infant/toddler setting.
Students follow the same pre-practicum preparation required for all Early Childhood
Care and Education majors.
Students are required to major in Human Development with a Developmental
Psychology focus as their Liberal Arts/Sciences Major.
Required Support Courses*16 credits
MAT 130/131 or 140/141 Concepts and Processes
8 credits
HDP 120/121 and 122/123 or HDP 124/125 and 126/127
Human Growth and Development
8 credits
* These support courses may also apply to the requirements for General Education or
for the Human Development Major with Developmental Psychology Focus.
Required Support Courses taken as part of the Human Development major with
Psychology focus. (12 credits within the credits required for the major)
HDP 257
Infant and Toddler Behavior & Development
4 credits
HDP 227
Language Development
4 credits
HDP 362
Meaning and Development of Play
4 credits
Major Course Requirements:
EDU 201
Orientation to Education Programs EDU 250 Supporting Young Children with Special Needs
EDU 255
Racial and Cultural Identities (Fulfills General Education Ethics/Social Justice requirement)
EDU 305
Principles of Inclusive ECE in a Diverse Society EDU 315
Quality Infant Toddler Programs
80
0 credits
2 credits
4 credits
4 credits
4 credits
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
EDU 367 EDU 420 EDU XXX
EDU 464
EDU XXX
Found. of Communication & Collaboration, I
Advancing Communication & Collaboration, I
Supporting Infants & Toddlers w Sp. Needs
Seminar Policy Advocacy and Leadership ECE
Capstone: Infant/Toddler
2 credits
2 credits
2 credits
1 credit
1 credit
Integrated Practicum I 16 credits
EDP XXX
EC Practicum and Seminar: Infants/ Toddlers
6 credits
EDP 390
Curriculum & Prog. Develop. for Inf. & Toddlers
4 credits
EDU 365
Supporting Families with Infants & Toddlers
4 credits
EDU 341
Assessment of Yng Children w/ & without Sp. Needs 2 credits
Optional course work: EDP 467 Kindergarten/Early Childhood Internship
(150- 300 hr) (2-4 credits)
Suggested Course Sequence
FIRST YEAR MAT 130/131 or MAT 140/141 Concepts and Processes 8 credits
HDP 120/121 and 122/123 or 124/125 and 126/127
Human Growth & Development I & II 8 credits
Successful completion of the WLCE
SECOND YEAR
Semester 1
EDU 201 Orientation to Education Programs
0 credits
EDU 255 Racial and Cultural Identities 4 credits
HDP 227 Language Development 4 credits
HDP 257
Infant and Toddler Behavior and Development 4 credits
Semester 2
EDU 315 Quality Infant Toddler Programs
4 credits
EDU 367 Foundations of Communication and Collaboration
with Families2 credits
EDU 250 Supporting Young Children with Special Needs
& Their Families2 credits
JUNIOR YEAR
Semester 1
EDU 420
Advancing Communication and Collaboration
with Families, II2 credits
HDP 364 Meaning and Development of Play 4 credits
UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS
Integrated Practicum II8 credits
EDP XXX
EC Practicum & Seminar (Infants & Toddlers)
4 credits and A selective course related to the second practi-cum
4 credits
or
EDP 456
Teaching and Collaboration in a Diverse Early
Childhood Setting 4 credits and
EDP 457
Early Childhood Practicum and Seminar
4 credits
or
EDP 467
Kindergarten/Early Childhood Internship
4 credits and
EDU 427
Child Care Management & Admin
4 credits
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UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
Semester 2
Integrated Practicum I
EDP XXX
Early Childhood Practicum and Seminar:
Infants/Toddlers6 credits
EDP 390
Curriculum and Program Development for
Infants and Toddlers4 credits
EDU 341
Assessment of Young Children with or without
Special Needs (B-8) 2 credits
SENIOR YEAR
Semester 1
Integrated Practicum II
EDP XXX
Part time Practicum and Seminar: Infants/Toddlers 4 credits and
A selective course related to the second practicum
4 credits
or
EDP 456
Teaching and Collaboration in a Diverse Early
Childhood Setting4 credits and
EDP 457
Early Childhood Practicum and Seminar
4 credits
or
EDP 467 Kindergarten/Early Childhood Internship
4 credits and
EDU 427: Child Care Management & Admin
4 credits
EDU 365
Supporting Families with Infants and Toddlers 4 credits
Semester 2
EDU 464
Seminar in Policy, Advocacy and Leadership in ECE 1 credit
EDU XXX
Capstone: Infant/Toddler
1 credit
Optional 3rd practicum:
EDP 467
Kindergarten/Early Childhood Internship
(150-300 contact hours; 2-4 cr)
DEPARTMENT OF ELEMENTARY EDUCATION
Donna McKibbens, Chair
Linda Banks-Santilli, Associate Professor
Joeritta de Almeida, Assistant Professor
Elaine Kohen, Instructor
Judith Richards, Instructor
Deborah Samuels-Peretz, Assistant Professor
William Thompson, Associate Professor
Jeff Winokur, Instructor
Karen Worth, Instructor
AVAILABLE PROGRAMS OF STUDY:
Elementary Education Major
Minor, Education
B.S OR B.A./ELEMENTARY EDUCATION / 40 CREDITS
The Elementary Education major prepares students to become teachers of elementary
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WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
school children (grades 1 to 6) in public and private schools, with a focus on urban
settings. Students study the foundations of elementary education, theories and methods
of teaching and assessing student learning in inclusive classrooms, and standards-based
curriculum development. Students study the arts and sciences disciplines including
human development, and they build content knowledge in the subject matter
they will be teaching. They develop a theoretical framework for understanding and
evaluating educational practice and work with children and their families in diverse
communities in a multicultural society. Students learn to design, implement, and assess
the effectiveness of curriculum and instruction in relation to the development and
academic achievement of all children. For information on teacher licensure, please refer
to the Professional Certification and Licensure section of this catalog on page 14.
Major Course Requirements18 credits
EDU 201
Orientation to Education Programs
0 credits
EDU 255
Racial and Cultural Identities
4 credits
EDU 306
Introduction to Elementary Teaching
4 credits
EDU 330
Elementary Mathematics
4 credits
EDU 337
Teaching Reading in Grades pre-K-8
4 credits
EDU 338
Teaching Nonfiction Literacy
(completed prior to or concurrent with the pre-practicum) 2 credits
Elementary Prepracticum Core8 credits
EDU 316
Elementary Curriculum Development 3 credits
EDP 317
Elementary Pre-practicum (minimum 100 hours)
1 credit
EDU 321
Elementary Science and Technology
2 credits
EDU 323
Elementary History & Social Sciences
2 credits
UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS
Required Support Courses*
(16-20 credits in addition to the 40 credits required for the major)
MAT 130/131/132 or MAT 140/141 Concepts and Processes 8-12 credits
AST 150
Introduction to American Government
4 credits
HIS 165
America through the Civil War or
4 credits
HIS 167
America since the Civil War
*These support courses may also apply to the General Education Requirements.
Elementary Practicum Core 12 credits
EDU 446
Elementary Teaching & Learning
4 credits
EDP 447
Elementary Practicum
6 credits
EDU 445
Meeting Diverse Learning Needs
2 credits
Completion of Major
EDU 487*
Capstone: Elementary Education
2 credits
*Passage of the Massachusetts Literacy and Communication (Reading and Writing
subtests), General Curriculum (Multiple subject and Math sub-tests), and Foundations
of Reading Tests for Educator Licensure required prerequisites.
Sample/Suggested Course Sequence-Elementary Education
FIRST YEAR MAT 130, MAT 131 Concepts and Processes I, II
8 credits
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UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
AST 150
Introduction to American Government
4 credits
HIS 167
America since the Civil War 4 credits
or
HIS 165
America through the Civil War
4 credits
Successful passing of WLCE and passing scores on the Communication and Literacy
Skill Reading or Writing Subtest (in spring or over the summer).
SECOND YEAR
EDU 201
Orientation to Education Program
0 credits
EDU 255
Racial and Cultural Identities
2 credits
EDU 306
Introduction to Elementary Teaching
4 credits
MAT 132
Concepts and Processes III
4 credits
Passing scores on the MTEL General Curriculum Subtests I and II (taken separately)
JUNIOR YEAR
EDU 330
Elementary Mathematics 4 credits
EDU 337
Teaching Reading in Grades pre-K-8
4 credits
EDU 338
Teaching Nonfiction Literacy
2 credits
(Not to be taken concurrently with EDU 337)
Elementary Prepracticum Core
EDU 316
ELE Curriculum Development
3 credits
EDP 317
Elementary Pre-practicum (100 hours)
1 credit
EDU 321
Elementary Science and Technology
2 credits
EDU 323
Elementary History & Social Sciences
2 credits
Complete remaining MTEL test requirements including passing score on the Foundations
or Reading Test (immediately following EDU 337 and EDU 338); and passing any other
MTEL exams that were not passed in the first and second year.
SENIOR YEAR
First Semester
EDU 446
Elementary Teaching & Learning
4 credits
EDP 447
Elementary Practicum
6 credits
EDU 445
Meeting Diverse Learning Needs
2 credits
Complete all required MTELS
Second Semester
EDU 485
Capstone: Elementary Education
2 credits
EDUCATION MINOR / 16 CREDITS
The Education minor is designed for students interested in exploring professional
options in education that are outside of the class-room, such as working in educational
publishing, creating educational software, or working in after school settings or other
out-of-school settings. The Education Minor is open to all interested students who do
not have an Education major. It can be combined with the Community-based Human
Service Certificate, the Juvenile Justice and Youth Advocacy major, the Social Work
major, the Child Life major or any of the Arts and Sciences majors. It provides an
education option for students with a Human Development major who are interested in
school psychology rather than working with children in the classroom. The Education
Minor does not lead to state licensure and it does not require passage of any sections of
the Massachusetts Tests for Educator Licensure.
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WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
Course Requirements
EDU 255
Racial and Cultural Identities
4 credits
Introductory Education Course (select one)4 credits
EDU 305
Principles of Inclusive Early Childhood Education 4 credits
EDU 306
Introduction to Elementary Education
4 credits
HDP 290
Children with Special Needs
4 credits
Reading Course (select one)4 credits
EDU 327
Teaching Reading to Young Children
4 credits
EDU 337
Teaching Reading in Grades pre-K-8
4 credits
Suggested Course Sequence–Education Minor16 credits
SECOND YEAREDU 2554 credits
Choose one, EDU 305, EDU 306 or HDP 290 4 credits
JUNIOR YEAR
EDU 327 or EDU 337
4 credits
SENIOR YEAR
Selective course or courses
4 credits total
UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS
Selective courses 4 credits
EDU 316/317 Elementary Curriculum Development/
Elementary Pre-practicum4 credits
EDU 320
Mathematics for Young Children
4 credits
EDU 321
Elementary Science and Technology
2 credits
EDU 323
Elementary History and Social Sciences
2 credits
EDU 330
Elementary Mathematics
4 credits
EDU 341
Assessing Young Children With and Without
Special Needs2 credits
EDU 332
Multicultural Picture Books
2 credits
EDU 333
Multicultural Chapter Books
2 credits
EDU 351
Teaching and Learning Science in the Early
Childhood Classroom2 credits
SPE 346
Assistive Technology2 credits
SPE 264
Behavior Management
2 credits
SPE 392
Teaching Students with Diverse Learning Needs
2 credits
DEPARTMENT OF HUMANITIES
Marcia Folsom, Chair and Professor
Mary Battenfeld, Associate Professor
Jama Lazerow, Professor
Jenne Powers, Assistant Professor and Director of the Writing Center
Joyce Hope Scott, Associate Professor
Swen Voekel, Associate Professor
Scott Votel, Instructor and Director of Composition Programs
Phillip Weiss, Assistant Professor
Lee Whitfield, Associate Professor
Richard Williams, Instructor
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WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
AVAILABLE PROGRAMS OF STUDY:
B.A., Humanities
Minors, History, Humanities, Literature, Philosophy, Writing
B.A./HUMANITIES/ 36-40 CREDITS
UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS
Humanities is a multidisciplinary major based in history, literature and philosophy.
The major introduces the origin of “humanities” as the study of human experience and
culture, and explores its evolving meaning over time. Students in the major focus in
one of the three Humanities disciplines as they consider questions of value, identity,
and meaning in the histories, literatures, philosophies, religions, and arts of different
cultures. An aim of the Humanities major is to develop in students an appreciation
not only of their own intellectual heritages but also of their cultural legacies of other
peoples. In Humanities courses, students are also encouraged to explore the changing
lives of women, people of color, and working people throughout the world.
The Humanities major complements professional preparation for careers working
with children and families, and for all careers in which an understanding of the past,
analytical skills, and excellent writing are necessary. It provides a lens through which
students can view, reflect on and understand human culture and experience. Study in
the Humanities provides the intellectual basis for a full, rich life.
Course Requirements 20 credits
HUM 201
Introduction to the Humanities
4 credits
One Global Perspectives Course
4 credits
One Humanities or Art History course at the intermediate or
advanced level 4 credits
One Integrated Course4 credits
HUM 450
Research Seminar in the Humanities
4 credits
GLOBAL PERSPECTIVES COURSES
These are courses based in Asian, African, or Latin American cultures.
AST 290
W. African History, Culture and Spirituality
4 credits
HIS 210
Encounters Between East and West in World History 4 credits
HIS 215
Africa and its Global Encounters
4 credits
HIS 270
Human Rights as World History
4 credits
LIT 226
Literature and History of the Caribbean
4 credits
LIT 225
African Literature4 credits
MUS 240
World Music Traditions
4 credits
PHL 215
Asian Thought4 credits
THE 305
African and Caribbean Theatre
4 credits
INTEGRATED COURSES
These are courses that integrate at least two disciplines.
AST 160
American Identities
AST 215
Political and Social Change in America
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4 credits
4 credits
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
HIS 194
Europe in the Age of Discovery
4 credits
HIS 208
Twentieth Century European History
4 credits
HIS 240
The Holocaust4 credits
HUM 210
Russian History through Literature
4 credits
LIT 226
Literature and History of the Caribbean
4 credits
LIT 225
African Literature4 credits
LIT 240
The English Renaissance
4 credits
LIT 270
The American Renaissance
4 credits
LIT 262
Shakespeare4 credits
LIT 263
The Epic: Heroes and Monsters
4 credits
LIT 301
Medieval Literature: Epic and Romance
4 credits
PHL 240
Great Ages and Ideas of the Jewish People
4 credits
FOCUS (16 CREDITS)
Humanities Major Without Professional Major 40 credits
Students who choose to major in the Humanities without a professional major follow
the requirements for the 36-credit major as listed above and must also complete an one
additional course in the focus at the intermediate or advanced level.
Suggested Course Sequence-Humanities Major
36 or 40 credits
FIRST YEAR HUM 201
Introduction to the Humanities
4 credits
Successful completion of the WLCE
SECOND YEAR
Global Perspectives Course 4 credits
1-2 courses in Focus 4-8 credits
JUNIOR YEAR
Humanities or Art History course at the intermediate or
advanced level4 credits
Integrated Course4 credits
1-2 courses in Focus
4-8 credits
SENIOR YEAR
1-2 courses in Focus
4-8 credits
HUM 450
Research Seminar in the Humanities
4 credits
UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS
Students select a focus in one of the following disciplines: literature, history, or
philosophy. At least 4 credits in the focus must be at the advanced level.
MINOR/WRITING/16 CREDITS
The minor in Writing is open to all students looking to complement their primary field
of study. Students in the program may chose courses from a variety of departments
and disciplines in both creative and professional writing. These courses may count for
the minor after students have completed English 111 and the Wheelock Literacy and
Communication Exam (WLCE).
Course Requirements: three courses from the following list, one of which must
have an ENG designation (12 credits), and the writing capstone.
ENG 220
Writing for Social Change
4 credits
ENG 201
Creative Nonfiction
4 credits
LIT 150
Introduction to the Short Story
4 credits
LSC XXX
Science Writing4 credits
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WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
THE XXX
Storytelling4 credits
THE XXX
Playwriting4 credits
ENG 3XX
Writing Capstone4 credits
DEPARTMENT OF JUVENILE JUSTICE AND YOUTH ADVOCACY
William Rodriquez, Chair and Assistant Professor
Ann Tobey, Associate Professor
AVAILABLE PROGRAMS OF STUDY:
UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS
B.S., Juvenile Justice and Youth Advocacy
BSW, Dual Major Social Work and Juvenile Justice and Youth Advocacy
Minor, Juvenile Justice and Youth Advocacy
B.S./ JUVENILE JUSTICE AND YOUTH ADVOCACY/42 CREDITS
The major in Juvenile Justice and Youth Advocacy prepares students to become leaders
and professionals ready to work with and/or for youth in a wide range of settings.
Students gain a thorough understanding of the conditions and circumstances that
place youth at risk as well as those that help youth thrive. Our students are interested
in working to help young people through jobs in fields such as: Law, policy, politics,
education, after-school time, recreation and sports, prevention, and corrections.
Courses cover topics such as: What causes delinquency and how can it be pre-vented;
Courts, legal procedure, laws, community safety and the juvenile justice system; Justice,
fairness, and policy in our society; and Advocacy for youth and families in a variety
of circumstances and settings. We explore current issues from multiple perspectives
and the positive youth development approach forms a foundation for practice and
skills development in youth work. Students in the major have numerous opportunities
to learn through practical community based experiences, allowing them to integrate
theory with practice and to develop marketable skills and a pathway into a career.
Course Requirements*
Support Courses12 credits
HDP 366
Adolescent Development
4 credits
Choose one:4 credits
HDS 106
Sociology of Minority Groups
SWK 225
Dynamics of Oppression and Discrimination
Choose one:4 credits
HDP 264
Research Methods
SWK 268
Social Research
JJYA Professional Core Courses 26 credits
JJA 201
Intro. to Juvenile Justice and Delinquency
4 credits
JJA 301
Juvenile Courts and Juvenile Law
4 credits
JJA 302
Delinquency: Causes, Prevention & Intervention
4 credits
JJA 380
Youth Work and Youth Advocacy
4 credits
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WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
JJP 401
JJA 402
JJA 403
Practicum in JJYA
Field Seminar in JJYA
Senior Integrative Seminar in JJYA
4 credits
2 credits
4 credits
Sample Course Sequence
FIRST YEAR
Second Semester:
MAT 120
Quantitative Reasoning
4 credits
HDS 106 Sociology of Minority Groups
4 credits
SECOND YEAR
First Semester:
JJA 201
Intro. to Juvenile Justice and Delinquency
4 credits
MAT 170
Statistics for Behavioral Sciences
4 credits
Second Semester:
JJA 302
Delinquency: Causes, Prevention & Intervention 4 credits
SWK 268
Social Research
4 credits
JUNIOR YEAR
First Semester:
JJA 301 Juvenile Courts and Juvenile Law
4 credits
HDP 366
Adolescent Development
4 credits
UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS
Selectives: 4 credits
AST 140
Media and Race in American Society
4 credits
AST 150
Introduction to American Government
4 credits
AST 215
Political and Social Change in America
4 credits
HDP 214
Violence in Lives of Children & Families
4 credits
HDP 221
Family Theories4 credits
HDP 265
Achievement Motivation
4 credits
HDP 301
Counseling Psychology
4 credits
HDS 343
On Being Different: Sociological Perspectives
4 credits
HUM 201
Introduction to Humanities
4 credits
PHL 170
Contemporary Moral Issues
4 credits
PHL 205
Philosophies of Social Justice
4 credits
CFS 240
Helping Children with Grief and Loss
4 credits
PRO 257
Theory & Practice: Stress Reduction
1 credits
PRO 314
Child Neglect and Abuse
2 credits
PRO 342
Child Welfare2 credits
PRO 336
Student Policy Fellows Seminar
4 credits
PRO 344
Crisis Intervention
4 credits
SBD 203
Introduction to Coaching Youth Sports
4 credits
SBD 260
Exercise and Sport Psychology
4 credits
SPE 264
Managing Behavior
4 credits
SWK 345
Human Behavior and Social Environment
4 credits
THE 123
Public Speaking4 credits
THE 205
Acting4 credits
*College Math Requirement: Students in JJYA fulfill the General Education math
requirement with MAT 120 Quantitative Reasoning and MAT 170 Statistics for
Behavioral Sciences.
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WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
Second Semester:
JJA 380 Youth Work and Youth Advocacy
4 credits
Selective4 credits
SENIOR YEAR
First Semester
JJP 401 Practicum in JJYA
4 credits
JJA 402 Field Seminar in JJYA
2 credits
Second Semester:
JJA 403 Senior Integrative Seminar in JJYA
4 credits
BSW/DUAL MAJOR IN SOCIAL WORK AND JUVENILE JUSTICE AND YOUTH
ADVOCACY/102 CREDITS
UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS
For a full description of the program see the Social Work department section on pages xx-xx.
MINOR/JUVENILE JUSTICE AND YOUTH ADVOCACY/16 CREDITS
The Juvenile Justice and Youth Advocacy minor provides students with an
understanding of effective methods of prevention, advocacy, and intervention with
youth, and the conditions and circumstances that place youth at risk as well as
conditions that help youth thrive. Our students are interested in working to help young
people through jobs in fields such as: Law, policy, politics, education, after-school
time, recreation and sports, prevention, and corrections. Courses cover topics such as:
What causes delinquency and how can it be prevented; Courts, legal procedure, laws,
community safety and the juvenile justice system; Justice, fairness, and policy in our
society; and Advocacy for youth and families in a variety of circumstances and settings.
We explore current issues from multiple perspectives and students in the minor have
opportunities for field based learning experiences.
Course Requirements
JJA 201
Introduction to Juvenile Justice and Delinquency
JJA 302
Delinquency: Cause, Prevention & Intervention
JJA 301
Juvenile Courts and Juvenile Law
JJA 380
Youth Work & Youth Advocacy
DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE
Ellen Faszewski, Chair and Associate Professor
Debbie Borkovitz, Associate Professor, Math Coordinator
Samuel Cook, Assistant Professor
Galina Dobrynina, Associate Professor
Charles Fidler, Assistant Professor
Dorothy Gorenflo, Instructor
Sara Levine, Assistant Professor
Maurice Page, Instructor
Christine Redford, Instructor, Assistant Math Coordinator
Judith Richards, Instructor
Ivy Schram, Instructor
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4 credits
4 credits
4 credits
4 credits
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
AVAILABLE PROGRAMS OF STUDY:
B.S., Mathematics and Science
Minors, Mathematics, Life or Physical Science
B.S./MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE/36-48 CREDITS
THE MATH FOR TEACHERS PATHWAY HELPS STUDENTS TO:
• Develop profound understanding of fundamental mathematics ideas vital for
teaching K-8 mathematics.
• Gain significant mathematical content knowledge in algebra, geometry,
probability, statistics, and number theory, as well as some other areas, such as
discrete mathematics, calculus, and/or history of mathematics.
• Acquire numerous strategies for approaching and solving unfamiliar problems.
Demonstrate ability to justify mathematical reasoning and to construct formal
proofs.
• Achieve strong capacity to communicate mathematical ideas orally and in writing,
as well as to independently read and comprehend mathematical texts.
• Demonstrate ability to use appropriate technology for data analysis and
interpretation, for exploring mathematical ideas, and for creating tables, graphs,
pictures, and other mathematical representations.
UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS
The Mathematics and Science Department offers a 36-credit major for students electing
a professional major and a 48-credit major for those students without a professional
major. There are three path-ways through the 36-credit major: Mathematics, Science,
and Interdisciplinary.
• The Math for Teachers Pathway is intended to be taken in con-junction with an
Elementary Education, Special Education or Early Childhood Education major
• The Science for Teachers Pathway is a program to produce and support
scientifically skilled and knowledgeable pre-service teachers. The Science Pathway
is intended to be taken in con-junction with an Elementary, Special Education or
Early Child-hood Education major.
• The Interdisciplinary Pathway is for students who prefer a broader preparation in
both mathematics and science, want to study Environmental Science through the
Colleges of the Fen-way consortium, or wish to design their own program.
Course Requirements
Math 140/141 or Math 130/131/132. 4 credits
MAT 230
Algebra and Number Theory
4 credits
MAT 245
Geometry4 credits
MAT 255
Probability and Statistics (preferred)
4 credits
MAT 170
Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences
MAT 390
Mathematics Seminar
4 credits
Mathematics Selectives8 credits
Two mathematics courses (one advanced; one either intermediate or advanced.)
Science Courses 12 credits
PSC 184
Science Inquiry and the Earth
4 credits
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WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
1 Physical Science Course (intermediate or advanced)
1 Life Science Course (intermediate or advanced)
4 credits
4 credits
Suggested Course Sequence–Mathematics for Teachers Pathway
FIRST YEAR
Mat 140/141 or Mat 130/131
SECOND YEAR
Mat 132 (if needed), Mat 245 and/or Mat 255, Mat 230,
possibly intermediate elective
JUNIOR YEAR
Mat 245 or 255, if needed. One or two electives
SENIOR YEAR
Mat 390, possibly electives.
UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS
THE SCIENCE FOR TEACHER’S PATHWAY HELPS STUDENTS TO:
• Demonstrate a conceptual as well as functional understanding of the process of
scientific inquiry including: question formation, prediction, observation, data
analysis, experimental de-sign, and communication of ideas.
• Understand how scientific inquiry is related to and distinguished from other
forms of inquiry through characteristic elements such as the nature of evidence,
skepticism, and creativity.
• Demonstrate awareness of the nature of science and how the development of
scientific knowledge may be influenced by historical, cultural, political, and
economic contexts.
• Develop ability, as appropriate, to use technology for scientific research, data
analysis, and dissemination of findings.
• Demonstrate knowledge of fundamental concepts of life and physical sciences and the
ability to make interdisciplinary connections across the various domains of science.
• Utilize science content and process knowledge to ask, find, or determine answers
to questions derived from curiosity about everyday experiences as well as issues
described in the media. Clarify the concepts underlying the nature of science,
scientific thinking, and scientific modes of inquiry.
Course Requirements*
*No more than three courses in the major can be at the introductory level.
MAT 130/131/132 or MAT 140/141 Concepts and Processes 8-12 credits
(The above courses are taken as support courses for the major, the
credits for these courses do not count toward the major.)
PSC 184 Science Inquiry and the Earth
4 credits
MSC 401
Seminar in Critical Thinking
4 credits
Selective
Any math or science course
4 credits
Mathematics Course (choose one) 4 credits
MAT 230
Algebra and Number Theory
4 credits
MAT 245
Geometry4 credits
MAT 255
Probability and Statistics
4 credits
MAT 280
Calculus I4 credits
CORE DOMAIN COURSES (12 CREDITS)
Students choose one of the core domains, and take one introductory, one intermediate,
and one advanced course in that domain.
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WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
Human Biology Core Domain:
Introductory Course (choose one)4 credits
LSC 152
Nutrition4 credits
LSC 153
Human Biology4 credits
Intermediate Course (choose one) 4 credits
LSC 250
Human Physiology
4 credits
LSC 280
Metabolic Processes in the Human Female
4 credits
Advanced Course (choose one)4 credits
LSC 302
Human Diseases4 credits
LSC 305
Human Genetics4 credits
LSC 317
Human Embryology
4 credits
Intermediate Course (choose one)4 credits
LSC 254
Marine Biology4 credits
LSC 257
Animal Behavior4 credits
Advanced Course (choose one)4 credits
LSC 330
Natural History of New England
4 credits
LSC 335
Environmental Impacts
4 credits
LSC 400
Independent Studies in Life Science
4 credits
MINOR CORE DOMAIN COURSES (8 CREDITS):
Students take two courses, either one at the introductory and one at the intermediate
level or one at the intermediate and one at the advanced level.
Introductory course4 credits
PSC 140
The Physics of Sports
4 credits
PSC 161
The Solar System
4 credits
PSC 185
Discovering Planet Earth
4 credits
PSC 191
The Physical Universe
4 credits
UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS
Environmental Science Core Domain:
Introductory Course (choose one) 4 credits
LSC 151
Introduction to Plants and Animals
4 credits
PSC 185
Discovering Planet Earth
4 credits
Intermediate Course4 credits
PSC 251
Principles of Chemistry
4 credits
PSC 255
Natural Disasters4 credits
Advanced Courses4 credits
PSC 399
Field Studies in Environmental Science
4 credits
PSC 400
Independent Studies in Physical Science
4 credits
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WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
MINOR CORE DOMAIN IN MATHEMATICS (OPTIONAL) (8 CREDITS)
Students may complete an additional minor core domain in mathematics by
completing two additional mathematics courses.
UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS
Education Major Requirement (4 credits applied to education major):
EDU 351
Teach and Learn Science in Early Childhood 2 credits
Sample/Suggested Course Sequence–Teacher of Science
FIRST YEAR
MAT 130/131 Concepts and Processes I, II
PSC 184 Science Inquiry and the Earth
SECOND YEAR
MAT 132 Concepts and Processes III
PSC 255 Natural Disasters
LSC 151 Introduction to Plants and Animals
MAT 255 Probability and Statistics
JUNIOR YEAR
LSC 254 Marine Biology
LSC 257 Animal Behavior
LSC 335 Environmental Impacts
SENIOR YEAR
MSC 401
Seminar in Critical Thinking
PSC 400 Independent Studies in Physical Science
INTERDISCIPLINARY PATHWAY/36-CREDITS
Mathematics Support Requirement:
Completion of the College Requirement in Mathematics. Students who use the regular
Concepts and Processes sequence (Math 130/131) for this requirement, must also
complete Math 132.
Introductory Science Course:
Students must take one of the following courses in their first or second year at Wheelock:
PSC 185
Discovering Planet Earth
4 credits
PSC 191 The Physical Universe
4 credits
LSC 151
Introduction to Plants and Animals
4 credits
PSC 184
Science Inquiry and the Earth
4 credits
Students electing to take PSC 191 or LSC 151 are strongly encouraged to take both
courses (with the other course counting as a selective).
Intermediate or Advanced Mathematics Course: 4 credits. Students must take one
mathematics course at the 200 level or above.
Selectives: 24 credits. In conjunction with their academic advisors, students determine
the scope of the major. At least one course must be chosen from life science, and one
from physical science. At most, two courses can be at the introductory level and at least
one course must be at the advanced level.
Capstone: 4 credits. Students must take either MSC 401 Seminar in Critical Thinking or MAT
390 Mathematics Seminar. Students may take both courses (with one counting as a selective).
Minor: Working in conjunction with an advisor, students may de-sign a 16-credit
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WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
minor in mathematics, physical, or life sciences.
48 Credit Major without a Professional Major:
The Department of Mathematics/Science allows students who do not elect a professional
major, in Education or Child Life, to follow a course of study beyond the 36-credit
major. After consulting with a Mathematics/Science academic advisor, students may
choose to focus their major in such areas as: environmental studies or human biology.
Students enrolled in this major may elect to take a selection of courses in their area of
focus, or may wish to incorporate a 4-8 credit Field Study into their program of study.
MINOR/MATHEMATICS/16 CREDITS
Course Requirements
MAT 230
Algebra and Number Theory
4 credits
MAT 245
Geometry4 credits
MAT 255
Probability and Statistics
4 credits
MAT 390
Mathematics Seminar
4 credits
MINOR/LIFE OR PHYSICAL SCIENCE/16 CREDITS
The life or physical science minor is intended for students who de-sire a strong
preparation in life or physical science, but do not wish to major in the subject. Students
take four courses as a minor, in consultation with an advisor.
Department of Psychology and Human Development
Eric Silverman, Chair and Associate Professor
Detris Adelabu, Associate Professor
Janine Bempechat, Associate Professor and Coordinator, Center for Research and
Scholarship
Akeia Benard, Assistant Professor
Emily Cahan, Professor
Gail Dines, Professor
Tina Durand, Assistant Professor
Martha Eshoo, Instructor
Petra Hesse, Associate Professor
Maya Honda, Associate Professor
Grace Kim, Assistant Professor
Kathryn Portnow, Instructor
William Sharp, Instructor
Eleonora Villegas Reimers, Associate Professor
UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS
The Mathematics Minor is intended for students concentrating in education who desire
a strong preparation in mathematics, but do not wish to major in the subject. Students
are strongly encouraged to take these four designated courses as a minor; however, in
some cases, in consultation with an advisor, substitute courses may be approved.
AVAILABLE PROGRAMS OF STUDY:
B.S. /Psychology and Human Development
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WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
PSYCHOLOGY AND HUMAN DEVELOPMENT MAJOR/B.S. DEGREE/36 CREDITS
The Psychology and Human Development major is rooted in the intellectual traditions
of psychology, sociology and anthropology. The theories, research and practices of
this multidisciplinary field of inquiry contribute to a greater understanding of human
experience in our complex and changing world. Human development over the life
course is studied in cultural, social, historical and political contexts. Students are
encouraged to explore the relevance of the field to their personal experiences and
professional growth and to formulate new research questions and policy agendas for
improving the quality of the lives of children, families and communities.
UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS
This major, with its emphasis on development, is designed to pro-vide in-depth
study in an area that complements professional preparation for the fields of teaching,
social work, juvenile justice and youth advocacy, and child life. The major is also
recommended for students interested in pursuing graduate study in related areas.
Course Requirements
Students must take 36 credit hours of course work in Psychology and Human
Development, consisting of a multi-disciplinary core of 16 credits and 20 credits in one
of three focus areas: Counseling Psychology, Developmental Psychology, or Children,
Families and Culture. Courses taken to fulfill multi-disciplinary core requirements
cannot be used to fulfill focus area requirements.
MULTI-DISCIPLINARY CORE (16 CREDITS)
Students must complete a course in each discipline of the major (psychology, sociology,
and anthropology) and a research methods course to meet the multi-disciplinary core
requirement. Human Growth and Development, a college requirement for all first year
students, also counts as the psychology course in the multi-disciplinary core:
Human Growth and Development (choose one)4 credits
HDP 122/123 Human Growth and Development or
HDP 126/127 Human Growth and Development Intensive
One Sociology or Anthropology Course 4 credits
Students can take any sociology (HDS) or anthropology (HDA) course 4 credits
Research Methods
HDP 264
Research Methods
4 credits
Diversity Selective (choose one)4 credits
HDS 106 Sociology of Minority Groups
4 credits
HDP 260
Special Topic: Psychology of Race
4 credits
HDS 343 On Being Different
4 credits
New HDA
Psychological Anthropology
4 credits
New HDP
Asian American Psychology
4 credits
New HDP
Race, Culture and Mental Health
4 credits
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WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
FOCUS (20 CREDITS)
In addition to the multidisciplinary core requirement, students must complete 20
credits in one of three focus areas: Counseling Psychology, Developmental Psychology,
or Children, Families and Culture. In each focus area, students must take a
combination of introductory, intermediate and advanced courses.
FOCUS: COUNSELING PSYCHOLOGY
The counseling psychology focus explores topics related to mental health and counseling
with a particular emphasis on human development and diversity. This focus prepares
undergraduate students for graduate study in counseling or clinical psychology, which
can lead to working in various mental health and human services fields. Please note that
the course work is at the undergraduate level. In order to practice as a counselor, one
needs to obtain a state licensure upon the completion of graduate study.
Counseling Psychology Core (choose two)8 credits
HDP 223 Abnormal Psychology
4 credits or
HDP 379/380 Emotional Problems of Children/Seminar in
Emotional Problems of Children
4 credits
HDP 301
Counseling Psychology
4 credits
Introductory and Intermediate Courses (choose one or two)
4-8 credits
CFS 240 Helping Children with Grief and Loss
4 credits
HDP 102
Introduction to Psychology
4 credits
HDP 104
Social Psychology4 credits
HDP 207 Psychodrama2 credits
HDP 220 Theories of Personality
4 credits
HDP 223 Abnormal Psychology
4 credits
HDP 224 Theories of Emotional Development
4 credits
CFS 240 Helping Children with Grief and Loss
4 credits
New HDP Positive Psychology
4 credits
New HDP Health Psychology
4 credits
UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS
In addition to the required coursework, students are recommended to pursue gaining
experiences in the field and/or seeking research opportunities. Please see your advisor
for more information.
Advanced Courses (choose one or two) 4-8 credits
AUT 320 Foundations of Development in Autism
4 credits
HDP 379/380 Emotional Problems of Children
4 credits
HDP 385 Psychological Trauma
4 credits
New HDA Psychological Anthropology
4 credits
New HDP Asian American Psychology
4 credits
New HDP Race, Culture and Mental Health
4 credits
Students choosing to major in Psychology and Human Development with a
Counseling Psychology focus may combine their major with the following professional
majors and certificates: Juvenile Justice and Youth Advocacy, Human Service
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WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
Certificate, Child Life, Early Childhood, Elementary Education, Social Work and
Special Education (Moderate Disabilities). Instead of a professional major, some
students may also want to double major in Humanities, Math/Science, American
Studies or the Arts.
Students majoring in Psychology and Human Development with a focus in Counseling
Psychology may also pursue an extended major without a professional major by taking
an additional 4 advanced credits. Students interested in completing additional fieldwork may do so as an independent study with a faculty advisor.
UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS
Students interested in graduate study in clinical or counseling psychology should complete
the following courses as part of their counseling psychology focus or extended major.
HDP 102 HDP 220 HDP 223 HDP 301 Introduction to Psychology Theories of Personality
Abnormal Psychology
Counseling Psychology
4 credits
4 credits
4 credits
4 credits
FOCUS: DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY
This focus examines the cognitive, social, motivational, and emotional changes that
occur in the individual across the life span. The study of human development is framed
within the context of families, schools, and communities. Courses emphasize the
variety of social, cultural, economic, and political factors that influence the trajectories
of both individuals and groups.
Intermediate Courses (choose two or three) 8-12 credits
HDP 222 Language and Culture
4 credits
HDP 224 Theories of Emotional Development
4 credits
HDP 227 Language Development
4 credits
HDP 257
Infant and Toddler Behavior and Development
4 credits
New HDP Infants, Toddlers, and the Media
4 credits
HDP 265 Achievement Motivation
4 credits
New HDP Moral Development
4 credits
HDP 282 Children and the Media
4 credits
HDP 290 Children with Special Needs
4 credits
Advanced Courses (choose two or three) 8-12 credits
HDP 316 Children’s Political Lives
4 credits
HDP 325 Memory, Identity and Development
4 credits
HDP 330
The Psychology of Race
4 credits
HDP 335 Cognition in the Deaf and Blind
4 credits
HDP 352 Cognitive Development
4 credits
HDP 358 Cross-cultural Perspectives on Child Care
4 credits
HDP 362 Meaning and Development of Play
4 credits
HDP 366 Adolescent Development
4 credits
HDP 368 Adult Development
4 credits
HDP 371 Humor and Child Development
4 credits
HDP 382 Nature of Linguistic Knowledge
4 credits
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WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
AUT 320 New HDP Foundations of Development in Autism
Ethnicity and Achievement
4 credits
4 credits
Students choosing to major in Psychology and Human Development with a
Developmental Psychology focus may combine their major with the following
professional majors and certificates: Child Life, Juvenile Justice and Youth Advocacy,
Human Service Certificate, Early Childhood Education, Elementary Education, Social
Work and Special Education. Instead of a professional major, some students may also
want to double major in Humanities, Math/Science, American Studies or the Arts.
Students majoring in Psychology and Human Development with a focus in
Developmental Psychology may also pursue an extended major without a professional
major by taking an additional 4 advanced credits. Students interested in completing
additional field-work may do so as an independent study with a faculty advisor.
HDP 224 HDP 227 HDP 352 Theories of Emotional Development Language Development
Cognitive Development
4 credits
4 credits
4 credits
FOCUS: CHILDREN, FAMILIES AND CULTURE
This focus introduces students to the diversity of childhoods and families in the United
States and elsewhere, as understood by Anthropology and Sociology. This focus area
also studies different aspects of culture, including globalization, ethnicity, gender, race,
religion, sexuality, consumerism, inequality, and power–how people create, contribute
towards, and challenge their social worlds.
Introductory Courses (choose one)4 credits
HDS 103 Women, Culture, & Society
4 credits
HDA 266 Children, Families and Parenting Around the World 4 credits
HDS 106 Sociology of Minority Groups
4 credits
HDA 120 Cultural Anthropology
4 credits
UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS
Students with a major in Elementary Education should consider taking one or more of
the following courses as part of their developmental psychology focus:
Intermediate Courses (choose one or two)4-8 credits
AST 220 Coming to America
4 credits
AST 265 Studies in American Popular Culture
4 credits
AST 285 In the Best Interest of the Child
(formerly Children and Families in American Society) 4 credits
HDP 222 Language and Culture
4 credits
HDA/AST 258 Religion in America
4 credits
New HDA/HDS Globalization and Immigration
4 credits
New HDA/HDS Sex and Culture
4 credits
New HDA/HDS Native Americans
4 credits
HDA/AST 225Boys and Men in America
4 credits
HDP 222 Language and Culture
4 credits
New HDP
Global Perspectives in Media Literacy
4 credits
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WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS
Advanced Courses (choose two or three)8-12 credits
HDS 332 Feminist Theories
4 credits
HDS 343
On Being Different
4 credits
HDP 316 Children’s Political Lives
4 credits
HDP 330
The Psychology of Race
4 credits
HDP 358 Cross-cultural Perspectives on Child Care
4 credits
New HDA Psychological Anthropology
4 credits
New HDA Human Rights and Globalization
4 credits
Students choosing to major in Psychology and Human Development with a focus
on Children, Families and Culture may combine their major with the following
professional majors and certificates: Child Life, Juvenile Justice and Youth Advocacy,
Human Service Certificate, Early Childhood Education, Elementary Education, Social
Work and Special Education (Moderate Disabilities). In-stead of a professional major,
some students may also want to double major in Humanities, Math/Science, American
Studies or the Arts.
Students majoring in Psychology and Human development with a focus on Children,
Families and Culture may also pursue an ex-tended major without a professional
major by taking an additional 4 advanced credits. Students interested in completing
additional fieldwork may do so as an independent study with a faculty advisor.
DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WORK (BSW PROGRAM)
Hope Haslam Straughan, Interim Chair, M.S.W. Program Director and Associate Professor
Nina Aronoff, Associate Professor
Lenette Azzi-Lessing, Assistant Professor
Deborah Lisansky Beck, Director, BSW Program Director and Assistant Professor
James Bourque, Instructor
Nicole Dubus, Assistant Professor
Castagna Lacet, Instructor
Roy Old Person, Assistant Professor
Keavy Hennessey Smith, Director of Social Work Field Education
Wendy Champagnie Williams, Instructor
Diane Zipoli, Field Advisor
AVAILABLE PROGRAMS OF STUDY:
BSW, Social Work
BSW, Dual Major Social Work and Juvenile Justice and Youth Advocacy
BSW/ SOCIAL WORK/82 CREDITS
The mission of the BSW program is to improve the quality of life for children, adults,
families, and communities by preparing entry-level generalist social work practitioners
who work collaboratively with clients to provide services, help to identify and secure
re-sources, and advance human rights and social justice. Social workers serve people
of all ages, from infants to senior citizens. The program places students in practicum
sites that reflect diverse needs of people in society. In keeping with the goal of the
Social Work program, the primary focus of the senior practicum is generalist practice,
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WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
in which students are given a range of assignments to learn a core group of skills. The
program is accredited by the Council on Social Work Education.
Course Requirements*
Support Courses (These courses may also apply to the General Education Requirements)
HDP 120/121 Human Growth and Development I 4 credits
HDP 122/123 Human Growth and Development II 4 credits
LSC 153
Human Biology4 credits
MAT 120
Quantitative Reasoning
4 credits
MAT 170
Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences
4 credits
SOCIOLOGY Students can take any Sociology (HDS) course 4 credits
AST 150
Intro to American Government
4 credits
Selectives2 credits
The Selective requirement may be fulfilled by completing any course in American
Studies (AST), Autism (AUT), Human Development (HD), Inter-professional Studies
(PRO), Child and Family Studies (CFS), or Education (EDU). Seniors may choose
a graduate level course for this purpose. Courses chosen as the Selective may not be
used to fulfill a General Education requirement or to fulfill the 12 additional arts and
science credits required for the BSW major.
UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS
Professional Core Courses SWK 205
Introduction to Social Work
4 credits
SWK 225
Dynamics of Oppression & Discrimination 4 credits
SWK 268
Social Research4 credits
SWK 345
Human Behavior & the Social Environ.
4 credits
SWK 355
Social Welfare Policy and Services (offered spring only) 4 credits
*SWK 440
SWK Practice & Skills Lab I
4 credits
SWK 450
SWK Practice& Skills Lab II
4 credits
SWK 451
SWK Practice & Field Seminar I
2 credits
SWK 452
SWK Practice: Practicum I
4 credits
SWK 455
SWK Practice and Skills Lab III
4 credits
SWK 456
SWK Practice & Field Seminar II
2 credits
SWK 457
SWK Practice: Practicum II
4 credits
Students must complete a minimum of 12 additional arts and sciences credits beyond
their general education requirements. This may be fulfilled by a second major in
the arts and sciences, an arts and sciences minor, the Autism (AUT) minor or three
individual arts and sciences courses. One AUT course can be included as one of these
three separate courses.
*Successful passing of the WLCE is a prerequisite for SWK 440: SWK Practice I
and all subsequent professional core courses in the major
Suggested Course Sequence-BSW
FIRST YEAR
Fall semester
HDP 120/121 Human Growth & Development I
4 credits
101
UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
Spring semester
HDP 122/123 Human Growth & Development II
4 credits
MAT 120
Quantitative Reasoning 4 credits
SOCIOLOGY Students can take any Sociology (HDS) course
4 credits
AST 150
American Government
4 credits
SWK 205
Introduction to Social Work
4 credits
SECOND YEAR
Fall semester
SWK 225
Dynamics of Oppression and Discrimination 4 credits
LSC 153 Human Biology
4 credits
Spring semester
MAT 170
Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences
4 credits
Successful completion of the WLCE.
JUNIOR YEAR
Fall semester
SWK 268 Social Research
4 credits
SWK 345
Human Behavior and the Social Environment4 credits
SWKSelective2 credits
Spring semester
SWK 355
Social Welfare Policy and Services (offered spring only)
4 credits
SWK 440
Social Work Practice and Skills Lab I
4 credits
Arts & Sciences Elective
4 credits
SENIOR YEAR
Fall semester
SWK 450
Social Work Practice and Skills Lab II
4 credits
SWK 451
Social Work Practice: Field Seminar I
2 credits
SWK 452
Social Work Practice: Practicum I
4 credits
SWK Selective2 credits
Spring semester
SWK 455
Social Work Practice and Skills Lab III
4 credits
SWK 456
Social Work Practice: Field Seminar II
2 credits
SWK 457
Social Work Practice: Practicum III
4 credits
Arts & Sciences Elective
4 credits
BSW/DUAL MAJOR IN SOCIAL WORK AND JUVENILE JUSTICE AND YOUTH
ADVOCACY/102 CREDITS
The mission of the Bachelor of Social Work Program is to improve the quality of
life for children, adults, families, and communities by preparing entry-level social
work practitioners who work collaboratively with clients to provide services, help to
identify and secure resources, and human rights and social justice. In a complementary
fashion, the Juvenile Justice and Youth Advocacy pro-gram prepares students to work
with youth and their families in a range of settings including preventative programs,
advocacy pro-grams, and programs for juvenile offenders. The focus in the Juvenile
Justice and Youth Advocacy major is on adolescent development, legal systems,
conditions and circumstances that place youth at risk for involvement in the juvenile
justice system, and effective methods of prevention, advocacy, and intervention with
youth. Dual majors focus their academics and practical experiences in understanding
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WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
the dynamics of working with adolescents and youth at risk. These students complete
a yearlong practicum in a juvenile justice setting that fulfills the field requirement for
both programs and concurrently take separate field seminars in each.
