Amici populi Romani - Universidad Autónoma de Madrid

Transcripción

Amici populi Romani - Universidad Autónoma de Madrid
Amici Populi Romani
Prosopographie der auswärtigen Freunde Roms
Prosopography of the Foreign Friends of Rome
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
entworfen und herausgegeben von / designed and edited by
Altay Coskun
in Zusammenarbeit mit / in cooperation with
Sheila L. Ager (Waterloo)
Alexandru Avram (Lemans)
Konstantin Boshnakov (Toronto)
Luis Ballesteros Pastor (Sevilla)
Kathrin Christmann (Marienthal/Pfalz)
Victor Cojocaru (Iasi)
Madalina Dana (Paris)
Dorit Engster (Göttingen)
David Engels (Brüssel)
Johannes Engels (Köln)
Margherita Facella (Pisa)
Andrew Faulkner (Waterloo)
Oleg Gabelko (Moskau)
Heinz Heinen (Trier)
Wassiliki Kalfoglu-Kaloterakis (Thessaloniki)
John Lamberty (Luxemburg)
Alexandrina-Victoria Litu-Girboviceanu (Bukarest)
Andreas Luther (Kiel)
Stefan Pfeiffer (Chemnitz)
Henrik Prantl (Trier)
Ligia Ruscu (Klausenburg-Cluj)
Eduardo Sánchez Moreno (Madrid)
Andrea Raggi (Pisa)
Federico Santangelo (Newcastle)
Wolfgang Spickermann (Erfurt)
Simon Thijs (Trier)
Manuel Tröster (Wien)
Rik van Wijlick (Durham)
Julia Wilker (Berlin)
Jürgen Zeidler (Trier)
Quicklinks: Liste der Romfreunde / List of Friends of the Romans – Inhaltsverzeichnis / TOC
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Begonnen im Umfeld des Projekts A 2
Roms auswärtige Freunde
im Rahmen des Sonderforschungsbereichs (SFB) 600
Fremdheit und Armut
an der Universität Trier
(2004 – 2008)
Fortgeführt am
Waterloo Institute for Hellenistic Studies (WIHS)
& im Department of Classical Studies
University of Waterloo, Ontario
(seit 2009)
Initiated in the context of the research project A 2
The Foreign Friends of Rome
Within the Collaborate Research Center
Strangers and Poor People (SFB 600)
at the University of Trier
(2004 – 2008)
Continued at the
Waterloo Institute for Hellenistic Studies (WIHS)
& in the Department of Classical Studies
at the University of Waterloo, Ontario
(since 2009)
Die drei Münzabbildungen (S. 1) repräsentieren das Treueverhältnis zwischen Rom und auswärtigen
Mächten (der Stadt Lokroi, 3. Jh. v.Chr.; des Numiderkönigs Bocchus, 1. Jh. v.Chr.; des
bosporanischen Königs Tib. Iulius Rheskuporis II., 1. Jh. n.Chr.). Quellennachweise und
Kurzkommentare sind auf der Website des Projekts Roms auswärtige Freunde zusammengestellt.
The three coin illustrations of the front page represent the fides relation between Rome and foreign
powers (the city of Lokroi, 3rd century BC; Bocchus, King of Numidia, 1st cent. BC; Tib. Iulius
Rheskuporis II, King of the Bosporos, AD 1st cent.). Source references and short commentaries are to
be found on the website of the project The Foreign Friends of Rome.
Redaktion von APRRE 001 (Trier, bis Anfang Oktober 2004): Altay Coskun/Henrik Prantl
Redaktion von APRRE 002 (Trier, bis Anfang Juli 2007): Altay Coskun/Manuel Tröster
Redaktion von APR 01 (Trier, Oktober 2007): Altay Coskun
Redaktion von APR 02 (Trier, Sommer 2008): Altay Coskun
Editing of APR 03 (Waterloo, On., Jan.-April 2010): Altay Coskun
Editing of APR 04 (Waterloo, On., Dec. 2011-April 2012): Altay Coskun/Ryan Walsh
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
2
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Inhaltsübersicht
(for an English version, scroll down the page)
0. Vorworte und empfohlene Zitation
1. Listen der Romfreunde
1.1 Liste namentlich erfasster Romfreunde
Quicklinks: B C D E F G H I/J K L M N O P Q R S T U/V/W X Z
1.2 Liste anonymer Romfreunde
2. Prosopographie der Romfreunde
2.1 Namentlich erfasste Romfreunde
Quicklinks: B C D E F G H I/J K L M N O P Q R S T U/V/W X Z
2.2 Anonyme Romfreunde
3. Richtlinien für Autoren
3.1 Aufbau eines Lemmas
3.2 Weitere Richtlinien
4. Quicklinks zu den Stammbäumen in GTHW
Table of Contents
(eine deutsche Version befindet sich weiter oben auf dieser Seite)
0. Prefaces and Recommended Citations
1. Lists of the Friends of the Romans
1.1 List of the Friends of the Romans Known by Name
Quicklinks: B C D E F G H I/J K L M N O P Q R S T U/V/W X Z
1.2 List of Anonymous Friends of the Romans
2. Prosopography of the Friends of the Romans
2.1 Friends of the Romans Known by Name
Quicklinks: B C D E F G H I/J K L M N O P Q R S T U/V/W X Z
2.2 Anonymous Friends of the Romans
3. Guidelines for Authors
3.1 Composition of an Entry
3.2 Further Guidelines
4. Quicklinks to the Stemmata in GTHW
r/30.04.12
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
3
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
0. Vorworte und empfohlene Zitation
Prefaces and Recommended Citation
Preface to APR 04 (2012)
Besides 32 new prosopographical entries, the major change of this latest version of APR is
that all genealogical tables have been taken out of this document and re-assembled in the new
database Genealogical Tables of the Hellenistic World (GTHW). Both databases are
interlinked and are hoped to be much more user-friendly than the predecessor. I would like to
thank all of my colleagues who have contributed to APR this time. I am particularly grateful
to my research assistants Ryan Walsh and Bashar Jabbur (Waterloo) as well as Julia Marx
(Trier) for their support.