Course Requirements
Support Courses (These courses may also apply to the General Education Requirements)
HDP 120/121 Human Growth and Development I
4 credits
HDP 122/123 Human Growth and Development II
4 credits
AST 150
Intro to American Government
4 credits
LSC 153
Human Biology4 credits
HDS Any Sociology (HDS) course 4 credits
MAT 120
Quantitative Reasoning
4 credits
MAT 170
Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences
4 credits
HDP 366
Adolescent Development
4 credits
Social Work and Juvenile Justice Courses36 credits
SWK 205
Introduction to Social Work
4 credits
SWK 225
Dynamics of Oppression/Discrimination
4 credits
SWK 345
Human Behavior &the Social Environment
4 credits
SWK 355
Social Welfare Policy and Services (spring only) 4 credits
SWK 440
Social Work Practice: Methods & Skills Lab I
4 credits
JJA 201
Intro to Juvenile Justice and Delinquency
4 credits
JJA 301
Juvenile Courts & Juvenile Law
4 credits
JJA 302
Delinquency: Cause, Prevention & Intervention
4 credits
JJA 380
Youth Work & Youth Advocacy
4 credits
Practicum Core I/ 12 credits (fall semester only)
SWK 450
SWK Practice: Methods &Skills Lab II
SWK 451
SWK Practice: Field Seminar I SWK 452
SWK: Practicum I JJA 402
Field Seminar in Juvenile Justice 4 credits
2 credits
4 credits
2 credits
UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS
Additional credits in the Arts and Sciences12 credits
Research Course (choose one)4 credits
SWK 268
Social Research4 credits
HDP 264
Research Methods4 credits
HDS 264
Sociological Research Methods
4 credits
Practicum Core II/14 credits (Spring Semester Only)
SWK 455
SWK: Methods and Skills Lab III
4 credits
SWK 456
SWK Practice: Field Sem II 2 credits
SWK 457
SWK Practice: Practicum II 4 credits
JJA 403
Senior Integrative Seminar in JJYA 4 credits
**HDP 366: Adolescent Development may be used for 4 credits in this category
Sample/Suggested Course Sequence
FIRST YEAR
Spring Semester
MAT 120
Quantitative Reasoning
4 credits
103
UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
HDS
Students can take any Sociology course
4 credits
AST 150
American Government
4 credits
SWK 205
Introduction to Social Work
4 credits
SECOND YEAR
Fall semester
SWK 225
Dynamics of Oppression and Discrimination 4 credits
LSC 153 Human Biology
4 credits
JJA 201
Introduction to Juvenile Justice and Delinquency 4 credits
Spring semester
MAT 170
Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences
4 credits
JJA 301
Juvenile Courts and the Law
4 credits
HDP 366
Adolescent Development (counts as an
Arts & Sciences Elective)
Successful completion of the WLCE.
JUNIOR YEAR
Fall semester
SWK 268 Social Research
4 credits
SWK 345
Human Behavior and the Social Environment 4 credits
JJA 302
Delinquency: Causes, Prevention & Intervention 4 credits
Spring semester
SWK 355
Social Welfare Policy and Services
(offered spring only)4 credits
SWK 440
SWK Practice and Skills Lab I 4 credits
JJA 380
Youth Work and Youth Advocacy
4 credits
Arts & Sciences Elective
4 credits
SENIOR YEAR
Fall semester
SWK 450
SWK Practice and Skills Lab II
4 credits
SWK 451
SWK Practice: Field Seminar I
2 credits
SWK 452
SWK Practice: Practicum I
4 credits
(JJP 401Practicum in JJYA)
JJA 402
Field Seminar in JJYA
2 credits
Arts & Sciences Elective
4 credits
Spring semester
SWK 455
SWK Practice and Skills Lab III
4 credits
SWK 456
SWK Practice: Field Seminar II
2 credits
SWK 457
SWK Practice: Practicum III
4 credits
JJA 403
Senior Integrative Seminar in JJYA
4 credits
DEPARTMENT OF SPECIAL EDUCATION
Elaine Kohen, Chair
John Crapps, Professor
Felicity Crawford, Assistant Professor
Kathleen McDonough, Instructor
Ju Hee Park, Assistant Professor
Shoshanna Starr Collins, Instructor
Stephanie Cox Suarez, Associate Professor
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WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
AVAILABLE PROGRAMS OF STUDY:
B.S, Special Education Major: Teacher of Students with Moderate Disabilities
Minor, Understanding Autism
B.S/ SPECIAL EDUCATION: TEACHER OF STUDENTS WITH MODERATE
DISABILITIES/40 CREDITS
Course Requirements
Required Support Courses (Credits may apply to General Education Requirements) 36-40 credits
HDP 122/ 123 Human Growth and Development 4 credits
MAT 130/131 and 132 or MAT 140/141 Concepts and Processes 8-12 credits
AST 150
Intro to American Government
4 credits
HIS 165
America through the Civil War or HIS 167
America since the Civil War
4 credits
One Global History course
4 credits
Two Life and Physical Science courses
8 credits
One Literature Course
4 credits
Program Requirements 44 credits
EDU 201
Orientation to Educ. Programs 0 credit
HDP 290
Children with Specials Needs
4 credits
EDU 255
Racial and Cultural Identities
4 credits
SPE 264
Behavior Management
2 credits
SPE 346
Assistive Technology2 credits
EDU 330
Elementary Mathematics
4 credits
EDU 337
Teaching Reading in Grades Pre-K-8
4 credits
SPE 392
Teaching Students with Diverse
Learning Needs2 credits
UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS
This is a nationally recognized program is designed that leads to the Teacher of Students
with Moderate Disabilities (PreK-8) Initial license by the Massachusetts Department
of Elementary and Secondary Education.. It prepares professionals to work with
children, pre-kindergarten through eighth grade, with mild to moderate dis-abilities
who participate in inclusive, resource, or substantially separate public or private schools.
Students develop skills in inclusive curriculum design, creating a supportive classroom
ecology, differentiating instruction, understanding and managing behavior, collaborative
problem-solving, and commitment to equity for all children in a multiracial and
multicultural society. Students must participate in a faculty group interview prior to
acceptance into the program. For information on teacher licensure, please refer to the
Professional Certification and Licensure section of this catalog on page xx.
Special Education Practicum Core I
12 credits
EDU 338
Teaching Nonfiction Literacy
2 credits
SPE 394
Curriculum, Learning & Special Needs
4 credits
SPP 460
Practicum I4 credits
SPP 461
Seminar I2 credits
Special Needs Practicum Core II 8 credits
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WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
SPE 481
Assessing Children with Special Needs
4 credits
SPP 470
Practicum II3 credits
SPP 471
Seminar II1 credit
Program Completion
SPE 465
Capstone & Portfolio: Special Education
2 credits
All sections of the MTEL (Communication and Literacy Skills Test [both sub-tests],
General Curriculum [both subtests], and Foundation of Reading) must be completed;
strongly advised to complete Practicum Core II prior to taking the capstone course.
UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS
MINOR/UNDERSTANDING AUTISM/16 CREDITS
106
Understanding Autism is a 16-credit (4 course) interdisciplinary minor that is open
to all Wheelock undergraduate students. The minor offers students the opportunity
to understand the cognitive, language, social, emotional and physical aspects of
individuals with autism. It introduces and examines current approaches and strategies
that enable people with autism to communicate and participate fully in their lives.
Students will explore current research-based interventions, teaching methodologies,
services and pro-grams as well as fully consider the personal stories of people with
autism. Students will begin to develop professional skills to foster the development of
effective programs and to advocate for individuals with autism and their families and
communities.
Course Requirements
Prerequisites
HDP 120/121 or HDP 124/125 Human Growth and Development 4 credits
HDP 290 Children with Special Needs
4 credits
Program Requirements
AUT 320
Foundations of Development in Autism
AUT 322
Assessment and Intervention in Autism
AUT XXX
Family, Community & Inter-professional Collaboration
AUT XXX
Advancing the Field of Autism
4 credits
4 credits
4 credits
4 credits
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
GRADUATE PROGRAMS AT
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
Graduatate Admissions108
Graduatate Financial Informatation
112
Graduatate Academic Policies
117
Departments and Graduatate Programs
131
GRADUATE PROGRAMS
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WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
GRADUATE STUDY AT WHEELOCK COLLEGE
GRADUATE ADMISSIONS AND FINANCIAL AID
GRADUATE PROGRAMS
Graduate Admissions
Wheelock College seeks applications from individuals with diverse social, professional,
educational, racial, geographic and economic backgrounds who have the personal
and academic potential to become outstanding educators, early childhood specialists,
social workers, child life specialists, and advocates. Admissions decisions are based
on a careful and thorough evaluation of each applicant’s academic record, written
application, essay, résumé, references and relevant experience, professional, academic
and personal background, skills and goals.
Graduate students matriculating into degree programs enter Wheelock in either the fall,
spring, or summer semester, although some programs begin at specified semesters. Our
graduate programs adhere to the following priority deadlines for application. In general, our
application deadlines are guidelines that students should use to complete their application.
In setting these priority deadlines the College has taken into consideration the need for
applicants to secure academic and field experience advising prior to the start of their
academic program. However, we will consider applications past the deadline as long as
we are able. Please Note: The Child Life and Family Centered Care Program will NOT
consider applications submitted or completed after March 1st.
Spring Semester (January)
Summer Semester (June)
Fall Semester (September)
Child Life Program (fall)
December 1
March 1
May 1
March 1 (firm)
The Admissions Committee makes every attempt to notify applicants of a decision
within two to four weeks of receipt of a complete application. Details can be found in
the Graduate Programs section of this catalog.
All requests for information should be made to the Office of Graduate Admissions,
200 The Riverway, Boston, MA, 02215-4176, by calling 617)879-1114 , or by email at
[email protected]
ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS
I. U.S. Graduate Students
Candidates for admission to Wheelock College graduate programs must have received a
bachelor’s degree at an accredited institution and generally attained a minimum of 3.0
(on a 4.0 scale) GPA for the last two years of undergraduate study.
To apply, you should submit:
• A completed online graduate application.
• Official transcripts showing degree conferral and any completed graduate coursework.
• A current résumé.
• A 3-5 page personal essay that discusses the applicant’s career goals, strengths,
challenges, and interest either in Wheelock’s vision and mission or the college and
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WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
the particular program of interest.
• Three (3) letters of reference. One should be of an academic nature from a faculty
member who is familiar with the applicant’s academic work (e.g., a former professor
or instructor of the applicant). The second reference should be from an individual
who can discuss the applicant’s work or relevant experience. The third letter may be
either academic or professional at the applicant’s discretion. References from family
members or friends are not acceptable. Please note that additional letters of reference
may be requested at the discretion of the Admission Committee.
All references must arrive in unopened envelopes with the evaluator’s signature across
the flap. While an applicant’s recommender may draft a letter on his or her own
letterhead we do require that the Reference Form be submitted with the applicant’s
signature as well as the recommender’s information. Please make sure that information
regarding the confidentiality of the letter is appropriately marked on this form.
Applicants to the Child Life and Family Centered Care program are highly encouraged
to provide a reference from the Child Life Specialist who supervised their 100 hours of
volunteer work.
• Some programs (Integrated Elementary & Special Education, Organizational
Leadership and Child Life) require an interview with faculty once an application is
complete. In addition all applicants are welcome to request an interview through
the Office of Graduate Admissions to explore program and specialization options,
and to devise a plan that maps out a schedule and likely time to graduation.
Applicants should reference particular program descriptions for program specific
admissions requirements.
GRADUATE PROGRAMS
Applicants to the Social Work: Advanced Standing program must have a reference from
their field liaison, field instructor or director of the BSW program from which they
graduated.
II. INTERNATIONAL GRADUATE STUDENTS
Wheelock welcomes students of diverse cultural backgrounds. In order to ensure a
successful experience for students, the Wheelock College Graduate Programs require
additional information from international students.
TOEFL - Applicants whose native language is not English, and who have not received
a degree from a college or university in the United States or another English-speaking
country, are required to submit scores from the TOEFL (Test of English as Foreign
Language) as evidence of proficiency in oral and written English. The minimum
TOEFL score generally accepted is 550 paper based, 213 computer based, or 80
Internet-Based Test.
Transcript Evaluation - Applicants are required to provide an evaluation of their
undergraduate and graduate course of study, if completed outside of the U.S.
Acceptable evaluations can be obtained by sending all international transcripts to:
Education Credentials Evaluators
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Educational Credential Evaluators, Inc.
PO Box 514070 Milwaukee WI 53203-3470
www.ece.org
World Education Services
Bowling Green Station
P.O. Box 5087
New York, NY 10274-5087
www.wes.org
GRADUATE PROGRAMS
Financial Statement–Prior to being issued an I-20, immigration or visa form, all
international applicants are required to certify that they have made adequate financial
arrangements to cover their expenses for the full duration of their program of graduate
study as a full-time student. Please contact the Office of Graduate Admissions for
further explanation of what is required.
International applicants are also required, if needed, to obtain third party translations of
any letters of recommendation or other supporting documents if those documents are not
written in English. Applicants are not permitted to translate the documents themselves.
Please contact the Office of Graduate Admissions for further information if needed.
TEACHER LICENSURE
Applicants who want to be teachers, in public and many private PreK-12 schools in
Massachusetts, need a license from the State Department of Elementary and Secondary
Education. Eligibility for the first Initial license includes completion of a state approved
program. Wheelock programs in Early Childhood (PreK-2), and the Integrated
Elementary (1-6) and Special Education (PreK-8) program are state approved and
nationally recognized as part of the accreditation process for the National Council for
Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) through which Wheelock College is
accredited, and both lead to licensure.
ADVANCED LICENSURE
Applicants who wish to complete requirements for Massachusetts licensure as Teacher
of Reading (all levels) must supply a copy of their initial teaching license and a
letter from their principal written on official stationery to verify at least one year of
employment in the role of that basic license. The Department of Elementary and
Secondary Education requires that the year of teaching experience with a teacher
license has been completed in the state which issued the license.
CERTIFICATE OPTION PROGRAM
A certificate option program is available to recent graduates of Wheelock College who
completed all or most of the requirements for an education major or licensure program
except the MTEL examinations and final course or courses. After completing all state
examination requirements for the license, a candidate can apply for department faculty
approval to enter the Certificate Option Program and complete the remaining program
requirements for institutional endorsement as a non-degree candidate.
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Because the Certificate Option Program is not degree-granting, financial aid is not
available. Explanation of tuition and fees is included in the Financial Information
section below.
ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS FOR SPECIFIC PROGRAMS
CHILD LIFE AND FAMILY-CENTER CARE PROGRAM
Applicants who wish to pursue a program of study in Child Life must submit a
completed verification form and a favorable letter of reference documenting 100 hours
experience in a pediatric health care setting under the direct supervision of a Child
Life Specialist. A background in child development and an internship in a child life
program are preferred. An interview is required for this program.
EARLY CHILDHOOD PROGRAM AND INTEGRATED ELEMENTARY AND SPECIAL
EDUCATION
Since students must complete three prerequisite courses before beginning the
internship in the fall, they should contact the Office of Field Experience (617-8792165) as soon as they have made a deposit to attend Wheelock and have spoken with
their academic advisor. The placement process, which can take up to two months,
begins ideally in March. Most placements for the following fall semester are completed
by early June before public schools close.
APPLICATION PROCESS
1. Early submission of application materials is strongly encouraged for all programs.
2. Once all application materials are received, candidates are reviewed for admission
consideration, and each applicant is notified, in writing, of acceptance or denial as
soon as a decision has been made.
3. Accepted students who plan to enroll are required to return the enrollment form with a
non-refundable tuition deposit of $100. This deposit is applicable to tuition charges.
GRADUATE PROGRAMS
These programs include internships and in-depth mentoring by sponsoring teachers at
partnering schools. All internships are processed through the Field Experience Office.
Each partner school has its own interview requirements and employment criteria for
paid internships.
DEFERRED ENROLLMENT
Students who have been offered admission to a master’s degree program offered at
the Boston campus only may request deferral of or to the next appropriate term
of entry if the program has set entry terms. To do so students must submit, in
writing, an explanation for this request to the Office of Graduate Admissions. This
request will then be discussed with the appropriate Dean or Department Chair for
approval. Students who defer for one year may be asked to submit new letters of
recommendation and a new resume to be used in the placement process for practicum
and field experience. Students who have received approval for deferral of admission are
expected to update the Office of Graduate Admission regarding any change in address,
phone or contact information.
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REACTIVATED APPLICATIONS
Students who are accepted to a graduate program but do not enroll, or students who
are not accepted, may reactivate their applications within a period of two years. For
further information on reactivating an application, students should contact the Office
of Graduate Admissions at (617) 879-1114.
TRANSFER OF CREDIT
GRADUATE PROGRAMS
Graduate students are eligible to transfer up to six (6) graduate credit hours for courses
successfully completed at an accredited institution of higher education. Transfer credits
will not be awarded for classes that are taken pass/fail. No credits will be transferred if
the graduate student received a grade of B or higher in the course or if the credits in
question are older than six years at the time of admission. The credits in question also
may not duplicate any graduate or undergraduate work for which credit has been given
at Wheelock College and cannot have been applied to an academic degree at any other
institution. All requests for transfer of credit must be submitted within one year from
the student’s date of matriculation.
To have credits considered for transfer, students must:
• Obtain and complete the Transfer of Credit form available from the Office of
Records and Registration;
• Obtain written approval from the student’s advisor;
• Submit course description(s) of the courses successfully completed at the other
institution for review by the Dean of their school or Department Chair or
Director.
• Submit to the Registrar an official transcript issued by the other institution.
APPROVAL OF FUTURE COURSE WORK FOR TRANSFER OF CREDIT
Matriculated students must obtain written approval from the Dean of their school
before enrolling in graduate courses that are to be transferred for credit into a Wheelock
College degree program. Only courses that are to be completed at an accredited graduate
institution shall be eligible for such approval. Students will be held to a limit of 6
graduate transferred credit hours. Transfer credits will not be awarded for classes that are
taken pass/fail. No credits will be transferred unless the graduate student receives a grade
of B or higher in the course. The credits in question also may not duplicate any graduate
or undergraduate work for which credit has been given at Wheelock College and cannot
have been applied to an academic degree at any other institution.
GRADUATE FINANCIAL INFORMATION
TUITION
On-campus Courses: $920 per credit.
Off-campus graduate courses and programs are offered for cohorts at varying rates.
Likewise, Professional Development Institute fees may vary by term. For more
information, refer to the registration guidelines published each semester.
TUITION PAYMENTS
Graduate tuition is charged on a per-credit basis.
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AUDIT FEES
Students wishing to audit a course pay two-thirds of the tuition.
CERTIFICATE OPTION
Students in the Certificate Option Program pay the regular fees.
ENROLLMENT FEE
For all students, an enrollment deposit of $100 is due when a student accepts
Wheelock College’s offer of admission. This fee is non refundable but is applicable to
tuition charges.
REGISTRATION FEES
For all students, a $10 fee is charged for registration every semester.
LATE REGISTRATION FEE
All students who register after the deadline are charged a $100 late fee in addition to
the $10 registration fee.
In appreciation for the learning experiences provided to our practicum students,
Wheelock College issues one voucher per student to each supervising practitioner
with whom a student has completed a 3, 4, 5, or 6 credit practicum. Supervising
practitioners may use their voucher for any course or professional development
institute taking place on campus or at other locations. To view the complete Voucher
policy visit the College website at www.wheelock.edu/wheelock/academics/fieldexperience. If you have questions about the voucher policy, you may contact the
Director of Field Experience by calling (617) 879-2237.
RETURNED CHECK FEE
A fee of $25 is charged to any student who submits a payment check or money order
that the College’s bank cannot honor due to insufficient funds or any other cause.
GRADUATE PROGRAMS
TUITION VOUCHERS
TUITION REFUND POLICY
WITHDRAWAL
Refunds for withdrawal from a course and/or practicum will not be made without a
receipt from the Office of Records and Registration, of written notification of intent to
withdraw. Net refundable fees paid (tuition less registration fees and general fees) will
be refunded according to the college’s refund schedule.
Drop/Add: Refunds for courses dropped during the Drop/Add period when a
replacement course is NOT added will be refunded according to the college’s refund
schedule. When a student adds a course in place of a dropped course, the full tuition
payment may be applied towards the added course.
REFUND SCHEDULE
Before classes begin
=
100% of net refundable fees.
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From the day classes begin through
the 1st class meeting
After the 1st class meeting
through the 2nd class meeting
After the 2nd class meeting
=
75% of net refundable fees.
=
=
50% of net refundable fees.
No tuition refund.
For more information, please contact Financial Services/Student Accounts at (617)
879-2236.
RETURN OF TITLE IV FUNDS
GRADUATE PROGRAMS
This policy applies to students who withdraw, are approved for a leave of absence for
longer than 180 days, or are academically dismissed from the institution. Tuition/
fees and room and board refunds for these students are determined according to the
following policy:
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1. The term “Title IV Funds,” which refers to the federal financial aid programs
authorized under the Higher Education Act of 1965 (as amended) and for
graduate students enrolled at Wheelock College, includes the following programs:
Direct Subsidized Stafford Loans and Direct Unsubsidized Stafford Loans
2. A student’s withdrawal date is:
• The date the student began the institution’s withdrawal process or officially
notified the institution of intent to withdraw; or
• The midpoint of the period of enrollment for a student who leaves without
notifying the institution.
3. Determining the amount of Title IV funds to be returned:
• The amount of Title IV funds to be returned will be based on the number of days
in attendance as a proportion to the number of days in the term or period of
enrollment, up to the 60% point in the semester. There are no refunds after the
60% point in time, as the federal regulations view the aid has been “100% earned”
after that point in time. A copy of the worksheet used for this calculation and
examples can be requested from the Wheelock College Office of Admissions and
Financial Aid.
• In accordance with federal regulations, the return of Title IV funds is paid in the
following order:
• Direct Lending Unsubsidized Stafford Loans
• Direct Lending Subsidized Stafford Loans
• Direct Lending Graduate PLUS Loan
4. Other Title IV assistance
Institutional and student responsibilities in regard to the Return of Title IV Funds
Wheelock College’s responsibilities include:
• Providing each student with the information given in this policy;
• Identifying students who are affected by this policy;
• Completing the Return of Title IV Funds calculation for students who are subject
to the policy; and
• Returning the Title IV Funds that are due the Title IV programs.
• The student’s responsibilities include:
» Completing an official withdrawal form (available in the Office of Academic Records);
» Notifying the Financial Aid Office (email: [email protected]) immediately
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
of a pending withdrawal or leave, as federal refunds must be made within 30
days of the date of withdrawal or leave; and
» Returning to the Title IV programs any funds that were disbursed directly to
the student and for which the student was determined to be ineligible via the
Return of Title IV Funds calculation.
Students have the right to obtain a final calculation of the Return of Federal Funds.
The procedures and policies listed above supersede those published previously and are
subject to change at any time.
GRADUATE ASSISTANTSHIPS
GRADUATE MERIT SCHOLARSHIPS
All incoming graduate students with an undergraduate GPA of 3.2 or higher will be
considered for these scholarships for full or half-time study. Scholarships are awarded
by the Admissions Committee based on undergraduate GPA, the application essay and
references. Applications will be reviewed on a rolling basis each term until the funds
are awarded. There is no separate application for the merit grant. Applicants will be
informed in writing if they have received a scholarship. Scholarships are a one-time
award for incoming students and are not renewable. Scholarship recipients are notified
by the Graduate Admissions Office.
GRADUATE PROGRAMS
Assistantships are awarded to students attending at least half-time (5 credits or more),
qualified matriculated students on the basis of academic merit. Assistantships involve
research or scholarly work or administrative functions assistance to one of the academic
schools of the College. Awards are one academic year in length. Students who wish
to be considered for an assistantship should complete the Application for Graduate
Assistantship on the financial aid page for graduate students under “scholarships and
assistantships.” Only admitted students who are starting their program in the summer
or fall will be considered for graduate assistantships. Assistantships are awarded in the
spring for a fall start.
FEDERAL STAFFORD LOANS
This fixed-rate loan program is available for graduate students enrolled at least half-time
during the semester(s) within they wish to borrow. (Half-time for graduate students
is five credits.) Students who demonstrate financial need are eligible for the federal
subsidy that pays the interest during the in-school and grace period. Students without
need are eligible for the unsubsidized loan, which has the same conditions as the needbased loan except for the interest subsidy. The maximum subsidized loan is $8,500,
and the maximum combined subsidized and unsubsidized loan is $20,500. If you
plan to apply for this loan, you must submit the Free Application for Federal Student
Aid (FAFSA) and the Wheelock College graduate financial aid application which is
available on the graduate financial aid page on the Wheelock website.
ALTERNATIVE LOANS
If additional resources are necessary to finance your education, other loans are available.
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These loans can be borrowed by the student or by another borrower on the student’s
behalf. Repayment typically begins within 45 days of disbursement, but deferments
may be available. For loan information and applications, please visit the graduate
financial aid section of Wheelock College’s website (www.wheelock.edu/finaid) or call
the Financial Aid Office at (617) 879-2443 to request a brochure.
OTHER SOURCES OF AID
Several graduate education programs offer paid internships as an integral part of their
program. This includes the Integrated Elementary and Special Education Program and
the Early Childhood Master’s Programs.
GRADUATE PROGRAMS
FINANCIAL AID FOR STUDENTS IN THE INTEGRATED ELEMENTARY AND SPECIAL
EDUCATION (IESE) PROGRAM
The School of Education, Social Work, Child Life and Family Studies offers an
innovative program leading to an M.S. in Integrated Elementary and Special
Education. A hallmark of this program is that all students participate in a full-time
teaching internship; students can also elect to teach in their own classrooms (with
faculty review and approval). Internships with stipends ranging from $10,000 to
$15,000 are offered through several partner schools in the Boston area.
Policy on Satisfactory Academic Progress for Graduate Financial Aid Recipients
In order to remain eligible for assistance, financial aid applicants must meet
satisfactory academic progress (SAP) standards established in accordance with federal
regulations. The academic progress of aid applicants and recipients must be evaluated
by the Financial Aid Office annually. This evaluation will generally occur in May
after semester grades are posted as a part of our determination of eligibility for the
next academic year (Summer session is considered the beginning of the academic year
for financial aid purposes). Students applying for financial aid are also subject to the
standards at the point of financial aid application. The Graduate Satisfactory Academic
Progress (SAP) Standards for Financial Aid include quantitative and qualitative
measures.
The standards used for measuring GR Satisfactory Academic Progress are:
• Quantitative: Completion Rate
• Quantitative: Maximum Attempted Credits
• Qualitative: Cumulative Grade Point Average
The completion rate standard for financial aid consideration is calculated by dividing
the cumulative credit hours earned by the cumulative credit hours attempted. To
remain in good standing, students are expected to successfully complete at least 80
percent of the course work attempted. Students falling below the minimum completion
rate of 80 percent are placed on Financial Aid Suspension.
For example, a student earning 12 of 18 attempted graduate credit hours would enter
Financial Aid suspension. (12/18 = 67%).
The standard for maximum attempted credits students must proceed through their
program of study with not more than 150 percent of the total courses required to attain
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each grade level. Progress toward program completion is determined by comparing the
total number of credit hours attempted (including course withdrawals and failures) to
the number of credit hours successfully completed.
For example, if a student is pursuing a graduate degree requiring 36 credit hours, no
financial aid consideration would be available after attempting 54 credit hours, even
if the student has not yet earned the graduate degree and meets all other satisfactory
academic progress standards. (36 x 150% = 54)
The standard for cumulative grade point average for financial aid consideration,
students must maintain a cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 2.0 or higher.
Students falling below the minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.0 are placed
on Financial Aid Suspension.
FINANCIAL AID SUSPENSION
FINANCIAL AID SUSPENSION APPEALS
Students with significant and documented extenuating circumstances may appeal to
regain aid eligibility. Students may submit a written appeal with documentation to the
Financial Aid Office. The appeal must explain, and documentation must support, the
unusual circumstances that prevented the student from meeting required academic
standards. Unusual circumstances may include: death of a close family member,
extended illness, personal injury or other extraordinary circumstances. Supporting
documentation may include: death certificate, physician’s/counseling psychologist
statement, police report, etc. During the appeal process the student must be prepared to
pay his/her own expenses, such as tuition, fees, books, supplies, etc., without expectation
of financial aid reimbursement. Students whose appeals are approved are granted one
additional semester of aid, and in general, a student will be granted only one waiver
during their academic career. Students are expected to meet the standards of academic
progress upon completion of the semester for which they were granted a waiver.
GRADUATE PROGRAMS
Students failing either the quantitative or qualitative measures are placed on Financial
Aid Suspension. Students with deficiencies and/or whose aid is subject to suspension
are notified at their permanent address. The student is responsible for paying his/her
own expenses, such as tuition, fees, books, supplies, etc. and will not be reimbursed for
period(s) of financial aid suspension. Students on suspension status who improve their
academic performance to the required completion rate and cumulative GPA without
exceeding maximum attempted credits will return to good standing and are eligible
for financial aid consideration. Students exceeding the maximum attempted credits
immediately enter Financial Aid Suspension status and may no longer receive financial
aid for the declared program of study.
GRADUATE ACADEMIC POLICIES
This section of the College Catalog briefly describes certain key academic policies of
Wheelock College. These policies ought not be considered all-inclusive. A complete
description of the College’s Academic Policies can be accessed online at www.
wheelock.edu. In addition to the policies described here, there are requirements
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for students enrolled in various professional academic programs. Questions about
academic policies, procedures, or requirements should be directed to an academic
advisor, Academic Dean, and/or the Vice President for Academic Affairs. Finally, the
academic policies described in this catalog and on the college website may refer to other
documents (e.g., handbooks and pamphlets) that explain certain policies, procedures,
or requirements more fully and may be obtained from the Registrar’s office.
A. GRADUATE GRADING POLICY
GRADUATE PROGRAMS
1. Grades and course status
For Graduate students, Wheelock College uses a system of letter grades that are
equivalent to the following numerical quality points.
Letter Grade Quality Point Equivalent
A 4.00Superior
A-3.67Excellent
B+ 3.33
Very good
B 3.00Good
B-2.67Satisfactory
F 0.00Failing
R
0.00
Satisfactory progress in a course that spans over one semester
In addition, the following status may appear in a transcript
AU0.00 Audit
I 0.00Incomplete
WD0.00 Withdrawal
P (Pass)
Pass. Not included in grade-point average.
Each semester at registration, a graduate student may elect to take courses under the
Pass/Fail option. Students must declare at the time of registration their choice of
the Pass/Fail option or before the second class meeting. After this deadline, neither
students nor instructors may change the grading election. Students who are considering
pursuing study beyond the Master’s Degree level are encouraged to take at least onehalf of their courses for letter grades. A grade of Pass (P) does not affect a student’s
cumulative grade-point average.
An Incomplete (I) may be given to a student only for health reasons or in extraordinary
circumstances. It is the student’s responsibility to contact the instructor to request an
Incomplete. Unless the student has requested an incomplete, the faculty cannot assign
an incomplete.
Satisfactory in a continuing course (R) is the grade submitted by an instructor to
indicate satisfactory progress in a continuing independent study, field study, thesis, or
course that has been approved by the instructor and the appropriate Academic Dean
as a two semester study, thesis, or course. At the end of the second semester, a letter
grade, Pass, or Incomplete will be given. If an R is changed to an Incomplete, the
student must comply with the Incomplete procedures described above. If an R grade
is changed to Incomplete for a thesis, the student must complete the thesis within one
calendar year. A continuation fee of $100 will be charged for each semester that the
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student carries an Incomplete only in this circumstance. If the completed work is not
submitted by the deadline, the Incomplete will automatically be converted to a failing
grade of F.
Withdrawal (WD) is recorded by the Registrar when a student officially withdraws
from a course before the course withdrawal deadline published in the academic
calendar. A faculty member cannot submit a request for withdrawal. Only a student
can submit that request.
A graduate student who wishes to audit (AU) a course may do so with the approval of
the instructor and the appropriate Academic Dean. To audit a course, a student must
register for the course at registration or within the Drop/Add period. The tuition fee
for auditing a course is two-thirds of the normal course tuition.
All incomplete work must be submitted by the student to the instructor so that the
instructor may submit a change of grade to the Office of Records and Registration
before the deadline for submitting changes of grades. Students who plan to enter a
practicum in the semester following the granting of an Incomplete must finish all work
prior to beginning the practicum. If a grade has not been submitted by the deadline
for submitting changes of grades, the grade of “I” will be administratively changed to a
failing grade of “F.”
3. Deadline to change a final grade
A faculty member may change a grade he or she has assigned no later than 12 months
after the original grade submission deadline. After this time the students and instructor
must petition the Graduate Review Board for an exception to the grade change policy.
Once a student’s degree is conferred, the student’s academic statistics are considered
final and no grade changes are permitted.
GRADUATE PROGRAMS
2. Incompletes
It is the student’s responsibility to request an incomplete or “I” by submitting to the
instructor a completed Request for Incomplete form. If a student makes such a request
for more than one course, he or she must complete and submit a separate form for
each course (available from the Registrar). The instructor, at his or her sole discretion,
may grant the student’s request. The instructor will submit the completed form to the
Registrar at the same time that he or she submits final grades.
B. ACADEMIC STATUS
Graduate Full-Time and Part-Time Status
Graduate students who are registered for nine or more credit hours in the fall or
spring semester or six total credit hours during the summer session are considered
full-time. Graduate students who enroll for fewer than these numbers of credit hours
are considered part-time. A student’s status may change from one semester to the next.
Students may register for a maximum of fifteen credit hours per semester for the fall and
spring semesters, and a maximum of nine for a summer session. Permission to register
for additional credit hours must be obtained in advance from the student’s advisor and
the appropriate Academic Dean. To remain eligible for most types of financial aid,
graduate students must enroll in a minimum of five credit hours each semester.
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C. ACADEMIC STANDARDS
GRADUATE PROGRAMS
1. Good academic standing
A 2.67 (B-) semester and cumulative grade-point average is the minimum acceptable
standard for all graduate students. A graduate student must maintain this standard to
graduate from the College. Graduate students whose grade-point averages are below
2.67 are automatically placed on academic probation. In addition, a student must
demonstrate a strong likelihood that he or she will be able to complete successfully the
requirements of a graduate program. The Graduate Review Board monitors a graduate
student’s academic progress.
2. Waiver Policy (graduate students only)
Graduate students with excellent records of previous graduate coursework and/or
extensive work experience may request a substitution of specific required courses for
others; they may request an exemption from program requirements
Graduate students who have already mastered specific content knowledge or
competency evidence for their programs, and can provide evidence of this knowledge
may request a reduction of program credit hour requirements not to exceed six credit
hours. All requests must be submitted to Department Chairs and Academic Deans. All
students must take at least twenty-seven credit hours at Wheelock to obtain a Master’s
Degree. Graduate students who wish to request exemption from graduate program
requirements should discuss the appropriateness of the request with their advisors.
3. Independent or Field Study (graduate students)
Matriculated graduate students who have demonstrated competence in conducting
advanced research and study are encouraged to explore an Independent Study or Field
Study in lieu of course electives. An Independent Study or Field Study may not usually
replace required courses in a student’s program of study. Students may not usually
apply more than a total of six credit hours of Independent Study or Field Study toward
a Master’s Degree program.
D. ACADEMIC WARNING, PROBATION AND DISMISSAL
1. Academic Probation
Students whose semester or cumulative grade point averages drop below the level of
good standing (2.67) are automatically placed on academic probation. The Graduate
Review Board may recommend a range of actions for such students including dismissal
from the College.
Students who receive a grade of F will be placed on probation no matter what their
grade point average. Student who receive a second grade of F will have their cases
automatically reviewed by the Graduate Review Board for consideration for dismissal
from the College or other actions. The Graduate Review Board will attempt to notify
promptly any student who has been placed on academic probation. However, even if a
student is not notified, he/she is on academic probation.
2. Removal from Academic Probation
At the conclusion of each semester, the Graduate Review Board will review the record
of each graduate student who has been placed on academic probation for the previous
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semester. The Board may remove the student from academic probation if the student has:
• received a failing grade of “F” in the previous semester
• demonstrated sufficient academic progress as determined by the Graduate Review
Board
• failed to achieve a cumulative grade-point average of 2.67 or higher, achieved a
minimum 2.67 cumulative grade-point average or higher.
The Graduate Review Board decides, in its sole discretion, whether to remove a
graduate student from academic probation. The decision of the Graduate Review Board
regarding academic probation is final.
E. MINIMUM ACADEMIC REQUIREMENTS FOR STUDENTS RECEIVING FINANCIAL AID (GRADUATE STUDENTS)
See ‘Policy on Satisfactory Academic Progress for Graduate Financial Aid Recipients’
under Graduate Financial Information. If a student withdraws from one or more courses,
his/her bill and financial aid may be adjusted according to federal student aid guidelines.
F. ACADEMIC APPEALS
A Wheelock College student has a right to appeal a final grade or academic dismissal. A
student may appeal a final grade or academic dismissal to the Academic Appeals Board.
Undertaking such an appeal is an extraordinary matter.
GRADUATE PROGRAMS
3. Academic Dismissal
A graduate student who receives two failing grades of “F” in one or more courses,
or who violates the standards for academic honesty, or who fails to be removed from
academic probation after a semester, may be dismissed from the College following a
review by the Graduate Review Board. Such a student will not be allowed to register for
additional graduate program courses. A graduate student who has been dismissed for
academic reasons may apply to the Graduate Review Board for readmission after one
semester. The Graduate Review Board decides, in its sole discretion, whether to dismiss
or not dismiss a student for academic reasons.
G. NON-MATRICULATED STUDENT POLICY FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS
Wheelock welcomes students who have not yet been admitted into a graduate program
or who are not interested in matriculating into a graduate program to register for
courses as non-matriculated students.
All non-matriculated students who have attended six credit hours or more of graduate
courses will be automatically placed on academic hold and will not be permitted to
register for additional graduate program courses without obtaining prior approval from
the Director of Graduate Admissions.
Non-matriculated students who are considering applying to a Wheelock graduate
degree program are strongly encouraged to seek advice from the department chair and
the Academic Dean prior to registering for any graduate program courses.
Non-matriculated students who are not interested in enrolling in a Wheelock graduate
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degree program, but who are interested in pursuing course work at the graduate level
for reasons of personal enrichment or professional development, may request NonDegree Student status. Once a student is granted Non-Degree Student status, he or she
may take an unlimited number of graduate program courses, excluding those courses
restricted to matriculated students. Excluded courses include, but are not limited to,
all practica and clinical experiences, independent and field studies, and other courses
designated as restricted by the appropriate Academic Dean.
GRADUATE PROGRAMS
H. LENGTH OF TIME IN A PROGRAM (GRADUATE STUDENTS)
Graduate students are required to complete their graduate degree programs of study
within five years of the semester of matriculation. Part-time students who have
not completed their programs of study within this time limit must, no later than
one month before the end of their fifth year since matriculation, consult with their
academic advisor and Academic Dean and submit a letter of petition to the Graduate
Review Board requesting an extension. A rationale for delaying completion should be
included. Students should be aware that delay in completing their degree requirements
may result in their inability to complete their original program of study, as the
requirements and availability of programs may change over time.
The Graduate Review Board may choose to accept or reject the student’s petition. The
decision of the Graduate Review Board is final, and there is no right of appeal this decision.
I. WITHDRAWAL FROM THE COLLEGE
1. Voluntary Withdrawal
A graduate student who wishes to withdraw from the College, must complete an
Official Withdrawal form and meet with the appropriate Academic Dean. This form
is available on MyWheelock or in the Registrar’s office. The student should obtain all
necessary signatures and return the form to the Registrar’s office. Failure to complete
this form in a timely manner may affect any refund the student may receive. A student
will not be removed from the billing list until the withdrawal procedure has been
completed.
Students who withdraw once the semester begins, should review the College’s refund
schedule and return of Title IV funds. The date of withdrawal is based on the date the
withdrawal form is initiated.
2. Non-Voluntary Withdrawal
When a student is required to withdraw from the College for academic reasons, a
non-voluntary withdrawal occurs. See Section V.I (Academic Warning, Probation and
Dismissal) discussing academic dismissal. A graduate student who does not register
for a semester, and who has not requested a leave of absence, will be deemed to have
withdrawn from the College.
3. Leave of Absence
Graduate students who plan to interrupt their studies for one semester or a period
longer than one semester are required to submit a Leave of Absence form. This form
is available on MyWheelock or in the Registrar’s office and should be completed as
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soon as the student decides to take a leave of absence. The student should obtain all
necessary signatures and return the form to the Registrar’s office. Failure to complete
this form in a timely manner may affect any refund the student may receive.
Normally, students may request a leave of absence for no more than three consecutive
semesters. At the end of an approved leave of absence, and prior to the beginning of
the semester in which the student plans to resume her or his studies, the student must
submit to the appropriate academic dean a Request for Reinstatement form in order
to reactivate her or his status and to be able to register for courses. If, at the end of
an approved leave of absence, a student does not submit a Request for Reinstatement
form, the student will then automatically be considered withdrawn from Wheelock. All
withdrawn students are automatically placed on academic hold and are not permitted
to register for additional graduate courses without submitting to the appropriate
academic dean a Request for Reinstatement form.
J. READMISSION TO THE COLLEGE
A graduate student in good academic standing who has withdrawn and wishes to seek
reinstatement within five years of the date of his/her matriculation should complete
the Request for Readmission. This Request for Readmission is then forwarded to the
Graduate Review Board.
GRADUATE PROGRAMS
In ordinary circumstances, all graduate students must complete their degree programs
within five years of the semester of matriculation. If a leave of absence for a student is
approved, the amount of approved leave time does not count as part of the five years
allowed for completion. Students may not retroactively request a leave of absence but
must acquire permission before the beginning of the first semester of leave of absence.
Graduate students who interrupt their studies for a period longer than one semester
without acquiring in advance of the first semester a formally approved leave of absence
will be automatically considered withdrawn from the graduate program. All withdrawn
students will be placed on academic hold and will not be permitted to register for
additional graduate courses without first submitting to the appropriate academic
dean a Request for Reinstatement form. In these cases, the semesters of unauthorized
academic inactivity will count as part of the five years total allowed for completion of a
degree program.
A student who has been required to withdraw by the Graduate Review Board for
academic reasons may request to be readmitted after a year’s absence from the College.
The student must complete the Request for Readmission form. The student will also
be required to provide supporting documents such as college transcripts, letters of
recommendation from employers, or letters of support for readmission. The Graduate
Review Board will review the supporting documents and make the final decision
regarding reinstatement.
Students seeking to return to the College more than five years after their initial
matriculation should follow the admissions procedures in the catalog.
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K. PRACTICA
GRADUATE PROGRAMS
Standards for Entering a Practicum
Normally, students must be admitted into a graduate program for at least one semester
prior to the semester in which they wish to begin their first practicum (with the
exception of Social Work). Full-time graduate students in Education and Child Life
programs should consult with the Field Experience Office as soon as they are admitted
to discuss placement options. Part-time graduate students should meet with the Field
Experience staff early in the semester before they plan to begin a pre-practicum,
practicum or internship. Deadlines for graduate students to register for practica can
be obtained from the student’s academic advisor or department chair. Social Work
students should plan a practicum with the Director of Social Work Field Education.
Students should consult with the Office of Field Experience (or, in the case of social
work, the Director of Social Work Field Education) to receive complete information on
the College’s/program’s practica policies. These policies include:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Incomplete Grades before Entering a Practicum
Reinstatement in a Practicum
Withdrawing From A Practicum Or Internship
Grievous Behavior at Placement
Student Employment at Placement Site
CORI (Criminal Offender Record Inquiry) and Other Background Checks
L. ACADEMIC RECORDS
The Office of Academic Records and Registration maintains the academic transcript
of each student. A student’s transcript is available to a student upon written request.
An official transcript bears the seal of the College and the signature of the Registrar.
A transcript issued directly to a student is designated “Issued to Student.” To obtain
a copy of his or her transcript, a student must complete the Transcript Request form
available on the Wheelock College website or by submitting a request online through
the National Student Loan Clearinghouse and paying the appropriate fee for each
transcript requested. To obtain an official transcript, a student must also have satisfied
his or her financial obligations to the College.
A file for every student is maintained in the Office of Academic Records and
Registration and in the Office of Academic Advising and Academic Assistance.
Students may inspect these files upon request.
M. Degrees, Diplomas and Graduation Ceremony Participation
Wheelock College confers degrees three times per year in May, August, and December.
Wheelock conducts its graduation ceremony on the Boston campus each May to
celebrate as a community the achievements of its degree recipients and program
completers.
Students who are not degree recipients or program completers are eligible to participate
in the graduation ceremony if they are within eight credits of the total required course
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credits. Other graduation ceremonies take place at selected national and international
program delivery sites to honor the achievements of off-campus Wheelock College
students. The President of Wheelock College will consult with administration, faculty,
and students to decide when and where to host these off-campus graduation ceremonies.
Complete information regarding diplomas, the process of degree completion, and
academic eligibility to participate in the commencement ceremony is available from the
Office of Academic Records and Registration.
LICENSURE AND CERTIFICATION INFORMATION
CHILD LIFE SPECIALIST/CHILD LIFE PROFESSIONAL CERTIFICATION
EDUCATOR LICENSURE/MASSACHUSETTS DEPARTMENT OF ELEMENTARY
AND SECONDARY
EDUCATION LICENSURE
Wheelock students who complete a post baccalaureate licensure or master’s program
that is approved for Initial Educator Licensure in Massachusetts (including passing
state licensure examinations), are eligible for institutional endorsement for that license
in Massachusetts. Once a teacher is employed in a position that requires the Initial
License, the license is activated and valid for employment in Massachusetts for up
to five consecutive years. Within five years after the license is activated, it must be
advanced to a Professional level. The Professional license can be renewed every 5 years
indefinitely. Requirements for Professional Licensure include three years of teaching
in the field and at age/grade level of the Initial License after being eligible for that
license; mentoring in the first year of teaching with the license; 50 hours of supervised
experience beyond the first year of mentoring; and course work approved by the state
for Professional Licensure, including any master’s degree in a content area of the license
or a number of state approved 12-credit course clusters developed and approved for
specific licenses.
GRADUATE PROGRAMS
Certification as a Child Life Specialist is available through the Child Life Council
(CLC). To become a Certified Child Life Specialist (CCLS) students must pass
an examination that is administered by the CLC two times per year in May and
November. All eligibility requirements must be completed by the time of application
to take the examination. Once eligibility is approved, the student may take the
certification examination. The student may take this examination as many times as he
or she needs to pass it, as long as the current eligibility requirements are met. For more
information on Child Life Certification requirements, contact the Child Life Council
at Child Life Council, Inc., 11820 Parklawn Drive, Suite 240, Rockville, MD 208522529, or via their web site at www.childlife.org, or call 301-881-7090.
Undergraduate and graduate state-approved and nationally recognized (accredited)
teacher preparation programs offered at Wheelock lead to institutional endorsement
for the Massachusetts Initial Teacher License in three graduate areas and one advance
specialist license:
• Early Childhood: Teacher of Students With and Without Disabilities (PreK-2)
• Integrated Elementary (1-6) or /Special Education (Moderate Disabilities, PreK-8)
at the graduate level only
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• Advanced Specialist, Initial Teacher of Reading license (All Levels)
EARLY CHILDHOOD CREDENTIAL REQUIREMENTS/MASSACHUSETTS
DEPARTMENT OF EARLY EDUCATION AND CARE (DEEC)
Wheelock graduates of baccalaureate and post-baccalaureate Early Childhood Programs
can use courses and supervised practica from their programs to apply for lead teacher
and director credentials issued by the Department of Early Education and Care.
The Massachusetts Department of Early Education and Care (DEEC) has established
prerequisite educational and job experience requirements for individuals working in
child care centers, nursery schools and private kindergartens. The DEEC credential
indicates that an individual meets these criteria and, therefore, is eligible to be
employed in specific roles within child care settings. Wheelock College has individual
courses and programs that meet the requirements for the DEEC credentials required
for the following positions:
GRADUATE PROGRAMS
TEACHER:
Must be at least 18 years of age or have a high school diploma or equivalent AND
have 3 credits or 4 CEU credits in Child Development (birth to 8 years of age) and 9
months of supervised work experience or one practicum with children under 7 years
of age, three months of which must be with infants or toddlers for Infant/Toddler
Teacher, and with preschoolers for Preschool Teacher.
INFANT/TODDLER LEAD TEACHER:
B.S. or B.A. or advanced degree in ECE or related field of study; 12 credits or
equivalent CEUs in early childhood or a related field of which 3 credits or equivalent
CEUs must be in either curriculum, program planning or classroom management,
and 3 credits or equivalent CEUs must be in a course in child development (birth to
8 years) and 3 credits or equivalent CEUs must be in a course related to the care of
infants and toddlers; and 18 months of supervised work experience with children under
7 years of age, six months of which must be with infants and toddlers.
PRESCHOOL LEAD TEACHER:
B.S. or B.A. or advanced degree in ECE; PreK-3 Certification from DOE, or in
a related field of study; 12 credits in early childhood or a related field of which
3 credits or equivalent CEUs must be either curriculum, program planning or
classroom management, and 3 credits or equivalent CEUs must be in a course in child
development (birth to 8 years); and 18 months of supervised work experience with
children under 7 years of age, six months of which must be with preschoolers.
DIRECTOR:
Must meet the requirements of lead teacher; have 6 months of work experience after
meeting lead teacher qualifications; and must have at least 6 additional credits or
equivalent CEU credits in courses covering either day care administration, business or
management.
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DEFINITION OF A PRACTICUM FOR EEC CREDENTIAL
Completion of 150 hours, over an 8-week period, of direct work with infants/toddlers
or preschoolers, supervised by personnel from an institution of higher learning, with at
least three site visits, and placement with at least a Lead Teacher qualified staff member.
One practicum may substitute for 9 months of work experience. The practicum must
be verified on the Verification of Work Experience form and listed on a transcript.
Verification may be from the placement or the institution of higher learning.
For more information about credentials for child care providers and center directors
certification, or to receive an updated listing of the current child care certification
requirements, see the Department for Early Education and Care web-site at www.eec.
state.ma.us or contact them at 51 Sleeper Street, 4th Floor, Boston, MA 02210. You
may also call the DEEC at (617) 988-6600; fax at (617) 988-2451; and TTY at (617)
988-2454.
APPROVED MASTERS PROGRAM FOR PROFESSIONAL LICENSURE
ADVANCED COURSE CLUSTERS FOR PROFESSIONAL LICENSURE
The college offers three state-approved 12-credit course clusters for teachers who hold
a masters degree in any field and an Initial teacher license they want to advance to
the Professional level. Three years of experience under their Initial license are required
for Professional Licensure, in addition to state requirements for mentoring in the
early years of teaching. The clusters also offer teachers new initial level content for a
variety of professional development purposes and do not require a masters degree for
enrollment. The three Wheelock 12-credit clusters are:
GRADUATE PROGRAMS
Wheelock College offers one full master’s program approved for initially licensed
teachers who seek Professional Licensure in Massachusetts: the Teacher of Reading
Master’s Degree. This program is also nationally recognized by the International
Reading Association (IRA). Any teacher applying for the Teacher of Reading master’s
program must provide a copy of his/her initial teacher license with the admissions
materials and a letter from a principal or director on letterhead verifying at least one
year of teaching under that initial license.
• English Language Learners/English as a Second Language (for advancement of
licenses in Early Childhood, Elementary, or Moderate Disabilities);
• Reading (for advancement of licenses in Early Childhood, Elementary, Moderate
Disabilities, or English as a Second Language);
• Special Education (for advancement of licenses in Early Childhood, Elementary,
or English as a Second Language).
Entrance to the Reading cluster courses requires permission from the Chair of the
Language and Literacy Department because some of the courses are related to the
advanced Teacher of Reading Master’s program.
The School of Education, Social Work, Child Life and Family Studies offers several
masters programs that can incorporate the 12-credit clusters to serve the professional
development needs of students who do not already have a masters degree.
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For state licensure requirements contact the office of the Dean of Education, Social
Work, Child Life and Family Studies (or the Massachusetts Department of Elementary
and Secondary Education website at www.doe.mass.edu/educators).
SOCIAL WORK/SOCIAL WORKER LICENSURE: MASSACHUSETTS BOARD OF
REGISTRATION OF SOCIAL WORK
GRADUATE PROGRAMS
Social Work is a legally regulated profession in Massachusetts and in most states. The
nature of the regulation varies somewhat from state to state. The most common form,
as in Massachusetts, is licensure, although some states have certification. Technically,
what is usually regulated is practice under the title of “social worker.” Not all states have
all levels, and the terminology varies. Some states license only more advanced clinical
practice. In Massachusetts, the licensing levels are as follows:
• LSWA. Licensed Social Work Associate. Associate level (associate degree in human
service field or baccalaureate degree in any field).
• LSW. Licensed Social Worker. BSW-Basic level (baccalaureate degree in social
work plus passing LSW licensing exam).
• LCSW. Licensed Certified Social Worker. MSW-Intermediate level (master’s
degree in social work plus passing LCSW licensing exam).
• LICSW. Licensed Independent Clinical Social Worker. Advanced level (master’s
degree in social work plus two years of LICSW-supervised post-master’s degree
practice experience plus passing advanced licensing exam). This is the level that is
most likely to be recognized by insurance companies as eligible for reimbursement
for professional services.
Students should always investigate the specific licensure regulations in the state in
which you intend to practice. Contact the National Association of Social Workers at
www.socialworkers.org or the Association of Social Work Boards at 1-800-225-6880 or
www.aswb.org.
Massachusetts Licensing Regulations for Social Work
To practice social work, persons must be licensed in the state of Massachusetts. In
addition, all others who have the title “social worker,” or who refer to themselves as
practicing social work, must be licensed unless they are county, state, or municipal
employees. Practicing social work without a license is punishable by fine and/or
imprisonment, as is performing functions reserved for a higher licensing level. For
more information on these licensing requirements, please visit www.naswma.org.
MTEL POLICY AT WHEELOCK COLLEGE
According to Massachusetts law and regulations, to obtain an Initial License to teach in
Massachusetts public schools, candidates must complete a state approved program of
study and pass the Massachusetts Tests for Educator Licensure (MTEL). The tests are
license-specific and the purpose of these exams is to ensure that each licensed educator
has the knowledge and skills essential to teach effectively in Massachusetts public schools.
Students entering a post-baccalaureate or Master’s Program leading to a Massachusetts
Teacher License must pass the Communication and Literacy Skills exam and the
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appropriate Subject exam(s) prior to entering their capstone or portfolio course as
designated by their program. It is recommended that students take the MTEL as
advised, and as early as possible in their program. For graduate students, only the
Foundations of Reading Test should be delayed until related course work is completed.
Students in a graduate educator licensure-only program not leading to a Master’s degree
are required to pass all required MTEL exams prior to entrance into the program with
one exception. A passing score on the Foundations of Reading exam is required prior to
entering the capstone course.
MTEL TEST PREPARATION RESOURCES
2009-2010 PROGRAM COMPLETER INFORMATION
The following table summarizes the MTEL pass rates for the program completers in
academic year 2009-2010 reported in the 2011 Annual Institutional Report. Program
completers are defined as individuals who have completed all the requirements of a
state-approved teacher preparation program.
Pass Rates:
Basic Skills: Communication and Literacy
Reading 100%
Writing 100%
Aggregate 100%
Academic Content Areas
Early Childhood
Foundations of Reading
General Curriculum
Aggregate
GRADUATE PROGRAMS
The College has developed an extensive system of review sessions and support courses
specifically for MTEL preparation support. A sequence of courses, including writing
courses, is identified that should enhance students’ ability to perform well on the exams
if additional content knowledge is needed, in addition to test taking preparation or
general content review. Wheelock students have an obligation to work with faculty
members and advisors to develop an MTEL preparation plan and to fully utilize the
College’s resources. Additional information about the MTEL and Wheelock’s support
system is found on the College website at www.wheelock.edu. Beginning in 2009,
Wheelock MTEL preparation support is also available to the public on a fee basis.
100%
100%
100%
100%
Teaching Special Populations
Aggregate 100%
Summary Pass Rate*
100%
* The Summary Pass Rate represents the percent of program completers who have
passed every portion of the test they have attempted. Students may take each section of
the test as many times as necessary to obtain a passing score.
The faculty and administration of Wheelock College are committed to preparing
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GRADUATE PROGRAMS
exemplary classroom teachers. Wheelock allows students (depending on their
individual program requirements) to enter education degree programs without having
first passed the MTEL, but all candidates must pass the required examinations by
specific points within their preparation programs, as articulated in the institutional
MTEL policy in place since fall 2001 for undergraduate programs and since fall 2002
for graduate programs. Wheelock faculties believe that successful passage of the test
is only one measure of a potentially successful teacher. The coursework students will
complete and the test support system the College has in place are designed to help
students achieve their goals. While a student’s success on the MTEL is only one part of
becoming a classroom teacher, it is an important and necessary part, and the College
supports students in numerous ways to help them be successful.
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DEPARTMENTS AND GRADUATE PROGRAMS
DEPARTMENT OF CHILD LIFE AND FAMILY STUDIES
Paul Thayer, Chair and Associate Professor
Virginia Coleman, Instructor
Suzanne Graca, Instructor
Carolyn Kurker-Gallagher, Instructor
Stefi Rubin, Associate Professor
Claire White, Assistant Professor
AVAILABLE PROGRAMS OF STUDY:
Certificate in Parenting Education
Master of Science, Child Life and Family Centered Care
Master of Science, Child Life and Family Centered Care: Advanced Standing
Master of Science, Child Life and Family Centered Care: Combined Degree
Increasingly, parenting education is being recognized as an appropriate strategy for
supporting parents and parents-to-be, and as a foundation for raising healthy children
and families. There is a high demand for knowledgeable, skilled professionals in this
developing field. In this program, professionals who work with families in supportive,
educational and therapeutic capacities will gain knowledge of the issues and concerns
of parents, and of how to respond to these concerns; gain an understanding of how
adults grow and develop and of the developmental stages of parenting; and gain the
skills needed to work more effectively with parents individually and in groups.
HDF 515
CFS 614
CFS 737
CFP 603
Lifespan Development II: Adult Development
Perspectives on Parenting
Working with Parents
Practicum and Seminar I: Family Studies
3 credits
3 credits
3 credits
3 credits
GRADUATE PROGRAMS
CERTIFICATE IN PARENTING EDUCATION/15 CREDITS
Elective Courses
Students select an additional 3 credits from among HDF or CFS course offerings 3 credits
M.S./CHILD LIFE AND FAMILY CENTERED CARE/39 CREDITS
The Child Life and Family-Centered Care program prepares students to work as child
life specialists in inpatient, outpatient, and community-based health care settings.
Students develop skills as child development specialists, interdisciplinary team
members and health educators. They select courses in child life, human development,
multiculturalism, research, and child and family studies. The Child Life and FamilyCentered Care Program includes clinical experiences and course work that prepare
students, as members of an interdisciplinary health team, to support the psychosocial
and developmental needs of children and families across the health care continuum.
Upon successful completion of the program, students will obtain a Master of Science
in Child Life and Family Centered Care, and will be eligible to sit for the Child Life
Council Certification examination.
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Requirements
Core Courses 9 credits
HDF 526
The Meaning and Development of Play
3 credits
Multicultural selective3 credits
Research selective3 credits
GRADUATE PROGRAMS
Department Courses6 credits
Selectives in Human Development or other related courses to be determined with
academic advisor.
Program Courses 18 credits
CLF 632
The Child and Family in Health Care
3 credits
CLF 670
Clinical Issues in Child Life Programs
3 credits
CLP 671
Clinical Experience & Seminar I: Children in
Health Care Settings6 credits
CLF 770
Child Life Program Development and Administration 3 credits
CLP 673
Clinical Experience and Seminar II: Child Health
& Development3 credits
Elective Courses6 credits
MS/CHILD LIFE AND FAMILY CENTERED CARE: ADVANCED STANDING/36 CREDITS
Designed for students who are currently eligible to become certified as Child Life
Specialists or have completed a 480-hour internship under a certified Child Life
Specialist, this program offers opportunities for students to advance the skills of the Child
Life Competencies. During one required 200-hour internship in a community health care
or specialty settings, students work with interdisciplinary teams in more specialized areas
of child life, including: child development and family-centered care, health promotion,
bereavement support and program development. Upon successful completion of the
program, students will obtain a Master of Science in Child Life and Family Centered
Care and will be eligible to sit for the Child Life Council Certification Examination.
Requirements
Core Courses 9 credits
HDF 526
The Meaning and Development of Play
3 credits
Multicultural selective3 credits
Research selective3 credits
Department Courses
9 credits
Selectives in Human Development or other related field
Program Courses12 credits
CLF 632
The Child and Family in Health Care
3 credits
CLF 670
Clinical Issues in Child Life Programs
3 credits
CLP 670
Clinical Experience and Seminar I:
Child Health & Development
3 credits
CLF 770
Child Life Program Development and Administration 3 credits
Elective Courses6 credits
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Optional internship:
CLP 672 Clinical Experience and Seminar II 3 credits
MASTER OF SCIENCE IN CHILD LIFE AND FAMILY CENTERED CARE:
COMBINED DEGREE/27 GRADUATE CREDITS
This program is only open to students who graduate with a professional major in
Child Life from Wheelock College. Students must enter the program within 3 years of
receiving their undergraduate degree.
Required graduate coursework
CLF 670
Clinical Issues in Child Life
3 credits
CLF 770
Child Life Program Development and Administration 3 credits
Research selective3 credits
6 credits
3 credits
3 credits
3 credits
3 credits
Professional Internship Course CLP 670
Child Life Internship/Seminar I
3 credits
3 credits
Graduate Selectives (choose 3)
9 credits
CFS 504
Assessment of Development in B-3
3 credits
CFS 514
Curriculum Development B-3
3 credits
CFS 606
Family Support: Children with Special Needs
3 credits
CFS 614
Perspectives on Parenting
3 credits
CFS 617
Bereavement Care3 credits
CFS 618
Contemporary Issues in Child and Family Studies
3 credits
CFS 622
Issues in Death and Dying
3 credits
CFS 630
Helping Children Cope with Stress
3 credits
CFS 737
Working with Parents
3 credits
SWK 670
Spirituality of Children and Families
3 credits
CLF 674
The Hospitalized Child in England
3 credits
GRADUATE PROGRAMS
Human Development Selectives (Choose two) HDF 501
Lifespan Development I: Birth-Adolescence HDF 502
Infant and Toddler Behavior and Development
HDF 521
Children’s Cognitive Development
HDF 560
Risk and Resiliency in Infancy
DEPARTMENT OF EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION
David Fernie, Chair and Professor
Cheryl Render Brown, Associate Professor
Catherine Donohue, Associate Professor
Ellie Friedland, Associate Professor
Lucinda Heimer, Assistant Professor
Patricia Hnatiuk, Instructor
Deborah Keefe, Instructor
Diane Levin, Professor
Amy Phillips Losso, Associate Professor
Karen Murphy, Associate Professor
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Bobbi Rosenquest, Associate Professor
Susan Shainker, Instructor
Susan Zoll, Instructor
AVAILABLE PROGRAMS OF STUDY:
Master of Science in Early Childhood Education (PreK-2) for Initial Licensure
Master of Science in Care and Education in Early Childhood Settings
GRADUATE PROGRAMS
MS/EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION (PREK-2) FOR INITIAL LICENSURE/34 CREDITS
The 34-credit Early Childhood Education (PreK-2) Masters Program is designed
to prepare professionals who wish to pursue careers in public schools, child care
programs, Head Start programs, and community- or corporate-based early care and
education settings. Students develop skills in curriculum design, observation and
assessment, communication, collaboration, responding to diverse learning styles, and
classroom management. Emphasis is placed on a commitment to equity in a multiracial and multicultural society, working in partnership with families, fully integrating
children with special needs into the learning environment, and collaboration with
community agencies. This program leads to Massachusetts’ Department of Elementary
and Secondary Education Early Childhood: Teacher of Students With and Without
Disabilities (PreK-2) Initial Licensure. This license enables educators to work in
diverse settings, including inclusive pre-K-2 public school settings and early childhood
programs serving children ages 3-8 in public and private settings. To be eligible for
state licensure through this program, students must meet all program requirements,
including successfully passing the Massachusetts Tests for Educator Licensure (MTEL).
Requirements
Orientation to Education Programs
0 credit
Core Courses9 credits
Take either of the following:
HDF 504
Child Development: The Early Years or
HDF 501 Lifespan Development: Birth through Adolescence
3 credits
EDU 505
Racial and Cultural Identities
3 credits
RES 651
Action Research I
1 credit
RES 652
Action Research II
2 credits
Program Courses25 Credits
EDU 520
Introduction to Inclusive Early Childhood Education 3 credits
RDG 537
Teaching Reading3 credits
EDU 535
Developing Numeracy for Diverse Learners
3 credits
Practicum Core I:
EDU 522
Curriculum for EC Social Studies & Arts (fall only)
EDU 528
Impact of Special Needs: ECE (fall only)
EDP 521
Practicum & Seminar: ECE PreK/K or
EDP 526
Practicum & Seminar ECE 1st/2nd
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2 credits
2 credits
3 credits
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
Practicum Core II:
EDU 525
Curriculum for ECE Science, Technology & Health
(spring only)
EDP 521
Practicum & Seminar: ECE PreK, K or
EDP 526
Practicum & Seminar: ECE, 1st/2nd
2 credits
3 credits
Completion of Program:
RDG 530
Teaching Literacy to English Language Learners
3 credits
EDU 702
Capstone Course1 credit
M.S./ CARE AND EDUCATION IN EARLY CHILDHOOD SETTINGS/30 CREDITS
The Care and Education program has two different options: one for beginning early
childhood education practitioners and one for continuing practitioners.
• Beginning practitioners typically are students without an academic background
in early education who want to pursue careers outside of a public school setting.
This program includes foundation courses in early childhood education including
children with special needs, child development, early childhood curricula and
multicultural issues.
• Certification: Students completing the Beginning Practitioner option can use
their course experience to qualify for the Department of Early Education and
Care (EEC) lead teacher credential. This program does not lead to institutional
endorsement for a PreK-2 teacher license issued by the Massachusetts Department
of Elementary and Secondary Education (SES)
• Continuing practitioners are students who want to increase their knowledge of
early childhood education and may have already obtained an initial teaching
license or have an academic background in early education.
GRADUATE PROGRAMS
Care and Education in Early Childhood Setting, a 30 credit masters program is
designed for students who will work with young children from 2.8 to 8 years of age
in public, private and parochial care and education settings as care givers, classroom
teachers, lead teachers, directors, and/or family liaison workers. This program prepares
students to work with an increasingly diverse population of children, families and
communities.
Certification: Students who have an initial license, the masters degree, and who
complete a state approved 12-credit course cluster (in Special Education, Teaching
English Language Learners or Reading) as part of their program, may advance their
license to the professional level after teaching for three years. Depending on students’
prior experience and course of study at Wheelock, the Continuing Practitioner option
may lead to DEEC Director I certification.
Requirements: Beginning Practitioner Option
Orientation to Education Programs
0 credits
Core Courses 9 credits
Take either of the following:
HDF 504
Child Development: The Early Years or
HDF 501 Lifespan Development: Birth through Adolescence
3 credits
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EDU 505
Racial and Cultural Identities*
3 credits
Research Selective3 credits
GRADUATE PROGRAMS
Program Courses15 credits
EDU 520
Introduction to Inclusive ECE
3 credits
RDG 537
Teaching Reaching
3 credits
EDU 528
Impact of Special Needs: ECE
2 credits
EDU 522
Curriculum for EC Social Studies and Arts or
EDU 525
Curriculum for ECE Science, Technology, & Health 3 credits
EDP 530
Field Experience & Seminar in ECE
3 credits
EDU 655
Capstone: Care and Education
1 credit
Focus of Study 6 Credits
All students must do a focus of study consisting of six credits in related area and
drawing from an approved list of focus courses. A focus of study can be selected
from the following options or can be constructed by the student in consultation with
their academic advisor. All foci of study must be approved by and planned with the
academic advisor. Individual courses can not be used to meet more than one program
requirement.
Suggested Areas of Focus
Early Child Care Environments
Family Communication and Support
Expressive Arts
Math, Science and Technology
Child Development
Early Childhood Curriculum Development
Early Childhood Special Needs
Early Childhood Leadership, Policy and Administration
Requirements: Continuing Practitioner Option
Core Courses 9 credits
Human Development Selective or Specialization specific HD course 3 credits
EDU 505 Racial and Cultural Identities* 3 credits
*Racial and Cultural Identities is waived if already taken as a Wheelock undergraduate student
Research Selective 3 credits
Program Courses15 credits
CFS 618 Cont. Issues in Ch and Fam Stud 3 credits
EDU 528
Impact of Special Needs: ECE
2 credits
EDU 522
Curriculum for ECE Social Studies/Arts or
EDU 525
Curriculum for ECE Science/Tech/Health 3 credits
(if student selects some specialization options a different curriculum course may be
substituted)
Language/Literacy Selective or Specialization Content Course EDP 531 Extended Field Experience in ECE EDU 655 Capstone: Care and Education 136
3 credits
3 credits
1 credit
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
Focus of Study All students must do a focus of study consisting of six (6) credits in a related area. A
focus of study can be selected to meet the requirements of a formal specialization or
course cluster or can be constructed by the student in consultation with their academic
advisor. All foci of study must be approved by and planned with the academic advisor.
Individual courses can not be used to meet more than one program requirement.
Students may wish to develop a self-constructed program that meets their own interests
and professional needs or select a specialization or course cluster. (see below)
Areas of Formal Specialization
Child and Family Studies
Certificate in Parenting Education
Areas of Focus to Meet Requirements For Massachusetts DESE Professional License
If you wish to advance an Initial License to the Professional Level, select a 12 credit
course cluster approved by the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and
Secondary Education for this purpose. The course clusters are:
If you are not seeking to advance an Initial license to the Professional level, or pursuing
a formal specialization, a broader selection of courses is open to you to use for your
focus of study.
DEPARTMENTS OF ELEMENTARY AND SPECIAL EDUCATION
ELEMENTARY EDUCATION
Donna McKibbens, Interim Dean and Chair
Linda Banks-Santilli, Associate Professor
Joeritta de Almeida, Assistant Professor
Judith Richards, Instructor
Deborah Samuels-Peretz, Assistant Professor
William Thompson, Associate Professor
Jeff Winokur, Instructor
Karen Worth, Instructor
GRADUATE PROGRAMS
• Teaching English Language Learners
• Reading
• Special Education
SPECIAL EDUCATION
Elaine Kohen, Chair and Instructor
John Crapps, Professor
Felicity Crawford, Assistant Professor
Kathleen McDonough, Instructor
Ju Hee Park, Assistant Professor
Shoshanna Starr Collins, Instructor
Stephanie Cox Suarez, Associate Professor
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AVAILABLE PROGRAMS OF STUDY:
Master of Science in Integrated Elementary and Special Education
Master of Science in Educational Studies
Educational Studies: Peace Corps Masters International
Advanced Professional Course Cluster in Special Education
MS/EDUCATIONAL STUDIES/30 CREDITS
GRADUATE PROGRAMS
This program is designed for students who are interested in pursuing a master’s degree
in education, but are not interested in obtaining initial state licensure as a teacher.
Students work with an academic advisor to develop a program of study that meets the
student’s academic and professional goals. The program includes 17 credits of elective
courses which allow the student to select from a number of courses, including one of
the 3 advanced professional course cluster, the parenting education certificate program,
the organizational leadership certificate program, or a combination of courses from
different areas of study offered at Wheelock.
Requirements
Core Courses 13 credits
Human Development Selective 3 credits
Multicultural Selective3 credits
Research Selective 3 credits
EDU 505
Racial and Cultural Identities
3 credits
EDU 704
Capstone: Educational Studies
1 credit
Elective Courses: 17 credits
Students work with an advisor to select courses in Elementary Education, Special
Education, Language and Literacy, Early Childhood Education, Child and Family
Studies, Social Work and/or Organizational Leadership.
MS/INTEGRATED ELEMENTARY AND SPECIAL EDUCATION/38-47 CREDITS
The nationally recognized Master of Science in Integrated Elementary and Special
Education(IESE) program prepares educators to work in an inclusive setting with
children in a public or private school as an Elementary teacher or a Teacher of Students
with Moderate Disabilities. The IESE program leads to institutional endorsement for
the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education Elementary
Teacher (1-6) license at the Initial stage, and Teacher of Students with Moderate
Disabilities (PreK-8) license at the Initial stage*.
The Integrated Elementary and Special Education program incorporates essential
elements required of a teacher prepared to meet the needs of all learners. The content
areas of mathematics, science, social studies, and language arts are incorporated in
the study of curriculum development, assessment, meeting curriculum standards, and
differentiating the curriculum for learners working at, above, and below grade level.
Teachers acquire the knowledge, skills, and dispositions to provide effective special
education services which includes understanding the impact of disabilities on learning,
assessing children to determine their learning strengths and areas of need, collaborating
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with the family and team to promote a positive learning environment, and creating
adaptations to enable the child to access the general curriculum.
This program is designed to prepare both experienced teachers who currently hold a
license to teach as well as those new to the field of teaching and education.
Students typically complete the program full-time or part time. Full-time students
complete the program in 14-18 months, starting in the summer semester. Students
may begin their course work on a part-time basis but must enroll full-time during the
semesters in which the internship is completed. Part-time students typically complete
the program in 2 years or longer. Students follow a sequence of courses and participate
in the paid teaching internship with courses meeting in the evening, weekend,
and summers. Candidates may also elect to complete their internship in their own
inclusive or special needs classroom but this site must be approved to meet licensure
requirements by the faculty and Field Experience Office.
Requirements***
EDU 201
Orientation to Education Programs
0 credits
Core Courses
Human Development (choose one)
HDF 530 Language Acquisition
HDF 702 Language, Literacy and Culture
3 credits
3 credits
3 credits
Multicultural
EDU 505 or 506 Racial and cultural Identities/–Advanced
3 credits
GRADUATE PROGRAMS
Upon entering the program, students meet with an advisor to develop a study plan.
Preference for admission is given to applicants with prior experience working with
children and families, preferably in a group setting. A prerequisite for admission is
completion of a major in the Arts and Sciences or its equivalent.
Research (choose one)3 credits
RES 723 Teacher as Researcher
3 credits
RES 725 Research Methods
3 credits
Program courses 38 credits
RDG 537 Teaching Reading
3 credits
SPE 542
Impact of Special Education
3 credits
SPE 652
Inclusive Education Curriculum or SPE 654 Advanced Inclusive Curriculum
3 credits
EDU 535 Mathematical Learning For Diverse Learners or
SPE 635 Number Sense For Learners Who Struggle
3 credits
SPE 710
Assistive Technology1 credit
SPE 656 Special Education Assessment
3 credits
EDU 546 Teaching and Learning History and Social Studies
3 credits
SPE 650 Understanding Reading Difficulties
2 credits
SPE 560 Understanding & Managing Behavior
2 credits
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EDU 545 SPE 685 RDG 531 Elementary Science
Democracy and Education
Teaching Reading & Writing to ELLs 3 credits
2 credits
1 credit
Internship**
SPP 640 EDP 536 SPE 645 Practicum: Students with Special Needs Elementary Practicum
Instructional Methods 3 credits
3 credits
2 credits
Portfolio
EDU 682 Portfolio Development: Integrated Elementary
and Special Education1 credit
GRADUATE PROGRAMS
* Licensure: Students select either Elementary Teacher (1-6) or Teacher of Students
with Moderate Disabilities (PreK- 12) as a primary Initial license, and they are eligible
to apply for a second license upon receipt of the first.
** Students are required to take the Communication and Literacy Test of the
Massachusetts Tests for Educator Licensure (MTEL) no later than the August
administration before the start of their internship.
*** Some courses are waived or substituted based on previous licensure and experience;
these are reviewed by the faculty advisor.
ADVANCED PROFESSIONAL COURSE CLUSTER IN SPECIAL EDUCATION/12
CREDITS
This 12-credit course cluster in special education develops expertise in teaching
children with exceptional learning needs in diverse settings. For teachers who already
hold a master’s degree and an initial teaching license, this group of courses is designed
to be used to move an initial license in early childhood education, elementary
education, and ESL to professional status.
Requirements
SPE 542
SPE 654
SPE 656
SPE 560
SPE 710
Impact of Special Needs on Development and Learning
Advanced Inclusive Curriculum Special Education Assessment
Understanding and Managing Behavior Assistive Technology 3 credits
3 credits
3 credits
2 credits
1 credit
PEACE CORPS MASTERS INTERNATIONAL/30 CREDITS
Wheelock College is proud to partner with the Peace Corps to offer the Master’s
International (MI) Program at Wheelock. This program gives passionate, idealistic
students who are interested in the Peace Corps the opportunity to get a Master of
Science in Educational Studies degree from Wheelock College while also fulfilling
their commitment to international service. This 30-credit master’s program begins
with one year of courses completed on the Wheelock campus. Courses include human
development, multiculturalism, research, and a 12-credit elective area of focus. The
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elective area of focus helps students design a flexible and creative field study project that
is sustainable and meets requirements of their local host country. Courses can be taken
from a variety of programs such as: Language and Literacy, Integrated Elementary
and Special Education, Early Childhood Education, Child Life, Social Work and
Organizational Leadership.
The PC MI Program concludes with a 1-credit capstone course at Wheelock upon the
students’ return. In this course, students compile their portfolio and present it to the
Wheelock and Peace Corps community.
DEPARTMENT OF LANGUAGE AND LITERACY
Lowry Hemphill, Chair and Associate Professor
Terry Meier, Associate Professor
Jennifer Klinefelter, Instructor
Twakia Martin, Instructor
Jane Yedlin, Associate Professor
GRADUATE PROGRAMS
Upon completing a majority of their coursework, students will enroll in 8 credits of
field study during their two years of Peace Corps service (4 credits per year of service).
These 8 credits are at no cost to the MI student. Peace Corps service is an integral part
of the academic program, as it will be the focus of students’ required field study project.
The 12 credit focus for electives will be dependent on the student’s own interests and
what they would like to learn, research, and reflect upon while abroad. Examples of
Peace Corps field study projects which are co-developed with host country colleagues
could include a women’s literacy program, a youth sports program, a girls’ reading club,
or working with children with special needs. The 12 credit focus for electives could also
be applied to one of the professional clusters (special education, teaching reading, ELL)
for a student who already holds an initial teaching license and wants to advance this to
the professional level.
AVAILABLE PROGRAMS OF STUDY:
Master of Science in Language and Literacy Studies
Master of Science in Teacher of Reading
12-credit Course Cluster in Teaching English Language Learners
12-credit Course Cluster in Reading
MS/LANGUAGE AND LITERACY STUDIES/31 CREDITS
The Language and Literacy Studies master’s degree is non-licensure program designed
for students interested in developing expertise in topics such as multilingual literacy
or reading, writing and assessment. Students may use this program as preparation for
work in curriculum development, school leadership, or doctoral study in literacy and
may incorporate courses into this program to qualify for professional licensure.
Requirements
Core courses9 credits
HDF 521
Children’s Cognitive Development or
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HDF 702
MLE 535
RES 722
Language, Literacy and Culture
Second Language Acquisition and Assessment
Research in Language and Literacy
3 credits
3 credits
3 credits
Specialty courses21 credits
Specific program developed with advisor. Suggested areas of focus given below.
GRADUATE PROGRAMS
Working in Multilingual Communities
RDG 530
Teaching Literacy to English Language Learners
3 credits
RDG 558
Multicultural Children’s Literature
3 credits
RDG 559
Latino Children’s Literature
3 credits
RDG 560
African-American Children’s Literature
3 credits
RDG 568
Developing Young Writers3 credits
MLE 525
Content Area Instruction for English Language Learners 3 credits
MLE 530
Supporting Second Language Acquisition
3 credits
Reading, Writing and Assessment
RDG 616
Assessment of Reading and Writing
3 credits
RDG 618
Literacy Across the Curriculum
3 credits
RDG 558
Multicultural Children’s Literature
3 credits
RDG 568
Developing Young Writers3 credits
RDG 601
Multisensory Approaches to Teaching Literacy
3 credits
RDG 622
Individualized Instruction in Literacy
3 credits
RDG 626
Diagnosis and Correction of Reading Problems
3 credits
Completion of program
EDU 708
Capstone: Language and Literacy Studies 1 credit
Sample Course Sequence
First Semester
RDG 558
Multicultural Children’s Literature or other elective
Second Semester
HDF 702
Language, Literacy and Culture
RDG 618
Literacy Across the Curriculum or other elective
RDG 622
Individualized Instruction in Literacy or other elective
MLE 530
Supporting Second Language Acquisition or other elective
Third Semester
RES 722
Research in Language and Literacy
RDG 601
Multisensory Approaches to Teaching Literacy or other elective
Fourth Semester
MLE 525
Content Area Instruction for English Language Learners or
other elective
RDG 530
Teaching Literacy to English Language Learners or other elective
EDU 708
Capstone: Language and Literacy Studies
MS/TEACHER OF READING/31 CREDITS
The Teacher of Reading master’s program is designed for students who want to become
reading specialists or classroom teachers who are experts in teaching reading and
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writing in multilingual and multicultural settings. Upon successful completion of
the program and the required Massachusetts Tests for Educator Licensure (MTEL),
students are eligible for Massachusetts Teacher of Reading Initial license (all levels).
Before program entry, students must have an initial teacher license, and must have
at least one year of teaching experience in the area of this first license. The Master’s
in Reading fulfills state content requirements for advancing an Initial license to the
Professional level for teachers with initial licenses in Early Childhood , Elementary ,
English as a Second Language or Moderate Disabilities .
Requirements
Core courses 9 credits
MLE 535
Second Language Acquisition and Assessment
3 credits
HDF 702
Language, Literacy and Culture
3 credits
RES 722
Research in Language and Literacy
3 credits
Program selective: (choose one) 3 credits
RDG 559
Latino Children’s Literature
3 credits
RDG 560
African-American Children’s Literature
3 credits
RDG 568
Developing Young Writers3 credits
RDG 601
Multisensory Approaches to Teaching Literacy
3 credits
RDG 616
Assessment of Reading and Writing
3 credits
MLE 530
Supporting Second Language Acquisition
3 credits
MLE 525
Content Instruction for English Language Learners
3 credits
Completion of Program*
ACD 507
MTEL Preparation–Reading Specialist Review EDU 706
Capstone: Teacher of Reading
GRADUATE PROGRAMS
Program courses 21 credits
RDG 558
Multicultural Children’s Literature
3 credits
RDG 530
Teaching Literacy to English Language Learners
3 credits
RDG 618
Literacy Across the Curriculum
3 credits
RDG 622
Individualized Instruction in Literacy
3 credits
RDG 626
Diagnosis and Correction of Reading Problems
3 credits
RDP 609
Teacher of Reading Practicum
3 credits
0 credits
1 credit
*Entrance to capstone requirement: passing scores on the Reading Specialist and
Communication and Literacy Massachusetts Tests for Educator Licensure (MTEL).
Sample Course Sequence
First Semester
MLE 535
Second Language Acquisition and Assessment
RDG 558
Multicultural Children’s Literature
Second Semester
HDF 702
Language, Literacy and Culture
RDG 618
Literacy Across the Curriculum
RDG 622
Individualized Instruction in Literacy
Program selective
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WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
Third Semester
RDG 626
RDP 609
Fourth Semester
RES 722
RDG 530
ACD 507 EDU 706
Diagnosis and Correction of Reading Problems
Teacher of Reading Practicum
Research in Language and Literacy
Teaching Literacy to English Language Learners
MTEL Preparation–Reading Specialist Review
Capstone: Teacher of Reading
12-CREDIT COURSE CLUSTER/TEACHING ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS
This 12-credit course cluster develops expertise in working with young English
language learners in mainstream or sheltered English immersion classrooms.
GRADUATE PROGRAMS
For teachers who already hold or are completing a master’s degree, these courses can be
used to move an initial license in early childhood education, elementary education, or
special education (teacher of students with moderate disabilities) to professional licensure.
Requirements
RDG 530 MLE 535 MLE 530
MLE 525 Teaching Literacy to English Language Learners Second Language Acquisition and Assessment Supporting Second Language Acquisition
Content Instruction for English Language Learners
12-CREDIT COURSE CLUSTER/READING
This 12-credit course cluster develops expertise in teaching reading in culturally and
linguistically diverse classrooms. For teachers who already hold or are completing a
master’s degree, these courses can be used to move an initial license in early childhood
education, elementary education, English as a second language, or special education
(teacher of students with moderate disabilities) to professional licensure.
The course of study is most appropriate for teachers in urban schools or who work with
multicultural populations in grades pre-K-6.
Requirements
RDG 618 HDF 702 RDG 616 RDG 530 RDG 622 Literacy Across the Curriculum
Language, Literacy and Culture
Assessment of Reading and Writing Teaching Literacy to English Language Learners or
Individualized Instruction in Literacy
DEPARTMENT OF LEADERSHIP AND POLICY
Irwin Nesoff, Chair and Associate Professor
Michelle Gibbons-Carr, Instructor
AVAILABLE PROGRAMS OF STUDY:
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3 credits
3 credits
3 credits
3 credits
3 credits
3 credits
3 credits
3 credits
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
Master of Science in Organizational Leadership
Certificate in Organizational Leadership
MSW Certificate in Organizational Leadership
MS/ ORGANIZATIONAL LEADERSHIP/30 CREDITS
The thirty-credit Master of Science in Organizational Leadership is designed to prepare
a diverse group of students for leadership roles in nonprofit organizations, NGO’s and
higher education institutions. Students will be prepared to take on administrative,
executive and leadership positions through a series of required courses and advanced
electives providing them with the knowledge, skills and values necessary to assume
leadership roles. Students completing the four-course core curriculum will be awarded
a Certificate in Organizational Leadership. The courses in this sequence include:
Organizational Mission, Strategy and Leadership; Planning Evaluation and Marketing;
Leading People: Developing Human Potential; and, Budgeting, Financial Management
and Resource Development.
All students, as part of their studies, will also complete a two-semester Capstone
Project. This group project will consist of applied research in a specialized area of
interest, providing students with a critical learning experience as they seek to address
an identified organizational priority, issue or service delivery challenge. Over the
course of an academic year, students will work in teams to address an organizational
challenge and identify organizational opportunities or to conduct applied research on
a specific issue of interest. Through this hands-on group experience, students will have
the opportunity to become engaged in real-world issues and problem solving, while
integrating and enhancing their learning.
GRADUATE PROGRAMS
After completing the four course core curriculum students will then take a two course
required sequence designed to further enhance their leadership skills in organizational
governance and change. Students will also have the opportunity to choose two
advanced electives specific to higher education or nonprofits.
Upon completion of the degree, students will have a unique combination of theory,
knowledge of practical applications to organizational issues, leadership skills and
applied knowledge that will qualify them for a wide-range of leadership positions in
nonprofit organizations, NGO’s and institutions of higher education. Consistent with
Wheelock’s mission of improving the lives of children and families the masters program
will also provide students the skills and knowledge to lead diverse multicultural
organizations with a global perspective focusing on social and organizational change.
Requirements 30 credits
ORL 510
Organizational Leadership, Mission and Strategy
3 credits
ORL 520
Leading People: Developing Human Potential
3 credits
ORL 530
Planning, Evaluation and Marketing
3 credits
ORL 540
Nonprofit Budgeting and Financial Management
3 credits
ORL 620
Organizational Governance3 credits
ORL 710
Capstone I3 credits
ORL XXX
Organizational Change3 credits
ORL 711
Capstone II3 credits
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Advanced Electives (2)6 credits
GRADUATE PROGRAMS
Suggested Course Sequence
First Semester
Foundation Year: Semester 1 (Fall)(6 credits)
ORL 510
Organizational Leadership, Mission and Strategy
ORL 620 Organizational Governance
Second Semester
Foundation Year: Semester 2 (Spring)(6 credits)
ORL 530
Planning, Evaluation and Marketing
ORL 540 Nonprofit Budgeting and Financial Management
Third Semester
Advanced Year: Semester 3 (Fall)(9 credits)
ORL 520 Leading People
ORL 710 Capstone I
Advanced elective
Fourth Semester
Advanced Year: Semester 4 (Spring)(9 credits)
ORL XXX Organizational Change
ORL 711
Capstone II
Advanced Elective
CERTIFICATE IN ORGANIZATIONAL LEADERSHIP/12 CREDITS
Recent research indicates that within the next five to 10 years, more than half of
current nonprofit leaders will retire and their organizations are not involved in
succession planning or training of the next generation of leaders. This is also true of
higher education, where we will be seeing a generational shift in leadership. As these
shifts are approaching, more opportunities will be opening up for people interested
in taking on leadership positions and responsibilities in these institutions. In this
program, students will gain skills, knowledge, and hands-on experience needed to
advance in nonprofit and higher education management and leadership. The certificate
program is designed for nonprofit professionals, higher education administrators,
social workers, and for-profit professionals and others who want to transition into the
nonprofit sector. This program provides students with the fundamentals of effective
management and leadership in as little as one year. The courses in this program can also
fulfill the foundation year requirements for Wheelock’s full Master of Science degree.
Requirements 12 credits
ORL 510 Organizational Leadership, Mission and Strategy 3 credits
ORL 520 Organizational Governance 3 credits
ORL 530 Planning, Evaluation and Marketing 3 credits
ORL 540 Budgeting, Financial Management and
Resource Development 3 credits
MSW/CERTIFICATE IN ORGANIZATIONAL LEADERSHIP/12 CREDITS
Recent research indicates that within the next five to 10 years, more than half of
current nonprofit leaders will retire and their organizations are not involved in
succession planning or training of the next generation of leaders. This is also true of
higher education, where we will be seeing a generational shift in leadership. As these
shifts are approaching, more opportunities will be opening up for people interested
in taking on leadership positions and responsibilities in these institutions. In this
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program, students will gain skills, knowledge, and hands-on experience needed to
advance in nonprofit and higher education management and leadership.
The certificate program is designed for nonprofit professionals, higher education
administrators, social workers, and for-profit professionals and others who want
to transition into the nonprofit sector. This program provides students with the
fundamentals of effective management and leadership in as little as one year. The
courses in this program can also fulfill the foundation year requirements for Wheelock’s
full Master of Science degree.
Requirements12 credits
ORL 510 Organizational Leadership, Mission and Strategy
3 credits
ORL 530 Planning, Evaluation and Marketing
3 credits
ORL 540 Budgeting and Financial Management and
Resource Development 3 credits
ORL 620 Organizational Governance
3 credits
MSW CERTIFICATE IN ORGANIZATIONAL LEADERSHIP/12 CREDITS
Required Courses12 credits
ORL 510 Organizational Leadership, Mission and Strategy
3 credits
ORL 530 Planning, Evaluation and Marketing
3 credits
ORL 540 Budgeting and Financial Management and
Resource Development 3 credits
ORL 620 Organizational Governance
3 credits
DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WORK (MSW PROGRAM)
GRADUATE PROGRAMS
Open to students enrolled in Wheelock’s Master of Social Work program and
professionals who already have an MSW, this program provides the additional
knowledge and skills needed to take on leadership positions in a variety of settings. The
four courses in this program can also fulfill some of the requirements for Wheelock’s
MSW degree when taken together.
Hope Haslam Straughan, Interim Chair, Director, MSW Program and Associate Professor
Nina Aronoff, Associate Professor
Lenette Azzi-Lessing, Assistant Professor
Deborah Lisansky Beck, BSW Director and Assistant Professor
James Bourque, Instructor
Nicole Dubus, Assistant Professor
Castagna Lacet, Instructor
Irwin Nesoff, Associate Professor
Brenda Noel, Instructor
Roy Old Person, Assistant Professor
Keavy Hennessey Smith, Director of Social Work Field Education
Wendy Champagnie Williams, Instructor
Diane Zipoli, M.S.W., Field Advisor
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AVAILABLE PROGRAMS OF STUDY:
Masters of Social Work- Full and Part time programs
Masters of Social Work- Advanced Standing
MASTER OF SOCIAL WORK/60 CREDITS
GRADUATE PROGRAMS
The Master of Social Work (MSW) program is designed to educate a diverse group
of students who are committed to being leaders in justice-based social work practice,
effecting change in the social conditions of children , families, and communities,
especially those who are the most discriminated against, oppressed, and disadvantaged.
Students will be prepared for advanced social work practice that is grounded in
advancing human rights and justice for clients and client systems.
Foundation and advanced coursework provides students with professional social work
knowledge, skills, and values that are strengths-based and empowerment focused, so that
graduates are able to work effectively toward change at the individual, family, community,
and structural/systems levels. The focus of the program, to advance human rights and
social justice, is contextualized throughout the curriculum by nine curricular themes
that form the basis for advanced professional education and lifelong practice. In the first
year of the program, students prepare for practice with individuals, families, groups,
organizations, and communities through study in the five core areas of social work
education. The second year of the program is organized around a singular concentration
on human rights and justice, for those children, families, and their communities that
are most at risk for not being able to participate fully in society’s services, resources, and
supports. Some of the conditions that put families at risk include, but are not limited
to, poverty, homelessness, violence, substance abuse, long-term individual and group
marginalization and discrimination, incarceration, special health and education needs,
immigrant or refugee status, and religious or spiritual diversity.
Building on the foundation knowledge of the first year, students in the second
year identify a focus of study which is a self identified specialization within the
concentration (e.g., violence in the lives of children and families; death, dying, and
bereavement; child-centered practice, and others). Students then use their policy,
practice, research, human behavior, and field practicum experience to further refine
and develop their knowledge and skills in that selected area. Students will have the
opportunity in their second year to choose a field practicum and elective courses that
support and strengthen their learning in this chosen area of focus. For example, a
student with an interest in family violence might be placed in the Child Witness to
Violence Program at Boston Medical Center for their concentration field practicum,
use their advanced human behavior class to write a grant proposal that focuses on
supporting families experiencing violence, and take an elective on Children and the
Law. In their final year of study, MSW students take part in group human rights
action projects through the Integrative Project Seminar I and II, often based on a
student’s identified focus of study.
Upon completion of the MSW degree, students are eligible to sit for the intermediate
social work licensure examination (LCSW) in Massachusetts. General questions about
state licensure can be answered by searching the Massachusetts NASW website (http://
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WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
naswma.org/licensingQs.asp). Students planning to practice in other states can also
consult other NASW state chapter websites for additional information on licensure,
which can be located through the national website (http://www.naswdc.org).
MASTER OF SOCIAL WORK DEGREE (MSW)/FULL AND PART TIME/ 60 CREDITS
Full-time study is completed on a four-semester, two-year (fall and spring semester)
schedule. Part-time study can be completed within four years, usually including no
more than eight part-time semesters on a four-year, fall and spring semester schedule.
The MSW program begins in the fall semester.
MASTER OF SOCIAL WORK DEGREE (MSW): FULL AND PART-TIME/60 CREDITS
GRADUATE PROGRAMS
Requirements
SWK 510
Human Behavior and the Social Environment I
3 credits
SWK 520
Social Policy3 credits
SWK 540
Generalist Social Work Practice I
3 credits
SWK 550
Social Work Field Practicum and Seminar I
3 credits
SWK 511
Human Behavior and the Social Environment II
3 credits
SWK 530
Foundations of Social Research
3 credits
SWK 541
Generalist Social Work Practice II
3 credits
SWK 546
Multicultural Social Work Assessment 3 credits
SWK 551
Social Work Field Practicum and Seminar II
3 credits
SWK 610
Social Work Leadership and Administration
3 credits
SWK 640
Social Work Practice with Children & Families I
3 credits
SWK 650
Social Work Field Practicum and Seminar III
3 credits
SWK 690
Integrative Project Seminar I
3 credits
SWK 620
Social Policy Practice
3 credits
SWK 641
Social Work Practice with Children & Families II
3 credits
SWK 651
Social Work Field Practicum and Seminar IV
3 credits
SWK 691
Integrative Project Seminar II
3 credits
SWK 850
Dynamics of Oppression and Discrimination
3 credits
Concentration Electives6 credits
Optional Course Work: Students may choose to pursue an additional msw certificate
in organizational leadership, which consists of four core courses. The certificate may
be taken in addition to the 60 credit msw degree or in conjunction with the regular
program, by using two or three of the certificate courses to fulfill msw program
requirements.