April 2012, Waterloo ON
AC
Preface to APR 03 (2010)
The database Amici Populi Romani (APR) has now been moved to the website of the
Waterloo Institute for Hellenistic Studies (WIHS). The release of the update APR 03 (nearly)
coincides with the inauguration of the Institute within the University of Waterloo (UW) in
March 2010. Many other research tools such as the Bibliography of the Hellenistic World
(BibHW) and a peer-reviewed online journal on Hellenistic Studies are to follow in the near
future. These will be paired with research activities such as a conference panel at the Annual
Meeting of the Classical Association of Canadian (Quebec, May 2010) and the Workshop
Opportunities for Interdisciplinarity in Hellenistic Scholarship (Waterloo, Dec. 2010).
The database originates in the research project The Foreign Friends of Rome (SFB 600-A2 –
click here for a brief description in German and English). This formed part of the Collaborate
Research Centre 600 Strangers and Poor People. Modes of Inclusion and Exclusion from
Antiquity to the Present Day (SFB 600). The Centre is based at the University of Trier,
Germany, and has been receiving funding from the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG)
since 2002. I wish to express my gratitude to all of these institutions for the excellent
conditions my research enjoyed at Trier over those past years. In particular, I acknowledge the
kind permission to move the database to its new virtual home at WIHS. Most of all, however,
I am indebted to the director of the project The Foreign Friends of Rome: Heinz Heinen not
only supported my studies on Roman foreign policy (2002 to 2008), but also guided me
through several other areas of Ancient History and Academia with all his gentleness,
knowledge, and wisdom ever since 1992.
The project The Foreign Friends of Rome initiated dozens of case studies and systematic
analyses of the ‘friendly’ relations between the Roman state or Roman individuals on the one
side and their diplomatic partners throughout the Mediterranean World and even beyond these
boundaries on the other. I am happy to see that its impact has been acknowledged not only by
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
4
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
several favourable reviewers, but also in the most recent handbook on ancient foreign
relations (Ernst Baltrusch: Außenpolitik, Bünde und Reichsbildung in der Antike, Munich
2008, see index). As the five most important publications, I refer the reader to the following
titles (a more complete list, which also includes several abstracts, is available here):
Altay Coskun (ed.): Roms auswärtige Freunde in der späten Republik und im frühen Prinzipat, in
Zusammenarbeit mit Heinz Heinen und Manuel Tröster, Göttingen 2005 (=Göttinger Forum
für Altertumswissenschaft, Beiheft 19).
Altay Coskun (ed.): Freundschaft und Gefolgschaft in den auswärtigen Beziehungen der Römer
(2. Jh. v.Chr. – 1. Jh. n.Chr.), Frankfurt/M.: Peter Lang Verlag, 2008 (=Inklusion/Exklusion.
Studien zu Fremdheit und Armut von der Antike bis zur Gegenwart, vol. 9).
Altay Coskun/Heinz Heinen/Stefan Pfeiffer (eds.): Repräsentation von Identität und Zugehörigkeit
im Osten der griechisch-römischen Welt, Frankfurt/M.: Peter Lang Verlag, 2009 (2010)
(=Inklusion/Exklusion. Studien zu Fremdheit und Armut von der Antike bis zur Gegenwart,
vol. 14).
Heinz Heinen: Kleopatra-Studien. Gesammelte Schriften zur ausgehenden Ptolemäerzeit,
Konstanz: Universitätsverlag Konstanz, 2009 (=Xenia 49).
Heinz Heinen: Antike am Rande der Steppe. Der nördliche Schwarzmeerraum als
Forschungsaufgabe. Abhandlung der Mainzer Akademie der Wissenschaften und Literatur,
Geistes- und sozialwissenschaftliche Klasse, Stuttgart 2006.