Course Sequence MSW–Full time
First Semester
Foundation Year: Semester 1 (Fall)(15 credits)
SWK 510
Human Behavior and the Social Environment I
SWK 520
Social Policy
SWK 540
Generalist Social Work Practice I
SWK 550
Social Work Field Practicum & Seminar I
SWK 850
Dynamics of Oppression & Discrimination
Second Semester
Foundation Year: Semester 2 (Spring)(15 credits)
SWK 511
Human Behavior and the Social Environment II
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GRADUATE PROGRAMS
SWK 530
Foundations of Social Research
SWK 541
Generalist Social Work Practice II
SWK 546
Multicultural Social Work Assessment
SWK 551
Social Work Field Practicum & Seminar II
Third Semester
Concentration Year: Semester 3 (Fall)(15 credits)
SWK 610
Social Work Leadership and Administration
SWK 640
Social Work Practice with Children & Families I
SWK 650
Social Work Field Practicum & Seminar III
SWK 690
Integrative Project Seminar I
Concentration Elective
Fourth Semester
Concentration Year: Semester 4 (Spring)(15 credits)
SWK 620
Social Policy Practice
SWK 641
Social Work Practice with Children & Families II
SWK 651
Social Work Field Practicum & Seminar IV
SWK 691
Integrative Project Seminar II
Concentration Elective
Course Sequence MSW–Part time
First Semester
Foundation Year: Semester 1 (Fall)(9 credits)
SWK 510
Human Behavior and the Social Environment I
SWK 520
Social Policy
SWK 850 Dynamics of Oppression & Discrimination
Second Semester
Foundation Year: Semester 2 (Spring)(6 credits)
SWK 511
Human Behavior and the Social Environment II
SWK 530
Foundations of Social Research
Third Semester
Foundation Year: Semester 3 (Fall)(6 credits)
SWK 540
Generalist Social Work Practice I
SWK 550
Social Work Field Practicum & Seminar I
Fourth Semester
Foundation Year: Semester 4 (Spring)(9 credits)
SWK 541
Generalist Social Work Practice II
SWK 546
Multicultural Social Work Assessment: Applying Theory
to Practice
SWK 551
Social Work Field Practicum & Seminar II
Fifth Semester
Concentration Year: Semester 5 (Fall) (6 credits)
SWK 640
Social Work Practice with Children & Families I
SWK 650
Social Work Field Practicum & Seminar III
Sixth Semester
Concentration Year: Semester 6 (Spring)(6 credits)
SWK 641
Social Work Practice with Children & Families II
SWK 651
Social Work Field Practicum & Seminar IV
Seventh Semester Concentration Year: Semester 7 (Fall)(15 credits)
SWK 610
Social Work Leadership and Administration SWK 690
Integrative Project Seminar I
Eighth Semester
Concentration Year: Semester 8 (Spring)
SWK 620
Social Policy Practice
SWK 691
Integrative Project Seminar II
Concentration Elective
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WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
MASTER OF SOCIAL WORK DEGREE (MSW): ADVANCED STANDING FULL
TIME/MINIMUM 30 CREDITS
Any student who has graduated with a BSW degree from a CSWE-accredited program
is welcome to apply for advanced standing status. If accepted into the advanced
standing program, students typically enter directly into the concentration (advanced)
year of study. The concentration year curriculum provides students with advanced
professional social work knowledge, skills, and values that are strengths-based and
empowerment focused, so that, as graduates, they are able to work effectively toward
justice-based change at the individual, family, group, community, and structural/
systems levels. All students in the advanced year concentrate in social work practice
that will actively advance human rights and social and economic justice in partnership
with client systems and their providers, through the study of advanced theory, research,
policy, direct practice skills, an advanced field practicum, as well as an integrative
capstone project that is focused on human rights action in a specific area.
Building on the foundation knowledge of the BSW degree, students in the advanced
year identify a particular focus of study, which is a self identified specialization, within
the concentration (e.g., violence in the lives of children and families; death, dying,
and bereavement; child-centered practice and others). Students then use their policy,
practice, research, human behavior, and field practicum experience to further refine and
develop their knowledge and skills in that selected area. For example, a student with an
interest in family violence might be placed in the Child Witness to Violence Program
at Boston Medical Center for their concentration field practicum, use their advanced
human behavior class to write a grant proposal that focuses on supporting families
experiencing violence, and take an elective on Children and the Law.
GRADUATE PROGRAMS
The concentration/advanced year of the program is organized around a singular
concentration on human rights and justice, particularly in the lives of children ,
families, and their communities that are most at risk for not being able to participate
fully in society’s services, resources, and supports. Some of the conditions that put
families at risk include, but are not limited to, poverty, homelessness, violence,
substance abuse, long-term individual and group marginalization and discrimination,
incarceration, special health and education needs, immigrant or refugee status, and
religious or spiritual diversity.
Advanced Standing full time study is completed in a two-semester, one year (fall
and spring) schedule. Advanced Standing part-time study is completed in a two
year (fall and spring) schedule.
Advanced Standing MSW Program Requirements
SWK 610
Social Work Leadership and Administration
SWK 640
Social Work Practice with Children & Families I
SWK 650
Social Work Field Practicum and Seminar III
SWK 690
Integrative Project Seminar I
SWK 620
Social Policy Practice
SWK 641
Social Work Practice with Children & Families II
SWK 651
Social Work Field Practicum and Seminar IV
SWK 691
Integrative Project Seminar II
3 credits
3 credits
3 credits
3 credits
3 credits
3 credits
3 credits
3 credits
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WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
GRADUATE PROGRAMS
Concentration Electives6 credits
Optional Course Work: Students may choose to pursue an additional MSW
Certificate in Organizational Leadership, which consists of four core courses. The
certificate may be taken in addition to the 30 credit Advanced Standing MSW degree
or in conjunction with the regular program, by using two or three of the certificate
courses to fulfill MSW program requirements.
Sample/Suggested Course Sequence-Full time
First Semester
Concentration Year: Semester 1 (Fall)(12 credits)
SWK 610
Social Work Leadership and Administration
SWK 640
Social Work Practice with Children & Families I
SWK 650
Social Work Field Practicum and Seminar III
SWK 690
Integrative Project Seminar I
Concentration Elective
Second Semester
Concentration Year: Semester 2 (Spring)(15 credits)
SWK 620
Social Policy Practice
SWK 641
Social Work Practice with Children & Families II
SWK 651
Social Work Field Practicum and Seminar IV
SWK 691
Integrative Project Seminar II
Concentration Elective
Sample/Suggested Course Sequence-Part time
First Semester
Concentration Year: Semester 1 (Fall)(6 credits)
SWK 640
Social Work Practice with Children & Families I SWK 650
Social Work Field Practicum and Seminar III
Second Semester
Concentration Year: Semester 2 (Spring)(6 credits)
SWK 641 Social Work Practice with Children & Families II SWK 651
Social Work Field Practicum and Seminar IV
Third Semester
Concentration Year: Semester 3 (Fall)(9 credits)
SWK 610
Social Work Leadership and Administration
SWK 690
Integrative Project Seminar I
Concentration Elective
Fourth Semester
Concentration Year: Semester 4 (Spring)(9 credits)
SWK 620
Social Policy Practice
Concentration Elective
SWK 691
Integrative Project Seminar II
MASTER OF SOCIAL WORK FIELD PRACTICUM
Basic Requirements:
Following acceptance into Wheelock’s MSW program, each student will meet with staff
in the Social Work Field Education office to discuss his/her areas of interest and begin
the process of identifying an internship for the academic year. All students who are
eligible for field practicum are in the field for a full academic year and must complete
the following requirements.
Foundation Year students are required to be in the field 16 hours per week, for a
total of 480 hours for the academic year. Days in the field are not predetermined; the
schedule is established through a collaborative effort between the student and the field
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site. Students must receive a minimum of 1 hour of supervision per week provided by
an MSW licensed at the LCSW or LICSW level.
Concentration Year Students (including advanced standing) are required to be in the
field 24 hours per week, for a total of 720 hours for the academic year. Days in the
field are not predetermined; the schedule is established through a collaborative effort
between the student and the field site. The student must receive a minimum of 1 hour
of supervision per week provided by an MSW licensed at the LCSW or LICSW level.
The concentration year practicum and supervision hours count towards licensure.
FLEXIBLE FIELD OPTION
GRADUATE PROGRAMS
The MSW program is committed to our students’ success in achieving their academic
and professional goals. Being mindful that many of our students are not only graduate
students but also may be juggling a variety of professional and personal responsibilities,
we offer a flexible field option when possible. The Social Work Field Education staff
meets with each of our students in order to assess individual needs and, in some
situations, to collaborate with the student and potential field practicum sites to
craft a flexible field practicum experience. The goal is to assist students in fulfilling
the required number of hours in a more flexible format – generally over a longer
period of time than what is typical - while also allowing for a rich, yet challenging,
field experience. . The flex field option must be approved by the Social Work Field
Education staff and the agency supervisor prior to the student starting their field
placement. Requirements for the total number of hours at the practicum site and
for supervision are consistent with those in the regular field options, specified by the
program year.
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WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
COURSES OF INSTRUCTION
COURSES OF INSTRUCTION AT
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
154
Academic Support157
American Studies157
Arts160
Autism160
Child and Family Studies
160
Child Life162
Communications164
Education166
English178
Foreign Language179
General Education Capstones
180
History180
Human Development182
Human Development/Anthropology
184
Human Development/Psychology
184
Human Development/Sociology
190
Humanities190
Juvenile Justice and Youth Advocacy
191
Leadership, Policy and Administration
192
Life Science193
Literature195
Mathematics198
Mathematics/Science199
Multilingual Education200
Music200
Organizational Leadership
201
Philosophy202
Physical Science204
Inter-professional Studies205
Reading/Language and Literacy
207
Research209
Social Work210
Special Education214
Theatre Arts217
Visual Arts220
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
COURSES OF INSTRUCTION
The academic programs are organized into two schools: Arts and Sciences and
Education, Social Work and Child Life and Family Studies. Specific requirements for
programs are detailed in the Undergraduate and Graduate Academic Programs sections
of this catalog.
The courses described here are expected to be offered during the next three years.
Students should consult the Course Offerings published each semester to determine
the availability of courses. Co-requisites, prerequisites and enrollment policies, as well
as information about fulfilling undergraduate General Education requirements, follow
each course description.
COURSE NUMBERING SYSTEM
Introductory courses have no prerequisites and are usually taken by students in their
first or second year of college (for undergraduate students) and during the first semester
(for graduate students).
Intermediate courses require some prior knowledge in the field and are usually taken
by sophomores and juniors (at the undergraduate level) or second or third semester (at
the graduate level). Prior knowledge can be obtained through prerequisite course work
and/or experience. In the case of “prior experience,” permission of the instructor is
required for admission to the course.
Advanced courses in the Arts and Sciences assume significant exposure to the field,
usually represented by completion of at least one-half (four) of the courses required for
the major. Advanced courses in both the Arts and Sciences and the Professional Programs
require well-developed analytical skills and provide more in-depth exposure to theories,
research and work with primary sources. Such courses are usually taken by juniors and
seniors (at the undergraduate level) and in the last semesters of graduate programs.
COURSES OF INSTRUCTION
Through the Colleges of the Fenway, full time undergraduates, beginning in the
second semester of their matriculation, may enroll in up to two courses per semester
at the other colleges: Emmanuel College, Massachusetts College of Art, Massachusetts
College of Pharmacy and Allied Health Sciences, Simmons College, or Wentworth
Institute of Technology. Cross-registration information and forms are available in the
Office of Academic Records and Registration or Colleges of the Fenway website.
100 level courses include the Human Growth and Development course and other
General Education requirements.
200 level courses are either introductory or intermediate courses in the Arts and
Sciences and Professional Programs. They may fulfill college requirements or be taken
as electives.
300 level courses are specialized courses in the Arts and Sciences and Professional
Programs. They may fulfill requirements or be electives in either area.
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400 level courses consist of core requirements in the majors; seminars that accompany
a student teaching/practicum experience; and Independent Study, Honors Tutorial, and
Individualized Plans of Study.
500-800 level courses are graduate level courses.
COURSES OF INSTRUCTION
COURSE PREFIXES
156
ACD Academic Support
AST American Studies
AMT Arts
CLF, CLP, Child Life
CFS, CFP Child and Family Studies
COM Communications
EDU, EDP Education
ENG English
ENV Environmental Studies
HDF, HDV Human Development
HDA Human Development/Anthropology
HDP Human Development/Psychology
HDS Human Development/Sociology
HIS History
HUM Humanities
JJA, JJP Juvenile Justice and Youth Advocacy
LPA, LPP, LPS Leadership, Policy and Administration
LSC Life Science
LIT Literature
MAT Mathematics
MSC Mathematics/Science
MLE, MLP Multilingual Education
MUS Music
ORL Organizational Leadership
PHL Philosophy
PSC Physical Science
PRO Inter-professional Courses
RDG, RDP Reading/Language and Literacy
RES Research
SWK Social Work
SPE, SPP Special Education
SBD Sports-Based Youth Development
THE Theatre Arts
VIS Visual Arts
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
ACADEMIC SUPPORT
ACD 306/506
MTEL preparation – Early Childhood
Education review
0 credits
This course reviews the content included
in the Massachusetts Test for Educator
Licensure Early Childhood Exam.
ACD 505
MTEL Preparation–Elementary Education
Subject Review
0 credit
This course reviews the subject matter
included in the Massachusetts Tests for
Educator General Curriculum Subject
Exam. Topics include Introduction and Test
Strategies, Child Development, Science,
Math, Social Studies, Language Arts, Reading.
ACD 507
MTEL Preparation–Reading Specialist
Subject Review
0 credit
This course reviews the subject matter
included in the Massachusetts Tests for
Educator Licensure Reading Specialist test.
Topics include introduction and testtaking strategies, reading development,
assessment, reading instruction, roles of the
reading specialist. Enrollment is limited to
students enrolled in the master’s program in
Teacher of Reading. Prerequisites: RDG 622
Individualized Instruction in Literacy.
ACD 516
MTEL Prep: Gen Curriculum-Multi
Subject Test
ACD 517/518
MTEL Prep: Gen Curriculum II: Math
Sub Test
0 credit
This course reviews Mathematics related to
the General Curriculum II: Mathematics
Subject Test in the Massachusetts Tests for
Educator Licensure (MTEL).
AMERICAN STUDIES
AST 140
Media and Race in American Society
4 credits
Introduces students to a multicultural
analysis of media theory, content, and effects.
Explores how racial and racist perceptions
of people of color shape cultural norms,
attitudes, and practices. Course will cover a
wide range of media forms such as HipHop, advertisements, movies, and reality
TV. General Education: Self and Society
and Perspectives on Diversity. For students
entering prior to September, 2010: Social
Science. Introductory.
AST 145
The Life of an American Leader: A Critical
Inquiry
4 credits
The purpose of this seminar is to help you
“learn how to learn.” You will be introduced
to the skills and attitudes of ‘critical inquiry.’
You will be asked to learn and practice these
skills and attitudes by using them in the
study of an American Leader such as Eleanor
Roosevelt. General Education: Critical
Thinking and Self and Society. Introductory.
COURSES OF INSTRUCTION
ACD 310/510
MTEL Preparation–Foundations of
Reading Review
0 credit
This course reviews content related to
the teaching of reading included in the
Massachusetts Tests for Educator Licensure
Foundations of Reading exam. Topics
include phonemic awareness and phonics,
reading assessment, including miscue
analysis and running records, and reading
comprehension instruction.
0 credit
This course reviews Reading and Writing,
the subject matters related to the
Communication & Literacy Subject Test
in the Massachusetts Tests for Educator
Licensure (MTEL).
AST 150
Introduction to American Government
4 credits
Analyzes institutional development
of American national government,
Massachusetts politics, emphasizing the
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WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
COURSES OF INSTRUCTION
presidency, Congress, and the Supreme
Court. Topics include interaction of the
three branches of government, the history of
politics in the United States, political parties,
and interest groups. Focuses on current
events and public policy issues. For students
entering prior to September, 2010: Social
Science Introductory.
AST 160
American Identities
4 credits
Introduction to interdisciplinary American
Studies. Explores the history, reality, ideology
and meaning of American identity. American
identities as shaped by such factors as place,
work, family, political systems, religion and
education. Focus on how American identities
both shared and individual are formed by
race, class, gender and ethnicity. General
Education: Self and Society or Historical
Perspectives and Perspectives on Diversity.
For students entering prior to September,
2010: US History, Civilization, and Culture.
Introductory.
AST 220
Coming to America
4 credits
Places immigrant narratives into the broader
context of immigration policies that shaped
immigrant communities. Analyzes current
rise in hate crimes and growing antiimmigrant sentiment. Topics include how
immigration policies have been influenced
by economic interests, demand for labor,
war, colonization nativism and xenophobia.
Uses oral histories, poetry, and multi-media
resources. General Education: Historical
Perspectives or Perspectives on Diversity and
Upper-Level Writing For students entering
prior to September, 2010:: US History,
Civilization, Culture and Multicultural
requirement. Intermediate
AST/HDA 225
Boys and Men in America
4 Credits
Examines the social and cultural construction
of masculinity in the United States using
the theories and methods of Anthropology.
Topics include race, class, ethnicity, and
158
religion; popular images of American men
(e.g., movies, magazines, sports, jokes);
relationship of US manhood to sexuality,
war, and women. Some comparison to other
cultures. General Education: Perspectives
on Diversity, Self and Society and Historical
Perspectives. For students entering prior
to September, 2010: Social Sciences.
Intermediate.
AST 257
Race in America
4 Credits
Analyzes history and meaning of race in
America. Interdisciplinary, including fiction,
philosophy, historic documents, laws, and
popular culture. Focus on Native American,
African American, Asian American, and
Latino experiences. Topics include Indian
removal policies, slavery, creation of
“whiteness,” eugenics, immigration exclusion
laws, 1960s civil rights movements, and
contemporary meanings of race. General
Education: Perspectives on Diversity AND
Upper Level Writing (after ENG 111) AND
Ethics and Social Justice OR Historical
Perspectives OR Perspectives on Diversity.
For students entering prior to September,
2010: .US History, Civilization Culture
requirement. Upper level writing (after
ENG 111). Multicultural requirement.
Intermediate.
AST 258
Religion in America
4 credits
Investigates different religious traditions
in the United States, past and present,
while studying social science theories of
religion. Topics include: Why does religion
exist; how different religions assimilate
or resist citizenship; the tension between
“religious freedom” and the “common
good”; consumerism and religion; religions
in Boston; what does religion do for us that
so many Americans are religious; does truth
matter, and are there ‘fake’ religions? General
Education: Self and Society, Historical
Perspectives, Perspectives on Diversity.
Intermediate course.
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
AST 265/365
Studies in American Popular Culture
4 credits
Provides examples, context, theories, and
methodologies for understanding the
development and meaning of American
popular culture. Particular focus on gender,
race, and ethnicity. Emphasis on analysis of
culture from different mediums, including
popular literature, film, music, and
television. Organized historically, and by
medium. General Education: Perspectives on
Diversity AND Upper Level Writing (after
ENG111) AND Historical Perspectives.
Prerequisite: AST 160 or by permission of
instructor. Intermediate/Advanced.
AST 290
History, Culture and Spirituality of West
Africa
4 credits
A travel/study course on West African
culture, history and spirituality with a
2-week international service learning
component. Study and experience 2 West
African countries, Ghana and Bénin
that have been pivotal historically and
culturally to the development of the US and
other countries in the Americas. General
Education: Perspectives on Diversity For
students entering prior to September, 2010:
Multicultural Intermediate.
AST 403
Senior Seminar in American Studies
4 credits
Explores the richness of scholarship in
American Studies. Using theories and
methodologies adopted in the social sciences
and the Humanities, students examine
specific time periods, such as the 1950s or
specific topics, such as the social construction
of whiteness or the nature of work in
capitalism. Prerequisites: AST 160 and at
least one intermediate AST course or by
permission of instructor. Advanced.
COURSES OF INSTRUCTION
AST 285
In the Best Interest of the Child (formerly
Children and Families in American
Society)
4 credits
Provides students with the historical
knowledge, skills and dispositions to
understand the lives of children. Topics
include childhood in Puritan America,
childhood in slavery, origins of Head
Start, kindergartens, and role of science
in understanding children. Uses varied
sources including literature, cultural
and social history, social work and social
policy. Prerequisites: Course in Human
Development, History or American Studies,
or by permission of instructor. Advanced.
AST 322/HDS 322
Feminist Theories: Controversies and
Current Issues
4 credits
Examines different ways feminists analyze
patriarchal society and women’s place within
it. Emphasis on debates within feminist
theory, ranging from radical to post-modern.
Selected topics of controversy include
pornography, reproductive technologies,
racism, prostitution, and masculinity. Takes
a multicultural perspective on women’s
experiences. Focus on ways feminists
translate theory into practice. Prerequisite:
course in Human Development, History
or American Studies, or by permission of
instructor. General Education: Upper Level
Writing (after ENG 111), Self and Society,
Ethics and Social Justice, Perspectives on
Diversity. For students entering prior to
September, 2010: Upper Level Writing (after
ENG111) Advanced.
AST 410
Internship in American Studies
Builds upon student’s focus and provides
experience in a field of the student’s choice.
Students gain deeper understanding of role
of cultural institutions in American Society,
such as museums, media organizations and
activist based organization. Location decided
in consultation with advisor. Placements
are 10 hours a week. Discussion group
accompanies fieldwork. Open to American
Studies majors only. Prerequisite: Juniors and
Seniors only. Advanced.
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WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
ARTS
COURSES OF INSTRUCTION
AMT 101
Introduction to the Arts
4 credits
Introduces the world of arts and the
vocabularies of music, theatre and visual
arts. Using a multi-disciplinary approach,
offers opportunity to be creator, performer,
audience member, critic. General Education:
Creativity and the Arts. For students entering
prior to September, 2010: Arts.
Introductory. Open only to first-year and
sophomore students Offered: Fall
AMT/PHL 254
Aesthetics: Philosophy of the Arts
4 credits
Explores the experience associated with art,
and considers the nature of artistic expression
and of creativity. Through reading of selected
philosophical texts, pursues an understanding
of how we produce, perceive, and respond to
art. Field trips to museums or performances.
Required for Arts Majors. General
Education: Upper Level Writing (after ENG
111) Intermediate. Prerequisite: ENG 111
and one course in the arts or philosophy.
Offered: Fall.
AMT 412
Internship in the Arts
4 credits
Offers professional experience in an arts field
of the student’s choice. Provides a context
for understanding the meaning of the arts in
people’s lives. Placements for the internship
are 150 hours per semester. Open to Arts
Majors only. Advanced. Prerequisites: Arts
Major, Junior or Senior Status, permission of
department chair. Offered: Fall, Spring
AMT 499
Arts Major Portfolio
0 credits
Provides the means by which the Arts
Department will record the successful
submission of the portfolio required of all
arts majors. Students should register in their
final semester at the College. Prerequisites:
permission of instructor. Pass-fail only.
Advanced.
160
AUTISM
AUT 320
Foundations of Development in Autism
4 credits
Situates contemporary understandings of
autism in multiple fields. Analyzes research
in multiple developmental domains. Studies
the autism spectrum ranging from profound
to mild, often mixed in any one individual.
Explores the emergence of expert-advocates
with autism and their families, of self-reports
across the life-span, and of myriad cultural
depictions. Counts as an Advanced Human
Development course for the following
Human Development majors: Child, Family
and Culture; Counseling Psychology; and
Developmental Psychology. Prerequisite:
One semester of HGD and HDP 290
Children with Special Needs (may be taken
concurrently). Advanced.
AUT 322
Assessment and Intervention in Autism
4 credits
Reviews the process of screening fro and
diagnosing Autism. Discusses evidence-based
practices. Studies intervention designed to
promote children’s communication and social
skills and to address challenging behaviors.
Explores instructional strategies used in
educational settings for children with Autism
and how to collaborate with parents and
families. Prerequisite: AUT 320. Advanced.
CHILD AND FAMILY STUDIES
CFP 420
Practicum and Seminar in Human Services
4 credits
A 150-hour supervised practicum chosen
from a variety of settings and a bi-weekly
seminar. Undertake responsibilities suited
to site’s priorities and needs and students’
knowledge, skills, and learning goals. Explore
organizational dynamics, community
contexts, resources, and direct service goals.
Prerequisite: Completion of WLCE, CFS
340 and GPA of 3.0.
CFP 603
Practicum and Seminar I: Family Studies
3 credits
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
CFS 514
Curriculum Development B-3
3 credits
Planning individualized learning
experiences across the four domains in Early
Intervention, Child Care, or other settings.
Designing of activities that evaluate learning
environment and examine culture and
family-centered care. Special program design
in curriculum development. Prerequisite:
HDF 502. Must be taken as a prerequisite to
or concurrently with CFP 612.
CFS 240
Helping Children with Grief and Loss
4 credits
Explores developmental understandings of
death and how children cope with grief and
loss. Prepares students to help children with
life-threatening conditions and to facilitate
the bereavement needs of children who
experience the death of a sibling, parent,
relative, or friend. Prerequisite: HDP 120123 or HDP 124-127.
CFS 516
Curriculum/Program Planning in EI
3 credits
Focuses on program issues of models of
service delivery, program evaluation and
efficacy studies, policy development, and
advocacy in early intervention. Curriculum
resources and intervention strategies for
infants and toddlers with special needs are
reviewed with emphasis on interdisciplinary
planning and implementation. Prerequisite:
CFS 504 or permission of instructor.
CFS 340
Introduction to Human Services
4 credits
Critically examines relationships between
U.S. public policies and human services
across the lifespan in health, mental health,
education and social welfare. Identifies
occupations and practitioners’ roles,
responsibilities and challenges. Explores
partnerships that build upon clients’
strengths. Opportunities to advocate for
social change. Prerequisite: HDP 120-123 or
HDP 124-127.
CFS 504
Assessment of Development in B-3
3 credits
Examines procedures for formal and informal
assessment of physical, cognitive and
language development in children ages birth
to 3. Critical issues in early developmental
assessment are identified and addressed.
Opportunities for supervised practice in
assessment are offered. (Prerequisites: A
course in child development, or equivalent,
and HDF 502, or permission of instructor.)
CFS 520
Medical Ethics
3 credits
Examines different models of medical
ethics, uses case studies, discussion, and
ethical reasoning to examine decisions about
healthcare options and issues. Teaches skills
to help families decide about healthcare
options and choices.
COURSES OF INSTRUCTION
A 150-hour supervised practicum in urban
or suburban settings serving children and
families, ranging from early childhood home
visiting, school, health or social service,
center-based consultations or workshops,
to program development and public policy.
Collaborate as interdisciplinary team
member. Participate in monthly individual
and group supervision and seminar. Offered:
Fall and Spring. (Open only to students
enrolled in the Certificate in Parenting
Education.)
CFS 602
Family Interaction
3 credits
Examines current theories of family
dynamics, communication patterns, and
member roles, e.g., siblings, within a
particular family systems. Students utilize
personal experience as family members to
explore the effects of family interactions
on individual and family development,
adaptation to stressors, and relationships with
school, work and other settings.
CFS 606
Family Support: Child Special Needs
3 credits
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COURSES OF INSTRUCTION
Families of children, 0-12, with special needs
have legal rights and responsibilities. Explores
parent-professional partnerships, informal
and formal family support networks, and
ways parents, siblings, extended family, and
friends contribute to a child’s development.
Analyzes family-centered care principles as
they apply to home, school, medical, and
other settings.
CFS 614
Perspectives on Parenting
3 credits
Explores topics including parenthood and
adult development, parent-child issues, childrearing practices, varieties of parenthood
experiences, challenges for children and their
parents, parents’ involvement in their child’s
learning and the dynamics of family life.
Parenting education materials and family
support services explored.
CFS 617
Bereavement Care
3 credits
Examines theories about loss and
bereavement and individual responses to
various types of losses. Prepares students
to provide bereavement interventions for
individuals and groups.
CFS 618
Contemporary Issues in Child and Family
Studies
3 credits
Introduces students to contemporary and
controversial issues related to the lives of
children and families, using the ecological
approach as a framework. Interdisciplinary
faculty guest speakers select specific issues for
analysis and discussion.
CFS 622
Issues in Death and Dying
3 credits
Explores developmental, cultural, ethical,
legal, and clinical issues in death and dying.
Prepares students to help families cope with
life-threatening illness across the lifespan.
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CFS 630
Helping Children Cope with Stress
3 credits
Children’s coping skills, styles, and social
support can buffer effects of stressors.
Explores concepts of resiliency, risk, and
vulnerability within a developmental
framework. Stressors range from transitions
such as starting kindergarten, to threats of
loss through divorce, illness, or death, and
contending with systematic barriers such as
discrimination or poverty.
CFS 632
Cross Cultural Perspectives on Grief
3 credits
Examines cultural/global responses to illness
and death including beliefs about death,
religious rituals, and care of the bereaved in
the community. Fulfills core requirement in
multiculturalism.
CFS 737
Working with Parents
3 credits
Examines principles for organizing individual
and group parenting education that builds on
parental knowledge and responds to parental
needs. Examines supportive, therapeutic, and
educational models, materials and resources.
Develops communication skills and
leadership capacities to work with parents in
school, healthcare, family support and home
settings.
CHILD LIFE
CLF 210
Child and Family Health Systems
4 credits
Introduces students to the history and
development of the U.S. health care system
from a family-centered care perspective,
including identification of the organizations
and professional disciplines serving
children and their families. Focuses on the
psychosocial, financial and emotional costs
of health care and introduces students to the
profession of Child Life. Course is open to
second-semester first-year students and firstsemester second-year students.
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
stresses associated with health care services,
and resources to support the child who is
ill. The seminar is designed to support each
student to integrate theory and practice.
Prerequisites: CLF 204, CLF 205 and CLF
350. Child Life Internship Core I. Taken
concurrently with CLF 421 and CLP
472. Students completing an off-campus
internship will receive an additional 2 credits.
CLF 350
Role of the Child Life Specialist
4 credits
Explores ways in which Child Life Specialists
developmentally serve children across the life
span and from diverse cultural environments.
Focuses on the child and family’s responses to
medical care and the philosophy of familycentered care.Students complete a 75 hour
pre-internship placement in a health care
setting. Prerequisite: Completion WLCE,
CLF 204, CLF 205, HDP 120-123, or HDP
124-127. Enrollment limited to junior level
Child Life students.
CLF 452
Integrative Seminar in Child Life
2 credits
Examines the pre-professional experiences of
students and considers their transition into
a professional role. Addresses administrative
issues in child life, including grant writing,
program development, management, and
evaluation. Child Life Internship Core II.
Taken concurrently with CLP 474.
CLF 355
Hospitalized Child in England
4 credits
Participate in a two-week intensive course
surveying the psychosocial practice and
healthcare delivery within the UK. Through
visits, seminars, and intensive observation
hours, students will be immersed in learning
and gaining an understanding of the clinical
practice of play specialists in the UK.
CLF 421
Child Life Methods and Materials
4 credits
Explores relationships between child life
play activities and child development
theories, stressing the acquisition of practical
skills needed for child life programming.
Prerequisites: CLF 204, CLF 205 CLF
350. Child Life Internship Core I. Taken
concurrently with CLF 423 and CLP 472.
CLF 423
Issues and Processes Seminar
2/4 credits
Focuses on issues related to acute and
chronic illness, hospitalization, the family
CLF 632
Child and Family in Health Care
3 credits
Introduces research and literature on the
psychosocial needs of children and families
in health care settings. Focuses on theories
of development, play, preparation, coping
and delivery of family-centered care in
the context of health care. This is the first
in a required three course sequence for
matriculated child life students.
CLF 670
Clinical Issues in Child Life
3 credits
Provides skills to plan, implement,
document, and assess developmentally
appropriate child life interventions including
coping with medical procedures, familycentered care, ethics, expressive activities,
crisis intervention, and pain management.
Open to matriculated child life students or
permission of instructor.
COURSES OF INSTRUCTION
CLF 255
Children with Special Healthcare Needs
4 credits
Examines the impact of acute and chronic
illness on development of children with
special healthcare needs. Studies neurological,
genetic, metabolic, orthopedic, and
developmental disorders of children with
special healthcare needs. Intermediate.
CLF 674
The Hospitalized Child in England
3 credits
Provides a five-week summer experience.
Complete a placement in London pediatric
hospital. Learn about the role of the Hospital
Play Specialist and the British health care
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WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
system and how services are provided to
a diverse society. Supervision is provided
by Wheelock College faculty. Students
participate in a weekly reflective seminar.
COURSES OF INSTRUCTION
CLF 770
Child Life Program Development
3 credits
Provides skills to plan, implement,
document, and assess Child Life program
objectives and strategic planning,
including child health systems, alternative
settings, grant writing, professional
presentations, group dynamics,
interdisciplinary collaboration, and
supervision. Open to matriculated child
life students or permission of instructor.
CLP 472
Child Life Internship
8 credits
Offers supervised work in child life with
children and families in inpatient hospital
settings. Students integrate theory from
Issues and Processes Seminar into their
planning for, and interactions with,
children and families. Students are in the
field a minimum of 400 hours during the
semester. Prerequisite: CLF 350 and LSC
153 or 302. Child Life Internship I. Taken
concurrently with CLF 421 and CLF 423.
CLP 474
Alternative Applications of Child Life
4 credits
Provides a second, supervised experience
in a health or non-health care setting.
Enables students to explore the application
and adaptation of child life knowledge
and skills in alternative settings, including
outpatient clinics, community health
centers, and home care programs.
Prerequisites: CLF 421, CLF 423, and
CLP 472. Child Life Internship II. Taken
concurrently with CLP 452.
CLP 670
CL Internship/Seminar I 200-hour
3 credits
Provides a 200 hour supervised internship
opportunity in a community, outpatient,
or primary care setting with focus on
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developing skilled based on the Child Life
Competencies. Students participate in
a weekly process seminar at the college.
Prerequisite: CLF 632. (CLF 670 must be
taken concurrently.)
CLP 671
CL Internship/Seminar I 400-hour
6 credits
Provides a 400 hour internship opportunity
under the direct supervision of a certified
Child Life Specialist in a hospital setting with
focus on developing skills based on the Child
Life Competencies. Students participate
in weekly process seminar at the college.
Prerequisite: CLF 632. (CLF 670 must be
taken concurrently.)
CLP 672
CL Internship/Seminar II 200-hour
3 credits
Provides a second 200 hour supervised
internship opportunity in a community,
outpatient, primary care, or alternative
setting with focus on continuing to develop
and refine skills based on the Child Life
Competencies. Students participate in weekly
process seminar at the college.
CLP 673
CL Internship/Seminar II 200-hour
3 credits
Provides a 200 hour internship opportunity
under the direct supervision of a certified
Child Life Specialist in a community,
outpatient, or primary care setting with focus
on developing skills based on the Child Life
Competencies. Students participate in weekly
process seminar at the college.
COMMUNICATIONS
COM 101
Introduction to Media Production
4 credits
Discover the basics of digital media
production, including graphic design, digital
photography, video production, and digital
music production. Students will learn to plan
and complete a project from pre-production
to finish. Students will learn software skills
for media production including Adobe
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
Photoshop, In Design, and Final Cut.
COM 140
Media And Race in American Society
4 credits
Introduces students to a multicultural
analysis of media theory, content, and effects.
Explores how racial and racist perceptions
of people of color shape cultural norms,
attitudes, and practices. Course will cover a
wide range of media forms such as HipHop, advertisements, movies, and reality
TV. General Education: Self & Society and
Perspectives on Diversity. Introductory.
COM 210
Video Production I
4 credits
Learn to produce digital video for TV
web and mobile from project conception
to completion. Students will practice
camera operation in field and on location
settings. Students will learn techniques for
producing a variety of video formats, and will
demonstrate learning by writing, shooting
and editing several short form videos.
Prerequisite: COM 101 or permission of the
instructor. General Education: Creativity and
the Arts. Intermediate course.
COM 255
Media Literacy for Children and Youth
4 credits
Learn the best practices for teaching media
literacy to children and teens. Explore
pedagogical approaches to teaching youth to
use and understand media, discover strategies
COM 224
Designing the Digital Image
4 credits
Introduces computer imaging and its capacity
to design and control the two-dimensional
page. Through use of various twodimensional imaging software applications,
students learn to manipulate photographs,
compose with text, and develop image
concepts in the digital arena. Intermediate.
General Education: Creativity and the Arts.
For students entering prior to September,
2010: Arts.
COM 410
Video Production 2
4 credits
Advance understanding and ability in
video production with an emphasis on
dramatic and short documentary pieces.
Build on experience from video production
1, completing all aspects of the production
process. Projects will cover script writing,
directing, three point lighting, multi camera
shoots and advanced postproduction skills.
Advanced. Prerequisite: COM 210 Video
Production 1.
COURSES OF INSTRUCTION
COM 150
Communication, Persuasion, and
Propaganda
4 credits
Examine the ways that people
communication and the impact that
communication messages have on our
selves, communities, and society. Students
be introduced to the communication
process, explore interpersonal and group
communication, gain a better understanding
of how rhetoric is used to shape social norms,
and political realities. General Education:
Self and Society. Introductory course.
for working with children that are age
appropriate and engaging, and develop skills
in creating curricula and delivering media
education in classroom and community
settings. Fulfills Communications Media
Literacy requirement. Intermediate.
COM 440
Media as a Tool for Social Change
4 credits
Introduces students to social media, and the
ways that media messages can be used to
create change for families and communities.
Students will learn strategies for using media
as a tool for organizing and facilitating
social change. Project planning will allow
students to put what they learn into practice.
Advanced. Satisfies: Advanced requirement
in communications for Communications and
Culture and Production tracks.
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COURSES OF INSTRUCTION
EDUCATION
EDP 317
Elementary Prepracticum
1 credit
100-hour minimum prepracticum.
Implement curriculum and assessments
designed in accompanying courses, and
apply their knowledge of child development
and theories and principles of education in
an elementary classroom. Reflect upon and
evaluate the impact of their teaching on
children’s learning and their own professional
development. Prerequisites: Completion
WLCE, EDU 255, Mathematics sequence,
MTEL Literacy and Communication Tests,
EDU 306, 330 and 337. Corequisites: EDU
316, 321, and 323.
EDP 427
Early Childhood Practicum and Seminar
(Grade K)
6 credits
Student teachers are mentored through
performance-based assessment and reflection
in kindergarten classrooms. They apply
early childhood theory to practice, develop
inclusive/integrated curricula, facilitate
inquiry learning and play, manage the
classroom, and collaborate with families
and professionals. Examine social, legal,
economic and political issues that impact
early education. Full semester practicum.
Prerequisites: EDU 255, EDU 305, EDU
320 and EDU 327. Completion of WLCE.
Taken concurrently with EDP 436 and EDU
328.
EDP 436
Teaching and Learning in the Primary
Grades
4 credits
Focus on children as active learners in
developmental domains and content areas.
Students design, adapt, implement and
assess inclusive, integrated curriculum that
is developmentally, culturally, linguistically
and individually appropriate. Emphasizes
curriculum development and assessment
responsive to children with diverse cultural,
cognitive, social, racial, ethnic, religious, class
and linguistic backgrounds. Prerequisites:
166
Pass WLCE, pass MTEL Literacy and
Communication tests (for students seeking
licensure), EDU 255, EDU 305, EDU 320
and EDU 327. Taken concurrently with EDP
437 and EDU 328.
EDP 437
Early Childhood Practicum and Seminar
(Grade 1-2)
6 credits
Student teachers are mentored through
performance-based assessment and reflection
in grade 1-2 classrooms. They apply early
childhood theory to practice, develop
inclusive/integrated curricula, facilitate inquiry
learning and play, manage the classroom, and
collaborate with families and professionals.
Examines social, legal, economic and political
issues that impact early education. Full
semester practicum. Prerequisites: Pass WLCE
and MTEL Literacy and Communication
Tests, EDU 255, EDU 305, EDU 320 and
EDU 327. Taken concurrently with EDP 436
and EDU 328.
EDP 447
Elementary Practicum
6 credits
Develops students’ skills in working with
diverse children and integrating theory
and practice. Students assume increasing
responsibility for designing curriculum,
teaching, and assessing children’s learning
in a classroom setting. Students evaluate all
aspects of their teaching through ongoing
reflection and conferences with teachers and
supervisors. Prerequisites: Passage EDU 316,
EDP 317, EDU 321, EDU 323, and EDU
338. Corequisites: EDU 445 and EDP 446.
EDP 456
Teaching and Collaboration in Diverse
Early Childhood Settings (B-6)
4 credits
Extends students’ knowledge of creating
learning environments that foster children’s
development through collaborative play.
Emphasizes interactive teaching, formal and
informal assessment, and individualized
learning goals developed using IFSPs and
IEPs. Concentrates on inter-professional
collaboration with specialists from education,
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
health, and social service perspectives and
partnerships with families from diverse
backgrounds. Prerequisites: EDP 427/437,
436, and EDU 328. Taken concurrently with
EDP 457.
EDP 467
Kindergarten/Early Childhood Internship
2 - 4 credits
Offers an guided field experience in an early
childhood setting linked to career goals
(e.g., kindergarten teacher, director, family
relationship coordinator) or specialties
(e.g., early intervention, special education,
bilingual education). Includes opportunities
to gain leadership skills through working
in community-based centers (e.g., North
American Indian Center) or action
research projects. Taken concurrently with,
or following, EDP 456 and EDP 457.
Prerequisites: completion of EDP 427 or
EDP 437, EDU 436 and EDU 328.
EDP 521
Practicum/Seminar: ECE PreK/K
Prac/Sem ECE P /K
3 credits
Provides opportunities to assume
responsibility for preparation of
curriculum in inclusive preschool or
kindergarten classrooms with children
and families from diverse backgrounds,
using theories of child development and
culturally responsive, Developmentally
Appropriate Practice. Seminar topics
include: ethical responsibilities, anti-bias
EDP 526
Practicum/Seminar: ECE 1st/2nd
3 credits
Provides opportunities to assume
responsibility for preparation of curriculum
and management in inclusive first or
second grade classrooms with children
and families from diverse backgrounds,
using theories of child development and
culturally responsive Developmentally
Appropriate Practice. Seminar topics
include: ethical responsibilities, anti-bias
practices, promotion of social competence,
management and partnerships with families.
(200 hours) May be taken as either the first
or second early childhood practicum.
EDP 530
Field Experience/Seminar: ECE
3 credits
Provides opportunities to assume
responsibility for preparation of curriculum
and management in early childhood care
and education settings with children
and families from diverse backgrounds,
using theories of child development and
culturally responsive, Developmentally
Appropriate Practice. Seminar topics
include: ethical responsibilities, anti-bias
practices, promotion of social competence,
management, and partnerships with families.
(300 hours)
COURSES OF INSTRUCTION
EDP 457
Early Childhood Practicum and Seminar
(B-6)
4 credits
Extends student skills to working with
families and very young children with varying
needs and from diverse backgrounds and
communities. Students set teaching goals and
evaluate their professional development to
assume responsibility for the preparation of
the learning environments, management of
the program, and collaboration with families
and allied professionals. Prerequisites:
EDP 427/437, 436 and EDU 328. Taken
concurrently with EDP 456.
practices, promotion of social competence,
management, and partnerships with families.
(200 hours) May be taken as either the first
or second early childhood practicum.
EDP 531
Extended Field Experience in Early
Childhood Education
1-3 credits
Provides students with an individualized,
guided field experience in an early childhood
setting that is linked to career goals or their
chosen focus of study. Students may choose
to extend their previous practicum experience
or they may choose to diversify their
experience in a different setting. Students
construct an independent study plan and
select a site in consultation with their
academic advisor and their Wheelock field
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WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
supervisor. (100-300 hours.) Prerequisite:
EDP 530: Field Experience and Seminar in
Early Childhood Education.
COURSES OF INSTRUCTION
EDP 536
Elementary Practicum
3 credits
Students assume increasing responsibility for
curriculum, management, teaching diverse
learners, children’s learning, and relationships
with children, parents and school
personnel. Assessment of teaching through
reflection and supervisory consultations.
Demonstration of competencies for Initial
Licensure required.
EDU 201
Orientation to the Education Programs
0 credits
Orients students to early childhood,
elementary education, and special education
concentrations. Presents the Standards for the
Education Programs. Describes the portfolio
process for assessing progress toward meeting
these standards. Explains the process for
meeting the Massachusetts Tests for Educator
Licensure requirements. Required for all
undergraduate education students.
EDU 228
Civic Issues, Skills and Engagement
4 credits
Investigates social justice issues embedded in
community centered experiential learning.
Knowledge of a community is examined
in relation to larger issues including access,
power, and inequities. Leadership and
academic content are rooted in student
directed projects. Communication,
collaboration, problem-solving, and advocacy
skills develop in planning and implementing
civic service projects. Enrollment requires
permission of the instructor.
EDU 240
Impact of Sp Needs on Learning and
Development
4 credits
Considers ways various special needs impact
children’s learning and development.
Emphasizes the learning experience from the
perspective of the child with special needs
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and his/her family. Introduces policies and
regulations relevant to special education and
their implications for optimally serving all
children. Addresses curriculum development
and instructional methodology. Examines
learners’ learning needs in a historical and
social context.
EDU 250
Supporting Yng Children w/Sp. Needs and
Their Families
2 credits
Explores the effects of special needs on
children 3-age 8. Introduces historical
background, legislation, procedures
influencing educational services, IFSP/
IEP, supporting families, collaborating
and building partnerships with specialists,
community services and resources, etiology
of disabilities and curriculum adaptations
and instructional strategies. Prerequisites:
HDP 120/122 and 121/123 or HDP
124/127.
EDU 255
Racial and Cultural Identities
4 credits
Introduces the critical study of race, culture,
and identity. Explores theories to help
students examine their own socialization and
understanding of race, ethnicity, culture, and
identity. Considers political, social, cultural,
historical, economic, and power dynamics as
a context for interpreting interpersonal and
structural relationships. General Education:
Ethics and Social Justice
EDU 276
Advanced Foundations in Communication
and Collaboration
2 credits
Promotes ways to build trusting
interprofessional relationships and achieve
cultural consistency through effective
communication in settings/institutions
involving parents and professionals.
Leadership and research activities include
conducting environmental scans, examining
alliance building strategies, and designing
professional development and action plans
that are inclusive and address community
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
assets and needs. Prerequisite: Completion of
EDU 385 Foundations in Communication
and Collaboration with Families,
Professionals and Communities.
EDU 306
Introduction to Elementary Teaching
4 credits
Introduces history, philosophy, and theories
of education. Develops teaching and
learning skills for diverse learners in diverse
communities. Explores assessment and use
of field observations. Analyzes relationships
among families, schools, and communities;
intricacies of social justice; ethnicity
and family; and legal aspect of working
with children who have special needs.
Prerequisites: Completion WLCE, HDP
120/121 or HDP 124/125, and EDU 255.
EDU 315
Quality Infant-Toddler Programs
4 credits
Examines therapeutic, educational and
developmental programs serving young
children and families, including but not
limited to early intervention, hospital
programs, family/home care providers, and
center-based/Early Head Start services.
Organizational structure and funding, legal
and philosophical foundations for delivering
services, and research and regulations that
determine ‘best practices’ will be analyzed.
Prerequisites: Pass WLCE, HDP 120/122
EDU 316
Elementary Curriculum Development
3 credits
Explores influences of educational,
psychological, political, and sociological
theories on curriculum development.
Analyzes interactions between community
and school cultures and pedagogical
practices. Uses Massachusetts Curriculum
Frameworks in planning and evaluating
lessons, units, and assessments of children’s
understandings. Prerequisites: Completion
of WLCE, Mathematics Sequence, EDU
255, EDU 306, EDU 330 and EDU 337,
MTEL Literacy and Communications Test.
Corequisites: EDP 317, EDU 321, and
EDU 323.
EDU 320
Mathematics for Young Children
4 credits
Explores the content and methods of
teaching mathematics to all young children
from 3 to 8 years. Course topics include
concept development in mathematics;
assessment; prenumber development;
number sense; problem solving; patterns and
functions; graphing; measurement; fractions
and geometry. Students design, evaluate,
and adapt mathematical curriculum.
Prerequisites: Completion of College
requirement in Mathematics, EDU 201,
EDU 255, HDP 120/121 and 122/123 or
HDP 124/125 and 126/127.
COURSES OF INSTRUCTION
EDU 305
Principles of Inclusive Early Childhood
Education
4 credits
Considers theoretical principles underlying
developmentally appropriate practice in
regular, special and inclusive education and
how they inform practice, e.g., curriculum,
environment, teachers’/children’s roles.