Thanks to the continuing support of a growing network of authors, the present database can
now be added with even more confidence to the foregoing list of substantial reference tools in
the field of Roman foreign relations. The number of prosopographical entries is now 205, and
that of originally designed genealogical tables has risen to 4 after the addition of Kommagene
and Osrhoene. Another new feature is the list of selected genealogical tables available
elsewhere online or in print. Moreover, the overall structure of the document has been
improved and several hyperlinks added, so that APR now appears in a more user-friendly
shape. A more sophisticated user interface for convenient online research is currently in
preparation. It is to be expected that the next issue early in 2011 will see further formal and
technical improvements. In particular, I intend to enhance search functions and consistency,
whereby the latter shall no longer be at the cost of unusual naming practices. These have up
until now seemed to be necessary to ensure a maximum of searchability within a simple word
document; e.g., where texts in German read Kommagene or Pompeius, English contributions
do the same in APR 03, but should have Commagene and Pompey instead. Another concern
will be the inconsistencies created by the old, new, and latest rules of German orthography (a
nightmare for editors of German texts …).
Given the variety of backgrounds of persons included into APR, it is worthwhile explaining
the criteria for their selection in some more detail than I did in the preface to APR 01.
Targeted are all extra-Italian individuals that made friends with the Roman state (as
represented by the senate, the assembly of the people, a magistrate, or pro-magistrate) or less
formally with a Roman aristocrat. This automatically entails a concentration on the period
from the Hannibalic War (218-201 BC) down to the Flavian period (AD 69-96). But these are
to be considered no more than ‘soft’ limits. At their one end, e.g., the kings of Egypt have
been included as far back as Ptolemy II Philadelphos, who entered into friendly relations with
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
5
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Rome in 273 BC; at the other end, some rulers remained – consistently or at least occasionally
– on friendly terms with Rome right into the 3rd century AD, such as the Abgars of Osrhoene.
But it is the Bosporan kings that boast the longest continuity of amicitia relations with Rome:
it is attested as late as the early 5th century AD. However, apart from such exceptions, the
Alamanic and Gothic incursions, coupled with the ascension of the Sasanid dynasty in Parthia
during the 3rd century, mark the beginning(s) of a new era. These events are normally taken as
lower limits of APR.
The change between indirect and direct rule, i.e. the imposition of a provincial regime, is
relevant only in so far as it normally ends a series of reges amici populi Romani or more petty
dynasts that enjoyed at least formal autonomy. But as their descendants frequently continued
to play prominent roles in local governments and beyond, as can be richly exemplified with
the Herodians, these do continue to be of interest to APR. Empire-wide friendship relations
still permeated the provinces, and this often to an increasing extent. These inter-personal
relations strongly contributed to the political, social, and ultimately also legal inclusion of the
peripheries into the Roman state. More complicated is the issue of citizenship. Roman
franchise started spreading among the aristocrats of newly established provinces, even though
at very different paces. APR would normally take account of only the first generation of such
cives novi. But this restriction will be overridden wherever the son or grandson of a new
citizen effectively held a dynastic, if not royal, position. This seems to be a pragmatic
circumscription also in order to avoid rivalling the Prosopographia Imperii Romani (PIR).
Such an effort would by far exceed the resources of the APR network, which is currently
without funding.
This is why I wish to express even more strongly my gratitude to all voluntary contributors to
the current issue of APR. They are, in alphabetical order, Luis Ballesteros Pastor, Victor
Cojocaru, David Engels, Dorit Engster, Margherita Facella, Wassiliki Kalfoglu-Kaloterakis,
Andreas Luther, Henrik Prantl, Eduardo Sánchez Moreno, Federico Santangelo, Julia Wilker,
and Jürgen Zeidler. Over the last year, I have also been receiving manifold support by
Dorothea Coskun, Louise Frost, April Ross, and Brigitte Schneebeli. This has directly or
indirectly benefited APR 03, too, and I feel cordially indebted to them as well.
Waterloo, Ontario, im April 2010
AC
Recommended Citation of APR in Publications in English:
Altay Coskun (ed.): Amici Populi Romani (APR 03). Prosopography of the Foreign Friends of Rome,
Waterloo, On. 2010. URL: http://www.apr.uwaterloo.ca.
Luis Ballesteros Pastor: Ariarathes IV. Eusebes, King of Cappadocia, in: Amici Populi Romani (APR
03), ed. by Altay Coskun, Waterloo, On. 2010. URL: http://www.apr.uwaterloo.ca.
David Engels: Antiochos IV. Epiphanes, König des Seleukidenreichs, in: Amici Populi Romani (APR
03), Waterloo, On. 2010. URL: http://www.apr.uwaterloo.ca.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
6
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Empfohlene Zitation von APR in deutschsprachigen Publikationen:
Altay Coskun (Hg.): Amici Populi Romani (APR 03). Prosopographie der auswärtigen Freunde der
Römer, Waterloo, On. 2010. URL: http://www.apr.uwaterloo.ca.
Luis Ballesteros Pastor: Ariarathes IV. Eusebes, King of Cappadocia, in: Amici Populi Romani (APR
03), hg. von Altay Coskun, Waterloo, On. 2010. URL: http://www.apr.uwaterloo.ca.
David Engels: Antiochos IV. Epiphanes, König des Seleukidenreichs, in: Amici Populi Romani (APR
03), hg. von Altay Coskun, Waterloo, On. 2010. URL: http://www.apr.uwaterloo.ca.
Vorwort zu APR 01 (2007)
Die vorliegende Datenbank ist ein Produkt des Projekts Roms auswärtige Freunde, das im Fach Alte
Geschichte an der Universität Trier unter der Leitung von Heinz Heinen durchgeführt wird. Die
Forschungsaufgabe besteht in der Untersuchung der persönlichen Nahverhältnisse zwischen
römischen Aristokraten und den außeritalischen Eliten diesseits und jenseits der Reichsgrenzen. Unser
Interesse gilt den freundschaftlichen Semantiken, personalen Netzwerken und wechselseitigen
Auswirkungen dieser Beziehungen einerseits auf den Staat und die Gesellschaft der Römer sowie
andererseits auf die abhängigen oder formal autonomen Territorien der Peripherie.
Die vorliegende Datenbank dient dazu, das in Aufsätzen und Qualifikationsarbeiten verstreute
prosopographische Material zentral zusammenzuführen und der Öffentlichkeit ohne großen Aufwand
zur Verfügung zu stellen. Auch die bisher wichtigste Projektpublikation, der Sammelband ‘Roms
auswärtige Freunde in der späten Republik und im frühen Prinzipat’ (2005), hat vielfachen
Niederschlag in den hier versammelten Artikeln gefunden. Zugleich soll APR aber auch ein nützliches
Instrument für künftige Arbeiten bilden und sukzessive vervollständigt bzw. aktualisiert werden. Dies
ist nur durch die ehrenamtliche Mitwirkung zahlreicher Kolleginnen und Kollegen möglich, die
namentlich auf dem Deckblatt aufgeführt sind.
Ein zeitlicher Schwerpunkt des genannten Projekts liegt im Anschluß an Ernst Badians Foreign
Clientelae (1958) in der Phase der ausgehenden Römischen Republik, beginnend mit dem Zeitalter
Sullas und endend mit der Errichtung des Prinzipats durch den jungen Caesar Augustus im Jahr 27
v.Chr. Dieser zeitliche Rahmen war ursprünglich auch für die Projekt-Datenbank vorgesehen, wie ihr
früherer Name Amici Populi Romani Reipublicae Exeuntis (APRRE) unschwer zu erkennen gab. Indes
haben regionale Vertiefungen in der zweiten Projektphase ein immer größeres Gewicht gewonnen:
Nachdem die Arbeiten zur iberischen Halbinsel und Kleinasien schon in der ersten Projektphase
vielfältigen Niederschlag gefunden haben, wurde der Fokus auf Anatolien, besonders auf Galatien,
weiter verfolgt und auf angrenzende Gebiete ausgedehnt. Ohnehin sind auch die Interessen unserer
Kooperationspartner eher räumlich als zeitlich definiert. Bislang betreffen sie besonders Pontos, Judäa,
Ägypten, demnächst z.B. auch Thrakien, Skythien und Asia.
Folglich erschien es auch in dieser Hinsicht sinnvoll, die chronologische Beschränkung aufzugeben
und den Titel schlicht in Amici Populi Romani (APR) umzubenennen. Die aktuelle Version umfaßt
Beiträge zu Persönlichkeiten vom 3. Jh. v. bis 1. Jh. n.Chr., wenn auch das Schwergewicht der
Lemmata ins 1. Jh. v.Chr. fällt. Dies entspricht nicht nur der Konzentration der literarischen Quellen,
sondern auch der herausragenden Bedeutung des Phänomens der Romfreundschaft im Zeitalter der
Bürgerkriege sowie der zunehmenden politischen Inklusion der Romfreunde im Übergang von der
Republik zum augusteischen Prinzipat.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
7
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Gegenüber den gründlich revidierten 53 Einträgen von APRRE 001 (Oktober 2004) zählt APRRE 002
(Juli 2007) bzw. APR 01 (Oktober 2007) mittlerweile 108 Lemmata, wobei der Großteil der
Ergänzungen Kleinasien und der Levante zuzuordnen ist. Zahlreiche weitere Beiträge sind für APR 02
zugesagt, mit deren Veröffentlichung im Verlauf des Jahres 2008 zu rechnen ist.
Folgende Zitation der Einzelbeiträge sei empfohlen: Manuel Tröster: Zarbienos, König von Gordyene,
in: APR 01, Trier 2007 (http://www.sfb600.uni-trier.de/filebase/A2/APR_01.doc).