Models and analyses active, play- and
inquiry-based, and individualized learning.
Emphasizes diverse social and cultural
factors in teaching/learning. Includes 25
hour practicum in school and community
settings. Prerequisites: Completion WLCE,
EDU 201, EDU 255 and HDP 120/121 and
122/123 or HDP 124/125 and 126/127.
and 121/123 or HDP 124/127, EDU 201,
EDU 255, EDO 305, HDP 257l Pre or Corequisite: HDP 227 Language Development.
EDU 321
Elementary Science/Technology
2 credits
Elementary science concepts and topics
appearing in the Massachusetts Science
and Technology/Engineering Curriculum
Frameworks. Explores teaching strategies that
build children’s understanding of, and skills
in science inquiry. Prerequisites: EDU 306,
330 and 337. Corequisites: EDU 323, 316,
and EDP 317.
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WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
COURSES OF INSTRUCTION
EDU 323
Elementary History/Social Sciences
2 credits
Examines elementary history and social
science content as presented in the
Massachusetts History and Social Science
Curriculum Frameworks. Course includes
key concepts, epistemology, pedagogy, and
assessment. Emphasizes understanding sociocultural contexts and multicultural, anti-bias,
and anti-racist teaching. Prerequisites: EDU
306, EDU 330 and EDU 337. Corequisites:
EDU 316, 321 and EDP 317.
EDU 325
Teaching Literacy to English Language
Learners
4 credits
Introduces key factors affecting the literacy
development of bilingual children learning
to read and write in English such as print
exposure, phonological awareness, and
vocabulary in the home language and
in English. Develop skills in assessing
components of children’s reading and
writing competence, teaching early and later
reading skills, planning writing lessons, and
monitoring children’s literacy progress.
EDU 326
Promoting Young Children’s Language
Acquisition and Development
4 credits
Explores child language acquisition theory
and research and examines practices for
promoting children’s linguistic development
in the context of a multilingual society.
An important focus will be the use of
multicultural children’s literature to promote
vocabulary and other language systems
foundational to literacy development.
EDU 327
Teaching Reading to Young Children
4 credits
Analyzes stages of reading development from
birth to age 8, with an emphasis on emergent
and early stages. Focuses on balanced
instruction of early reading components:
oral language, phonological and phonemic
awareness, word identification and phonics.
Includes supervised off-campus sessions
170
assessing and instructing early readers.
Prerequisites: completion of WLCE, EDU
255, HDP 120/122 or HDP 124/127.
EDU 328
Reading, Writing and Understanding.
2 credits
Builds upon foundational knowledge
gained in EDU 327. Focuses on strategies
for developing vocabulary, improving
comprehension, and teaching writing in
grades preK-2. Reading informational text
and instruction of English language learners
are central themes. Includes observation and
analysis of a classroom literacy program.
Prerequisites: EDU 327.
EDU 329
Literacy for Young Children
4 credits
Emphasizes collaborative teacher inquiry
in research-based early literacy instruction
and assessment strategies: comprehension,
word study/phonemic awareness, vocabulary
development, the writing process, and family
literacy. Learners will become knowledgeable
practitioners who implement the assessment/
instruction cycle, organize and plan effective
instruction, and value the ongoing nature of
teacher inquiry.
EDU 330
Elementary Mathematics
4 credits
Examines contemporary influences on
pedagogy, curricular choices, and materials
when teaching mathematics to children in
elementary schools. Addresses the teacher’s
role in creating an effective learning
environment, and emphasizes strategies for
maximizing mathematical understanding for
all children. Discusses a variety of assessment
strategies. Prerequisites: HDP 120/121 or
HDP 124/125, EDU 255, and MAT 141 or
MAT 131 with simultaneous enrollment in
MAT 132.
EDU 331
Multicultural Picture Books
2 credits
Introduces students to a wide range of
multicultural picture books for children.
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
Guides students in development and
application of criteria for appropriate book
selection. Focuses on effective strategies
for reading aloud to young children. May
be taken as a sequence with EDU 332 or
separately.
EDU 335/RDG 335
Reading Theory and Practice
0 credits
Consolidates professional background in
theory and practice of teaching reading in
grades Pre-K - 8. Addresses core concepts
and instructional practices fr phonological
and phonemic awareness, emergent literacy,
phonics, vocabulary, comprehension,
and reading assessment. Builds upon the
professional knowledge developed in EDU
327 or EDU 337. Pre-Req: EDU 327 or
EDU 337. Pre- or co-requisites: EDU 328 or
EDU 338.
EDU 337
Teaching Reading in Grades preK-8
4 credits
Analyzes stages of reading development
during grades pre-K to 8. Focuses on balanced
instruction and assessment of oral language,
phonemic awareness, word identification,
phonics, structural analysis, and fluency.
Develops skills for guided reading instruction.
Includes supervised off-campus sessions
assessing and teaching developing readers.
Prerequisites: completion of WLCE, EDU
255, and HDP 120/122 or HDP 124/127.
EDU 338
Teaching Non-fiction Literacy
2 credits
Extends foundational knowledge gained
EDU 340
Developing Literacy for Young Children in
a Multilingual Society
4 credits
Analyzes stages of children’s early literacy
development in the context of a multilingual
society. Examines assessment procedures,
teaching strategies, classroom environments,
and reading materials in terms of effects on
children’s literacy development
EDU 341
Assessing Children with and without
Special Needs (B-8)
2 credits
Examines formal and informal assessment
of development in all children from
birth to age eight. Emphasizes ecological
approach, basing curriculum and teaching
on comprehensive assessment. Topics
include screening, referral, IEP and IFSP
processes, disabilities, family involvement,
culturally competent assessment. Identifies
and addresses critical issues in assessment of
young children. Prerequisite: HDP 120/121
and 122/123 or HDP 124/125 and 126/127.
Must be taken before EDP 456 and 457
COURSES OF INSTRUCTION
EDU 332
Multicultural Chapter Books
2 credits
Introduces students to a range of
multicultural chapter books for elementary
level children. Considers a variety of
critical perspectives for analyzing children’s
literature. Explores strategies for using this
literature effectively in the classroom. May
be taken in sequence with EDU 331 or
separately.
in EDU 337. Focuses on strategies
for developing vocabulary, improving
comprehension, and teaching writing.
Reading informational text and the
instruction of English language learners
are central themes of the course. Includes
observation and analysis of a classroom
literacy program. Prerequisite: EDU 337.
EDU 351
Teaching and Learning Science in Early
Childhood Classrooms
2 credits
Addresses current issues in the teaching
of science to children ages 3-8 (grades
PreK-2). Prepares students to address the
Massachusetts Science and Technology/
Engineering Curriculum Frameworks and
other related documents as they apply to
teaching children in grades preK through 2.
Introduces students to important elements
in young children’s science including
choosing appropriate topics; guiding
children’s inquiry; and deepening children’s
171
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
COURSES OF INSTRUCTION
science understanding through encouraging
representation and other forms of
communication. Prerequisite: HDP 120/121
and 122/123 or HDP 124/125 or 126/127
and one science course.
EDU 352 Information Technology in Early
Childhood Education
4 credits
Learn fundamental skills and strategies to
take full advantage of educational technology.
Evaluate the use of a variety of electronic
media for the classroom and early childhood
education, design lessons and curricula, and
create appropriate learning environments
using technological means. Gather the
information needed to use technology in the
assessment process and data analysis
EDU 355/555
Helping Children Heal-N. Ireland Lessons
2 credits
Accompanies Northern Ireland Service
Learning Program. Pre-trip sessions
provide foundation for trip: history of “The
Troubles,” how children are affected, efforts
to promote healing with children and adults,
broader implication for all children. In
Belfast sessions, expert practitioners connect
theory to student experiences. Post-trip
sessions explore implication for students’
professional work. Prerequisite: Admission
into Northern Ireland Service Learning
Program by application only.
EDU 365
Supporting Families with Infants
&Toddlers In Home & Community
Settings
4 credits
Promotes ways to build trusting interprofessional relationships and achieve
cultural consistency through effective
communication in settings/institutions
involving parents and professionals.
Leadership and research activities include
conducting environmental scans, examining
alliance building strategies, and designing
professional development and actions plans
that are inclusive and address community
assets and needs.
172
EDU 366
Supporting Young Children w/Special
Needs
2 credits
Examines programs and services for infants
and toddlers who have special learning and
developmental needs and their families
within a family-centered framework.
Recommended practices for programs
based on special education lens and policy
including the process for developing
and implementing the IFSP through a
transdisciplinary model will be studied.
HDP 120/121 and 122/123 or HDP
124/125 and 126/127, HDP 227, HDP
257, EDU 365, EDU 390.
EDU 367
Foundations in Communication &
Collaboration
2 credits
Explores effective adult interactions. across
roles and relationships. Cultural and critical
theories provide the foundations for analysis
and practical application of communication
skills. Communication skill-building focuses
on use of culturally competent approaches,
reflective practices, self-assessment, providing
and receiving feedback and setting
achievable goals. Emphasis is on cultivating
expertise for successful collaboration.
Prerequisites: HDP 120/121 and 122/123 or
HDP 124/125 and 126/127
EDU 367
Foundations in Communication &
Collaboration
2 credits
Explores effective adult interactions. across
roles and relationships. Cultural and critical
theories provide the foundations for analysis
and practical application of communication
skills. Communication skill-building focuses
on use of culturally competent approaches,
reflective practices, self-assessment, providing
and receiving feedback and setting
achievable goals. Emphasis is on cultivating
expertise for successful collaboration.
Prerequisites: HDP 120/122 or HDP
124/127.
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
EDU 390
Curriculum and Program Development for
Infants & Toddlers
4 credits
Examines research, theory and quality
indicator of the care and education of infants
and toddlers in home and community
settings and application to curriculum and
program development. Through familycentered and relationship-based frameworks,
focuses on early health and development and
environmental design within the context of
family and community. Prerequisites: HDP
120/122 and 121/123 or HDP 124/127 HDP
120/121,HDP 227, HDP 257.
EDU 427
Child Care Management and
Administration
4 credits
Focuses on developing, maintaining,
and evaluating child care classrooms and
programs. Assess staff, evaluate curriculum,
communicate with parents, implement
health care policies, and advocate for
quality care. Discussions of research on
children in group settings and the role of
child care in society. Prerequisite: 300 hr
practicum in Early Childhood concentration.
Recommended elective for Child Care
Specialist. Taken concurrently with or
following Integrated Practicum II
EDU 445
Meeting Diverse Learning Needs
2 credits
EDU 446
Elementary Teaching and Learning
4 credits
Focuses on classroom issues, events, and
interactions among children, families,
teachers, and communities. Provides a
framework for developing classroom climates
that are responsive to students from diverse
backgrounds, and for helping children
become responsible for their learning.
Emphasizes effective communication and
reflective practice. Prerequisites: EDU 316,
EDP 317, EDU 321, EDU 323, and EDU
338. Corequisites: EDU 445 and EDP 447.
EDU 462
Capstone: Inclusive Classroom TeacherNon-Licensure
1 credit
Non-licensure inclusive classroom teachers
reflect on teaching and learning experiences
throughout the program; explore issues
related to educational philosophies, public
policy, leadership in the field, societal
pressures affecting very young children and
their families. Complete professional portfolio
demonstrating evidence of meeting Wheelock
College Education Standards. Open to
seniors, usually in final semester.
COURSES OF INSTRUCTION
EDU 420
Advancing Communication &
Collaboration
2 credits
Promote ways to build trusting interprofessional relationships and achieve
cultural consistency through effective
communication in settings/institutions
involving parents and professionals.
Leadership and research activities include
conducting environmental scans, examining
alliance building strategies and designing
professional development and action plans
that are inclusive and address community
assets and needs. Prerequisite: EDU 367.
Examines theories of causation; historical
and social contexts affecting learning;
neurodevelopmental, behavioral, and
motivation issues; and curriculum and
instructional strategies for inclusive
classrooms. Students use informal and
standardized assessments to inform and
evaluate instruction, including impact of
teaching on student learning. Prerequisites:
EDU 316, EDP 317, EDU 321, EDU 323,
and EDU 338. Co-requisites: EDU 446 and
EDP 447.
EDU 464
Seminar in Policy Advocacy and
Leadership in ECE
1 credit
Inclusive classroom teachers and Birth-5
Specialists explore issues related to education
philosophies, education reform, societal
173
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
COURSES OF INSTRUCTION
pressures affecting children and families,
leadership in the field. Open to seniors,
usually in the final semester.
EDU 465
Capstone: Early Education Initial
Licensure
1 credit
Inclusive classroom teachers reflect on
teaching and learning experiences throughout
program; explore issues related to educational
philosophies, education reform, societal
pressures affecting children and families,
leadership in the field. Complete professional
portfolio demonstrating evidence of having
met Wheelock College Education Standards.
Open to seniors, usually in final semester.
Requires passage of Massachusetts Literacy
and Communication, Early Childhood
Subject, and Foundations of Reading Tests
for Educator Licensure.
EDU 474
Policy, Advocacy & Leadership in ECE
4 credits
Explores issues related to social justice and
early education policy in a cultural context.
Analyses the process of change, leadership
theories and the meaning of advocacy.
Emphasis is placed on understanding
leadership skills and applying them across
roles and domains in the field. A community
action project focuses on the local early
childhood sector and concludes the
Capstone.
EDU 480
Portfolio Development and Presentation
4 credits
Assemble and present evidence of achieving
Wheelock Education Standards. Develop
a professional portfolio, integrating all
aspects of teaching and learning, to support
them as lifelong learners. An approach
for documenting professional growth,
encouraging reflection and self-evaluation,
and peer mentoring. Discussion of the
integration of the portfolio and implications
in relation to each course.
174
EDU 483
Entrepreneurship in Early Childhood
Education Context
4 credits
Provides the foundation to plan, build,
implement, manage and grow an organization
that provides a service or product for children
and families. Gain an understanding of the
realities of entrepreneurship, including the
pitfalls encountered and the lessons learned
by other entrepreneurs. Topics to be reviewed
include how to think analytically about
organizational systems, how leaders play
a critical role in shaping an organization,
how to determine and marshal the financial
resources necessary for a start-up business,
and what to do to improve the likelihood of
success.
EDU 485
Capstone: Elementary Education
2 credits
Enables candidates to construct and
defend web-based program exit portfolios
demonstrating their achievement of
the Wheelock Education Standards.
Seminar provides a collaborative space
to discuss artifacts and drafts of analytic/
reflective essays. Selected educational
policies are addressed. Prerequisite:
Passage of Massachusetts Literacy and
Communication (subtests I and II), General
Curriculum(multi-subject and mathematics
subsets),, and Foundations of Reading Tests
for Educator Licensure. Completion of
EDP 446, EDP 447, and SPE 445 strongly
recommended.
EDU 486
Elementary Ed: Portfolio Development
1 credit
Enables candidates to construct web-based
program exit portfolios demonstrating their
achievements of the Wheelock Education
Standards, State and ACEI standards.
Seminar provides a collaborative space
to discuss artifacts and drafts of analytic/
reflective essays. Selected educational
policies are addressed. Prerequisites: Passage
of Reading and Writing Massachusetts
Tests for Educator Licensure. Completion
of EDP 446, EDP 447, and SPE 445
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
strongly recommended, but may be taken
concurrently.
EDU 502
Curriculum for ECE Social Studies and
Arts
2 credits
Design curriculum for early childhood social
studies, arts, and multicultural teaching.
Principles of curriculum development,
assessment, and historical events that
are part of early childhood curriculum.
Using national and state standards and
frameworks to inform teaching and develop
ability to find and adapt curriculum to
provide appropriate learning experiences.
Prerequisite: EDU 520-Introduction to
Inclusive Early Childhood Education or
permission of the instructor.
EDU 505
Racial and Cultural Identities
3 credits
Introduces the critical study of race, culture,
and identity. Explores theories to help
students examine their own socialization and
understanding of race, ethnicity, culture, and
identity. Considers political, social, cultural,
historical, economic, and power dynamics as
a context for interpreting interpersonal and
structural relationships.
EDU 506
Racial/Cultural Identities Advanced
4 credits
EDU 515
Curriculum for ECE Science, Tech and
Health
2 credits
Refine skills in designing and assessing
curriculum for early childhood classrooms
emphasizing science, technology, and health.
Strengthen knowledge of science content
that is part of early childhood curriculum.
Integrate technology into ongoing
curriculum and support beginning computer
literacy skills. Practice using national and
state standards and frameworks to inform
teaching. Prerequisites: EDU 520: Intro to
Inclusive Early Childhood Educ and EDU
502 Curriculum for Social Studies and the
Arts (For ECE DOE licensure students only)
EDU 520
Introduction to Inclusive ECE
3 credits
Historical, legal, theoretical foundations of
care and education for young children and
their families. Application of principles to
educational models. Curriculum design and
assessment, strategies for developmentally
appropriate learning opportunities for all
young children, including those with special
needs and those from diverse cultural,
ethnic and linguistic backgrounds. Course
requirements include 25 hours of prepracticum field experience.
COURSES OF INSTRUCTION
EDU 487
Elementary Ed Capstone
1 credit
Enables candidates to present and defend
web-based program exit portfolios
demonstrating their achievement of the
Wheelock Education Standards, State
and the ACEI standards. Prerequisite:
Passage of the Massachusetts Literacy
and Communication (Reading and
Writing subtests), General Curriculum
(Multiple subject and Math sub-tests), and
Foundations of Reading Tests for Educator
Licensure. Completion of EDP 446, EDP
447, and SPE 445 strongly recommended,
although they may be taken concurrently.
Students examine social theory and role of
ideology to examine their orientation to race
ethnicity, culture and identity in education.
Considers political, social, cultural,
historical, economic, and power dynamics
as a context for exploring curriculum,
educational pedagogy, and structures that
influence educational opportunity and school
achievement. Pre-requisite: EDU 255, EDU
505 or permission of instructor.
EDU 522
Curriculum for EC Social Studies and Arts
3 credits
Design curriculum for early childhood
social studies, arts, multicultural teaching.
Principles of curriculum development
and assessment and historical events that
are part of early childhood curriculum.
175
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
COURSES OF INSTRUCTION
Using national and state standards and
frameworks to inform teaching and develop
ability to find and adapt curriculum to
provide appropriate learning experiences.
Prerequisite: EDU 520 Intro to Inclusive
Early Childhood Education or permission of
the instructor.
EDU 525
Curriculum for ECE Science, Tech and
Health
3 credits
Refine skills in designing and assessing
curriculum for early childhood classrooms
emphasizing science, technology, and health.
Strengthen knowledge of science content
that is part of early childhood curriculum.
Integrate technology into ongoing
curriculum and support beginning computer
literacy skills. Practice using national and
state standards and frameworks to inform
teaching. Prerequisites: EDU 520: Intro to
Inclusive Early Childhood Educ and EDU
502 Curriculum for Social Studies and the
Arts or permission from the instructor.
EDU 528
Impact of Special Needs: ECE
2 credits
Explores effect of special needs on children
birth to age eight. Introduces legislation,
rights, services, stereotypes that affect
children, families, and communities.
Major areas of special needs are examined.
Emphasis is on understanding children as
individuals with varying performance and
rates of development rather than members of
a disability group.
EDU 534
Mathematics for Teachers
2 credits
Focuses on understanding mathematical
concepts and processes emphasized in the
Massachusetts Mathematics Curriculum
Frameworks and national (NCTM)
standards. Emphasizes a problem-solving
approach to exploring and connecting
concepts, applying that knowledge in
classrooms, and integrating technology where
appropriate.
176
EDU 535
Mathematical Learning for Diverse
Learners
3 credits
Examines contemporary influences
on pedagogy, curricular choices, and
materials. Addresses the teacher’s role in
creating an effective learning environment,
and emphasizes strategies to maximize
understanding mathematics for all children.
Discusses a variety of assessment strategies.
EDU 540
Intro to Elementary Communities
2 credits
Examines historical, legal, philosophical,
and theoretical foundations of elementary
education and application of those principles
to teaching. Introduces curriculum design
and assessment as interrelated processes that
include structuring learning environments
and experiences that are responsive to typical
and atypical children’s developmental needs,
and to children from diverse backgrounds.
EDU 545
Elementary Science
3 credits
Examines fundamentals of elementary
inquiry-based science programs. Through
direct experiences, focuses on the nature
of scientific inquiry, selected concepts
from across scientific domains, and basic
instructional approaches. Includes design
and implementation of a unit of study and
assessment of student learning. Considers
literacy and mathematics, and cultural
influences in science. Prerequisite: EDU 540
or its equivalent.
EDU 546
ELE History and Social Sciences
3 credits
Students explore social studies subject
matter including historical narrative and
legacy. They develop, implement, and assess
inclusive curricula; analyze pre-existing
curricula; learn and compare city, state and
national standards; and document implicit
and explicit social studies learning.
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
EDU 550
Issues in Early Childhood Literacy and
Numeracy Development
3 credits
Introduces theoretical frameworks of
how children begin to develop the early
concepts of literacy and numeracy that
lay the foundation for reading, writing,
and reasoning mathematically. Analyzes
connections between observation and
assessment of children’s emerging
mathematical and language development and
various inquiry-based pedagogical practices.
EDU 610
Mathematical Thinking for Teachers
3 credits
Deepens understanding of the mathematical
concepts taught in grades K-6, including
Number and Operation; Algebraic Thinking;
Geometry and Measurement; and Probability
and Data Analysis. Emphasizes problemsolving, justifying reasoning, mathematical
communication, representation, and
mathematical connections.
EDU 615
Educational Environments for Children
3 credits
Design, plan, implement, and evaluate
developmentally appropriate environments
that encourage the growth and active
learning of children with a focus on infants,
toddlers, preschoolers, and early elementaryaged children. Gain practical, hands-on
experiences that aid them to select, organize,
create, and evaluate various educational
programs, products, and environments that
EDU 655
Capstone: Care and Education
1 credit
Reflect on teaching and learning throughout
program. Complete portfolio evidence
of having met the Wheelock College
Education Standards. Analyze issues related
to educational philosophies, public policy,
leadership in the field, and societal pressures
affecting children and families. Present
portfolios orally to faculty and practitioners.
Taken in last semester of program.
EDU 682
Portfolio Development: Integrated
Elementary and Special Education
1 credit
Develop performance assessment portfolio
demonstrating competence in Association
for Childhood Education International and
Council for Exceptional Children standards.
Pre-requisites: Successful completion of the
MTEL in Communication and Literacy,
General Curriculum (sub-tests 1 and 2), and
Foundations of Reading.
EDU 685
Capstone: Elementary Education Initial
Licensure
1 credit
Enables candidates to construct and
defend web-based program exit portfolios
demonstrating achievement of the Wheelock
Education Standards. Seminar provides
a collaborative space to share artifacts
and drafts of analytic/reflective essays.
Selected educational policies are discussed.
Prerequisite: Passage of Massachusetts
Literacy and Communication, General
Curriculum, and Foundations of Reading
Tests for Educator Licensure. Completion of
EDP 536 strongly recommended.
COURSES OF INSTRUCTION
EDU 607
Teacher Inquiry Seminar
2 credits
Examines intellectual, social, professional,
and/or personal challenges arising from
participants’ teaching practice. Using a
formal protocol, students describe the
problem, solicit feedback, articulate their
insights, and describe the strategies they will
implement. Students document the impact
of their own learning on children’s learning,
development, and ability to engage with the
curriculum.
allow children to grow and learn.
EDU 702
Capstone: Early Education Initial
Licensure
1 credit
Reflect on teaching and learning throughout
Early Education Initial Licensure program.
Complete portfolio evidence of having met
177
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
COURSES OF INSTRUCTION
the Wheelock Education Standards. Analyze
issues related to educational philosophies,
public policy, leadership in the field and
societal pressures affecting children and
families. Present portfolios orally to faculty
and practitioners. Taken in last semester
of program. Prerequisite: Passage of
Massachusetts Literacy and Communication,
Early Childhood Subject, and Foundations
of Reading Tests for Educator Licensure.
EDU 704
Capstone: Educational Studies
1 credit
Enables candidates to construct and
defend web-based program exit portfolios
demonstrating achievement of the Wheelock
Education Standards. Seminar provides a
collaborative space to share artifacts and
drafts of analytic/reflective essays. Selected
educational policies are discussed. Taken in
last semester of program.
EDU 706
Capstone: Teacher of Reading
1 credit
Enables students to reflect on
accomplishments in the program, specifically
as these relate to the International Reading
Association’s Professional Standards for
Reading Professionals. Seminar provides a
collaborative space to explore professional
development strategies and draft
personal professional development plans.
Prerequisites: Passage of the Massachusetts
Tests for Educator Licensure Literacy and
Communication and Reading Specialist tests.
EDU 708
Capstone: Language and Literacy Studies
1 credit
Enables students to reflect on
accomplishments in the program, specifically
as these relate to the Wheelock Education
Standards. Seminar provides a collaborative
space to share artifacts and drafts of analytic/
reflective essays and professional plans. Taken
in the last semester of the program.
EDU 710
Capstone: Leadership
1 credit
178
Enables students in the leadership programs
to construct and defend exit portfolios
demonstrating achievement of the Wheelock
Education Standards. Seminar provides a
collaborative space to share artifacts and
drafts of analytic/reflective essays. Selected
educational policies are addressed.
EDU 900
Independent Study in Education
1-3 credits
ENGLISH
All first-year students at Wheelock enroll
in a composition course. Most students
enroll in English 110 in the fall and
English 111 in the spring. However, some
students are placed directly into English
111 in the fall and have their English 110
requirement waived. These placement
decisions are based primarily on the results
of the Writing Placement Exam, as well
as students’ prior academic records and
SAT scores. The Writing Placement Exam
asks students to write a persuasive essay
on a specific debatable issue presented as a
question. Essays are judged on organization,
development, reasoning, use of language, and
grammatical and mechanical correctness.
ENG 105
Topics in Popular Culture
2 Credits
Introduces students to college level reading,
writing, and thinking through analysis of
contemporary high school experience in
America. Students will analyze films and
essays that depict the high school experience,
and they will reflect upon their own time
in high school as measured against those
depictions in an essay.
ENG 110
Principles of Writing and Reading
4 credits
Emphasizes fundamental skills of reading
and writing to develop students’ expressive
and analytical abilities. Review of grammar
and summarizing is designed to strengthen
students’ ability to comprehend and
construct essays. Students read classic and
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
contemporary essays and short stories to
expand their repertoire of reading and
writing skills.
ENG 201
Introduction to Creative Nonfiction
4 credits
Introduces the basic literary mechanics of
creative nonfiction. Introduces a variety of
subgenres including memoir, reportage, lyric
essays, cultural criticism, and critical reviews.
This course combines critical readings of
professional writers along with workshops of
students’ own creative nonfiction.
ENG 220
Writing for Social Action
4 credits
Provides experiences and tools necessary to
effect change through writing. Exposure
to historical and contemporary examples
of writing that have contributed to social
change. Students will practice writing for
different audiences, including peers and
policymakers. Culminates in a community
action project designed by the class.
Prerequisite: ENG 111. Intermediate.
RWS 099
Reading and Writing Seminar
0 credit
Reviews rules of grammar, punctuation, and
spelling as they apply to effective copyediting.
Provides students with practice writing
essays that are persuasive, well-organized,
and logically sound. Provides students with
practice writing summaries that are concise,
RWS 100
Reading and Writing Tutorial
0 credit
Provides students with individualized
instruction in college-level reading and
writing skills, with special attention to
essay writing, summary writing, reading
comprehension, copyediting skills, and
spelling skills. Administers sections of the
Wheelock Literacy and Communications
Exam (WLCE) to students after adequate
preparation. Students must arrange tutorial
time at Registration. $35 Materials Fee.
Prerequisite: RWS 099 or strong performance
on the WLCE.
FOREIGN LANGUAGE
Some introductory and intermediate-level
courses in French and Spanish are offered
at Wheelock. The course descriptions can
be found under Humanities. Students
should consult the course schedule for the
availability of these courses in any given
semester.
Through the Colleges of the Fenway,
Wheelock students also may enroll in foreign
language courses at Simmons and Emmanuel
Colleges. Courses available are at the
elementary and intermediate levels in French,
Spanish, and German.
HUM 120
Introductory French I
4 credits
Introduction to basic French grammar,
vocabulary, and cultural aspects of the
regions in which French is spoken with a
focus on enhancing students’ four basic skills
(listening, speaking, writing and reading).
Relies on a communicative approach:
speaking French rather than talking about it.
COURSES OF INSTRUCTION
ENG 111
Critical Writing and Reading
4 credits
Concentrates on writing to develop students’
critical thinking. Writing assignments based
on experience and on readings are designed
to develop strengths in clarity, coherence,
organization, analysis, and argument.
Readings serve as models to deepen students’
understanding of good writing and thinking.
Includes a review of grammar. Prerequisite:
Completion of, or exemption from, ENG
110. General Education: Foundations of
Knowledge and Inquiry English Composition
clear, and accurate.
HUM 130
Introductory Spanish I
4 credits
Introduction to basic Spanish grammar,
vocabulary and cultural aspects of the Latin
American and Spanish regions with a focus
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on enhancing students’ four basic skills
(listening, speaking, writing and reading).
Relies on a communicative approach:
speaking French rather than talking about it.
COURSES OF INSTRUCTION
GENERAL EDUCATION CAPSTONES
GEC 250
Education and Theatre for Social Change
4 credits
Examines the theory and practice of Paulo
Freire’s Pedagogy of the Oppressed and
Augusto Boals’ Theatre of the Oppressed
for educational, social and political change.
Integrates education, human development,
and theatre to critically analyze and apply
approaches to social/political/educational
activism for social change. Final project
integrates research and theatre. General
Education: Capstone Seminar. Prerequisite:
Completion of General Education
requirements in both Creativity and the Arts
and Ethics and Social Justice.
HISTORY
HIS 151
Women, Work, and Family in Modern
Europe
4 credits
Explores how women from 1789 to the
present have sought to construct their
identity as equals in family, work, and
nation amidst the forces of revolution,
industrialization, scientific, and cultural
change. Examines the way in which European
women, along with their Asian and African
sisters, have individually and collectively
dismantled the legacy that biology determines
destiny. General Education: Perspectives
on Diversity AND Upper Level Writing
(after ENG 111) For students entering
prior to September, 2010: Global History,
Civilization, Culture AND Multicultural
AND Upper Level Writing (after ENG 111).
Introductory.
HIS 155
Europe and the World, 1789-1914
4 credits
Explores major transformations in Europe
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from the French Revolution to World
War I. These changes brought us the
modern era. Examines Europe’s worldwide
significance through developments such as
Enlightenment, Constitutional democracy,
social, economic, scientific, and cultural
revolutions, nationalism, and the colonial
empires. For students entering prior
to September, 2010: Global History,
Civilization, Culture Introductory.
HIS 160
History of the Family
4 credits
Examines how the family has been defined
and functioned. Topics include relationship
of the family to public and private spheres;
economic roles of family members; families
and the state; the family in psychology
and popular culture; effects of slavery;
immigration and family life; impact of
war; and the family in recent history. For
students entering prior to September, 2010
Global History, Civilization and Culture.
Introductory.
HIS 165
America Through the Civil War
4 credits
Surveys American history from colonial
period to end of Reconstruction (16071877). Topics include European presence in
America, settlement patterns, Revolution,
westward expansion, Industrial Revolution,
and Civil War. Studies political events in
relation to social history. Students work
with documents to examine how history is
constructed, not simply consumed. General
Education: Historical Perspectives AND
Upper Level Writing (after ENG 111). For
students entering prior to September, 2010:
US History, Civilization, Culture AND
Upper Level Writing (after ENG 111).
Introductory.
HIS 167
America Since the Civil War
4 credits
Surveys modern American history while
introducing uses (and abuses) of historical
evidence and reasoning. Topics include:
Industrial Revolution, immigrants, workers,
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
growth of cities, America as world power,
Progressivism, Great Depression, Cold War,
Vietnam, and Sixties. Emphasizes blacks,
women, farmers, rural migrants, and radicals
as well as presidents. Includes speeches,
autobiography, oral history, fiction, and texts.
General Education: Historical Perspectives
AND Upper Level Writing (after ENG 111).
For students entering prior to September,
2010: US History, Civilization, Culture
AND Upper Level Writing (after ENG 111).
Introductory.
HIS 208
Twentieth Century European History
4 credits
Explores how Europeans from 1914 to 1992
engaged changes in work and leisure, family,
childbirth, laws, government, new ideas,
conflict, and renewal. Historical sources
illuminate the importance of world wars,
Great Depression, Communism, Cold War,
technology and science, feminist and youth
revolutions. Designed to develop historical
perspective and critical thinking. Integrated
Humanities course. General Education:
Upper Level Writing (after ENG 111) For
students entering prior to September, 2010:
Upper Level Writing (after ENG 111) AND
Global History, Civilization, and Culture
Integrated Humanities. Introductory.
HIS 215
Africa and its Global Encounters
4 credits
Explores Africa’s triple heritage; its roots,
Islamic conquest, colonial era, and
emergence of independent African nations.
Uses historical sources to illuminate
evolution of Africa’s peoples in their various
socio-cultural contexts. Interprets African
history from perspective of Africans in
context of challenges to their integrity and
survival. Global Humanities course. General
Education: Perspectives on Diversity AND
Upper Level Writing (after ENG 111) AND
Historical Perspectives. For students entering
prior to September, 2010: Global History,
Civilization, Culture AND Multicultural
AND Upper Level Writing (after ENG 111)..
Introductory.
COURSES OF INSTRUCTION
HIS 194
Europe in the Age of Discovery
4 credits
Explores early modern European era, 1450
to 1750. Historical sources focus on five
themes: 1) everyday life in the peasant world
2) renaissance 3) religious reformations,
4) overseas discovery, expansion, global
commerce, 5) scientific revolution. Includes
primary and secondary historical sources
in texts and visual sources, with trips to
the MFA or Gardner Museums. Integrated
Humanities course. General Education:
Upper Level Writing (after ENG 111) For
students entering prior to September, 2010:
Upper Level Writing (after ENG 111)AND
Global History, Civilization, and Culture.
Introductory.
HIS 210
Encounters between East and West in
World History
4 credits
Explores world cultures East and West,
and the impact of ideas and events from
renaissance to Industrial Revolution in
revising society, laws, family, culture, and
institutions. Explores mutual influences
among people of eastern and western
civilizations. Global Humanities course.
General Education: Perspectives on Diversity
AND Upper Level Writing (after ENG 111)
For students entering prior to September,
2010: Global History, Civilization, Culture
AND Multicultural AND Upper Level
Writing (after ENG 111).Intermediate.
HIS 240
The Holocaust
4 credits
Studies the Nazi policies that led to the
Holocaust. Explores the meaning of the
Holocaust, and the ways in which historical
treatments of it have evolved since 1945.
Examines diverse government, organization,
and individual responses, including silence,
complicity, collaboration, and resistance.
General Education: Upper Level Writing
(after ENG 111) For students entering prior
to September, 2010: Upper Level Writing
(after ENG 111).Intermediate.
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COURSES OF INSTRUCTION
HIS 245
Women in America
4 credits
Explores women’s lives in America from
pre-colonial times to the present. Uses
primary sources and secondary sources
including essays, biographies, and films,
to consider expectations for women and
how women actually lived. Includes Native
American cultures, considers women’s
experiences in slavery, war, industrialization,
and women’s social and political activism.
General Education: Historical Perspectives.
For students entering prior to September,
2010: US History, Civilization, Culture.
Intermediate.
HIS 268
The Idea of the Witch in History
4 credits
Explores the role of the witch in cultures
around the world. Examines evolution of
attitudes toward witchcraft and magic,
locating their meaning within historical
forces that transformed society. Compares
primary and secondary sources as well as
representations of the witch in history.
General Education: Perspectives on Diversity
AND Upper Level Writing (after ENG
111) AND Historical Perspectives OR
Self and Society. For students entering
prior to September, 2010: Global History,
Civilization, Culture AND Multicultural
AND Upper Level Writing (after ENG 111).
Intermediate.
HIS 269
“The Sixties”
4 credits
Places “The Sixties” in context of 1930s to
1970s. Covers the presidencies of Kennedy,
Johnson, Nixon, civil rights movement, New
Left, Vietnam War and antiwar movement,
Black Power, the counterculture, and women’s
liberation movement. Materials include texts
and writings from the era, biography, and
autobiography, films, and music. General
Education: Historical Perspectives AND
Upper Level Writing (after ENG 111). For
students entering prior to September, 2010:
US History, Civilization, Culture AND Upper
Level Writing (after ENG 111). Intermediate.
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HIS 270
Human Rights as World History
4 credits
Flashes back to 1948 when the United
Nations adopted the Universal Declaration
of Human Rights. Explores genocide and
mass violations of human rights cases since
1945. Considers international justice tools
to prosecute Nazi war crimes applied at the
International Criminal Court. Engages
students in projects to conduct human rights
campaigns. General Education: Fulfills
Upper Level Writing (after ENG 111). Also
fulfills Historical Perspectives OR Ethics
& Social Justice. For students entering
prior to September, 2010: Global History,
Civilization, Culture AND Upper Level
Writing
HIS 402
Advanced Studies in History
4 credits
Provides students the opportunity to do
individual research projects that result in
substantial papers and public presentations.
Open to junior and senior Humanities
majors, with preference to those with a
focus in History, and to other juniors and
seniors by permission of instructor. General
Education: Upper Level Writing (after
ENG 111). For students entering prior to
September, 2010: Upper Level Writing (after
ENG 111). Advanced.
HUMAN DEVELOPMENT
Graduate Human Development courses are
designated as HDF. Undergraduate Human
Development courses are designated by
discipline: anthropology (HDA), psychology
(HDP), and sociology (HDS).
HDF 501
Lifespan Development I: Birth through
Adolescence
3 credits
Examines physical, cognitive, social, moral
and emotional development from conception
through adolescence. Discusses theory
and research from different psychological
approaches. Pays special attention to the
social and cultural contexts in which
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
development occurs.
HDF 502
Infant and Toddler Behavior and
Development
3 credits
Integrates theory, research and practical
experience about the first three years of
life through a transdisciplinary approach.
Considers development across domains and
the impact of parent-child relationships, peer
relationships, and early socialization patterns
on young children’s development. Observing
and recording an infant or young child’s
behavior and development required.
HDF 515
Lifespan Development II: Adult
Development
3 credits
Examines development from the transition
into adulthood through old age. Theory
and research from different psychological
approaches are presented. Topics include
changes in cognition; moral, psychosocial,
interpersonal and physical development; and
typical adult developmental tasks in different
cultures.
HDF 521
Children’s Cognitive Development
3 credits
Examines ways in which children construct
knowledge about physical and social worlds.
Considers contributions of Piagetian,
information processing and sociocultural
theories in understanding children’s cognitive
development. Introduces students to
clinical interviewing techniques. Requires
exploratory research with children. Offered
in conjunction with HDP 352.
HDF 526
The Meaning and Development of Play
3 credits
Explores the meaning and development of
play from infancy through adulthood through
theories, research, and application. Examines
value of play in therapeutic, educational
and medical settings; how the environment
(including toys and media) influences
play; how to support play, integrate it into
professional work, and advocate for play.
HDF 530
Language Acquisition
3 credits
Surveys and analyzes the literature on
child language in relation to educational
practice. Explores the nature and functions
of language, theories and developmental
stages of language acquisition, language and
cognition, and language assessment. Students
may pursue individual interests in related
areas: bilingualism, language deprivation,
dialect studies and language learning
disorders. Prerequisite: Prior knowledge or
previous course work in child development.
COURSES OF INSTRUCTION
HDF 504
Child Development: The Early Years
3 credits
Examines development from the prenatal
period to age 9 across physical-motor,
social, emotional, and cognitive domains.
Articulates the interactive roles of heredity,
environment, and culture. Implications for
curriculum design are drawn.
HDF 525
Memory, Identity, and Development
3 credits
Explores the dynamics of autobiographical
memory and the development of identity.
Topics include memories from personal
experiences, public events, childhood
amnesia, individual, gender, and cultural
differences; life transitions, traumatic events,
eyewitness testimony, collective memories,
mad memory disorders. Students apply
course readings to understand aspects of
memory through observations and written
assignments. Offered in conjunction with
HDP 325.
HDF 540
In the Best Interest of the Child(formerly
Children and Families in American
Society)
3 credits
Explores issues in the history of children and
families focusing on family structure and
functions and the rise of the “child experts.”
Topics include: the Puritan family, 19th
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COURSES OF INSTRUCTION
century transformations, origins of juvenile
justice, federal programs, child guidance,
gender norms, adoption, Head Start. Provides
solid foundation for child advocacy. Offered
in conjunction with AST 285.
HDF 560
Risk and Resilience in Infancy
3 credits
Reviews etiology, behavioral characteristics,
developmental outcomes and family impact
of infants born at environmental, biological,
or established risk for developmental delays
or disabilities. Reviews roles of medicine,
nursing, social work, education and the
developmental therapies in meeting the
needs of these children. Introduces early
intervention services and offers opportunities
to observe. Prerequisites: Prior knowledge or
previous course work in infant and toddler
development.
HDF 702
Language, Literacy and Culture
3 credits
Explores the relationships between language
and culture. Examines methods of helping
linguistically diverse students develop literacy
abilities within contexts that draw upon and
extend home language competencies. Focuses
both on native English speakers who speak
non-mainstream varieties of English and on
children who speak a first language other
than English.
HUMAN DEVELOPMENT/
ANTHROPOLOGY
HDA 120
Cultural Anthropology
4 credits
Introduces the student to the diversities and
similarities of cultures throughout the world
from simple homogeneous groups to complex
contemporary civilizations, including our own.
Emphasis will be placed on the development
of personality and the role of the family in the
total cultural complex. General Education:
Perspectives on Diversity AND Self and
Society OR Ethics and Social Justice OR
Historical Perspectives.. For students entering
prior to September, 2010: Social Sciences
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AND Multicultural.
Introductory.
HDA/AST 225
Boys and Men in America
4 Credits
Examines the social and cultural construction
of masculinity in the United States using
the theories and methods of Anthropology.
Topics include race, class, ethnicity, and
religion; popular images of American men
(e.g., movies, magazines, sports, jokes);
relationship of US manhood to sexuality,
war, and women. Some comparison to other
cultures. General Education: Perspectives on
Diversity, Self and Society and Historical
Perspectives. For students entering prior
to September, 2010: Social Sciences.
Intermediate.
HDA 266
Children, Families, and Parenting Around
the World
4 credits
Pursues an in-depth inquiry into
organizations and functions of families in
selected non-Western societies. Focuses
on the interaction between life course
paths and family strategies for adaptation.
Attention is given to caring for children,
organizing domestic labor and conveying
identities and statuses in foraging societies,
farming societies, and market based societies.
Prerequisite: HDP 120-121 or HDP
124-125. General Education: Perspectives
on Diversity AND Self and Society OR
Historical Perspectives. For students entering
prior to September, 2010: Social Sciences
AND Multicultural. Intermediate.
HUMAN DEVELOPMENT/PSYCHOLOGY
HDP 102
Introduction to Psychology
4 credits
Introduces the psychological study of human
behavior and experience. The history, scope
and methods of contemporary psychology
are described. Topic include: perception,
learning, memory, intelligence, emotion,
language and thought, social interaction in
small and large groups, behavior and mood
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
disorders and treatment, psychology and
health. General Education: Self and Society.
For students entering prior to September,
2010: Social Sciences. Introductory.
HDP 120/122
Human Growth and Development —
Theory
3/3 credits
Study of major developmental shifts
throughout the life span across social,
emotional, biological and cognitive domains.
Emphasis on competing theoretical
perspectives, the role of the sociocultural
context, and cultural diversity. Particular
focus on the connections between theory,
research and practice. General Education:
Foundations of Knowledge and Inquiry
Human Growth and Development
Introductory.
HDP 121/123
Human Growth and Development: Field
Work
1/1 credit
One-half day per week of field work.
First semester placements include group
settings for young children; second
semester placements include settings with
older children, adolescents, or adults,
individualized to meet students’ interests.
Guided observations (first semester)
and journals (second semester). General
Education: Foundations of Knowledge and
Inquiry Human Growth and Development
HDP 125/127
Human Growth and Development: Field
Work (Intensive)
1/1 credit
One-half day a week field placement in
group setting for young children. Uses
guided observations and journals to articulate
connections between developmental theory,
observed behavior and work with individuals
in field placement setting. General
Education: Foundations of Knowledge and
Inquiry Human Growth and Development
HDP 207/ THE 207
Introduction to Psychodrama
2 credits
Psychodrama is an active learning method
that uses role-playing and other theatrical
techniques as powerful tools for growth,
enhanced creativity and problem solving.
This introduction to psychodrama is a
didactic as well as an experiential course
that studies these group techniques and
applies them to various professional settings.
Psychodrama has many applications for
educators, social workers and child life
specialists. The course explores psychodrama
through demonstration, practice, theory, and
application. Introductory.
COURSES OF INSTRUCTION
HDP 104
Social Psychology
4 credits
Provides an introduction to theories and
research on how individuals are influenced
by others. Topics include social perception,
affiliation and interpersonal attraction,
altruism, aggression, stereotyping and
prejudice, group dynamics and conflict
resolution. The application of social
psychological knowledge to current social
problems will be discussed. General
Education: Self and Society. For students
entering prior to September, 2010: Social
Sciences. Introductory.
HDP 124/126
Human Growth and Development
(Intensive)
3/3 credits
Explores physical, cognitive, social and
emotional development across life span.
HDP 124 devoted to development through
preschool. HDP 126 focuses on development
from middle childhood through late
adulthood. Trains in observing, recording and
interpreting young children’s behavior and
in collecting and analyzing clinical interview
data. Designed for transfer students. Students
may be exempted from all or part of this
course by passing a written examination or
through articulation agreement. Completion
or exemption from HDP 124 is required for
entry into HDP 126. General Education:
Foundations of Knowledge and Inquiry
Human Growth and Development
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COURSES OF INSTRUCTION
HDP 214
Violence in the Lives of Children and
Families
4 credits
Explores how children and families are
increasingly affected by violence. Uses
psychological and sociological theory and
research to examine the root causes of
violence and explores the political, economic,
historical and gender relationships. Promising
approaches for breaking the cycle of violence
and promoting healthy development are
examined. Prerequisites: HDP 120/121 or
HDP 124/125. Intermediate.
HDP 220
Theories of Personality
4 credits
Deals with contemporary theories of
personality and their historical derivations,
with emphasis on the psychoanalytic,
behavioristic, humanistic, cognitive and
interpersonal approaches. Attention is given
to the major issues involved in the differing
conceptualization of personality. Prerequisite:
HDP 120/121 or HDP 124/125.
Intermediate.
HDP 221
Family Theories
4 credits
Examines theories concerning the formation,
functioning and development of families.
Different theoretical frameworks considered
are the family systems approach; symbolic
interaction; and role exchange and conflict
theories. The capacity of the theories
to explain phenomena such as family
stress, family dynamics, the decision to
have children and divorce is addressed.
Prerequisite: Semester one of Human Growth
and Development. Intermediate.
HDP 223
Abnormal Psychology
4 credits
Provides overview of the nature of
psychopathology. Examines the etiology,
classification, and treatment of emotional
disturbance. Attends to the criteria for
defining abnormal behavior and to the
physiological, interpersonal, and cultural
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factors involved. Prerequisite: HDP 120/122121/123 or HDP 124/126-125/127.
Intermediate.
HDP 224
Theories of Emotional Development
4 credits
Provides an overview of emotional
development throughout the life span.
Explores implications of theory and research
for curriculum development, social programs
and policy. Prerequisite HDP 120/121 or
introductory level psychology course or
the equivalent. Provides an overview of the
emotional development throughout the life
span. Explores implications of theory and
research for curriculum developmental, social
programs and policy. Prerequisite: HDP 264,
HDS 264, or, for students double-majoring
in Human Development and Social Work,
SWK 268. Intermediate.
HDP 226
Positive Psychology
4 credits
Provides an overview of strength-based
approaches in psychology that explore the
origins of happiness, optimism, gratitude
and hope of individuals, communities and
nations. Introduces participants to theory,
research and practice of positive psychology.
Prerequisite HDP 120/121 or introductory
level psychology course or the equivalent.
Intermediate.
HDP 227
Language Development
4 credits
Survey of theory and research on language
development from birth through school-age.
Examines the various components of signed
and spoken language and their acquisition.
Considers bilingualism, relationships between
oral and written language, atypical language
development, and the sociocultural context
of children’s language use. Prerequisite: HDP
120/121 or HDP 124/125. Upper Level
Writing (after ENG111) Intermediate.
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
HDP 257
Infant and Toddler Behavior and
Development
4 credits
Integrates theory, research and practical
experience about the first three years of
life through a transdisciplinary approach.
Considers development across domains and
the impact of parent-child relationships,
peer relationships, and early socialization
patterns on young children’s development.
Observing and recording an infant or young
child’s behavior and development required.
Prerequisite: HDP 120/122-121/123 or
HDP 124/126-125/127. Intermediate.
distorted sense of reality, and vulnerability
to commercialism and materialism.
Prerequisite: HDP 120-121; 122 – 123;
recommended: HDP 257. Intermediate.
HDP 264
Research Methods
4 credits
Introduction to scientific methods of inquiry
in psychology. Examines research design,
selection of measures, data collection,
descriptive analyses, and research ethics.
Individual research projects are required.
Prerequisites: MAT 131 or MAT 141, HDP
120/121 or HDP 124/125.
HDP 290
Children with Special Needs
4 credits
Provides an introduction to characteristics
of individuals with various exceptional
conditions. Explores areas of human
functioning impacted by these conditions.
Includes overview of social, educational,
and political context of the development of
exceptional children. General Education: Self
and Society. Intermediate.
HDP 280
Infants, Toddlers, and the Media
4 credits
Understand the effects of brand marketing
and screen media exposure on young
children’s development, imagination
and play. Course discussion is based on
research focusing on the consequences of
exposure, including obesity, impairment of
neurological development, aggression, child’s
HDP 301
Counseling Psychology
4 credits
Provides an overview of child and adult
psychotherapy. Discusses psychoanalytic,
client-centered, cognitive, behavioral,
narrative, couple’s, and family systems
approaches to counseling. Explores impact
of gender, class and race on therapeutic
relationships. Uses case studies in print and
video and role play to illustrate different
forms of psychotherapy. Prerequisite: HDP
120/122-121/123 or HDP 12/126-125/127.
Advanced.
COURSES OF INSTRUCTION
HDP 265
Achievement Motivation
4 credits
Examines contemporary theory and research
on motivational factors in learning among
children K-12. Explores family, school,
societal, and cultural influence on children’s
beliefs and attitudes about learning. Topics
include conceptions of effort and ability,
teacher expectancies, intrinsic motivation,
gender influences, tracking, and cross-cultural
differences in achievement motivation.
Prerequisite: HDP 120/122-121/123 or
HDP 124/126-125/127. Intermediate.
HDP 282
Children and the Media
4 credits
Examines impact of print and electronic
media (radio, television, video games,
computers and the Internet) on children’s
development. Explores curriculum and policy
responses to children’s fascination with the
media. Prerequisite: HDP 120/121 or HDP
124-/125. Intermediate.
HDP 316
Children’s Political Lives
4 credits
Pursues three objectives: to reconstruct the
stages or phases of political understanding
children bring to the political process;
to explore how children’s political beliefs
and attitudes are shaped by their political
environment (e.g., race, class, nationality,
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WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
COURSES OF INSTRUCTION
historical circumstances, society’s level of
development); and to develop strategies
for children’s political empowerment
Prerequisite: HDP 120/122-121/123 or
HDP 12/126-125/127. Advanced. Offered in
conjunction with HDF 791.
HDP 325
Memory, Identity, and Development
4 credits
Explores the dynamics of autobiographical
memory and the development of identity.
Topics include memories from personal
experiences, public events, childhood amnesia,
individual, gender, and cultural differences;
life transitions, traumatic events, eyewitness
testimony, collective memories, mad memory
disorders. (Advanced Psychology, Advanced
Children, Family, and Culture; open to honors,
juniors and seniors). General Education:
Perspectives on Diversity For students entering
prior to September, 2010: Upper Level Writing
(after ENG111).
HDP 330
Psychology of Race
4 credits
This course is an interdisciplinary
investigation of the historical, ideological,
structural, institutional, cultural, and
individual manifestations of race and racism
in society. The course will also examine
how the intersection of race with factors
such as social class, gender, ethnicity,
identity, and sexuality shape the human
experience. Although these factors are,
in fact, characteristics of individuals or
groups, the major focus of the course is
on how these factors operate as systems
of power and inequality-systems that
differentially advantage and disadvantage
groups depending on their social locationsand the ways these are embedded in the
structure of social institutions in the United
States. Satisfies Perspectives on Diversity.
Prerequisites: HDP 120/122.
HDP 335
Cognition in the Deaf and Blind
4 credits
Explores a key question about human
development: what is the role of experience
188
in development? Examines cognition in
children and adults who area deaf and/
or blind. Considers how limited sensory
experience affects the development of
language, spatial representation, and theory
of mind. Advanced course. Psychology Focus.
General Education: Perspectives on Diversity
For students entering prior to September,
2010: Upper Level Writing (after ENG111).
Prerequisites: HDP 120/122 - 121-123 OR
HDP 124/126 - 125/127; AND ENG 111.
HDP 352
Cognitive Development
4 credits
Examines major theories of cognitive
development from infancy through
adolescence. Considers contributions
of Piagetian stage theory, information
processing, and Vygotskian sociohistorical
theories to account for children’s capacities
to construct knowledge and understand the
world. Prerequisite: HDP 264. Advanced.
Offered in conjunction with HDF 521.
HDP 354
Ethnicity, Culture and Achievement
4 credits
Examines ethnic and cultural influences
in students’ academic achievement and
motivation for learning. Studies trends
in academic achievement in the U.S. and
internationally, and considers socio-cultural
models of motivation, schooling and parental
socialization. Draws readings from the
literatures on social cognition and cultural
psychology. Prerequisite: HDP 265.
HDP 358
Cross-Cultural Perspectives on Child Care
4 credits
Uses sociocultural frameworks to examine
the practices of nonparental caretaking of
young children within the United States
and worldwide. Focus on both center-based
and less formal practices of child care.
Students examine ways to become sensitive
in working with children of cultures other
than their own. General Education: Upper
Level Writing (after ENG111). Prerequisite:
HDP 264, or, for students double-majoring
in Human Development and Social Work,
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
SWK 268 or HDS 264. Advanced. Offered
in conjunction with HDF 658.
HDP 362
The Meaning and Development of Play
4 credits
Explores the meaning and development
of play from infancy through adulthood
through theories, research, and application.
Examines value of play in therapeutic,
educational and medical settings; how
the environment (including toys and
media) influences play; how to support
play, integrate it into professional work,
and advocate for play. Prerequisite: HDP
120/122-121/123 or HDP 124/126125/127. Advanced.
HDP 368
Adult Development
4 credits
Examines development from the transition
into adulthood through old age. Theory
and research from different psychological
approaches are presented. Topics include
changes in cognitive, moral, psychosocial,
interpersonal and physical development;
and typical adult developmental tasks in
the context of culture. Open to juniors and
seniors. Offered in conjunction with HDF
515. Advanced.
HDP 371
Humor and Child Development
4 credits
Explores the role of humor in children’s
development. Topics include: the structure
of humor, its social, cultural, emotional
HDP 379
Emotional Problems of Children
2 credits
Introduces major approaches to
understanding and programming for
young children with emotional problems.
Examines psycho-educational, behavioral,
and ecological perspectives concerning the
assessment and treatment of children with
emotional problems. Emphasis on utilizing
these perspectives to alert students to issues
and skills in identifying emotional problems.
Prerequisite: HDP 120/122-121/123 or
HDP 124/126-125/127. Fulfills requirement
of advanced course upon completion of HDP
380.
HDP 380
Seminar in Emotional Problems of
Children
2 credits
Further examines major approaches to
understanding and programming for young
children with emotional problems whose
needs range from mild to severe focusing on
medical and sociological models. Students
may study one model in-depth. Skills for
working with disturbed children are fostered
through observation of field sites, case studies
and simulations. Prerequisite: HDP 379.
COURSES OF INSTRUCTION
HDP 366
Adolescent Development
4 credits
Draws on disciplines of psychology,
education, biology and sociology to provide
a multidisciplinary perspective of adolescent
development. Examines risk and protective
factors within home, school and community
that shape development within and across
the contexts of race, ethnicity, gender, sexual
orientation and socioeconomic status.
Prerequisite: HDP 120/122-121/123 or
HDP 124/126-125/127. Advanced.
and cognitive dimensions. Provided with
opportunities to apply knowledge of children’s
humor by assessing children’s behavior in a
variety of settings. (e.g., classroom, hospital,
library, home, environment, playground).
Prerequisite: HDP 120/122-121/123 OR
HDP 124/126-125/127.
HDP 382
Nature of Linguistic Knowledge
4 credits
Survey of linguistic theory and first- and
second-language acquisition research.
Analyzes a speaker’s unconscious knowledge
of language by examining the structure
of English and other languages. Follows
the development of this knowledge in
infants, children, and adults. Considers
the sociopolitical context of becoming and
being bilingual. Prerequisite: HDP 120/122121/123 or HDP 124/126-125/127. General
189
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
Education: Languages and Literatures AND
Upper Level Writing (after ENG 111).
Advanced.
COURSES OF INSTRUCTION
HUMAN DEVELOPMENT/SOCIOLOGY
190
HDS 106
Sociology of Minority Groups
4 Credits
Explores the social, economic and political
dimensions of inequality in American Society.
Looks at how people of color, white women
and gays and lesbians are systematically
discriminated against in work, education,
media and government programs. Analyzes
whiteness as a social construct. Focus on social
change and activism. General Education:
Perspectives on Diversity AND Self and
Society OR Ethics and Social Justice. For
students entering prior to September, 2010:
Social Sciences AND Multicultural.
Introductory.
HDS 225
Cross-Cultural Perspectives on Health and
Illness
4 credits
Explores the social and cultural aspects of
health and illness. Emphasis is on the varied
ways that illness is defined and treated
throughout the world. Readings draw upon
the disciplines of sociology and anthropology.
Topics include witchcraft, faith-healing, and
alternative medicine in the U.S. Intermediate.
HDS 322
Feminist Theories: Controversies and
Current Issues
4 credits
Examines different ways feminists analyze
patriarchal society and women’s place within
it. Emphasis on debates within feminist theory,
ranging from radical to post-modern. Selected
topics of controversy include abortion, racism,
prostitution, and nature of masculinity.
Takes a multicultural perspective on women’s
experiences. Focus on ways feminists translate
theory into practice. General Education:
Perspectives on Diversity; Self and Society;
Ethics and Social Justice; Upper-Level Writing
(after ENG 111). For students entering prior
to September, 2010: Advanced.
HDS 343
On Being Different: Sociological
Perspectives
4 credits
Examines sociological theories, primarily
social constructionist, for explanations of the
origins, meanings, implications, and ways of
being different. Theories are applied to date
on topics including crime, disabilities, and
mental illness. Addresses basic questions such
as: What does it mean to be labeled different?
Who makes and enforces such social rules?
Prerequisites: One Sociology (HDS) course
and HDP 120/122-121/123 or HDP
124/126-125/127. Advanced.
HDS 357
Sociological Studies of Children: Recent
Works
4 credits
Explores a range of recent writings by
sociologists about children. Research
reports describe children’s lived experiences,
interactions and activities. Theories derived
from new approaches to sociology provide
frameworks for interpreting research
findings. Topics include children’s classroom
experiences, conversations, relations with
others (children, parents, teachers and
other adults), abilities, and constraints.
Prerequisites: One Sociology (HDS) course
and HDP 120/122-121/123 or HDP
124/126-125/127. Advanced.
HUMANITIES
For descriptions of courses for constructing
the Humanities major in addition to those
given here, refer to History, Literature, and
Philosophy.
HUM 120
Introductory French I
4 credits
Introduces students to basic French grammar,
vocabulary, and cultural aspects of the
regions in which French is spoken, with a
focus on enhancing students’ four basic skills
(listening, speaking, writing, and reading).
Relies on a communicative approach:
speaking French rather than talking about it.
Introductory.
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
HUM 130
Introductory Spanish I
4 credits
Introduces students to basic Spanish
grammar, vocabulary, and cultural aspects
of the Latin American and Spanish regions,
with a focus on enhancing students’ four
basic skills (listening, speaking, writing,
and reading). Relies on a communicative
approach: speaking Spanish rather than
talking about it. Introductory.
HUM 210
Russian History through Literature
4 credits
Focuses on events (starting in the 1860s)
surrounding the Russian Revolution and
culminating in the fall of the Soviet Union.
Explores the relationship between Russian
history and literature through selected works,
including novels, memoirs, short stories,
poems, and historical essays. Authors to
be considered include Turgenev, Bulgakov,
Akhmatova, and Babel. General Education:
Upper Level Writing (after ENG111) For
students entering prior to September, 2010:
Upper Level Writing (after ENG111).
HUM 450
Research Seminar in the Humanities
4 credits
Integrates study in Humanities through
intensive study of a specific period or culture.
Students work in the history, literature, and
philosophy of a period, read a significant
JUVENILE JUSTICE AND YOUTH
ADVOCACY
JJA 201
Intro to Juvenile Justice and Delinquency
4 credits
Overview of delinquent behavior and juvenile
justice system responses to delinquency.
Considers current issues (e.g., gangs, girls,
police, corrections) from perspectives of
individuals, families, communities, and
society. Explores history of juvenile justice in
America, the nature of justice, punishment,
rehabilitation, and the goals and effectiveness
of our juvenile justice system. Includes a
juvenile court experiential component.
Prerequisite: HDP 120-121 or HDP 124.
Introductory
JJA 301
Juvenile Courts and Law
4 credits
Explores the history of the juvenile court,
juvenile court structure, legislation, case law,
and the adjudication process. Special topics
include the constitutional rights of juveniles,
police and youth, immaturity and Highlights
important and emerging policy issues.
Prerequisite: JJA 201. Intermediate
JJA 302
Delinquency: Causes, Prevention and
Intervention
4 credits
Examines individual, environmental and
developmental explanations of juvenile
delinquency. Explores the influence of risk
and resiliency factors such as individual
traits, family characteristics, peers, schools,
community, race, and social class. Focuses on
theories and applied approaches to prevention
of delinquency. Review of communitybased and custodial corrections for juvenile
offenders. Prerequisite: JJA 201. Intermediate
COURSES OF INSTRUCTION
HUM 201
Introduction to the Humanities
4 credits
Introduces study of the Humanities by
exploring history, literature, religion,
philosophy, and art history. Beginning with
early human societies, considers the human
impulse to create art, explore morality, tell
stories, preserve memories, understand
the physical universe, and find meaning in
human life. Uses “Worldviews” approach
to study diverse roots of modern cultures.
General Education: Historical Perspectives
OR Languages and Literatures. For students
entering prior to September, 2010: Global
History, Civilization, Culture. Intermediate.
work in each area, and write a paper on a
topic from the period. Required of seniors
majoring in the Humanities. Advanced.
JJA 380
Youth Work and Youth Advocacy
4 credits
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WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
COURSES OF INSTRUCTION
Study core competencies of youth workers.
Explores direct and policy oriented advocacy
for court involved or at risk youth and
their families from strengths-based and
positive youth development approaches.
Special focus on substance abuse, trauma,
schools, youth activism, leadership, and
civic engagement. Field assignments
expose students to advocacy practices in a
community setting and the importance of
working collaboratively with providers and
systems. Prerequisites: JJA 201, JJA 301 and
JJA 302. Advanced
JJA 402
Field Seminar in JJYA
2 credits
Integrates conceptual frameworks, selfreflection, and skill development with the
practicum experience. Focus on professional
development for work with youth and
families. Meets bi-weekly. Taken concurrently
with JJP 401 (or SWK 452). Restricted
to majors in Juvenile Justice and Youth
Advocacy, senior standing or permission.
Prerequisite: JJA 380, Research Methods,
completion of WLCE requirement before
placement process begins.
JJA 403
Senior Integrative Seminar in JJYA
4 credits
Students integrate conceptual frameworks
with practical applications of concepts and
skills learned throughout the JJYA major. A
community-based integrative service learning
project and written assignments allow students
to demonstrate their attainment of program
competencies. Prerequisite: JJP 401 or SWK
452, and JJA 402.
JJP 401
Practicum in JJYA
4 credits
Provides students with a supervised 200hour experience in a juvenile justice/youth
advocacy related setting. Students meet
weekly with the on-site supervisor and
monthly with the faculty supervisor. Taken
concurrently with JJA 402. Restricted
to majors in Juvenile Justice and Youth
Advocacy, senior standing or permission.
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Social Work majors substitute SWK 452.
Prerequisite: JJA 380, Research Methods,
completion of WLCE requirement before
placement process begins.
LEADERSHIP, POLICY AND
ADMINISTRATION
LPA 701
Becoming Leaders in a Democracy
3 credits
Students learn about the process of becoming
a leader and the democratic ideal. Students
made connections between private selves
and public identity through leader behavior:
1) What is leadership? 2) What kind of
leadership supports a democracy? And 3) How
do effective leaders for a democracy develop?
LPA 702
Interpersonal Skills of Leadership
3 credits
A leader’s effectiveness is judged by skills in
working with and through others. Students
conceptualize and practice key skills such
as sharing reflexively withheld information;
testing assumptions about the other person
with that person; and taking others into
account by listening and testing the meaning
of what they say.
LPA 706
Role of the Mentor Teacher
3 credits
Topics include: observation, communication,
supervising and mentoring skills; adult
development and learning; knowledge
about teaching, learning and curriculum;
and societal changes. Examines issues
such as selecting and assigning mentors,
differentiating teacher roles, empowering
teachers, evaluation responsibilities, resource
and time allocation and coordination for
mentoring. Prerequisite: two or more years of
teaching experience in grades N-6.
LPA 734
Social Policy and Community
Collaboration
3 credits
Analysis of comprehensive services for
children and families given current
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
trends in social policy and community
collaboration. Provides leaders in care
and education, human service and health
agencies opportunities to examine and create
models of service integration. Review reform
initiatives from multiple perspectives and
current bills under legislative consideration.
LPA 806
Financial/Legal Aspects of Admin in ECE
2 credits
Designed for directors and teachers,
addresses the fiscal and legal aspects of
program administration. Topics include
liability, informed consent, confidentiality,
insurance, use of technology, cash flow and
break even analysis, accessing an sustaining
multiple funding sources, and how to control
expenditures and maintains balanced budgets.
LPA 807
Human Side of Administration in ECE
2 credits
Designed for directors and aspiring directors,
this course explores the human side of
administration in early education and
care programs. Topics include theories of
organizational development, communication
and collaboration with diverse staff and
families, problem solving and conflict
resolution, recruitment, hiring, supportive
supervision and evaluation, team building
and professional development.
LPA 850
Director to Director Mentoring
3 credits
Prepares existing leaders to mentor adults
across roles in a professional context.
Theory informs skill development for
effective applications. Transformation is
LPP 651
Practicum and Seminar: Leadership
3 credits
Provides opportunities for students in the
leadership programs to experience the role of
leader in the field.
LIFE SCIENCE
LSC 151
Introduction to Plants and Animals
4 credits
Covers plants and animals, and their
relationships with various environments.
Special attention will be given to species
native to New England. Topics include
structures and functions, diversity, growth,
development, adaptation, reproduction,
evolutionary processes, identification
and animal behavior. Activities include
observation, lab work, lab reports, readings,
discussion and field trips. Hands-on
approach. Routine use of technology. General
Education: Investigations in Science and
Technology. For students entering prior to
September, 2010: Life Science. Introductory.
Lab fee.
LSC 152
Nutrition
4 credits
Introduces metabolic pathways of
carbohydrates, fats, and proteins and
importance of vitamins and minerals in the
body from ingestion to utilization. Includes
dietary nutritional requirements, nutritional
components of foods, balanced diets,
analyzing diets, variations in nutritional
requirements with aging, and understanding
of nutritional issues in health and disease.
Moderate use of technology. General
Education: Investigations in Science and
Technology. For students entering prior to
September, 2010: Life Science. Introductory.
Lab fee.
COURSES OF INSTRUCTION
LPA 782
Leadership in Early Education and Care
3 credits
Offers diverse professionals across domains in
the field opportunities to expand their roles
as leaders and advocates in the movement
toward universally accessible, systematic
changes and development of community
action plans. Provides theoretical frameworks
and concrete skill development.
based on assets and needs assessments
and content-focused approaches. Areas
of knowledge include reflective practices,
adult development, diverse learning styles,
culturally competent relationship building
and processes of change.
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COURSES OF INSTRUCTION
LSC 153
Human Biology
4 credits
Studies the structure and function of
cells and organs within body systems
emphasizing mechanisms that allow the
body to maintain a balanced metabolism.
Topics include nutrition, illness, and current
research. Technology use occasional. General
Education: Investigations in Science and
Technology. For students entering prior to
September, 2010: Life Science. Introductory.
Lab fee.
LSC 201
Environmental Forum
2 credits
Provides a forum for different disciplines
and interests to assess and evaluate current
environmental topics. Provides a servicelearning component and encourages student
and faculty interaction with local, regional,
and national environmental advocates.
Develop applied research skills as well
as oral and written skills. In Addresses
environmental issues from a scientific basis,
as well as socioeconomic and political
aspects.
LSC 250
Human Physiology
4 credits
Addresses the biological functions of the
human body. An introduction to cellular
processes will be followed by consideration
of the organ systems. Emphasis will be
given to neural and endocrine homeostatic
control. Technology use occasional. General
Education: Investigations in Science and
Technology. For students entering prior to
September, 2010: Life Science. Prerequisite:
100 Level LSC course or permission of the
instructor. Intermediate.
LSC 254
Introduction to Marine Biology
4 credits
Learn marine flora and fauna and their
interrelationships with the physical,
chemical, and geological factors in the
marine system. Attention given to gaining
comprehensive knowledge of basic
194
ecological systems, food chains, taxonomy,
pollution, and biological resources of the
ocean. Technology use occasional General
Education: Investigations in Science and
Technology. For students entering prior to
September, 2010: Life Science. Prerequisite:
100 level LSC course or permission of the
instructor. Intermediate.
LSC 257
Animal Behavior
4 credits
Explores theories of animal behavior; the
behavior of domestic and farm animals;
and the behavior of wildlife native to
Massachusetts. Students will learn about
normal and “problem” behavior of domestic
animals like cats and dogs as well as ethical
issues related to the care of farm animals.
General Education: Investigations in Science
and Technology. For students entering
prior to September, 2010: Life Science.
Intermediate.
LSC 302
Human Diseases
4 credits
Explores the fundamental characteristics of
diseases and the mechanisms by which they
arise. Reviews the structure and function
of the body followed by emphasis of the
role of the immune system in disease and
repair. Considers the ecology, history
and pathophysiology of a selection of
infectious and genetic diseases. Technology
use extensive. Prerequisite: LSC 153 or
permission of the Instructor. Advanced.
LSC 305
Human Genetics
4 credits
Focuses on chromosome structure and
function, the basis and consequences
of mutation, and metabolic pathways
regulated through gene action. Topics
include population genetics, genetic
diseases, gene manipulation and current
issues in human genetics. Technology use
extensive. Prerequisite: LSC 153 or LSC 250.
Advanced.
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
LSC 317
Human Embryology
4 credits
Focuses on the development of tissues,
organs and systems during the embryonic
and fetal stages. Topics include the effects of
drugs, medicines, nutrition. Course includes
lectures, films, microscopic examination
of prepared embryonic tissue and study
of models and charts. Extensive use of
technology. Prerequisite: LSC 153 or LSC
250. Advanced.
LSC 335
Environmental Impacts
4 credits
Studies cultural, economic, biological and
political aspects of regional, national, and
international ecological issues. Focuses on
how and why modern society and population
growth causes environmental problems
and affect future generations. Includes
independent research. Technology use
extensive. Prerequisite: 200 Level LSC or
PSC course. Advanced.
LITERATURE
LIT 145
Women in Literature
4 credits
Explores the work of women writers from the
18th century to the present, including poetry,
essays, short fiction, drama, and novels.
Emphasis on female identity, creativity,
coming of age, race, and feminist literary
criticism. General Education: Languages
and Literatures. For students entering prior
to Fall 2010: satisfies General Education
Literature requirement. Introductory.
LIT 155
The Bible as Literature
4 credits
Offers a critical study of the Hebrew and
Christian Scriptures as distinct but related
literary and theological traditions. Stories
will be examined in light of their cultural,
historical, and especially literary contexts.
Students will be introduced to the Ancient
Near East and the Graeco-Roman world. For
students entering prior to September, 2010:
Literature. Introductory.
LIT 170
Introduction to Literature
4 credits
Introduces students to close reading and
critical analysis of literary texts from major
genres of literature (lyric poetry, drama,
novel, short story). Focuses on works of
British literature from Shakespeare to Eliot.
Considers historical context of themes that
are adapted, transformed, and rethought at
critical moments in literary history. General
Education: Languages and Literatures. For
students entering prior to September, 2010:
Literature. Completion of or exemption from
ENG 110. Introductory.
COURSES OF INSTRUCTION
LSC 330
Natural History of New England
4 credits
Studies New England flora and fauna with
emphasis on habitat and field identification
techniques. Local geology is also covered.
Includes trips to representative habitats,
designing and teaching a class at a local
school and, as the culminating project,
submitting a field guide of the Muddy River.
Prerequisite: LSC 151. Advanced.
LIT 150
Introduction to the Short Story
4 credits
Introduces students to the short story genre
and methods employed by authors to craft
successful short stories. Focuses on elements
of short fiction such as character, plot,
point of view, description, and style, and
how these elements contribute to a story’s
effect. Requires students to engage in both
analytical and creative writing. General
Education: Languages and Literatures OR
Creativity and the Arts. For students entering
prior to September, 2010: Literature.
Introductory.
LIT 180
Film and Fiction
4 credits
Compares cinematic and literary treatment
of a story. Emphasis on literary and film
history, and on comparing language,
structure and technique of film and fiction.
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WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
COURSES OF INSTRUCTION
Works may include Shakespeare, 19th novels
such as Frankenstein, or recent works, such
as Beloved. General Education: Languages
and Literatures. For students entering prior
to September, 2010: Literature. Prerequisite:
Completion of or exemption from ENG 110.
Introductory.
LIT 215
Survey of American Literature
4 credits
Surveys American literature from beginnings
to the present. Includes study of Native
American narratives and poetry, Puritan
writers, American Renaissance, modernism,
Harlem Renaissance, and contemporary
writers. Emphasis on distinctive themes of
American literature, such as individualism,
democracy, and equality. General Education:
Upper Level Writing (after ENG 111) AND
Languages and Literatures or Self and Society.
For students entering prior to September,
2010: Literature and Upper Level Writing
(after ENG 111).Prerequisite: Completion of
or exemption from ENG 110. Intermediate.
LIT 219
The British Novel of the 19th Century
4 credits
Examines 19th century British novels with
attention to historical and cultural contexts.
Focuses on British classics by such writers
as Austen, Dickens, the Brontës, Eliot,
and Hardy. Emphasizes students’ critical
perspectives on novels and current scholarly
criticism. General Education: Languages
and Literatures. . Fulfills General Education
requirement in Upper Level Writing
Intermediate.
LIT 226
Literature and History of the Caribbean
4 credits
Analyzes literature of the Caribbean in
cultural and historical contexts. May include
writers from Jamaica, Trinidad, Haiti,
Barbados, Guyana, Cuba, Guadeloupe,
Puerto Rico. Emphasizes concerns of island
writers, including Indian cultures, slave life,
African heritage, folk material, colonialism,
and independence movements. General
Education: Languages and Literatures AND
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Perspectives on Diversity. For students
entering prior to September, 2010: Literature
AND Multicultural Requirement. Integrated
Humanities course. Global Perspectives
course. Intermediate.
LIT 230
African-American Women Writers
4 credits
Studies fiction of African-American women
writers and its impact on American literary
tradition. Includes personal narratives of
slave women and progresses to novels of
contemporary writers. Examines strategies of
self-construction to affirm African-American
womanhood. May include Harriet Jacobs,
Zora Neale Hurston, Nella Larsen, Toni
Morrison, Alice Walker. Satisfies General
Education: Languages and Literatures
AND Perspectives on Diversity. For
students entering prior to September, 2010:
Literature AND Multicultural Requirement.
Intermediate.
LIT 240
The Renaissance in England
4 credits
Introduces literature of English Renaissance
of 16th century, beginning with English
revisions of Italian poetry, placing
achievements of Wyatt, Sidney, Shakespeare,
and Spenser in context of tumultuous
changes in religion, renaissance humanism,
power of the court, growth of London, Tudor
style, a female monarch, voyages of discovery,
and influences of classical literature. General
Education: Upper-Level Writing (after
ENG 111) AND Languages and Literatures
OR Historical Perspectives. For students
entering prior to September 2010: Literature
and Upper Level Writing (after ENG 111).
Integrated Humanities course. Intermediate.
LIT 245
Native American Literature
4 credits
Surveys Native American literature from oral
narratives, to 19th century autobiography
and speeches, to contemporary novels and
poetry. Topics include ways of telling stories
and writing, identity, and connections
to tribal and American history. General
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
Education: Languages and Literatures
AND Perspectives on Diversity. For
students entering prior to September, 2010:
Literature AND Multicultural Requirement
Intermediate.
LIT 249
Major Author
4 credits
Studies the achievement of a single author.
Selected works by one writer are studied to
consider the author’s artistic development,
vision of reality, persistent themes, and value
to 21st century readers. General Education:
Languages and Literatures and Upper-Level
Writing (after ENG 111). For students
entering prior to September, 2010: Literature
and Upper-Level Writing (after ENG 111).
Intermediate.
LIT 262
Shakespeare
4 credits
Studies Shakespeare’s plays in historical
context and on stage and screen. Emphasizes
plays as reflections of Renaissance culture in
England. Focuses on language of the plays,
genre (comedy, tragedy, history, romance),
and gender roles. May focus on comedy or
tragedy, analysis of one play in historical
context, or Shakespeare films. General
Education: Languages and Literatures. For
students entering prior to September, 2010:
Literature. Integrated Humanities course.
Intermediate.
LIT 270
The American Renaissance
4 Credits
Studies literature of mid-nineteenth century
America in historical context, emphasizing
close reading of works by major writers:
Melville, Hawthorne, Thoreau, Stowe,
Douglas, Jacobs, and Dickinson. Considers
such themes as the persistence of the
Puritan past, national identity, and issues
left unresolved from the Declaration of
Independence. General Education: Upper
Level Writing (after ENG 111) AND
Languages and Literatures or Self and Society.
For students entering prior to September,
2010: Literature and Upper Level Writing
(after ENG 111). Integrated Humanities
course). Intermediate.
LIT 288/388
Studies in the Novel
4 credits
Offers opportunity for intensive study
of selected novels. Novels are studied in
historical context, and differing critical
approaches to the works are reviewed.
Prerequisite: One course in literature or
permission of the instructor. Intermediate
(LIT 288) or Advanced (LIT 388).
Advanced.
COURSES OF INSTRUCTION
LIT 246
African-American Literature
4 credits
Surveys African-American literature from
slave narratives through contemporary novels
and poetry. Topics, periods, and genres
include slave narratives, late nineteenth
century novels, poetry of the Harlem
Renaissance, the 1960s, and contemporary
drama, fiction and poetry. General
Education: Languages and Literatures
AND Perspectives on Diversity. For
students entering prior to September, 2010:
Literature AND Multicultural Requirement
Intermediate.
LIT 263
The Epic: Heroes and Monsters
4 credits
Introduces students to the epic poems of
the ancient world. Topics include changing
nature of heroism, oral vs. literate poetry,
social function of the epic, myth and epic,
representation of evil and the monstrous, and
gender. Considers the historical and cultural
contexts in which epics were written. General
Education: Languages and Literatures. For
students entering prior to September, 2010:
Literature. Integrated Humanities course.
Intermediate.
LIT 301
Medieval Literature: Epic and Romance
4 credits
Examines epics and romances in medieval
literature from the 10th to the 14th century.
Focuses on changing ideals of heroism and
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COURSES OF INSTRUCTION
increasing importance of romantic love to
those ideals. Considers chivalric society,
the role of women, the function of kinship,
church, and feudalism in organizing social
ties. General Education: Languages and
Literatures. For students entering prior to
September, 2010: Literature. Integrated
Humanities course. Intermediate.
LIT 402
Advanced Study in Literature
4 credits
Offers opportunity for advanced study in
literature. Topics will vary from year to year
but include historical study, exploration
of critical and theoretical perspectives
on literature, and writing critical essays.
Prerequisite: One course in literature or
by permission of the instructor. General
Education: Upper Level Writing (after
ENG 111) For students entering prior to
September, 2010: Upper Level Writing (after
ENG 111). Advanced.
MATHEMATICS
MAT 120
Quantitative Reasoning
4 credits
Applies mathematics to understanding
important social and personal issues, such
as homelessness, AIDS, credit cards, and
government budgets. Mathematical concepts
include percentages, ratios and proportions,
probability, data analysis, mathematical
modeling, and functions. Emphasizes
mathematical processes. Meets three periods
per week, with an additional study group
led by peer tutor. General Education:
Foundations of Knowledge and Inquiry
Mathematics. For students entering prior
to September, 2010: Partially satisfies core
requirement in Mathematics. Introductory.
MAT 130/131/132
Concepts and Processes I, II, and III
4 credits each
Deepens understanding of Number and
Operation; Algebraic Thinking; Geometry
and Measurement; and Probability and
Data Analysis. Emphasizes problemsolving, justifying reasoning, mathematical
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communication, representation, and
mathematical connections. Intended
primarily for prospective teachers. Threesemester sequence, meets three periods per
week, with an additional study group led by
peer tutor. General Education: Foundations
of Knowledge and Inquiry Mathematics.
For students entering prior to September,
2010: First two semesters satisfy the Core
requirement in Mathematics.
MAT 140/141
Intensive Concepts and Processes I and II
4 credits each
Two semester intensive version of the
Concepts and Processes Sequence (Math
130/131/132), intended for well-prepared
students. Meets three periods per week, with
an additional study group led by a peer tutor.
Prerequisite: Passing Entry Exam. General
Education: Foundations of Knowledge and
Inquiry Mathematics. For students entering
prior to September, 2010: Satisfies core
requirement in Mathematics. Introductory.
MAT 170
Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences
4 credits
Develops understanding of elementary
statistical techniques needed in behavioral
sciences. Includes frequency distributions,
graphs, measures of central tendency and
variability, percentiles and standard scores.
Emphasis on sampling theory, hypothesis
testing and drawing conclusions about a
population from sample data. Includes
study group. Prerequisites: MAT 120, 130
or 140.General Education: Foundations
of Knowledge and Inquiry Mathematics.
For students entering prior to September,
2010: Partially satisfies core requirement in
Mathematics. Introductory.
MAT 230
Algebra and Number Theory
4 credits
Explores properties of number, operations,
functions, and equations in both familiar and
unfamiliar contexts. Emphasizes deepening
student understanding of fundamental
mathematics, as well mathematical processes.
Topics include modular arithmetic; Fermat’s
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
Theorem; number theory functions; linear,
exponential, and polynomial functions;
and solving equations. Extensive use of
technology. Prerequisite: MAT 132 or
MAT 141 or permission of instructor.
Intermediate.
MAT 255
Probability and Statistics
4 credits
Emphasizes descriptive and inferential
statistics, with examples chosen from
natural and social sciences and mathematics.
Designed for Math/Science majors. Extensive
use of technology. Prerequisite: MAT 131 or
MAT 141 or permission of instructor. Not
open to students who have completed MAT
170. Intermediate.
MAT 280
Calculus I
4 credits
Presents fundamental concepts of calculus
geometrically, numerically and algebraically.
Topics include functions, the derivative and
an introduction to the integral. Attention
is given to using calculus to solve realistic
problems. Extensive use of technology.
Intermediate.
MAT 335
History of Mathematics
4 credits
Examines mathematical problems and
solutions in different historical periods
and cultures. Studies some of the
MAT 340
Discrete Mathematics
4 credits
Studies some of the following: counting
techniques, logic and mathematical
proof, recurrence relationships, the art of
enumeration. Topics include permutations
and combinations, graph theory and
applications to other areas of mathematics.
Moderate use of technology. Prerequisite:
MAT 230 or permission of instructor.
Advanced.
MAT 390
Mathematics Seminar
4 credits
Provides an opportunity to work on
challenging, open-ended problems while
exploring one or several mathematical
topics in depth. Topics drawn from different
areas of mathematics. Includes projects and
presentations; uses technology. Prerequisite:
Two intermediate or advanced mathematics
courses, Jr. or Sr. standing. Advanced
MATHEMATICS/SCIENCE
MSC 401
Seminar in Critical Thinking
4 credits
Enables students to develop appropriate
research strategies, to collect and analyze
data, to evaluate work in progress, to
generate and present a research project
and to evaluate research of peers and other
investigators. Studies scientific methodology,
scientific writing and the application of
mathematics to science research. Technology
use extensive. Open to junior and senior
Mathematics/Science majors only. Advanced.
COURSES OF INSTRUCTION
MAT 245
Geometry
4 credits
Explores topics such as symmetry,
tessellations, polyhedra, topology and
Non-Euclidean Geometries. Emphasizes
using physical and computer models
to create meaning, developing problem
solving and communication skills, and
constructing convincing mathematical
arguments. Includes historical information
and connections to art. Extensive use of
technology. Prerequisite: MAT 131 or
MAT 141 or permission of instructor.
Intermediate.
following: Egyptian, Babylonian, Chinese,
Native American, Hindu and European
mathematics from prehistoric times through
the Renaissance. Considers the lives of
mathematicians and contributions of both
men and women. Prerequisite: MAT 230 or
245, preferably both. Advanced.
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WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
MULTILINGUAL EDUCATION
COURSES OF INSTRUCTION
MLE 525
Content Instruction for English Language
Learners
3 credits
Explores cultural and linguistic factors
affecting academic development of ELL
students. Develops skills for planning lessons
in mathematics, science, social studies, and
literacy with content and English learning
objectives. Emphasizes adaptation of
materials for ELLs and assessment of learning
in both English and academic content.
MLE 530
Supporting Second Language Acquisition
3 credits
Surveys second language learning processes
and strategies for teaching English to
bilingual students. Examines second language
acquisition theories and concepts Emphasizes
creating effective language learning
environments and assessment practices.
MLE 535
Second Language Acquisition and
Assessment
3 credits
Examines processes through which children
learn English as a second language. Explores
stages of second language acquisition.
Introduces multiple dimensions of language
proficiency. Develops competency in
administering the Massachusetts English
Language Assessment-Oral (MELA-O) and
other assessments for English language learners.
MUSIC
MUS 126
Introduction to Music
4 credits
Offers opportunities to explore formal
elements such as rhythm, melody, and
harmony. Major musical styles and lives of
great composers in relation to their historical
and cultural contexts. Emphasis on western
art music, but popular music styles and
music of other cultures also considered.
General Education: Creativity and the Arts.
For students entering prior to September,
2010: Arts. Introductory.
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MUS 130
American Popular Music: 1850s-1990s
4 credits
Surveys music in the popular idiom from
Stephen Foster to “Tin Pan Alley” to “Big
Band” and Broadway, through jazz and on
to rock music and rap. General Education:
Creativity and the Arts. For students entering
prior to September, 2010:General Education
Arts OR US History, Civilization, and
Culture. Introductory.
MUS 150
Handbell Performance
4 credits
Integrated ensemble approach combines
electronic keyboards, percussion instruments
and handbells. Keyboard technique, rhythm,
melody, chords and harmony, with goal of
group performance. General Education:
Creativity and the Arts. For students entering
prior to September, 2010: Arts. Introductory.
MUS 155
COF Orchestra
1 credit
Rehearsal and performance of standard
symphonic orchestra repertoire. Enrollment
is by audition. (One credit optional, may be
repeated for four credits)
MUS 220/THE 220
Musical Theatre
4 credits
Studies music, lyrics, texts written for European
and American stage. Focuses on opera and
the mature musical. Includes participation
in/observation of Wheelock Family Theatre
musical production. General Education:
Creativity and the Arts. For students entering
prior to September, 2010: Arts.
MUS 230
African-American Music
4 credits
Examines African-American music over
200 years, with emphasis on the impact of
African rhythm and instrumentation on
African-American music. Genres include
jazz, spirituals, ragtime, big bands, bebop and
rap music. Places music in context of social,
historical, cultural, and political realities of
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
African-American life. General Education:
Perspectives on Diversity AND Creativity
and the Arts or Historical Perspectives. For
students entering prior to September, 2010:
Multicultural AND Arts or US History,
Civilization, Culture. Intermediate.
MUS 240
World Music Traditions
4 credits
Examines various world music traditions
including Native American, Asian, African,
and Eastern European. Considers the
function of music in history, society,
and culture outside of the traditional
western European genres. Introduces
ethnomusicology and its conceptual
frameworks. Includes lecture, discussion,
audio and audiovisual presentations. General
Education: Perspectives on Diversity AND
Creativity and the Arts. For students entering
prior to September, 2010: Multicultural
AND Arts OR Global History, Civilization,
Culture. Intermediate.
MUS 279
Music for Children
4 credits
Explores ways music can be shared with
children in various settings. Provides
opportunity to learn songs and instrumental
music of various styles and cultures suitable
for use with children. Uses songs, games,
rhymes, chants, clapping, recorders,
keyboards, percussion, other instruments,
computer music software. Intermediate.
Prerequisite: junior or senior status
ORL 510
Organizational Mission, Strategy, and
Leadership
3 credits
This course will provide students with a
knowledge base for understanding leadership
theories and forms of leadership, organizational
theory, building an effective multicultural
organization, knowledge of the decision making
process, and how to create a mission-driven
organization with a focus on excellence.
ORL 520
Leading People
3 credits
Focusing on the skills, knowledge and
theories needed to create a high engagement,
high expectations workplace that respects
and encourages the talents and contributions
of individuals from diverse backgrounds,
students learn about emerging trends and
examine theories of human behavior, issues
relevant to supervision and leadership, and
personnel management and governance.
ORL 530
Planning, Evaluation, and Marketing
3 credits
This course will provide a theoretical and
practical knowledge of program planning and
evaluation, basic marketing theories, logic
modeling, change theory, and how to create
and sustain effective programs and services.
COURSES OF INSTRUCTION
MUS 235
Jazz Dance
4 Credits
Performance Class for the intermediate
dancer focusing on proper alignment,
refining style, enhancing phrasing and
developing strength. Studies jazz’s influential
people and its history, including AfricanAmerican influences, Jack Cole, Alvin Ailey,
Jerome Robbins, Bob Fosse, Hollywood, and
Broadway. General Education: Creativity
and the Arts. For students entering prior to
September, 2010: General Education Arts.
Intermediate.
ORGANIZATIONAL LEADERSHIP
ORL 540
Nonprofit Budgeting and Financial
Management
3 credits
Covering financial analysis and planning,
performance measurement and
benchmarking, different accounting methods,
government rules and regulations, identifying
and assessing resources, and revenue
generation and constraints.
ORL 620
Organizational Governance
3 credits
Covering the skills and knowledge needed
to successfully contribute to and develop
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WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
COURSES OF INSTRUCTION
effective organizational governance. Areas
covered will include legal and ethical aspects
of management and leadership; effectively
working with boards of directors and
trustees; leadership succession; internal
structure and policymaking; local, state and
national laws and regulations; creating a
culture of excellence; and maintaining an
ethical workplace.
ORL 630
Effective Organizational Communication
3 credits
Providing an understanding of how
communication defines and drives mission
based organizations. Organizational
communication approaches and how
they apply to nonprofit workplaces will
be examined to understand strategies for
effective communications. Students will
develop tools and skills for communicating
effectively with various constituencies and
managing public relations activities.
ORL XXX
Organizational Change
3 credits
Covering theories and foundations of
change, growth and transformation;
the decision-making process; theories
of organizational, group and individual
behavior in a change context; strategic
planning; assessing and analyzing an
organization’s strategic/competitive position;
and creating change that is inclusive of
staff, board and the organization’s various
constituencies.
ORL 640
Nonprofit Resource Development
3 credits
Covering the various sources of funding for
nonprofits and higher education, students
will learn about corporate, government
and foundation funding; individual giving
and contributions; and how to develop
entrepreneurial subsidiaries to produce a new
income stream.
ORL 710
Organizational Leadership Capstone I
3 credits
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Providing critical real-world learning
experiences. In this first course of a
2-semester sequence, students work in
groups addressing a priority, issue or service
delivery challenge on an area of need
identified by a partner nonprofit or higher
education institution. Includes a bi-weekly
on campus seminar.
ORL 711
Organizational Leadership Capstone II
3 credits
Providing critical real-world learning
experiences. In this first course of a
2-semester sequence, students work in
groups addressing a priority, issue or service
delivery challenge on an area of need
identified by a partner nonprofit or higher
education institution. Includes a bi-weekly
on campus seminar.
PHILOSOPHY
PHL 150
World Religions
4 credits
Explores Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism,
Christianity and Islam, focusing on their
founders and important leaders, doctrines
and rituals, historical and geographical
development. Course involves attending
religious services and meetings. General
Education: Perspectives on Diversity
AND Upper Level Writing (after ENG
111) AND Self and Society OR Ethics
and Social Justice. For students entering
prior to September, 2010: Global History,
Civilization, Culture AND Upper Level
Writing (after ENG 111). Introductory.
PHL 160
Introduction to Philosophy
4 credits
Introduces students to philosophy by
studying selected works of philosophers
from antiquity to the present. Emphasizes
sympathetic and critical understanding of
classic texts in the Western philosophical
tradition. General Education: Upper Level
Writing (after ENG 111) AND Historical
Perspectives OR Languages and Literatures.
For students entering prior to September,
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
2010: Global History, Civilization, Culture
AND Upper Level Writing (after ENG 111).
Introductory.
PHL 205
Philosophies of Social Justice
4 credits
Explores various ideologies of political
authority and social justice, such as
authoritarianism, individual democracy,
communism, social democracy and
feminism. Focuses on such writers as Plato,
Hobbes, Rousseau, Locke, Marx and Engels,
Wollstonecraft and de Beauvoir. Examines
current issues in light of diverse ideologies.
General Education: Upper Level Writing
(after ENG 111). General Education:
Upper level Writing; Self and Society; Ethics
and Social Justice. For students entering
prior to September, 2010: Global History,
Civilization, Culture AND Upper Level
Writing (after ENG 111). Intermediate.
PHL 215 (formerly PHL 315)
Asian Thought
4 credits
Examines central philosophical movements
and texts of India and China. Focuses on
close reading of the Upanishads, Bhagavad
Gita, various Buddhist texts, the Analects,
the Tao Te Ching. Global Perspectives
course. General Education: Self and Society;
Languages and Literatures; Perspectives on
PHL 230
American Philosophy
4 credits
Examines major movements in American
philosophy, focusing on works of
representative thinkers, such as Hamilton,
Madison, Jefferson, Emerson, Thoreau, S.B.
Anthony, Peirce, James, Royce, M.L. King,
Jr. General Education: Self and Society;
Ethics and Social Justice. For students
entering prior to September 2010, Ssatisfies
General Education requirement in UpperLevel Writing(after ENG 111). Intermediate.
PHL 240
Great Ages and Ideas of the Jewish People
4 credits
Surveys the diversity of cultural situations
faced in the major epochs of Jewish history:
the Biblical age, the Hellenistic age, the
Talmudic age, the Judeo-Islamic age, the
European age, and the Modern age. Focuses
on close readings of representative texts
conveying central Jewish ideas in each age.
Integrated Humanities course. General
Education: Languages and Literatures;
Historical Perspectives; Perspectives on
Diversity. For students entering prior to
September, 2010: General Education Global
History, Civilization, Culture. Intermediate.
COURSES OF INSTRUCTION
PHL 170
Contemporary Moral Issues
4 credits
Reflects upon contemporary moral issues
from a philosophical perspective. Introduces
major normative ethical theories and basic
techniques of logical analysis. Focuses on
topics such as sexual morality, abortion,
capital punishment, euthanasia, racial
equality, sexual equality, animal rights, global
economic responsibility, environmental
responsibility, the morality of war. General
Education: Upper Level Writing (after ENG
111) AND Self and Society OR Ethics and
Social Justice. For students entering prior to
September, 2010: Upper Level Writing (after
ENG 111) AND US History, Civilization,
Culture. Introductory.