Für die ‘Romfreunde’ des Westens wird in der Regel die lateinische Schreibweise, für diejenigen des
Ostens (auch in englischsprachigen Beiträgen) die griechische in lateinischer Transliteration
verwendet. Römische Neubürger erscheinen, sofern bekannt oder erschließbar, unter ihrem
vorrömischen Namen, in der Regel also unter ihrem Cognomen. Jahreszahlen verstehen sich ‘vor
Christus’, wenn nicht anders vermerkt. Weitere Formalia sind auf den folgenden Seiten
zusammengestellt.
Roms auswärtige Freunde bildet das Teilprojekt A 2 des Trierer Sonderforschungsbereichs Fremdheit
und Armut. Inklusions- und Exklusionsformen von der Antike bis zur Gegenwart (SFB 600), welcher
von der DFG nach 2002-4 nunmehr in der zweiten Phase (2005-8) gefördert wird.
Allen Beitragenden und Unterstützern sei an dieser Stelle herzlich gedankt.
Trier, im Oktober 2007 AC
Vorwort zum Update APR 02
Dank der Unterstützung zum Teil neu hinzugewonnener Autoren ist die Zahl der prosopographischen
Beiträge auf 160 angestiegen. Erstmals wurden zudem zwei genealogische Stammbäume hinzugefügt,
weitere sollen folgen.
Die Benutzer der Datenbank sind dazu eingeladen, den Autoren oder auch dem Herausgeber relevante
(bisher übersehene oder auch neu entdeckte) Quellen mitzuteilen und gegebenenfalls auch
Verbesserungsvorschläge zu unterbreiten. Zu diesem Zweck sind die auf der Titelseite genannten
Namen mit einem Email-Link unterlegt.
Die Betreuung der Datenbank werde ich auch nach dem Auslaufen der 2. Förderperiode des Trierer
Projekts Roms auswärtige Freunde (SFB 600-A 2) voraussichtlich zunächst von der University of
Exeter (Jan.-Juni 2009) und dann von der University of Waterloo/On. aus weiterführen. Für das
Update APR 03, das bis Ende 2009 erscheinen soll, sind nicht nur zahlreiche neue Einträge, sondern
auch eine benutzerfreundliche Oberfläche zu erwarten.
Trier, im September 2008
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
AC
8
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
1. Liste der Romfreunde
Lists of the Friends of the Romans
Die Liste ist weiterhin zu vervollständigen.
1.1 Liste namentlich erfasster Romfreunde
List of the Friends of the Romans Known by Name
Quicklinks: B C D E F G H I/J K L M N O P Q R S T U/V/W X Z
Ababos, Sohn des Kallisthenes, aus Olbia (VC)
Abgar (I.), osrhoenischer Phylarch zur Zeit des Crassus [Var. Abgar (I.) Piqā (?) ‚der
Stumme‘, Abgar (II.) Ariamnes (?), Augaros, Mazaras, Mazzarus] (AL)
Abgar (V.) Ukkāmā ‚der Schwarze‘, König von Osrhoene [Var. Abgaros, Acbarus] (AL)
Abgar (VII.), Sohn des Izates, König von Osrhoene [Var. Augaros] (AL)
Abgar (IX.) = L. Aelius Aurelius Septimius Abgarus, König von Osrhoene [Var.
Abgaros; Abgar, Sohn des Mannos] (AL)
Abgar (X.) Severus = Severus Abgarus, König von Osrhoene [Var. Abgaros] (AL)
Abgar (XI.) = Aelius Septimius Abgarus, König von Osrhoene [Var. Abgaros, Abgar
Prahates (?)] (AL)
Abgar ‚der Schöne‘(?), König von Osrhoene [Var. Abgar ‚der Heilige‘ (?); Augaros]
(AL)
Abluporis = Abrupolis (II?), King (?) of the Sapaioi / Sapaeans (ca. 80 BC) (i.V. KB)
Abrupolis, King of the Thracian Sapaioi / Sapaeans (KB)
Acco, Führer der Senonen
Adherbal, numidischer König
Adiatorix, Dynast von Herakleia Pontike (AC)
Adobogiona (I.), Schwester des Brogitaros Philorhomaios [Var. Abadogiona] (AC)
Adobogiona (II.), Tochter des Deiotaros Philorhomaios (AC)
Adobogiona (III.), Königin von Prusias (AC)
Agrippa I. Philorhomaios Philokaisar, König von Judäa = Iulius Agrippa (JW)