Diversity; Upper-Level Writing(after ENG
111). For students entering prior to Fall
2010: satisfies General Education Global
History, Civilization, Culture requirement;
satisfies College Multicultural requirement.
Intermediate.
PHL 254/ AMT 254
Aesthetics: Philosophy of the Arts
4 credits
Explores the experience associated with
art, and considers the nature of artistic
expression and of creativity. Through reading
of selected philosophical texts, pursues an
understanding of how we produce, perceive,
and respond to art. Field trips to museums
or performances. Required for Arts Majors.
General Education: Upper Level Writing
(after ENG 111) Intermediate. Prerequisite:
ENG 111 and one course in the arts or
philosophy. Offered: Fall.
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WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
PHYSICAL SCIENCE
COURSES OF INSTRUCTION
PSC 140
Physics of Sports
4 credits
Examines basic concepts of physics as
they apply to the performance of Sports.
Newtonian Mechanics including force
and motion, thermodynamics, energy
conservation, momentum, statistics, and
biophysics will be explored through various
sports such as baseball, football, hockey,
track, basketball, soccer, and skiing. General
Education: Investigations in Science and
Technology. For students entering prior
to September, 2010: Physical Science.
Introductory. Lab fee.
PSC 152
Earth Science
4 credits
Explores origin and evolution of the Earth.
Develops picture of Earth’s constituents as
well as their properties and interactions.
Examines how oceanic, atmospheric, and
terrestrial systems interact to produce
the natural environment. Considers how
human activities have modified those
systems Technology use moderate. General
Education: Investigations in Science and
Technology. For students entering prior
to September, 2010: Physical Science.
Introductory. Lab fee.
PSC 161
The Solar System
4 credits
Explores relationships among worlds in our
solar system. Communicates accurate picture
of structure and processes at work within
the solar system. Integrates fundamental
concepts from physics, chemistry, biology,
and geology. Technology use occasional.
General Education: Investigations in Science
and Technology. For students entering
prior to September, 2010: Physical Science.
Introductory. Lab fee.
PSC 184
Science Inquiry and the Earth
4 credits
Examines relationships between science and
204
other creative endeavors while exploring the
natural world. Reviews elements of scientific
process as well as humanistic aspects such as
morality, expertise, and motivation. Utilizes
lectures, labs and internet-based activities to
investigate the materials and processes of the
Earth. Includes semester long study of the
Muddy River. Moderate use of technology.
General Education: Investigations in Science
and Technology. For students entering prior
to September 2010: Physical Science or Life
Science. Introductory. Lab fee.
PSC 185
Discovering Planet Earth
4 credits
Studies and integrates physical and life
science relating to processes of planet and
earth including scientific exploration,
astronomy, ecology, earth systems, plants
and animals, food chains, and technology.
Includes experimentation, related readings,
report writing, simulations, models and
technology. Technology use occasional.
General Education: Investigations in Science
and Technology. For students entering
prior to September, 2010: Life Science and
Physical Science. Introductory. Lab fee.
PSC 191
The Physical Universe
4 credits
A laboratory focused course that uses
laboratory experimentation to develop skills
in data gathering, representation, analysis,
and interpretation while considering topics
such as motion, heat, light, waves and sound,
and geological structure. Technology use
occasional. General Education: Investigations
in Science and Technology. For students
entering prior to September, 2010: Physical
Science. Introductory. Lab fee.
PSC 251
Principles of Chemistry
4 credits
Introduces concepts of inorganic and organic
chemistry. Topics include structure, behavior
and reactions of molecular matter, and
identification and classification of matter.
Has extensive laboratory component.
Technology use occasional. General
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
Education: Investigations in Science and
Technology. For students entering prior
to September, 2010: Physical Science.
Prerequisite: Completion of General
Education Math. Intermediate.
PSC 399
Field Studies in Environmental Studies
4 credits
Provides Junior and Senior Math-Science
majors with direct experience applying
concepts and theories in professional settings.
Students work with a professional at a field
sit and a faculty member to implement
a program of study or research protocol.
Technology use extensive. Prerequisite:
200/300 level MAT course, 300 level science
course in field of study. Advanced.
INTER-PROFESSIONAL STUDIES
PRO 144/145
Foundation for Child-Related Service
Learning I, II
2 credits
Offers an experiential learning course
designed to prepare and support students
in service-learning settings. Using current
research on brain development, neuroscience,
psychology, and child development, the
seminar will bridge theory and practice
on how children learn. Supports group
discussion, reflection, and critical
examination in entering and learning from
multicultural settings. Note: Enrollment by
application only.
PRO 152
American Sign Language II
4 credits
Emphasizes further development of receptive
and expressive ASL skills, finger spelling,
vocabulary building and grammatical
structure. Encourages more creative use of
facial expressions, body posture, classifiers
and the signing space. Introduces cultural
behaviors, language, traditions, values and
rules of social interactions of Deaf Culture.
Prerequisites: PRO 151 or permission of
instructor.
PRO 201
Seminar for Mathematics Leaders
1 credit
Opportunity for students hired as
Mathematics Study Group Leaders to reflect
on mathematics content, pedagogy, and
group dynamics. Required of students hired
as Math Leaders, and only open to such
students. Meets biweekly. Intermediate. May
be repeated.
COURSES OF INSTRUCTION
PSC 255
Natural Disasters
4 credits
To understand the geological and physical
processes that affects the human environment
in catastrophic ways. Natural disasters are
commonly exacerbated when intensive
human activity expands into hazardous
zones prone to natural disasters. Hazards
will be examined in terms of science
prediction, mitigation, avoidance, and public
policy/safety issues. General Education:
Investigations in Science and Technology. For
students entering prior to September, 2010:
Physical Science.
PRO 151
American Sign Language
4 credits
Introduces American Sign Language (ASL).
Emphasizes visual readiness skills as students
learn to recognize and express spatial
relationships between objects and to use nonmanual signals, such as facial expressions and
body movements. Communicative functions,
vocabulary, grammar and cultural aspects of
the Deaf community will be studied .
PRO 212/612
Puerto Rico Cross-Cultural Inquiry
4/3 credits
Travel to Puerto Rico, visit schools and social
agencies, interact with Puerto Rican college
students and faculty. Pre-trip seminars and
readings provide historical, political, cultural,
educational and linguistic background for
inquiry projects completed upon return.
Enrollment through application only.
PRO 255
Child Centered Communication
1 credit
Introduces participants to some of the basic
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WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
COURSES OF INSTRUCTION
skills of child-centered play and therapy that
can be used in therapeutic, educational and
other settings with children. Participants
will learn how to build relationships with
children through their natural language
of play, how to facilitate the expression of
children’s feelings and how to set limits on
difficult behaviors.
PRO 256
Using Puppets to Communicate
1 credit
Introduces a variety of ways in which puppets
can be used to help children communicate.
Gives an overview of using puppets in
educational and therapeutic settings. Provides
opportunities for observing an experienced
puppeteer at work. Practice the use of puppets
in their own work with children.
PRO 257
Stress Management Techniques
1 credit
Familiarizes students with yoga, meditation,
relaxation and other stress management
strategies for children of different ages.
Explores how stress management techniques
can be used in hospitals, in social agencies,
and in schools.
PRO 270
Theory and Practice of Stress Reduction
1 credit
Presents a model of stress reduction based on
the dynamic interaction of internal mind/
body processes with external factors in the
impinging environment. Centers in the
theory and application of “mindfulness,”
enacted in meditation and yoga, and
activities of daily life. Examines additional
strategies such as social support and cognitive
restructuring.
PRO 275
AIDS and Addiction
2 credits
Provides information about AIDS and
addictions, as separate problems, and as
issues that intersect, using the ecological
framework and a feminist model. Open to
sophomores, juniors and seniors.
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PRO 314
Child Neglect and Abuse
2 credits
Focuses on prevention, intervention and
treatment for families in which there is
evidence of potential child abuse and neglect.
Topics include identification of abuse/
neglect, dynamics of abuse, interpretation
of relevant legislation, impact of abuse on
child development, treatment programs
and approaches, and analysis of social
issues relative to family violence. Open to
sophomores, juniors and seniors.
PRO 336/536
Student Policy Fellows Seminar
3 credits
Interdisciplinary seminar and concurrent
legislative placement focuses on policy
development, advocacy, and leadership skills.
Special emphasis placed on policy issues
affecting children and families. Open to
junior and senior undergraduate students
and graduate students. Sixteen hours of
placement weekly is required. Students must
apply and be selected prior to enrolling.
PRO 337
Drama for Children
4 credits
Explores the value of creative drama for
young and primary-aged children. Develop
the skills and techniques required to create
drama activities that enhance self-expression
and build self-esteem and community. Plan,
implement, and evaluate drama experiences
for children while investigating the role of
drama as a vehicle for teaching and learning
in a variety of settings.
PRO 342
Child Welfare
2 credits
Describes the goals and services of public and
private child welfare organizations. Students
examine the roles and responsibilities
of social workers in these organizations.
Relevant legal, ethical and policy issues are
discussed. Open to sophomores, juniors and
seniors.
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
PRO 344
Crisis Intervention
4 credits
Provides opportunity to learn theory and
techniques of crisis intervention. Topics
include concepts of crisis, dynamics of
selected crisis situations and methods of
intervention. Open to juniors and seniors.
PRO 417/517
Welcoming LGBT families in Education
and Human Services
4/3 credits
Prepares Early Childhood and Elementary
Educators, Child Life Specialists, and Social
Workers to understand and meet the needs
of LGBT- headed families and their children.
Examines research and case studies on LGBT
families and best practices for creating safe,
welcoming environments. Introduces LGBT
history; legal, medical and social systems;
homophobia; heterosexual privilege; action
for change. General Education: Perspectives
on Diversity
PRO 577
Movement and Drama for Children
3 credits
Explores value of creative drama for primaryaged children in varied settings. Develops
skills, techniques needed to implement,
evaluate drama activities that enhance selfexpression, build self-esteem, community.
Investigates drama’s role as vehicle for
teaching, learning. Prerequisite: junior or
senior status. Offered: Spring, in conjunction
with THE 277.
PRO 579
Music for Children
3 credits
Explores ways music can be shared with
children in various settings. Provides
opportunity to learn songs and instrumental
music of various styles and cultures suitable
for use with children. Uses songs, games,
rhymes, chants, clapping, recorders,
keyboards, percussion, other instruments,
computer music software. Offered: Fall,
Spring, in conjunction with MUS 279.
READING/LANGUAGE AND LITERACY
RDG 525
Adolescent Literacy
3 credits
Examines cognitive, social and language
understandings that older readers draw
on to make sense of different kinds of
texts. Focuses on metacognitive processes,
vocabulary and background know ledge
in later reading comprehension. Develops
assessment strategies for identifying readers’
strengths and vulnerabilities through small
group or tutorial intervention.
COURSES OF INSTRUCTION
PRO 415
Helping Children Cope with Stress
4 credits
Presents theory, research, and clinical
evidence concerning the effects of stress on
children’s coping patterns and development.
Stressors ranging from normal family life
cycle transitions to the threat of separation
and loss through divorce, illness, or death, to
the chronic stress of poverty are addressed.
Explores concepts of vulnerability and
resilience and practical methods for helping
children increase their competence in
mastering stress.
PRO 578
Art for Children
4 credits
Explores learning through, with, and about
art, through art making, reflective and
analytical writing, and research. Provides
exposure to art materials, and to the theory
and practice of using art with children in
various settings. Offered: Fall, Spring, in
conjunction with VIS 278.
RDG 530
Teaching Literacy to English Language
Learners
3 credits
Introduces key factors affecting the literacy
development of bilingual children learning
to read and write in English such as print
exposure, phonological awareness, and
vocabulary in the home language and
in English. Participants develop skills in
assessing components of children’s reading
and writing competence, teaching early and
later reading skills, planning writing lessons,
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COURSES OF INSTRUCTION
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
and monitoring children’s literacy progress.
literacy development.
RDG 531
Teaching Reading and Writing to ELLs
1 credit
Introduces factors affecting the literacy
development of English Language Learners.
Participants develop skills assessing and
teaching early and later literacy, developing
vocabulary, facilitating comprehension,
planning and implementing reading and
writing lessons, and adapting instruction for
children of diverse linguistic and cultural
backgrounds at a range of ages and English
proficiency levels.
RDG 560
African American Children’s Literature
3 credits
Examines children’s literature written by
and about African Americans. Explores the
literature’s cultural and historical context.
Discusses strategies for using the literature
effectively with children to enhance their
literacy development.
RDG 535/ EDU 335
Reading Theory and Practice
0 credits
Consolidates professional background in
theory and practice of teaching reading in
grades Pre-K - 8. Addresses core concepts
and instructional practices fr phonological
and phonemic awareness, emergent literacy,
phonics, vocabulary, comprehension,
and reading assessment. Builds upon the
professional knowledge developed in EDU
327 or EDU 337. Pre-Requisites: EDU
327 or EDU 337 or RDG 537. Pre- or
co-requisites: EDU 328 or EDU 338 or or
RDG 530 or SPE 650.
RDG 537
Teaching Reading
3 credits
Analyzes stages of reading development in
grades pre K-8. Focuses on phonological
awareness, print concepts, word
identification, vocabulary, fluency, and
comprehension. Participants administer
literacy assessments to children, interpret
assessment data, and plan engaging, small
group instruction. RDG 558
Multicultural Children’s Literature
3 credits
Introduces broad range of multicultural
literature. Focuses on criteria for making
appropriate book selections. Examines
literary theme and genre. Explores strategies
for using children’s literature to promote
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RDG 568
Developing Young Writers
3 credits
Introduces current research and theories
about children’s writing development.
Examines instructional practices for fostering
writing abilities in a variety of genres
including poetry, narrative, and exposition.
RDG 601
Multisensory Approaches for Teaching
Literacy
3 credits
Provides theoretical constructs in
multisensory literacy approaches to aid
the reading specialist, special educator,
or classroom teacher meet the complex
challenges in instructing students with
language-based learning differences. Includes
introduction to the Wilson Language
Program and the Lindamood-Bell’s Lips
and Visualizing and Verbalizing programs.
Prerequisites: RDG 537 or RDG 622 or
permission of the instructor.
RDG 616
Assessment of Reading and Writing
3 credits
Surveys traditional and innovative
approaches to assessing reading, writing, and
oral language: teacher checklists, standardized
tests, rubrics, portfolios, and work samples.
Utilizes case studies of children ages 4-10.
Develops skill at making instructional
decisions based on assessment data.
RDG 618
Literacy Across the Curriculum
3 credits
Examines reading comprehension, writing,
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
and vocabulary skills critical for success
in academic content areas. Investigates
the impact of text difficulty, background
knowledge, and understanding of text
structure on comprehension of nonfiction
text. Develops skill at teaching vocabulary,
metacognitive, and study skills in the context
of theme-based units.
RDG 626
Diagnosis and Correction of Reading
Problems
3 credits
Extends competencies developed in RDG
622 in closely mentored, twice-weekly
tutorials with struggling readers in upper
elementary grades. Emphasizes design of
instruction based on careful diagnosis of
literacy needs. Develops literacy leadership
skills. Prerequisite: RDG 622; permission of
the instructor
RDP 609
Teacher of Reading Practicum
3 credits
150-hour supervised practicum in the role of
teacher of reading, incorporating assessment,
small group work, resource development,
coaching and professional development,
and outreach to parents. Seminar provides
opportunities for critical reflection on
practice and explores multiple roles of
reading specialists. (Prerequisites: RDG
622; requires permission of the instructor).
Required of and restricted to students
enrolled in the Teacher of Reading licensure
program
RES 350
Research Methods Across Disciplines
4 credits
Guides students through the steps of rigorous
independent scholarly research; finding a
topic, shaping a research problem, locating
and providing appropriate documentation
of supporting evidence, and presenting an
original argument in written and oral form.
Examines research methods and scholarship
from a variety of disciplines.
RES 451/452
Action Research I/II
4 credits
Design and initiate a research project to
gather information about early childhood
classrooms, teaching methodologies, and
student learning, with a focus on research
questions that relate to literacy for young
children. Introduces the use of scientific
inquiry and qualitative research methodology
to answer research questions related to
effecting change to enhance children’s literacy
learning. Develop library research and
professional writing skills and gain familiarity
with methods used to study questions arising
from practice.
RES 651
Action Research I
1 credit
Introduces use of scientific inquiry and
research methodology to study questions
arising from practice and/or policies.
Students initiate a research project and
complete it the following semester in RES
652. Research and professional writing
skills are developed. Corequisite: Taken
sequentially with RES 652 to fulfill core
requirement in research.
COURSES OF INSTRUCTION
RDG 622
Individualized Instruction in Literacy
3 credits
Develops skill at diagnosing literacy needs
through formal and informal assessments
and planning research-based instruction.
Twice-weekly tutorial sessions with struggling
emergent readers in an off-campus laboratory
setting. Emphasizes importance of readers’
cultural and linguistic backgrounds..
(Requires permission of the instructor).
RESEARCH
RES 652
Action Research II
2 credits
Advances student-designed research projects
conceptualized in RES 651. Final projects
include use of relevant theories, a literature
review, discussion of research methods,
and analysis of data that was collected.
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WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
Corequisite: Taken sequentially with RES
651 to fulfill core requirement in research.
COURSES OF INSTRUCTION
RES 722
Research in Language and Literacy
3 credits
Introduces varied approaches to language and
literacy research. Provides experience with
qualitative and quantitative data collection
and analysis. Participants prepare analyses
of assessment data and write research briefs
for other teachers. Based on questions from
their practice, students summarize existing
literature and prepare a research proposal.
Prerequisite: one graduate course in
Language and Literacy; fulfills core
requirement in research
RES 723
Practitioner as Researcher
3 credits
Involves designing and implementing a
research project that answers own question
about site-based practice. Published
practitioner research is reviewed. Examines
research as a collaborative process that
supports constituent, researcher, institutional
and societal development.
RES 725
Research Methods
3 credits
Exploration of alternate research methods
and paradigms to answer questions in
education and children’s services. Topics
include formulating research questions and
related hypotheses, analysis of published
research, sampling, selection of instruments,
research ethics, and data analysis..
Preparation of individual research proposal
culminating project. Fulfills core requirement
in research.
RES 740
Advanced Research Seminar
3 credits
Uses research methodology to initiate change
in professional practice. Students identify a
challenging issue within their professional field
and design and implement a research project
aimed at improving it. Includes critiquing
existing research, writing a comprehensive
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research report, and presenting findings
orally. Fulfills core requirement in research.
Prerequisite: A course in qualitative or
quantitative research design.
SOCIAL WORK
SWK 205
Introduction to Social Work
4 credits
Provides an overview of the social work
profession, its foundation in values and
ethics, its theoretical framework, and its
role in society. Also examines a variety of
populations, fields of practice and focuses
on the activities and responsibilities of social
workers in diverse settings. Prerequisites:
Open to students starting in the second
semester of the first year.
SWK 225
Dynamics of Oppression/Discrimination
4 credits
Analyzes the economic and political
foundations of organizational and societal
oppression and discrimination utilizing
analytic tools to detect these roots and
to understand the uneven distribution of
resources. Also, debates regarding issues of
equity and equality will provide students
familiarity with contemporary social policy
issues. Prerequisites: SWK 205; sophomore
and junior transfers may take concurrently
with SWK 205. Open to sophomores and
juniors.
SWK 268
Social Research
4 credits
Introduces the purposes, types and basic
methodologies of social research. Prepares
students to be informed consumers of
research. Includes such topics as literature
review, problem formulation, research design,
data collection and data analysis and ethical/
political issues. Prerequisite: SWK 205
and completion of or exemption from the
college/core requirement in mathematics.
Open to sophomores, juniors and seniors.
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
SWK 345
Human Behavior and Social Environment
4 credits
Builds on the foundation of lifespan
development content in the Human Growth
and Development sequence. Focuses on the
interaction between human behavior and the
social environment from a multidimensional,
holistic perspective which stresses the
interdependence of biological, psychological,
social, cultural, and spiritual components of
functioning. Prerequisites: HDP 120/122 and
HDP 121/123 or HDP 124/126 and HDP
125/127. Additional prerequisites for Social
Work majors: SWK 205 and SWK 225.
SWK 440
Social Work Practice and Skills Lab I
4 credits
The Social Work Practice sequence consists
of three courses introducing the theoretical
and methodological aspects of the problemsolving process of the generalist practice
model. Each course features a segment of
the process and applies it to micro, mezzo,
and macro practice. SWK 440 examines
interviewing skills and engagement.
Prerequisites: SWK 205, HDP 120/122 and
HDP 121/123 or HDP 124/126 and HDP
125/127, and passing the Wheelock Literacy
and Communication Exam (WLCE). Open
only to junior Social Work majors.
SWK 450
Social Work Practice and Skills Lab II
4 credits
The Social Work Practice sequence consists
of three courses introducing the theoretical
and methodological aspects of the problemsolving process of the generalist practice
model. Each course features a segment of
the process and applies it to micro, mezzo,
SWK 451
Social Work Practice: Field Seminar I
2 credits
Integrates theoretical practice content with
practicum experiences and gives opportunity
for the discussion of professional and ethical
issues. Taken concurrently with SWK 450
and SWK 452. Open only to senior Social
Work majors.
SWK 452
Social Work Practice: Practicum I
4 credits
Placement in a social service agency for
two days a week for 15 weeks (200 hours).
Students will apply practice theory to
develop skills for generalist Social Work
practice. Taken concurrently with SWK 450
and SWK 451. Open only to senior Social
Work majors.
SWK 455
Social Work Practice and Skills Lab III
4 credits
The Social Work Practice sequence consists
of three courses introducing the theoretical
and methodological aspects of the problemsolving process of the generalist practice
model. Each course features a segment
of the process and applies it to micro,
mezzo, and macro practice. SWK 455
examines intervention, evaluation and
termination. Prerequisites: SWK 268 and
SWK 450, SWK 451 and SWK 452. Taken
concurrently with SWK 456 and SWK 457.
Open only to senior Social Work majors.
COURSES OF INSTRUCTION
SWK 355
Social Welfare Policy and Services
4 credits
Components of American and international
social welfare systems, policy-making, policy
advocacy, and policy analysis. Includes a
social policy field component. Prerequisites:
SWK 205, SWK 225, and AST 150. Open
only to junior Social Work majors.
and macro practice. SWK 450 examines
assessment, planning, and contracting.
Prerequisites: SWK 355 and SWK 440.
SWK 268 or a research course in Human
Development must be taken prior to,
or concurrently with this course. Taken
concurrently with SWK 451 and SWK 452.
Open only to senior Social Work majors.
SWK 456
Social Work Practice: Field Seminar II
2 credits
Integrates theoretical methods course
content with practicum experiences and
gives opportunities for the discussion
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WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
of professional and ethical issues. Taken
concurrently with SWK 455 and SWK 457.
Open only to senior Social Work majors.
COURSES OF INSTRUCTION
SWK 457
Social Work Practice: Practicum II
4 credits
A continuation of SWK 452, the focus is on
the development of Social Work skills for
generalist practice. Students are in placement
two days a week for 15 weeks (200 hours).
Taken concurrently with SWK 455 and SWK
456. Open only to senior Social Work majors.
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SWK 510
Human Behavior and the Social
Environment I
3 credits
Foundation-year, MSW theory course related
to individuals and families. Ecosystem
approach to understanding human
development and behavior across lifespan,
focusing on the continuous, transactional
relationship(s) between people and their
environments, contextualized by race, class,
history, culture, politics, religion. Critical
approach to how theories evolve in context,
inform social work practice, research, and
policy. Offered fall only.
justice-based social work practice. Offered
fall semester only.
SWK 530
Foundations of Social Research
3 credits
Introduces the purposes, types, methodology,
and ethics of social research. Prepares
students to be critical and informed
consumers of research and also provides
an applied learning opportunity through
conducting a group research study.
Prerequisites: Basic Statistics. Offered spring
semester only.
SWK 540
Generalist Social Work Practice I
3 credits
First foundation–year MSW practice course;
provides the knowledge, skills, and values for
justice-based social work practice with diverse
individuals and families in multiple systems.
Students are introduced to generalist social
work practice from ecological, strengthsbased, collaborative, and empowerment
perspectives. Concurrent with SWK 542 and
550. Offered once a year; fall semester.
SWK 511
Human Behavior and the Social
Environment II
3 credits
Second MSW theory course prepares
students to understand human behavior
within groups, organizations, and
communities through multidisciplinary
theoretical approaches. Learn strengths based
conceptual frameworks for understanding
groups and environments in ways that are
relevant to social work practice, policy, and
research. Prerequisite: SWK 510. Offered
spring only.
SWK 541
Generalist Social Work Practice II
3 credits
Continues the generalist social work
practice model. Develop knowledge, skills,
and values for practice with small groups,
organizations, communities. Emphasis is on
strengths-oriented, justice-based approaches
to these systems in historical, cultural, and
sociopolitical contexts for practice that is
collaborative, family-centered, communitybased, and multiculturally competent.
Prerequisites: SWK 510, 540, 542, 550.
Concurrent: SWK 543, 546, 551. Offered
once a year; spring semester. Offered once a
year; spring semester
SWK 520
Social Policy
3 credits
History of U.S. and international social
welfare programs, policy as social justice,
policy analysis and implementation and
social policy advocacy as a foundation of
SWK 546
Multicultural Social Work Assessment
3 credits
A critical learning approach to essential
assessment tools for social work practice
with children and families and the settings
in which interventions typically occur. Issues
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
of diversity, multicultural competence, and
social justice in assessment and practice are
explored. Develop an assessment framework
and social work philosophy-in-progress.
Prerequisites: SWK 510, 520, 530, 540,
542, 550. Concurrent: SWK 541, 543, 551.
Offered once a year; spring semester.
SWK 610
Social Work Leadership and
Administration
3 credits
Focuses on the advanced knowledge,
skills, and values necessary for social work
leadership in complex social service agencies.
Organized around the following modules:
organizational leadership, fundraising, grant
development, and community asset building.
Prerequisites: Completion of foundation
year courses or by permission of instructor.
Offered once a year; fall semester
SWK 620
Social Policy Practice
3 credits
An advanced policy course focusing on
the development of skills in social policy
practice, such as policy formation, policy
analysis, policy advocacy, and evaluation of
social policy related to children and families.
Prerequisites: SWK 520 and completion of
all foundation year courses or by permission
of instructor. Offered once a year; spring
semester
SWK 641
Social Work Practice with Children and
Families II
3 credits
Second required, advanced MSW practice
course. Continues with development of
advanced, justice-based family practice skills,
particularly related to the complex issues
impacting the lives of children and families
in the 21st century. Highlights connections
to students’ fieldwork and other courses.
Prerequisites: completion of foundation
year courses and SWK 640, 650; concurrent
with SWK 651. Offered once a year; spring
semester
SWK 650/651
Social Work Field Practicum and Seminar
III, IV
6 credits
Two-semester, advanced field practicum
experience. Students are expected to integrate
all areas of the MSW curriculum into
advanced, justice-based practice interventions
with children and families. Includes advanced
application of social work values and ethics
and capacity to select among differential
approaches based on knowledge and skills
that are collaborative and interprofessional
in order to effect social change at the
individual, family, group, organizational, and
community levels. Prerequisites: completion
of SWK 640, 650; concurrent with SWK
641, 651. Offered once a year, in sequence,
fall/spring semesters.
COURSES OF INSTRUCTION
SWK 550/551
Social Work Field Practicum and Seminar
I, II
6 credits
Two-semester practicum experience provides
students with a field-based environment in
which to develop and begin to demonstrate
mastery of curricular content. Students
are also expected to know and apply
the NASW Code of Ethics, values of
the profession, approaches that reflect a
celebration of differences, empowerment,
and a commitment to human rights and
distributive justice. Concurrent with
foundation year practice classes. Offered once
a year, in sequence, fall/spring semesters.
SWK 640
Social Work Practice with Children and
Families I
3 credits
First required, advanced MSW practice
course. Explore and develop skills with
several strengths-based models for working
with children and families. Integrates theory,
research, policy, and practice skills for
multiculturally competent, family-centered,
and community-based social work. Highlights
connections to students’ fieldwork and other
courses. Prerequisites: Completion of all
foundation year courses. Concurrent with
SWK 650. Offered once a year; fall semester.
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WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
COURSES OF INSTRUCTION
SWK 670
Spirituality of Children and Families
3 credits
This interprofessional course will enable
students to effectively utilize the spiritual
values/religious beliefs of clients and
themselves to create positive change, human
transformation, and healing. This will
include exploration of spiritual development,
supporting genuine respect for spiritual
experiences and strengths of diverse clients
during all stages of the helping relationship.
SWK 675
Family Violence Across the Lifespan
3 credits
This course will help students understand
and apply theories and practice skills related
to working with family violence. Topics will
span child abuse and neglect; adolescent and
adult intimate partner violence, including
LGBT populations and working with victims
and perpetrators of partner violence; and
abuse of elders disabled family members.
SWK 690
Integrative Project Seminar I
3 Credits
The first part of a year-long course that serves
as a capstone to the full MSW learning
experience. Design and conduct human
rights -based research projects that integrate
the key concepts of the MSW program’s
curricular themes and course work. Develop
an integrative project proposal in this
semester that contributes to the knowledge,
skills, and values of justice-based social
work practice. Prerequisites: completion of
foundation year courses. Offered once a year;
fall semester
SWK 691
Integrative Project Seminar II
3 credits
The second part of the year-long integrative
project course. Students complete the
human rights action project begun in the
fall. Projects focus on advancing human
rights and social and economic justice for
children, families and communities, through
education, social action, and policy. Projects
integrate the concepts learned in previous
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courses and reflect the curricular themes
and justice-based focus of the program.
Prerequisites: completion of foundation year
courses and SWK 690. Offered once a year;
spring semester
SWK 850
Dynamics of Oppression and
Discrimination
3 credits
Analysis of the economic and political
foundations of organizational and societal
oppression and discrimination utilizing
analytic tools to detect these roots and
to understand the uneven distribution of
resources. Also, debates regarding issues of
equity and equality provide students with
contemporary human rights social policy
issues. Offered fall only.
SPECIAL EDUCATION
SPE 264
Managing Behavior
2 credits
Introduces various theories / models of
managing behavior. Students learn to
recognize, understand and evaluate behavior
and to implement procedures designed to
prevent or decrease undesirable behavior and
increase desirable behavior.
SPE 341 Assessing Students with Special Needs
4 credits
Provides discussion and practice in assessing
academic, social, behavioral domains of
children. Focuses on informal and formal
tools to analyze, interpret, and communicate
results to families and school teams. Covers
interpretation assessment results related
to Individualized Education Program
development, curricula, and racial and
cultural bias. Discusses effective, informal
assessment techniques and emphasizes
an ecological approach to gathering
information. Introduces standardized
assessment and screening instruments and
provides an overview of the purposes and
limitations of such tests.
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
SPE 346
Assistive Technology
2 credits
Introduces Assistive Technology (AT)
solutions that can support students with
disabilities in fully accessing and progressing
in standards-based curriculum activities.
Include current laws and IEP considerations.
SPE 394
Curriculum, Learning and Special Needs
4 credits
Provides instruction and experience
in designing curricula and learning
environments for students with special needs.
Students establish goals and objectives;
select, modify and develop materials and
instructional activities; and evaluate the
appropriateness of ongoing programs.
Techniques and materials for developing
language, academic, social and career/
vocational skills are presented.
SPE 445
Teaching Reading to Struggling Readers
4 credits
Emphasizes the use of formal and informal
assessments to inform instruction. Instructs
learners on the administration and
interpretation of concepts about print,
running records, and miscue analysis (i.e.
QRI) to inform teaching practice. Builds
critical thinking skills to reflect on teaching
decisions and diagnose readers’ responses.
Addresses a range of issues faced by
struggling readers.
SPE 465
Capstone and Portfolio: Special Education
2 credits
Discussion of current issues/topics in special
education. Evolution of policies and practices
SPE 481
Assessing Students with Special Needs
4 credits
Discussion and practice assessing academic,
social, behavioral domains of children. Focus on
informal and formal tools to analyze, interpret
and communicate results to families and school
teams. Interpret assessment results related
to Individualized Education Program (IEP)
development, curricula, and racial and cultural
bias. Co-requisite: supervised placement.
SPE 542
Impact of Special Needs
3 credits
Surveys various disabilities and their impact
on learning and development. Covers
legislative issues, IEP development, service
delivery models, and strategies for working
with families/service providers of children
with special needs.
SPE 560
Understanding and Managing Behavior
2 credits
Explores traditional and current theories
and model of managing behavior. Emphasis
on analyzing and understanding causes
and explanations. Examines approaches
for preventing or decreasing undesirable
behavior and increasing self-control. (Online
course or one week course))
COURSES OF INSTRUCTION
SPE 392
Teaching Students with Exceptional
Learning Needs
2 credits
Explores theoretical perspectives of
exceptional learning needs. Curriculum
development and instructional approaches
for inclusive classrooms. Factors that affect
learning from multiple perspectives.
over time. Students compile and present
portfolio demonstrating competence in
Council for Exceptional Children standards.
Prerequisites: Passage of Massachusetts
Literacy and Communication, General
Curriculum, and Foundations of Reading
Tests for Educator Licensure.
SPE 635
Number Sense For Learners Who Struggle
3 credits
Discusses effective strategies to meet students’
needs and effective assessment procedures.
Reviews the big ideas of number sense and
current mathematics curricula. Prerequisite:
EDU 535 or approved waiver.
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WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
COURSES OF INSTRUCTION
SPE 645
Instructional Methods Seminar
2 credits
Focuses on use of evidence based
instructional practices for students in
inclusive classrooms. Selection, application,
and modification of EBP across curricular
content areas will be discussed. Related
topics such as Differentiated Instruction and
Response to Intervention will be covered.
Taken concurrently with SPP 640 or EDP
536 or permission of instructor.
SPE 650
Understanding Reading Difficulties
2 credits
Takes a critical orientation to examine reading
programs, instructional approaches, informal
literacy assessment, and factors that influence
reading development: decoding, vocabulary,
fluency, and comprehension. Explores
implications of social, political, and cultural
contexts on understanding literacy practices.
SPE 652
Inclusive Education Curriculum
3 credits
Develops theoretical and practical knowledge
of innovative curricula, flexible classroom
environments, and inclusive teaching
practices that integrate physical, behavioral,
social and academic needs of children.
Emphasizes that effective curriculum grows
from the intersection of accurate assessment,
meaningful schoolwork and a supportive
classroom ecology.
SPE 654
Advanced Inclusive Curriculum
3 credits
Provides direct, guided practice in planning
and implementing curricula that address the
academic, social, behavioral and physical
learning requirements of children with
special needs. Emphasizes group problemsolving as participants research, develop and
implement curricula and pedagogies which
respond to the assessed learning needs of
children in inclusive and special classrooms.
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SPE 656
Special Education Assessment
3 credits
Develop skills assessing academic, social,
behavioral domains of children’s learning.
Emphasizes both informal and formal tools
to analyze, interpret and communicate
results to families and school teams. Critique
assessment results related to Individualized
Education Program (IEP) development,
curricula, and racial and cultural bias.
(Co-requisite: Current placement teaching
children; prerequisite: SPE 542; or
permission of instructor.)
SPE 680
Portfolio Development: IESE Education
1 credit
Students develop performance assessment
portfolio demonstrating competence in
Council for Exceptional Children and
Wheelock Educator standards. Pre-requisites:
Successful completion of the Massachusetts
Test for Educator License (MTEL) in
Communication and Literacy, General
Curriculum, and Foundations of Readings
SPE 685
Democracy and Education
2 credits
Provides a social, historical, legal and political
context for understanding special education
practice and policy;. Addresses issues of
curricular quality, bias in assessment, equity
and parent empowerment.
SPE 710
Assistive Technology
1 credit
Introduces Assistive Technology (AT)
solutions that can support students with
disabilities in fully accessing and progressing
in standards-based curriculum activities.
Includes current laws and IEP considerations.
Provides overview on integration of
technology in teaching and learning.
SPP 460
Practicum I: Students with Special Needs
4 credits
Supervised experience with school-aged
children with exceptional learning needs in
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
inclusive, resource, or substantially separate
classrooms in public or private settings.
Students have increasing responsibility
for curriculum design and all other
responsibilities of a teacher. 4 days a week.
Taken concurrently with SPP 461 Seminar I:
Students with Special Needs.
SPP 461
Seminar I: Students with Special Needs
2 credits
Students reflect upon and analyze their
experiences as they work with school-aged
children during the practicum experience.
Must be taken concurrently with SPP 460.
SPP 471
Seminar II: Students with Special Needs.
1 credit
Students reflect upon and analyze their
experiences as they work with school-aged
children during the practicum experience.
Must be taken concurrently with SPP 470.
SPP 640
Practicum: Students with Special Needs
3 credits
Supervised experience with school-aged
children with exceptional learning needs
in inclusive, resource, or substantially
separate classrooms in public or private
settings (PreK-8). Students have increasing
responsibility for curriculum design and all
other responsibilities of a teacher. Minimum
300 hours. fulfills requirement for TSMD
license endorsement.
Sports-based Youth Development
THEATRE ARTS
THE 115
Moving Our Minds
4 credits
Explores critical and creative thinking
through the art of dance. Studies how dance
has affected societies and individual lives
through history, including consideration
of folk, cultural, and art dance. Analysis,
research, synthesis of information, and other
critical thinking skills are explicitly addressed.
Introductory.
THE 123
Public Speaking
4 credits
Explores basic principles, techniques of
effective speaking. Develops communication,
discussion, speech writing, interpretation,
delivery, critical analysis skills. General
Education: Creativity and the Arts. For
students entering prior to September, 2010:
Arts. Introductory.
COURSES OF INSTRUCTION
SPP 470
Practicum II: Students with Special Needs
3 credits
A second experience with school-aged
children with exceptional learning needs, at a
different age level and/or displaying different
learning needs than the first practicum.
Students have increasing responsibility
for curriculum design and all other
responsibilities of a teacher. 3 days a week.
Taken concurrently with SPP 471.
SBD 201
Sport-Based Youth Dev I: Theory
4 credits
Students will become familiar with
the benefits of SBYD programs in the
following areas of development: Biological,
psychological (including cognitive and
emotional functioning), and social. The
appropriate sporting environments and
training techniques for youth sport programs,
and the psychology of using sport as a means
of cultivating psychological health, wellbeing, and resiliency are reviewed. Students
will study the mission, goals, and practice
of sport based youth development programs
and apply concepts learned in class to
develop competency in quality sport based
youth development programs.
THE 126
Introduction to Theatre
4 credits
Introduces theatre as collaborative art form.
Surveys history of Western theatre. Explores
theatre art, practice. Requires participation
in Wheelock Family Theatre. General
Education: Creativity and the Arts. For
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WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
students entering prior to September, 2010:
Arts. Introductory.
COURSES OF INSTRUCTION
THE 203
Improvisation
4 credits
Explores ways of expressing creative potential
within theatre discipline. Develops selfawareness. Strengthens problem-solving skills
through individual and group exercises in
gesture, movement, mime, dialogue. General
Education: Creativity and the Arts. For
students entering prior to September, 2010:
Arts. Intermediate.
THE 205
Acting
4 credits
Explores basic acting techniques. Uses
exercises in observation, concentration,
emotional recall, imagination as basis for
character development. Develops voice and
body as tools for creating a role. Culminates
in performance of monologues and scenes.
General Education: Creativity and the Arts.
For students entering prior to September,
2010: Arts. Intermediate.
THE 207/ HDP 207
Introduction to Psychodrama
2 credits
Uses role-playing and other theatrical
techniques as powerful tools for growth,
enhanced creativity and problem solving. A
didactic as well as an experiential course that
studies these group techniques and applies
them to various professional settings. Has
applications for educators, social workers and
child life specialists. Explores psychodrama
through demonstration, practice, theory, and
application. Introductory
THE 215
Modern Drama
4 credits
Studies the works of such playwrights as
Ibsen, Chekhov, Hellman, Miller, Wilson,
Kushner. Textual analysis focuses on dramatic
structure, character development, thematic
content. General Education: Creativity and
the Arts OR Languages and Literatures. For
students entering prior to September, 2010:
218
Arts OR Literature. Intermediate
THE 220
History of Musical Theatre
4 credits
Studies music, lyrics, texts written for
European and American stage. Focuses on
opera and the mature musical. Includes
participation in/observation of Wheelock
Family Theatre musical production. General
Education: Creativity and the Arts. For
students entering prior to September, 2010:
Arts. Intermediate.
THE 225
Readers Theatre
4 credits
Explores theatre techniques to illuminate
literature. Uses poetry, fiction, nonfiction,
plays. Emphasizes textual analysis for group
presentation. Culminates in performance
of student-generated scripts. General
Education: Creativity and the Arts. For
students entering prior to September, 2010:
Arts. Intermediate.
THE 235/MUS 235
Jazz Dance
4 Credits
Performance Class for the intermediate
dancer focusing on proper alignment,
refining style, enhancing phrasing and
developing strength. Studies jazz’s influential
people and its history, including AfricanAmerican influences, Jack Cole, Alvin Ailey,
Jerome Robbins, Bob Fosse, Hollywood, and
Broadway. General Education: Creativity
and the Arts. For students entering prior to
September, 2010: General Education Arts.
Intermediate.
THE 238
African-American Theatre
4 credits
Surveys history of African-American theatre
from time of Ira Aldridge to present day.
Includes study of Harlem Renaissance
playwrights and African-American actors,
actresses, directors. General Education:
Perspectives on Diversity AND Creativity
and the Arts OR Languages and Literatures.
For students entering prior to September,
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
2010: Multicultural AND Arts OR
Literature. Intermediate.
THE 240
Storytelling and Folklore
4 credits
Introduces participants to the fields of
storytelling and folklore. Looks at common
story themes and the role of the Storyteller
in traditional and contemporary culture.
Students will research stories and fables and
examine how they shape and document
culture. Students will learn storytelling
techniques to use in a variety of settings.
General Education: Creativity and the Arts.
For students entering prior to September
2010: Arts. Intermediate.
THE 245
Theater Design and Production
4 credits
Uses the sequence of events that move a
play from a script to live performance to
explore the theatrical design and production
elements of scenery, costumes, lighting,
sound, makeup, and properties involved in
mounting a play. Students will participate
in building and running a production.
General Education: Creativity and the Arts.
Intermediate.
THE 277
Movement and Drama for Children
4 credits
Explores value of creative drama for primaryaged children in varied settings. Develops
skills, techniques needed to implement,
THE 310
Story Theatre
4 credits
Prepares, tours, and presents dramatizations
of children’s literature in a variety of settings.
Explores aspects of theatre management such
as booking engagements, public relations.
Prerequisites: one theatre performance class,
permission of instructor. Advanced.
THE 350
Directing Plays
4 credits
Explores the role of the theatre director
from interpreting a script to working with
designers, blocking the play and coaching
actors. Observe professional directors at
work, cast, stage and rehearse scenes. Select
from classic and contemporary plays. .
Prerequisite: one Theater course, permission
of instructor. Advanced.
THE 351
Learning and Teaching through the Arts
4 credits
Analyzes the creative processes through
the visual arts, music, movement, drama,
and dance. Examine current literature in
creativity, multiple intelligences theory, and
the arts. Bridge the gap between theory
and practice in order to effectively integrate
the arts into a classroom or workplace
setting. Combines experiential learning
with readings, reflective assignments, and
discussions.
COURSES OF INSTRUCTION
THE 242
Shakespeare
4 credits
Studies Shakespeare’s plays through
character analysis, evaluation, performance.
Emphasizes his views on life, death, love,
politics, evil, ambition; his insight into
human nature, his relevance today. Texts
include Romeo and Juliet, Taming of the
Shrew, Macbeth, Twelfth Night. General
Education: Creativity and the Arts or
Languages and Literatures. For students
entering prior to September, 2010: Arts OR
Literature. Intermediate.
evaluate drama activities that enhance selfexpression, build self-esteem, community.
Investigates drama’s role as vehicle for
teaching, learning. Prerequisite: Junior or
Senior Status. Offered: Spring. Intermediate.
THE 352
Immersion and Integration through Drama
4 credits
Covers movement, the use of drama to
develop speaking and listening skills, and
the use of drama as an alternative assessment
tool in 15 hours of workshop sessions with
the Wheelock Family Theatre. Participants
learn drama-based student observation
and assessment skills and connect drama
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WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
to leadership skills through scene work,
improvisation, and observation.
2010: Arts. Introductory. Offered: Fall.,
Spring
THE 374
Children’s Theatre
4 credits
Studies history, literature of children’s
theatre. Explores all aspects of mounting
children’s productions through scene work,
participation in Wheelock Family Theatre.
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
Advanced.
VIS 215
History of Architecture
4 credits
Studies world architecture from prehistory
to modern world. Focuses on major
building traditions through in-depth
study of individual monuments; considers
the interplay of materials, technologies,
and cultural needs responsible for built
environment. Slide lectures, readings,
discussions, field trips. General Education:
Upper Level Writing (after ENG111) AND
Creativity and the Arts OR Historical
Perspectives. For students entering prior to
September, 2010: Upper Level Writing (after
ENG111) AND Arts OR Global History,
Civilization, Culture.Prerequisite: ENG 111.
Intermediate.
COURSES OF INSTRUCTION
VISUAL ARTS
VIS 112
Western Art Renaissance to Modern
4 credits
Surveys Western art from the Renaissance
to the 20th century. Examines architecture,
sculpture, painting and graphic arts. Includes
lectures, slides and museum visits. General
Education: Creativity and the Arts OR
Historical Perspectives. For students entering
prior to September, 2010: Arts or Global
History, Civilization, Culture. Introductory.
VIS 125
Introduction to Design
4 credits
Introduces basic elements of twodimensional design. Explores fundamental
visual language of color, line, shape, texture,
in a variety of media. Traditional and
contemporary arts viewed, discussed in
conjunction with studio projects. Students
are encouraged to develop individual artistic
expression. Materials fee assessed. General
Education: Creativity and the Arts. For
students entering prior to September, 2010:
Arts. Introductory. Offered: Fall, Spring.
VIS 130
Drawing
4 credits
Explores basic concepts of drawing, develops
drawing skills as means of developing
personal artistic expressiveness. Charcoal,
pencil, brush and ink, pastel are used in still
life, life drawing, landscape, and portraiture.
General Education: Creativity and the Arts.
For students entering prior to September,
220
VIS 217
Art and Architecture of Ancient Cultures
4 credits
Explores art and architecture of selected
ancient cultures: India, China, the Near
East, Egypt, Nubia, Greece, Rome.
Examines paintings, sculpture, ceramics,
metal work, and architecture in historical
context. Slide presentations, class discussion,
museum visits. General Education: For
students entering prior to September, 2010:
satisfies General Education Arts or Global
History, Civilization, Culture requirement.
Satisfies upper level writing requirement.
Prerequisite: ENG 111. Fulfills General
Education requirements in Creativity and
the Arts or Historical Perspectives AND
Upper Level Writing. For students entering
prior to September, 2010: Arts or Global
History, Civilization, Culture and UpperLevel Writing. Prerequisite: ENG 111.
Intermediate.
VIS 218
Cathedral and Castle
4 credits
Studies art of Middle Ages in Europe and the
Middle East in cultural context. . Focuses on
religious, civic, and domestic architecture,
sculpture, stained glass, painting, book
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
VIS 235
Printmaking
4 credits
Explores basic graphic processes of
monotype, relief, collograph and intaglio
printmaking. Drawing and design issues
addressed as important factors in developing
a printed image. Projects encourage
exploration of printmaking media as well as
student’s own imagery. For students entering
prior to September, 2010: satisfies General
Education Arts requirement. Intermediate
VIS 220
Pottery
4 credits
Introduces techniques of hand-built and
wheel-thrown construction, mixing and
applying glazes, and firing. Sensitivity to
design necessities will be stressed through
self and group criticism. Students pay a
materials fee. General Education: Creativity
and the Arts. For students entering prior to
September, 2010: Arts. Intermediate.