Agrippa II. Philorhomaios Philokaisar, König von Chalkis u.a. = M. Iulius Agrippa
(JW)
L. Iulius Agrippa, Patron von Apameia am Orontes unter Trajan mit königlichen Ehren
(i.V. AC)
Aitidemos von Tralleis
Akornion, Sohn des Dionysios, aus Dionysopolis (LR)
Alchaudonios, König der Rhambäer [Var. Alchaidamnos] (MT)
Alexandra Salome, Königin von Judäa (JW)
Alexandra (die Jüngere) von Judäa (i.V. JW)
Alexandros I., König von Emesa (MT)
Alexandros Iannaios, König von Judäa (i.V. JW)
Alexandros, Sohn des Königs Aristobulos’ II. von Judäa (i.V. JW)
Alexandros, Sohn des Königs Herodes I., Kronprinz von Judäa
Alexandros von Palmyra
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
9
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Alexandros I. Balas, König des Seleukidenreichs (DaE)
Alexandros II. (Zabinas), Usurpator im Seleukidenreich [Var. Alexander Zabinaeus]
(i.V. DaE)
Amatokos (i.V. FS)
Ambiorix, König der Eburonen
Ammonios, Stellvertreter Ptolemaios’ XII. [Var. Hammonios] (KC)
Amyntas (I.), König und Tetrarch von Galatien (AC)
Amyntas (II.), galatischer Tetrarch (AC)
Anaxidamos (i.V. FS)
Andriskos, Thronprätendent in Makedonien [Var. Pseudophilippos] (i.V. DE)
Antigonos, Vertrauter Deiotaros’ (I.) (AC)
Antigonos, Sohn des Königs Aristobulos’ II. von Judäa: s. Matthatias Antigonos
Antipas, s. Herodes Antipas
Antiochos III. Megas, König des Seleukidenreichs (DaE)
Antiochos IV. Epiphanes, König des Seleukidenreichs [Var. Mithridates] (DaE)
Antiochos V. Eupator, König des Seleukidenreichs (DaE)
Antiochos VI. Epiphanes Dionysos, König des Seleukidenreichs [Var. Alexandros] (DaE)
Antiochos VII. Megas Soter Euergetes Kallinikos (Sidetes), König des Seleukidenreichs
(DaE)
Antiochos VIII. Epiphanes Philometor Kallinikos (Grypos), König des Seleukidenreichs
(DaE)
Antiochos IX. Philopator (Kyzikenos), König des Seleukidenreichs (DaE)
Antiochos X. Eusebes Philopator, König des Seleukidenreichs (i.V. DaE)
Antiochos XI. Epiphanes Philadelphos, König des Seleukidenreichs (i.V. DaE)
Antiochos XII. Dionysos, König des Seleukidenreichs (i.V. DaE)
Antiochos XIII. Philadelphos (Asiatikos), König des Seleukidenreichs (i.V. DaE)
Antiochos I. Theos Dikaios Epiphanes Philorhomaios Philhellen, König von Kommagene
(MT)
Antiochos II., König (?) von Kommagene (MT)
Antiochos III., König von Kommagene (i.V. MF)
Antiochos IV., König von Kommagene (i.V. MF)
Antiochos von Askalon (AF)
Antipatros von Derbe
Antipatros von Idumäa, Stratege von Judäa (JW)
Antipatros, Sohn des Königs Herodes I., Kronprinz von Judäa (i.V. JW)
Antonia Tryphaina, Königin von Pontos (VC)
Apellikon of Teos (i.V. FS)
Apollonios von Metropolis
Apollonios Molon (i.V. FS)
Apollonis (i.V. FS)
Aponius aus Lusitanien = Q. Aponius (JL)
Archelaos (general of Mithridates VI. of Pontus) (i.V. FS)
Archelaos, Priester von Komana Pontike und König von Ägypten (KC)
Archelaos (I.) Sisines (?) Philopatris, König von Kappadokien (MT)
Archelaos (II.), König im Rauhen Kilikien
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
10
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Archelaos von Judäa: s. Herodes Archelaos
Archias aus Antiocheia = A. Licinius Archias (i.V. AC)
Aretas III. Philhellen, König der Nabatäer [Var. Haretat] (i.V. AL)
Aretas IV., König der Nabatäer [Var. Haretat] (RvW)
Ariarathes IV Eusebes, King of Kappadokia [Var. Ariamenes, Ariaratus] (LBP)
Ariarathes V Eusebes Philopator, King of Kappadokia [Var. Mithridates] (LBP)
Ariarathes VI Epiphanes Philopator, King of Kappadokia [Var. Ariarathes Theos (?)
Philopator] (LBP)
Ariarathes VII Philometor, King of Kappadokia (LBP)
Ariarathes VIII Epiphanes Eusebes, King of Kappadokia (LBP)
Ariarathes IX. Eusebes Philopator, König von Kappadokien (MT)
Ariarathes X. Eusebes Philadelphos, König von Kappadokien (MT)
Ariobarzanes I. Philorhomaios, König von Kappadokien (MT)
Ariobarzanes II. Philopator, König von Kappadokien (MT)
Ariobarzanes III. Eusebes Philorhomaios, König von Kappadokien (MT)
Ariobarzanes (I.), König von Media-Atropatene (i.V. AL)
Ariobarzanes (II.), König von Media-Atropatene und Armenien (i.V. AL)
Ariovistus, König der Sueben (i.V. WS)
Aristainos von Dyme
Aristarchos, Dynast von Kolchis (AC)
Aristion of Athens (i.V. FS)
Aristion of Massilia (i.V. FS)
Aristobulos, König von Kleinarmenien bzw. von Chalkis (ad Belum?) = Iulius
Aristobulus (JW)
Aristobulos I., König von Judäa (i.V. JW)
Aristobulos II., König von Judäa (JW)
Aristobulos (III.), Sohn Herodes’ I., Kronprinz von Judäa (i.V. JW)
Aristobulos (IV.), Bruder Agrippas I. = Iulius Aristobulus (JW)
Ariston von Alexandreia
Aristonikos: s. Eumenes (III.) von Pergamon
Aristos von Askalon (AF)
Arminius, Dynast der Cherusker (i.V. WS)
Arsakes I., König von Armenien
Arsakes II., König von Armenien (i.V. DE)
Arsakes III., König von Armenien (i.V. DE)
Arsakes IV., König von Armenien (i.V. DE)
Arsakes, Usurper in Pontos (i.V. LBP)
Artabanos II., König des Partherreichs (i.V. AL)
Artabanos (III.), Usurpator im Partherreich (i.V. AL)
Artabanos IV., König des Partherreichs (i.V. AL)
Artavasdes I., König von Armenien (HP)
Artavasdes II., König von Armenien (HP)
Artavasdes III., König von Armenien (HP)
Artavasdes (II.), König von Media Atropatene und später von Kleinarmenien (HP)
Artaxias I., König von Armenien (HP)
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
11
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Artaxias II., König von Armenien (HP)
Artemidoros von Aphrodisias
Artemidoros von Knidos
Arthetauros, illyrischer König
Asandros, King of the Bosporos [Var. Asandrochos?] (LBP)
Ascalis, König von Mauretanien
Asklepiades of Klazomenai (AR)
Asklepiades of Priene (i.V. FS)
Aspurgos Philorhomaios, König des thrakischen Bosporos
Astolpas, Dynast of Lusitania (i.V. ESM)
Ateporix, Dynast der Karanitis [Var. Teporix] (AC)
Athambelos aus Spasinu Charax (AL)
Athenodoros (Kananites / Calvus) von Tarsos (JE)
Athenodoros (Kordyllion) von Tarsos (JE)
Athenopolis of Priene (i.V. FS)
Attalos I. Soter, König von Pergamon (i.V. WKK)
Attalos II. Philadelphos, König von Pergamon
Attalos III. Philometor Euergetes, König von Pergamon (WKK)
Attalos, Dynast von Paphlagonien (AC)
Azizos, Phylarch der Araber z.Z. des Pompeius
Azizos, König von Emesa (+ 54 n.Chr.)
B
Baebius aus Hasta (JL)
Balbus (I.) aus Gades = L. Cornelius Balbus (JL)
Balbus (II.) aus Gades = L. Cornelius L. f. Balbus, cos. suff. 40 (JL)
Balbus (III.) aus Gades = P. Cornelius Balbus (JL)
Balbus (IV.) aus Gades = L. Cornelius P. f. Balbus, cos. suff. 32 (JL)
Barsemias, König von Hatra [Var. Abdsamya] (i.V. AL)
Battakes (I.), Priester von Pergamon im Jahr 189 v.Chr. (i.V. AC)
Battakes (II.), Priester von Pergamon im Jahr 102 v.Chr. (i.V. AC)
Berenike IV. Thea, Königin von Ägypten (KC)
Berenike die Ältere, Ehefrau des judäischen Prinzen Aristobulos = Iulia Berenike (JW)
Berenike die Jüngere von Judäa, Tochter Agrippas I. = Iulia Berenike (JW)
Blesamios, Vertrauter Deiotaros’ (I.) (AC)
Bocchus I., König von Mauretanien
Bocchus II., König von Mauretanien
Boethos von Tarsos (JE)
Bogud I., König von Mauretanien (i.V. AL) [Verbündeter des Pompeius in den 80er
Jahren]
Bogud II., König von Mauretanien (i.V. AL) [Verbündeter Caesars]
Bogodiataros, trokmischer Dynast von Mithridation (?) (AC)
Brigatos, König von Galatien (AC)
Brithagoras of Heraclea Pontica (FS)
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
12
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Brogitaros Philorhomaios, Tetrarch und König der galatischen Trokmer [Var.
Bogodiataros] (AC)
Burebista, König der Thraker (LR)
C
Camulogenus, Aulercer
Cassivelaunus, König der Catuvellauner
Casticus, Prinz der Sequaner
Catovulcus, König der Eburonen
Cavarillus
Cavarinus, König der Senonen
Chairemon von Nysa
Charops the Elder of Epeiros (AR)
Charops the Younger of Epeiros (i.V. AR)
Chedosbios, König des thrakischen Bosporos (?)
Cingetorix, Dynast der Treverer
Commius, König der Atrebaten
Conconnetodumnus, Führer der Carnuten
Correus, Führer der Bellovacer
Cotiso, König der Daker (LR)
D
Damon of Chaironeia
Dapyx, getischer König (LR)
Dareios, König von Pontos (i.V. LBP)
Decidius Saxa aus Hispanien, s. Saxa (I.-II.)