VIS 240
Painting
4 credits
Introduces work in oil and acrylic paint.
Explores basic concepts of color, value,
composition, texture. Students work from
landscape and live models, developing
their personal artistic expression. General
Education: Creativity and the Arts. For
students entering prior to September, 2010:
Arts. Intermediate. Offered: Fall.
VIS/COM 222
Designing the Digital Image
4 credits
Introduces computer imaging and its
capacity to design and control the twodimensional page. Through use of various
two-dimensional imaging software
applications (Mac-based), students learn to
manipulate photographs, compose with text,
and develop image concepts in the digital
arena. Intermediate. General Education:
Creativity and the Arts. For students entering
prior to September, 2010: Arts.
VIS 245
Three Dimensional Design
4 credits
Introduces basic concepts of three
dimensional art. Through assignments
employing wide range of materials and
scales, students develop ability to manipulate
form, space. Relief sculpture, sculpture in
the round, installation, architecture, and
product design considered in terms of form
and function. General Education: Creativity
and the Arts. For students entering prior to
September, 2010: Arts. Intermediate.
VIS 225
Photography
4 credits
Introduces film photography as a creative
medium. Includes basics of camera usage,
black-and-white darkroom techniques. Slide
presentations, class critiques. Final portfolio
required. Students pay a materials fee; access
to a 35mm film camera is necessary. General
Education: Creativity and the Arts. For
students entering prior to September, 2010:
Arts. Intermediate.
VIS 278
Art for Children
4 credits
Explores learning through, with, and about
art, through art making, reflective and
analytical writing, and research. Provides
exposure to art materials, and to the theory
and practice of using art with children in
various settings. Prerequisite: Junior or Senior
status. Intermediate.
COURSES OF INSTRUCTION
illumination, metal work, fiber arts. Museum
visits, slide presentations, discussion. General
Education: Creativity and the Arts or
Historical Perspectives AND Upper Level
Writing. For students entering prior to
September, 2010: Upper Level Writing (after
ENG111) AND Arts OR Global History,
Civilization, Culture. Prerequisite: ENG
111. Fulfills General Education requirements
in Creativity and the Arts or Historical
Perspectives AND Upper Level Writing.
Intermediate.
221
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
COURSES OF INSTRUCTION
VIS 330
Intermediate/Advanced Drawing
4 credits
Builds on drawing experience; emphasis
on composition. Uses a variety of media:
charcoal, pencil, brush and ink, and pastel, in
still life, landscape, portrait, and imaginative
subjects. Includes slide presentations, guest
speakers and visits to museums, galleries
and studios. May be repeated for credit.
Prerequisite: One course in Drawing.
Advanced.
222
VIS 340
Intermediate/Advanced Painting
4 credits
Builds on painting experience; develops
familiarity with major painting media.
Emphasizes individual projects. Develops
personal artistic expression. Course will
also include films, guest speakers and visits
to museums, galleries and studios. May be
repeated for credit. Prerequisite: One course
in Painting. Advanced.
VIS 375
Mixed Media and Composition
4 credits
Explores the interaction between materials
and concepts through the use of mixed
media approaches to image making,
including collage, assemblage, layering,
and deconstruction. Develops strategies
for organizing visual images using
design principles and perceptual skills.
Experimentation with personal themes and
narratives is encouraged. May be repeated for
credit. Prerequisite: VIS 125. Advanced.
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
INSTITUTIONAL INFORMATION AT
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
Corporation and Board of Trustees Membership: 2010–2011 224
Offices of the Administration
227
Faculty233
Directions to Wheelock College239
Campus Directory242
INSTITUTIONAL INFORMATION
223
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
CORPORATION AND BOARD OF TRUSTEES MEMBERSHIP:
BOARD AND CORPORATION OFFICERS
Ranch C. Kimball
Chair of the Board of Trustees
Boston, MA
Kate Taylor
Vice Chair of the Board of Trustees
WGBH
Boston, MA
INSTITUTIONAL INFORMATION
Susan Brumi Simon ’73
Chair of the Corporation
Admissions Advantage
Weston, MA
Vicki C. Milstein ’72
Vice Chair of the Corporation
Brookline Public Schools
Brookline, MA
Robert A. Lincoln
Treasurer
Boston Trust and Investment
Management Company/Walden Asset
Management
Boston, MA
Barbara G. Sallick ’61
Clerk of the Board of Trustees
Waterworks
Danbury, CT
A. Keena Dunn Clifford ’68
Assistant Clerk of the Board of Trustees
Wayland, MA
BOARD OF TRUSTEES
Judith Parks Anderson ’62
Concord, MA
Steven B. Aveson ’78
Medway, MA
Stephanie Bennett-Smith
Brielle, NJ
Lisa McCabe Biagetti ’80
Medfield, MA
A. Keena Dunn Clifford ’68
Wayland, MA
224
Kathryn S. Conrad ’73 MS
Weston, MA
Patricia Cook ‘69
Cook & Company
Bronxville, NY
Barbara Drauschke ’72
Melrose, MA
Sally Edmonds ’55
Cambridge, MA
Fred K. Foulkes
Boston University
Betty C. Fuchs
Canton, MA
Annette Hill Green
Law Offices of Donald E. Green, P.C.
Roxbury, MA
Mitchell Harris
BNY Mellon
Boston, MA
Christina Morris Helm ’64/’98 MS
New London, NH
John Jackson
Schott Foundation
Cambridge, MA
Kathryn Jones ’96 MS
Dorchester, MA
Thomas J. Kelly
Mintz, Levin, Cohn, Ferris, Glovsky,
and Popeo, P.C.
Boston, MA
Ranch C. Kimball
Joslin Diabetes Center
Boston, MA
John Knutson
Boston, MA
Edward H. Ladd
Honorary Trustee
Standish Mellon Asset Management
Boston, MA
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
Robert A. Lincoln
Boston Trust and Investment
Management Company/Walden Asset
Management
Boston, MA
Eliane Markoff
Art in Giving
Boston, MA
Elizabeth Cluett Thors
Wellington Management Company
Boston, MA
Leverett Lee Wing
Asian and Pacific Islander American Vote
Boston, MA
CORPORATION MEMBERS
Barbara Mead Anthony ’60MS
Boston, MA
Robin Mount
Harvard University Graduate School of
Arts & Sciences Career Services
Cambridge, MA
Lynne Beasley, ’66
Brookline, MA
Heather Elizabeth Peach ’96 MS
Mass General Hospital for Children
Boston, MA
Linda Port
Greenberg Traurig, LLP
Boston, MA
Jane H. Roberts ‘73
Boston, MA
Mark E. Roberts ‘76MS
Boston University
Boston, MA
Doryl “Dory” Lloyd Rourke ’67
Worcester, MA
Barbara G. Sallick ’61
Waterworks
Danbury, CT
Susan Bruml Simon ’73
Admissions Advantage
Weston, MA
Ellen Haebler Skove ’49
Darien, CT
Karen Steffensen Sturges ’87 MS
Boston, MA
Kate Taylor
WGBH
Boston, MA
Gary Bergstrom
Acadian Assett Management, Inc.
Boston, MA
Grace Macomber Bird
George B.H. Macomber Company
Andover, MA
Joyce E. Butler ’73
Providence, RI
Julia Challinor ’75
University of California
San Franscisco, CA
Louise Close ’77
Sudbury, MA
Susan Constable ’82
Rhode Island Technical Assistance
Project
Providence, RI
INSTITUTIONAL INFORMATION
Alan Morse
Brookline, MA
Christina Cox ‘05
Rebecca M. Johnson Elementary School
Springfield, MA
Ellen T. Dwinell ’61
Weston, MA
Barbara Elliott Fargo ’52
Grafton, MA
Maria D. Furman
Wellesley, MA
225
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
William R. Hall
Center Harbor, NH
Sara Hosmer
Roslindale, MA
Marilyn Dexter Kenyon ’45/’69 BS
Naples, FL
Elizabeth Wheeler L’Hommedieu ’54
Convent Station, NJ
William A. Lowell
Choate, Hall & Stewart
Boston, MA
INSTITUTIONAL INFORMATION
Lois Mirsky ’54
Plymouth, MA
Juan Carlos Morales
Boston, MA
Mila J. Moschella ’75
Lynnhurst School
Saugus, MA
Valerie Mosley
Wellington Management
Boston, MA
Martha-Reed Murphy ’69
Martha-Reed Murphy Interior Designs
Darien, CT
Maryann O’Rourke ’60, ’98 MS
Children’s Day School, Inc.
Greenwich, CT
Nancy F. Purinton ’64
Eliot, ME
S. Paul Reville
Executive Office of Education
Boston, MA
Thekla Shackelford
Gahanna, OH
Daniel Stern Terris
Brandeis University
Waltham, MA
Geneva S. Thorndike
Westwood, MA
Joan Thorndike
Brookline, MA
226
Barry Wanger
Wanger Associates
Newton, MA
Kahris White-McLaughlin
Cambridge Public Schools
Cambridge, MA
Lauren McLachlan Widing ‘08
Fessenden School
West Newton, MA
Elizabeth Bassett Wolf ’54
Palo Alto, CA
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
OFFICES OF THE ADMINISTRATION
PRESIDENT’S OFFICE
Jackie Jenkins-Scott, B.S., M.S.W.
President
Julia Mears, B.A., M.A.
Academic Support Specialist
Adrian K. Haugabrook, B.S., M.S.A.,
Ed.D.
Vice President for Enrollment
Management and Student Success Chief
Diversity Officer
Jenne Powers, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
Director of the Writing Center
Anne Marie Martorana, B.S., C.P.A.
Vice President and Chief Financial
Officer
Linda A. Welter, A.B., M.B.A.
Vice President for Institutional
Advancement and Development
Julie Wollman, B.A., M.S., Ph.D.
Vice President for Academic Affairs
Lorie L. Spencer, B.S., M.Ed.
Director of Academic Operations
Yvonne Bello, A.S.
Executive Assistant to the Vice President
for Academic Affairs and Student Success
ASPIRE INSTITUTE
Julie Wollman, B.A., M.S., Ph.D.
Vice President for Academic Affairs
Jake Murray, M.Ed., M.P.P.
Senior Director
Valerie Thornhill Hudson
Executive Assistant to the President
Catherine Abbott
Program Administrator for Connected
Beginnings
Thomas A. Simers, B.A.
Administrative Assistant
ACADEMIC ADVISING AND
ASSISTANCE
Mary McCormack, B.S., M.S.
Associate Vice President for Academic
Services
Rachel Bundy
Academic Support Specialist
Patricia Drew, B.A., M.S.
Academic Advisor
Paul Hastings, B.A., M.Ed.
Director of Academic Assistance and
Disability Services
Erin Jenkins, B.A.
Academic Advisor
Jonathan Lewis, B.S., M.S.
Associate Director for Student Success
Christyne Anderson
Operations Manager
Mary Avery
Manager for Training and Professional
Development
Nicole Barnett
Research and Evaluation Assistant for
Connected Beginnings
INSTITUTIONAL INFORMATION
Roy Schifilliti, B.A., M.A.
Vice President for Administration and
Student Life
ACADEMIC AFFAIRS
Laura Beals
Manager for Research, Evaluation and
Instructional Technology, Connected
Beginnings
Barbara Joseph
STEP Project Manager
Elizabeth Lautz
Director, Connected Beginnings Training
Institute
Frances Moyer
Educator Mentor Coordinator
227
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
Catherine Wakely
Assistant for Data Management and
Instructional Technology, Connected
Beginnings
ATHLETICS
Diana Cutaia, B.S., M.A.
Director of Athletics
Adjunct Faculty
INSTITUTIONAL INFORMATION
Patrick Golden, B.S., M.A.
Administrative Assistant
Jayson Hill, B.S.
Head Athletic Trainer
Megan Lachman, B.S., M.S.
Assistant Athletic Trainer
Stephanie Smyrl, B.A., M.B.A.
Associative Director of Athletics
Alan Wickstrom, B.A., M. Ed.
Director of Sports Information
FINANCE
Anne Marie Martorana, B.S., C.P.A.
Vice President and Chief Financial
Officer
Joanne Baez
Accounts Payable Coordinator
Geanna Cohen
Staff Accountant/Accounts Payable
Tracy Ward
Executive Assistant
CENTER FOR CAREER AND
PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
Jennifer Hartwell, B.S., M.Ed.
Coordinator of Career and Professional
Development
COUNSELING SERVICES
Eileen Yang Thompson, B.A., M.S.W.,.
Director, Counseling Center
Ellen Dolansky, M.D.
Consulting Psychiatrist
Phyllis Fonseca, A.B., MSW, LICSW
Adjunct Senior Staff Clinician
Marcia Lowry, B.S., M.A., LMHC
Senior Staff Clinician
Althea Carr Neel, B.A., M.A.
Staff Clinician
Agustina Moron, B.S.
Administrative Assistant
CENTER FOR INTERNATIONAL
EDUCATION, LEADERSHIP AND
INNOVATION
Paul Duggan, B.A.
Manager of Payroll and Budgets
Linda A. Davis, B.A., M.Ed., Ph.D.
Interim Director and Associate Professor
Michael Discolo
Student Accounts Coordinator
Lauren M. Thorman, B.S., M.P.A.
Associate Director
Debora E. Evans
Manager of Financial Services
David Fedo, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
Executive Director and Visiting
Scholar—Singapore
Joseph Finneran
Loan Administrator
Samuel Joseph, B.S.
Associate Manager, Student Financial
Services / Student Accounts
Michael Seyffert, B.S.
Controller
228
Eric Texeira
Staff Accountant
Judith A. Ceven
Senior Executive Administrator
Brendan J. McGowan, B.A.
International Program Coordinator
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
CENTER FOR SCHOLARSHIP AND
RESEARCH
Janine Bempechat, M.S., Ph.D.
Director
FACILITIES MANAGEMENT
Edward E. Jacques
Director of Facilities Management
Michael Fesko
Director of Campus Services
Susan Mackey, BSW
Coordinator of Facilities Services
FINANCIAL AID
Roxanne Dumas, B.A., M.B.A.
Director of Financial Aid
Denise Goldman, B.S.
Assistant Director of Financial Aid
Bethany Wright, B.A.
Assistant Director of Financial Aid
GOVERNMENT AFFAIRS
Marta Rosa, M.Ed.
Special Assistant to the President for
Government and External Affairs
Nicole Anllo
Policy & Communications
Specialist-Graduate Intern
Courtney Patrick, LEED AP® certified
Assistant Project Manager/Executive
Assistant
Chikere Uchegber
Policy & Communications SpecialistGraduate Intern
Frank Romero
Facilities Supervisor
FACULTY SUPPORT
Heather Bundy, B.A., M.S.
Sara Rich, B.A.
Wyvette Tabb
Marsha Wilson, A.S.
FIELD EXPERIENCE
Moira Mannix, B.A., M.A.
Director of Field Experience
Marybeth Toomey, B.A., M.Ed.
Associate Director for Education
Afra Hamid. B.A., M.A.
Field Experience Coordinator
Arafat Akbar
Administrative Assistant
GRADUATE ADMISSIONS
Brian Minchello, B.S., M.S.
Director of Graduate Admissions
Michele Mahoney, B.S.
Graduate Admissions Counselor
Ronette Lyle, B.S.
Graduate Information Specialist
GRADUATE AND CONTINUING STUDIES
Dawna G. Burrus, B.S., M.Ed.
Director of Professional Development &
Continuing Education
INSTITUTIONAL INFORMATION
Robert Montville
Director of Security
Julie Thomson, B.S., M.S.
Assistant Director of National and
Regional Programs
HUMAN RESOURCES
Michele R. Crews, B. S., M.M.
Director of Human Resources
Christine Callender
Human Resources Generalist
229
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
Jonathan R. LaPierre, B.S.
Director of Information Technology
Clovis Andreu, A.S., B.S.
Information System Analysis
Amy Basque, B.A., M.S.L.I.S
Web Developer
Chris Hadges, B.S.
Student IS Manager
INSTITUTIONAL INFORMATION
Andrew Kahn
IT Support Specialist
Brendon McLean
Systems/Helpdesk Manager
Sandy Tubbs
Helpdesk Coordinator
Craig Walker
Desktop Intern
INSTITUTIONAL ADVANCEMENT
AND DEVELOPMENT
Linda A. Welter, B.A., M.B.A.
Vice President for Institutional
Advancement and Development
George Bacher
Assistant Director of Development Services
Christine Dall, B.A., M.S.
Director of Development
Communication & Alumni Magazine
Editor
Terri Houston
Director of Major Gifts and Planned
Giving
Rebecca Smokowski, B.A.
Assistant Director for the Annual Fund
Kenneth P. Spritz, B.A., M.F.A.
Director of Campaign Planning and
Corporate/Foundation Relations
LIBRARY
Brenda Ecsedy, B.A., M.S.L.I.S.,
M.S.C.I.S.
Director of Academic Resources and
Library Services
Youngmi An, B.S.
Administrative Assistant
Louisa Choy, B.A., M.S.L.I.S.
Digital Services Librarian
Ann Glannon, B.S., M.S.L.I.S.
Associate Director and Collection
Management Librarian
Allyson Harper-Nixon, B.S.
Library Services Specialist
Anne Moore, B.A., M.S.L.I.S.
Technical Services Librarian
Jeff D. Pearson, B.A.
Library Technology Specialist
Ashley Peterson, B.A., M.S.L.I.S.
Access Services Librarian
Adam Williams, B.A., M.S.L.I.S.
Instruction and Reference Librarian
MARKETING AND COMMUNICATIONS
Lauren Marquis
Director of Development and Alumni
Relations
Stephen Dill, B.A.
Interim Director of Marketing
Communications
Michelle McLaughlin
Office Manager and Events Coordinator
Marie Gendron, B.S.
Editor
Deanne Morse
Donor Relations and Stewardship Officer
REGISTRAR’S OFFICE
Kasey Riley
Associate Director of Alumni Relations
230
Lori Ann Saslav, B.A.
Editorial Assistant
Michelle Ormerod, B.A
Interim Registrar
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
John Burkett, B.S., M.F.A.
Administrative Assistant
Ashley Kohman, B.S.
Assistant Registrar
Vanessa Titang, B.A.
Assistant to the Registrar
William Morales
Sr. Director, Mattahunt Community
Partnerships
Chris Sumner
Director of Upward Bound
Jasmine Toussaint
Program Coordinator for Upward Bound
RESOURCE CENTER
Cortney Tunis, B.S., M. Hum.
Resource Center Manager
SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
Nancy Hutchins, B.A., M.S.
Assistant to the Dean
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION, SOCIAL
WORK CHILD LIFE AND FAMILY
STUDIES
Donna McKibbens, B.A., M.Ed., Ph.D.
Interim Dean
Emily St. Martin, B.S., M.Ed.
Academic Project Coordinator
Barbara Morgan, B.A., M.Ed.
Dean of Students
Eric Maitland
Coordinator of Student Leadership and
Diversity Programs
Bryan McGrath
Assistant Dean of Students
Amanda Schadlick
Administrative Assistant
Jamie Zackery
Assistant Director of Diversity and
Campus Programs
UNDERGRADUATE ADMISSIONS
Renee Ruggiero
Assistant to the Dean
Adrian K. Haugabrook, B.S., M.S.A.,
Ed.D.
Vice President for Enrollment
Management and Student Success
Sue Noel
Assistant to the Dean for Chair Support
Rachel Baerga, B.A.
Operations Manager
STUDENT SUCCESS
Adrian K. Haugabrook, B.S., M.S.A.,
Ed.D.
Vice President for Enrollment
Management and Student Success
Rashad Cope
Director of the Mattahunt Community
Center
Ceronne Daly, B.A., M.Ed.
Director of Pre-Collegiate and College
Access Programs
INSTITUTIONAL INFORMATION
Shirley Malone-Fenner, B.S., M.P.S.,
Ed.D.
Dean of Arts and Sciences
STUDENT LIFE
Jamie Coan, B.S.
Senior Undergraduate Admissions
Counselor
Kristen M. Harrington, B.A., M.S.
Senior Director of Undergraduate
Admissions
Kate Groetzinger, B.A., M.Ed.
Admissions Counselor
Kara Widdison, B.S.
Office Assistant
Rebecca LaPlante, B.A.
Senior Undergraduate Admissions
Counselor
231
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
Jacklyn Haas, B.A., M.Ed
Associate Director of Undergraduate
Admissions
Jessica Reyes, B.S.
Admissions Counselor for Diversity
Outreach and Recruitment
Lisa A. Slavin, B.A., M.A.
Special Assistant to the Vice President
for Enrollment Management and
Student Success
INSTITUTIONAL INFORMATION
WHEELOCK FAMILY THEATRE
Susan Kosoff, B.S., M.S., Ed. D.(Hon)
Producer of WFT and Professor of
Theatre Arts and Education
John Bay, B.A., M.S.
Director of Education
Charles Baldwin
Publicity and Marketing Director
Kay Arden Elliott
Assistant to the Producer/Grantswriter
Matthew Lazure, B.F.A.
Technical Director
Brian Masters, B.S.C.S
Production Manager
Stephen Reinstein, B.A.
Box Office Manager
Lisa Rowe-Beddoe, B.A., M.A.
Assistant Director of Education
Jane Staab, B.S.
General Manager
WRITING CENTER
Jenne Powers, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Humanities and
Director of the Writing Center
Scott Votel, B.A., M.F.A
Director of Composition Programs and
Instructor in Writing
232
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
FACULTY
FULL-TIME
Detris T. Adelabu
Associate Professor of Human Development
B.S., Southern University
M.S., Purdue University
Ed.M, Ed.D., Harvard University
Nina L. Aronoff
Associate Professor of Social Work
B.A., Empire State College
M.S.W., Boston University
Ph.D., Case Western Reserve University
Linda Banks-Santilli
Associate Professor of Education
B.S., Wheelock College
M.S., Lesley College
Ed.D., Harvard University
Mary Battenfeld
Associate Professor of Literature
B.A., Swarthmore College
M.A., Ph.D., University of Maryland
Deborah Lisansky Beck
Assistant Professor of Social Work
B.A., Smith College
M.S.W., Simmons College
Janine Bempechat
Associate Professor of Human Development
B.A., McGill University
M.S., Ph.D., Harvard University
Akeia Benard
Assistant Professor of Human Development
B.A., Salve Regina College
M.A., University of Connecticut
Ph.D., University of Connecticut
Cheryl Render Brown
Associate Professor of Education
B.S., Boston University
M.Ed., Tufts University
Emily Cahan
Professor of Psychology
B.A., Harvard University
M.A., M. Philo, Ph.D., Yale University
Leland Clarke
Associate Professor of Education and Music
B.S., Wheelock College
M.Ed., Lesley College
Ed.D., Boston University
Samuel Cook
Assistant Professor of Mathematics
B.S. University of Texas-Pan American
M.S. Stony Brook University
Ph.D. Stony Brook University
John Crapps
Professor of Education
B.A., Furman University
M.S., George Peabody College for
Teachers
Ph.D., University of Georgia
INSTITUTIONAL INFORMATION
Lenette Azzi-Lessing
Assistant Professor of Social Work
B.S., West Liberty State College
M.S.W., Washington University
M.B.A., University of Rhode Island
Ph.D., University of Connecticut
Debra Borkovitz
Associate Professor of Mathematics
B.S., University of Illinois
Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of
Technology
Felicity A. Crawford
Assistant Professor of Education
B.Mus., Berklee College of Music
M.Ed., Suffolk University
Ed.D., University of Massachusetts,
Boston
Linda A. Davis
Associate Professor of Education and
Interim Director, Center for International
Education, Leadership, and Innovation
B.A., College of St. Benedict
M.Ed., University of Ottawa
Ph.D., University of British Columbia
233
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
Joeritta Jones de Almeida
Assistant Professor of Education
B.A., State University of New York,
Fredonia
Ed.M., Boston College
Ed.D., Harvard University
Gail Dines
Professor of Sociology
B.S., Ph.D., University of Salford
INSTITUTIONAL INFORMATION
Galina Dobrynina
Associate Professor of Mathematics
M.A.T., Moscow Pedagogical University
Ed.D., Boston University
Catherine Donahue
Associate Professor of Education
B.A., Stonehill College
M.Ed., Lesley College
Ed.D., University of Massachusetts,
Amherst
Nicole Dubus
Assistant Professor of Social Work
B.A., University of California, Santa Cruz
M.S.W., San Francisco State University
Ph.D., Boston University
Tina M. Durand
Assistant Professor of Human Development
B.A., Boston College
M.S., Lesley University
Ph.D., Boston College
Martha Eshoo
Instructor in Human Development
B.A., Simmons College
Ed.M., Harvard University
Ellen Faszewski
Associate Professor of Biology
B.A., Elms College
M.A., Mt. Holyoke College
Ph. D., University of Massachusetts
David Fernie
Professor of Education
B.A., Harvard University
Ed.D. University of Massachusetts
234
Charles Fidler
Assistant Professor of Science
B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Syracuse University
Marcia M. Folsom
Professor of English
B.A., Wellesley College
M.A., Ph.D., University of California,
Berkeley
Ellie Friedland
Associate Professor of Education
B.S., Cornell University
M.S., Drexel University
Ph.D., The Union Institute
Gregory Gomez
Associate Professor of Art
B.A., Grinnell College
M.F.A., Washington University
Marjorie Hall
Associate Professor of Art History
B.S., M.A., University of Delaware
Ph.D., University of Michigan
Lowry Hemphill
Associate Professor of Education
B.A., University of Connecticut
M.Ed., Northeastern University
Ed.D. Harvard University
Lucinda Heimer
Assistant Professor of Education
B.S., Indiana University
M.S., Old Dominion University
Ph.D., University of Wisconsin
Petra Hesse
Associate Professor of Human Development
B.A., Universitat Hamburg
M.A., Harvard University
M.A.L.D., Fletcher School of Law and
Diplomacy
Ph.D., Harvard University
Peter Holden
Assistant Professor of Science
B.S., M.S., Rensselaer Polytechnic
Institute
Ph.D., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
Grace Kim
Assistant Professor of Human Development
B.A., John Hopkins University
M.A.R., Westminster Theological
Seminary
M.A., Ph.D., University of
Massachusetts
Jennifer Klinefelter
Instructor in Education
B.A., Gordon College
M.S., Harvard University
Castagna Lacet
Instructor in Social Work
B.A., Wellesley College
M.S.W., Boston College
Ph.D., Candidate, Boston College
Jama Lazerow
Professor of History
B.A., University of Massachusetts
Ph.D., Brandeis University
Diane E. Levin
Professor of Education
B.S., Cornell University
M.S., Wheelock College
Ph.D., Tufts University
Terry Meier
Associate Professor of Education
B.U.S., University of New Mexico
M.A., Marquette University
M.A., Cardinal Stritch College
Ed.D., Harvard University
Karen Murphy
Associate Professor of Education
B.A., Fort Lewis College
M.Ed., Ph.D., University of Maryland
Irwin Nesoff
Associate Professor of Organizational
Leadership
B.A. City College of New York
M.S.W. Hunter College
D.S.W. City University of New York
Graduate Center
Susan Owusu
Instructor in Communications
B.A., M.A., Bridgewater State College
Ju Hee Park
Assistant Professor of Education
B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Yonsei University
Ph.D., Ohio State University
Sara Levine
Assistant Professor in Science
B.A. Haverford College
D.V.M, Tufts University School of
Veterinary Medicine
M.F.A., Lesley University
Roy Old Person
Assistant Professor of Social Work
B.A., University of New MexicoAlbuquerque
M.S.S.W., Columbia University
Ph.D., Candidate, University of
Washington
Erica Licea-Kane
Instructor in the Arts
B.F.A., Parsons School of Design
M.F.A., Massachusetts College of Art
Amy L. Phillips-Losso
Associate Professor of Education
B.A., Smith College
M.A., Ph.D., Stanford University
Shirley Malone-Fenner
Dean of Arts and Sciences
Professor of Psychology/ Human
Development
B.S., M.P.S., Western Kentucky University
Ed.D., Vanderbilt University
Kathryn Portnow
Instructor in Human Development
B.S. Goddard College
M.S. Bank Street College
Ed.D., Harvard University
INSTITUTIONAL INFORMATION
Susan Kosoff
Professor of Theatre Arts and Education
B.S., M.S., Ed.D. (Hon),
Wheelock College
Kathy McDonough
Instructor in Education
B.S., University of Vermont
M.Ed., Lesley College
235
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
William Rodriquez
Assistant Professor of Juvenile Justice and
Youth Advocacy
B.A., Fordham University
M.S., Northeastern University
J.D., Northeastern School of Law
INSTITUTIONAL INFORMATION
Barbara Rosenquest
Associate Professor of Education
B.A., Skidmore College
M.A., Peabody College
Ed.S., Vanderbilt University
Ph.D., Tufts University
Debbie Samuels-Peretz
Assistant Professor of Education
B.A., Brandeis University
M.A., Tel Aviv University
Ph.D., Boston College
Joyce Hope Scott
Associate Professor of American Studies
B.S., Northeastern University
M.A., Northeastern University
Ed.D., Boston University
Eric Silverman
Associate Professor in Human
Development/American Studies
B.A., Brandeis University
M.A., University of Minnesota
Minneapolis
Ph.D., University of Minnesota
Minneapolis
Hope Haslam Straughan
Associate Professor of Social Work
B.A., Stamford University
M.S.W., Carver School of Social Work:
The Southern Baptist Theological
Seminary
Ph.D., Barry University
Stephanie Cox Suarez
Associate Professor of Education
B.S., University of Virginia
M.Ed., University of Connecticut
Ph.D., Boston College
236
Paul Thayer
Associate Professor of Child Life and
Family Studies
B.A., University of Connecticut
M.A., Assumption College
M.Div., Yale University
D. Ministry, Boston University
William B. D. Thompson
Associate Professor of Education
B.S., M.A., New York University
Ed.D., Harvard University
Eleonora Villegas-Reimers
Associate Professor of Human Development
B.S., Universidad Catolica Andres Bello
M.Ed., Ed.D., Harvard University
Swen Voekel
Associate Professor of English
B.A., Hamilton College
M.A., Ph.D., University of Rochester
Claire White
Assistant Professor of Child Life
B.S., M.S., Wheelock College
Lee Whitfield
Associate Professor of History
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Brandeis University
Richard Williams
Instructor in Humanities
B.S., Texas A &M University
J.D., University of Texas
M.F.A., Emerson College
Wendy Champagnie Williams
Instructor in Social Work
B.S.W., Wheelock College
M.S.W., Boston University
Ph.D., Candidate, Simmons College
Jane Yedlin
Associate Professor of Language and Literacy
B.A., Antioch College
M.Ed., Rhode Island College
Ed.D., Harvard University
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
Susan Zoll
Instructor in Education
B.A., Salem State College
AMS Montessori Credential
(NEMTEC, 3-6)
Doctoral Candidate, ABD, University of
Rhode Island/Rhode Island College
PART-TIME
Deborah Keefe
Instructor in Education
B.A., New York University
M.S., Wheelock College
Elaine Kohen
Instructor in Education
B.A., University of Kentucky
M.A., Ohio State University
M.Ed., Lesley University
Carolyn Kurker-Gallagher
Instructor in Child Life
B.S., M.S., Wheelock College
James Bourque
Instructor in Social Work
B.A., St. John’s Seminary College
M.S.W., Boston University
Twakia Martin
Instructor in Language and Literacy
B.A., University of North Carolina at
Charlotte
M. Ed., Harvard University
Ph.D., Harvard University
Virginia Coleman
Instructor in Child Life
B.A., Tufts University
M.S., Wheelock College
Shoshanna Starr Collins
Instructor in Education
B.S., University of Vermont
M.A., The American University
Michele Gibbons-Carr
Instructor in Organizational Leadership
B.A., Pennsylvania State University
M.A., Boston University
Ph.D., Boston University
Dorothy Gorenflo
Instructor in Mathematics
B.A., University of Massachusetts
M.Ed., University of Massachusetts
M.S., Wheelock College
M.Ed., University of Vermont
Suzanne Graca
Instructor in Child Life
B.A., College of the Holy Cross
M.S., Wheelock College
Maya Honda
Associate Professor of Human Development
B.A., Brandeis University
Ed.M., Ed.D., Harvard University
Maurice Page
Instructor in Mathematics
B.A., Cornell University
M.A.T., Harvard University
Christine Redford
Instructor in Mathematics
B.S., Lesley College
M. Ed., Lesley College
Ed.D., Boston University
Judith Richards
Instructor in Education and Mathematics
B.S., Wheelock College
Stefi Rubin
Associate Professor of Education
B.A., University of Pittsburgh
Ph.D., Harvard University
INSTITUTIONAL INFORMATION
Marianne Adams
Instructor in the Arts
B.A., University of Massachusetts
Ivy Schram
Instructor in Mathematics
B.Ed., University of Miami, Florida
M.S., University of Houston
M.S., University of Massachusetts—
Lowell
J.D., Suffolk University
237
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
William Sharp
Instructor in Human Development
B.A., Rider College
M.A., Rowan University
M.A., Boston Graduate School of
Psychoanalysis
Psya.D., Boston Graduate School of
Psychoanalysis Development
INSTITUTIONAL INFORMATION
Susan Shainker
Instructor in Education
B.S., University of Maryland
M.A., Regis College
Keavy Hennessey Smith
Instructor in Social Work
BA, Assumption College
MSW, Wheelock College
Jane Staab
Instructor in Theatre Arts
B.S., Northwestern University
Ann Tobey
Associate Professor of Juvenile Justice and
Youth Advocacy
B.S., University of Alaska, Fairbanks
M.A., Ph.D., State University of New
York at Buffalo
Phillip Weiss
Assistant Professor of Philosophy
B.A., Columbia College
M.A., Ph.D., S.U.N.Y., Stony Brook
Jeffrey Winokur
Instructor in Education
B.S., University of Pennsylvania
M.Ed., Antioch College
Karen Worth
Instructor in Education
B.S., Radcliffe College
M.S. Ed., Bank Street College of
Education
238
PRESIDENT EMERITUS
Dr. Majorie Bakken
DEAN EMERITUS
Dr. Kathleen Kirk Bishop
FACULTY EMERITI
Dr. Eleanor Chasdi
Dr. Leo Collins
Dr. Marie Cotter
Dr. Patricia Hogan
Dr. Susan Harris-Sharples
Dr. Amelia Klein
Dr. Edgar Klugman
Ms. Frances Litman
Dr. Robert Meredith
Ms. Frances Perkins
Dr. Sau Fong Siu
Dr. Rika Spungin
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
d IrectIons
W heelock
c ollege
DIRECTIONS
TOto
WHEELOCK
COLLEGE
227
from the West:
• Take
MassTurnpike
Turnpike(I-90,
(I-90,
•
Take Mass
Toll
Toll
18 for
Road)Road)
east toeast
Exitto18Exit
for Cambridge/
Cambridge/Somerville;
Somerville; Exit 18 is a leftExit
lane 18
exit.is a
left lane exit.
Before crossing the Charles River, turn
• Before
crossing the Charles River,
right onto Soldier’s Field Rd./Storrow
turn
right onto Soldier’s Field Rd./
Dr. headed
east.
Storrow
Dr.
headed east.
•
Follow Storrow
to to
thethe
third
exit exit
• Follow
StorrowDr.
Dr.
third
which isismarked
1 South”.
which
marked“Fenway/Rt.
“Fenway/Rt.
1
• South”.
Stay in the right-hand lane toward
• Stay
in the
laneBoylston
Fenway,
thenright-hand
bear right onto
toward
Fenway,
then bear right
St. headed
west (outbound).
onto Boylston St. headed west
• Stay on Boylston Street until you
(outbound).
come to the first MAJOR Intersection,
• Stay on Boylston Street until
Boylston Street ends in Brookline
you
come to the first MAJOR
Avenue.(D’Angelo Restaurant and The
Intersection,
Boylston Street ends
Landmark
Center
Mall, will be on your
in
Brookline
Avenue.(D’Angelo
right.)
Restaurant and The Landmark
• Center
Continue
straight
Brookline
Ave.
Mall,
willonto
be on
your right.)
and bear slightly
to the
left.Brookline
• Continue
straight
onto
Ave. and bear slightly to the left.
• Get immediately in the right hand
•
•
go through
Getlane,
immediately
in theone
rightmore
handset of
and IMMEDIATELY
bear
lane,lights
go through
one more set of lights
onto Pilgrimbear
Rd.right
Wheelock
andright
IMMEDIATELY
onto
College
is on the right.
Pilgrim
Rd. Wheelock
College is on
•
Go
to
Google
Maps for a map of
the right.
this complicated Intersection.
• NOTE:
Go to Google
Maps
for a the
mapcollege
of this is
Parking
around
complicated
Intersection.
limited; please make arrangements with
a specific
department
for prospective
NOTE:
Parking
around theor,
college
is
students,
limited;
pleasewith
makeadmissions.
arrangements with
a specific department or, for prospective
FROM
students,THE
with NORTH:
admissions.
InstItUtIonal IINFORMATION
nformatIon
INSTITUTIONAL
FROM THE WEST:
• Get on Rte.I-93 South.
• Follow
Rte. I-93 to Exit 26A, Route
from
the north:
28, Leverett Circle/Cambridge.
• •
GetAt
onthe
Rte.I-93
top ofSouth.
the Leverett
• Follow
Rte.
I-93(Tobin
to Exit 26A,
Route
28, will
Connector
Bridge
traffic
Leverett
Circle/Cambridge.
be merging) stay in the left hand
lanetop
and
go through
the tunnel
• At the
of the
Leverett Connector
onto
Storrow
drive.
(Tobin Bridge traffic will be merging)
•
Storrow
Drive
stayFollow
in the left
hand lane
andWestbound
go
PAST
the
Copley
Square
through the tunnel onto StorrowExit,
drive.get
the left hand lane and turn left onto
the Fenway/Kenmore exit which is
Wheelock college 2010-2011
239
INSTITUTIONAL INFORMATION
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
240
marked “Fenway/Rt. 1 South”.
• Immediately get in the right-hand
lane, then bear right onto Boylston
St. headed west (outbound).
• Stay in the right-hand lane
toward Fenway, then bear right
onto Boylston St. headed west
(outbound).
• Stay on Boylston Street until
you come to the first MAJOR
Intersection, Boylston Street ends
in Brookline Avenue.(D’Angelo
Restaurant and The Landmark
Center Mall, will be on your right.)
• Continue straight onto Brookline
Ave. and bear slightly to the left.
• Get immediately in the right hand
lane, go through one more set of
lights and IMMEDIATELY bear
right onto Pilgrim Rd. Wheelock
College is on the right.
• Go to Google Maps for a map of
this complicated Intersection.
NOTE: Parking around the college is
limited; please make arrangements with
a specific department or, for prospective
students, with admissions.
FROM LOGAN AIRPORT:
• Take Mass Turnpike (I-90,
Toll Road) west to Exit 18 for
Cambridge/Somerville.
• Before crossing the Charles River,
turn right onto Soldier’s Field Rd./
Storrow Dr. headed east.
• Follow Storrow Dr. to the third exit
which is marked “Fenway/Rt. 1
South”.
• Stay in the right-hand lane
toward Fenway, then bear right
onto Boylston St. headed west
(outbound).
• Stay on Boylston Street until
you come to the first MAJOR
Intersection, Boylston Street ends
in Brookline Avenue.(D’Angelo
Restaurant and The Landmark
Center Mall, will be on your right.)
• Continue straight onto Brookline
Ave. and bear slightly to the left.
• Get immediately in the right hand
lane, go through one more set of
lights and IMMEDIATELY bear
right onto Pilgrim Rd. Wheelock
College is on the right.
• Go to Google Maps for a map of
this complicated Intersection.
NOTE: Parking around the college is
limited; please make arrangements with
a specific department or, for prospective
students, with admissions.
FROM DOWNTOWN BOSTON:
• Beacon St. West to Brookline Ave.
(at Kenmore Square).
• Get in the left hand lane at the
second set of lights and turn left
onto Brookline Avenue
• Landmarks: the MBTA station
is on your left, Barnes &
Noble Bookstore on the right.
Commonwealth Avenue & Beacon
Street cross each other at this point.
• Continue on Brookline Avenue,
after the third set of lights.
IMMEDIATELY bear right onto
Pilgrim Rd. Wheelock College is on
the right.
NOTE: Parking around the college is
limited; please make arrangements with
a specific department or, for prospective
students, with admissions.
FROM THE SOUTH: RT 24, RT. 95
AND RT. 3:
NOTE: The Route numbering can be
confusing at this stretch of highway.
At various points along this road, Rte.
128 North, Rte. 93 South and Rte. 95
North are the same highway going in the
SAME direction.
• From Rte. 24 and Rte. 95: get on
Rte. 128 North towards Dedham.
Rte. 95 North merges with Rte.
128.
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
INSTITUTIONAL INFORMATION
• From Rte 3, stay to the left, at the
Braintree Split and follow signs to
93 South/Rt. 128 North.
• At Dedham, take Route 1 North,
heading toward Boston.
• Stay on Route 1, also known as
VFW Parkway and the Jamaica
Way, to the intersection with
Brookline Avenue.
• At this intersection, the Jamaica
Way becomes the Riverway.
• Stay on the Riverway until the third
set of lights, where the Riverway
intersects again with Brookline
Avenue.
• Turn right onto Brookline Avenue
and IMMEDIATELY turn right
again onto Pilgrim Road. Wheelock
College is on your right.
NOTE: Parking around the college is
limited; please make arrangements with
a specific department or, for prospective
students, with admissions.
241
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
c amPUs d Irectory
CAMPUS DIRECTORY
InstItUtIonal INFORMATION
InformatIon
INSTITUTIONAL
230
A 132
THET he
RIVERWAY
A 132
riverWAy
Library
library
Disabilities
Services
Disabilities Services
Media
Services
Media Services
Writing Center
Writing Center
B 25 PILGRIM ROAD
B 25 p ilgrim roAd
Classroom Building
classroom
Art
Studios Building
(3rd floor)
Art Studios (basement,
(3rd floor) 1st & 2nd floors)
Classrooms
Classrooms
(basement,
& floors)
2nd floors)
Faculty
Offices
(1st &1st
2nd
Faculty Offices
(1st
& 2nd floors)
Resource
Center
(basement)
Resource Center (basement)
C 37 PILGRIM ROAD
c 37 p ilgrim
Pilgrim
HouseroAd
Director
of Athletics (basement)
Pilgrim house
Director
Residence
Life (basement)
Director of
of Athletics
(basement)
Health
Liaison
(basement)
Director of Residence Life (basement)
Residence
Halls(basement)
(2nd & 3rd floors)
Health Liaison
Residence Halls (2nd & 3rd floors)
D 37 PILGRIM ROAD
Student Center
Commuter Center
Clubs, Organizations & House Council
Director of Student Activities
Wheelock college 2010-2011
242
d Riverway
37 p ilgrimCafe
roAd
Student Government Association
Student
center
Student
Services
Commuter Center
Clubs, Organizations & House Council
EDirector
180 THE
RIVERWAY
of Student
Activities
Riverway
CafeBuilding
Activities
Student
Government
Association
Academic
Advising
& Assistance (1st
Student
Services
floor, Activities West “ACW”)
Auditorium and Foyer
Center for Career Development (3rd
e 180 T he riverWAy
floor, ACW)
Classrooms
(2nd & 3rd floors, Activities
Activities
Building
East “ACE”;
2nd&floor,
ACW)
Academic
Advising
Assistance
(1st floor,
School West
of Arts
and Sciences (2nd floor,
Activities
“ACW”)
Auditorium
ACE) and Foyer
Center
for Career
Development
Facilities
& Security
Office(3rd floor,
ACW)
(underground garage)
Classrooms
(2nd & (2nd
3rd floors,
Faculty Offices
floor,Activities
ACW &
East
“ACE”; 2nd floor, ACW)
ACE)
School
of Arts
and Sciences
(2nd floor,
Financial
Services
(3rd floor,
ACW)
ACE)
Financial Aid (1st floor, ACW)
Facilities
& Resources
Security Office
Human
(3rd(underground
floor, ACW)
garage)
Information Technology (3rd floor,
Faculty Offices (2nd floor, ACW & ACE)
ACW)
Financial Services (3rd floor, ACW)
Larsen Alumni Room & Terrace (1st
Financial Aid (1st floor, ACW)
floor, ACE)
Marketing and Communications (3rd
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
floor, ACE)
Music Listening Room (lower level)
Academic Records and Registration (1st
floor, ACW)
Service Center (underground garage)
School of Social Work and Family
Studies (1st floor, ACW)
Towne Art Gallery (lower level)
Wheelock Family Theatre (1st floor)
K 295 KENT STREET
Wheelock College President’s House
L 116 COLCHESTER STREET
Colchester House
Residence Hall
M 43 HAWES STREET
Administration Building
Admissions (1st floor)
Enrollment Management (1st floor)
President (3rd floor)
Vice President for Academic Affairs (2nd
floor)
Vice President for Administration and
Student Services (3rd floor)
Vice President for Marketing and
Communications (3rd floor)
Vice President for Student Success (2nd
floor)
G 210 THE RIVERWAY
Peabody Hall
Dining Hall (basement)
Residence Hall (1st-5th floors)
Security Desk (lobby)
H 162 THE RIVERWAY
N
William J. Holmes Sports and Fitness
Center at Simmons College
INSTITUTIONAL INFORMATION
Brookline Campus
Cafe (ground floor)
Center for International Education
(ground & 1st floors)
Leadership and Innovation
Classrooms (ground floor, 1st & 2nd
floors)
School of Education and Child Life
Faculty Offices (ground floor & 1st floor)
Institutional Advancement (2nd floor)
President’s Office
Student Study (1st floor)
National and Regional Programs
ASPIRE Center for Scholarship and
Research
F 200 THE RIVERWAY
Riverway House
Counseling Center
Faculty Offices (basement)
Residence Halls (1st-3rd floors)
I 154 THE RIVERWAY
Longwood House
Residence Halls (1st, 2nd & 3rd floors)
Faculty Offices (basement, enter by
tunnel)
J 150 THE RIVERWAY
Campus Center and Student Residence
243
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
INDEX
A
Academic Calendar 2011–2011
5
Academic Degree Programs
21
Academic Experience at Wheelock
17
Academic Guiding Principles
14
Academic Policies, Graduate
117
Academic Policies, Undergraduate
49
Accreditation17
Admissions, Graduate108
American Studies157
Arts160
Autism160
B
INDEX
Birth-5 Specialist, Pre-School-Kindergarten
77
Board and Corporation Officers
224
Board of Trustees224
C
Campus11
Campus Directory242
Center for International Education,
Leadership, and Innovation
14
Center for Scholarship and Research
15
Child Life and Family Centered Care
125
Child Life and Family Studies
126
Colleges of the Fenway
11
Communications65
Community-Based Human Services
71
D
Departments and Undergraduate Programs
63
Directions239
Documentation Studio16
Dual Degree Program72
E
Early Childhood Education
Early Childhood Education Major
Elementary and Special Education
244
75
75
104
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
F
Faculty233
Federal Financial Aid Funds
48
Financial Information, Graduate
112
G
General Education Program at Wheelock College 53
Grading Policy50, 118
Graduate Academic Policies
117
GRADUATE ADMISSIONS108
Graduate Programs131
Graduate Study at Wheelock College
131
H
History9
Humanities85
Juvenile Justice and Youth Advocacy
88
L
INDEX
J
Language and Literacy141
Leadership and Policy144
Licensure and Certification Information
58, 125
Life or Physical Science Minor
95
M
Mathematics and Science90
Mathematics Minor95
MTEL Policy128
N
National Center for Race Amity
16
Offices of the Administration
Online and Off-Campus Learning
227
12
O
245
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
P
Portrait of the Present
Preschool-Grade 2 Specialist
Psychology and Human Development
10
75
96
S
Social Work100, 147
Special Education111, 137
T
Teacher Licensure110
Tuition and Fees40
Tuition, Graduate112
INDEX
U
Undergraduate Academic Policies
49
Undergraduate Admissions37
Undergraduate Degree Programs
21
Undergraduate Financial Aid
44
Undergraduate Programs37
Undergraduate Study at Wheelock College
37
Understanding Autism Minor
105
W
Wheelock and Beyond12
246
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
247
WHEELOCK COLLEGE 2011–2012
248

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