Deiotaros (I.) Philorhomaios, König von Galatien, Pontos und Kleinarmenien (AC)
Deiotaros (II.) Philopator, König von Galatien, Pontos und Kleinarmenien (AC)
Deiotaros (III.) Philadelphos, König von Paphlagonien (AC)
Deiotaros (IV.) Philopator (II.), König von Paphlagonien (AC)
Demetrios I. Soter, König des Seleukidenreichs (DaE)
Demetrios II. Theos Philadelphos Nikator, König des Seleukidenreichs (DaE)
Demetrios III. Philopator Soter (Eukairos), König des Seleukidenreichs (i.V. DaE)
Demetrios, Sohn Philipps V. von Makedonien (DoE)
Demetrios von Pharos, illyrischer Tyrann
Dexandros, Sebastos-Priester von Apameia am Orontes (AC)
Dicomes, König der Geten (LR)
Diodotos von Mopsuestia
Diodotos Tryphon, Usurpator im Seleukidenreich (DaE)
Dion von Alexandreia (KC)
Dion von Prusa
Dionysodoros von Thasos
Diviciacus, Druide der Häduer [Var. Divitiacus] (WS)
Domnekleios, Tetrarch der Tosioper (?) [lat. Var.: Domnilaus; Tetrarch der Tektosagen] (AC)
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
13
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Dorylaos, Gesandter Deiotaros (I.) (AC)
Doubtounos, König des thrakischen Bosporos (?)
Drusilla, Tochter des Königs Agrippa I. von Judäa = Iulia Drusilla (JW)
Dumnorix, Dynast der Häduer (i.V. WS)
Dynamis, Queen of Pontos and of the Bosporos (LBP)
Dyteutos, Hohepriester von Komana Pontike (AC)
E
Epigonos Philopatris, Potentat von Eumeneia (AC)
Eporedorix, Tetrarch der galatischen Tosioper (AC)
Eposgognatos, galatischer regulus (AC)
Erato, Königin Armeniens
Eumenes II. Soter, König von Pergamon
Eumenes (III.), Thronprätendent von Pergamon [Var. Aristonikos]
Eunike, Königin des thrakischen Bosporos
Eunones, König der Aorser
Eupator II., König des thrakischen Bosporos
Eurykles, Hegemon von Sparta
F
Flaccus aus Italica = L. Munatius Flaccus (JL)
Flavius aus Hasta (JL)
G
Genthius, illyrischer König
Gepaepyris, Königin des thrakischen Bosporos
Gordios, Cappadocian Nobleman (LBP)
Gotarzes, König des Partherreichs (i.V. AL)
H
Herakleides, Bruder des Satrapen Timarchos
Herakleitos of Priene (i.V. FS)
Hermias of Stratonicea (i.V. FS)
Hermodoros, Son of Olympichos of Oropos
Herodes I., König von Judäa (JW)
{Herodes} Agrippa: s. Argrippa I. Philorhomaios Philokaisar, König von Judäa
Herodes Antipas, Tetrarch von Galiläa und Peräa = Iulius Antipas (JW)
Herodes Archelaos, Ethnarch von Iudäa, Idumäa und Samaria = Iulius Archelaus (JW)
{Herodes} Philippos: s. Philippos, Tetrarch von Gaulanitis, Trachonitis, Bataneia und Panias
Herodes Philoklaudios, König von Chalkis am Libanon = Iulius Herodes (JW)
Herodes of Priene (i.V. FS)
Herodias von Judäa, Schwester Agrippas I. = Iulia Herodias (JW)
Hiempsal, numidischer König
Hieras, Vertrauter Deiotaros’ (I.) (AC)
Hierokles of Aphrodisias (i.V. FS)
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
14
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Hieronymos, König von Syrakus
Hispaniensis aus Hispanien = L. Fabius L. f. Hispaniensis (JL)
Hyrkanos I. von Judäa: s. Iohannes Hyrkanos I., Hohepriester von Jerusalem
Hyrkanos II., König/Ethnarch von Judäa [Var. Iohannes Hyrkanos II.] (JW)
I
Iakimos, Stratopedarch (?) von Bataneia, Trachonitis und Gaulanitis (i.V. AC)
Iamblichos I., Phylarch oder König von Emesa (MT)
Iamblichos II., König von Emesa (MT)
Indutiomarus, Dynast der Allobroger
Indutiomarus, Dynast der Treverer
Inintimeus, König des thrakischen Bosporos
Iohannes Hyrkanos I., Hohepriester von Jerusalem (i.V. JW)
Ionathan, Bruder des Iudas Makkabaios von Judäa (i.V. JW)
Iotape
Isidoros von Spasinu Charax
Izates II., König von Adiabene (AL)
Iuba, König von Mauretanien (i.V. AL)
Iudas Makkabaios von Judäa (i.V. JW)
Iunius aus Hispanien = Q. Iunius (JL)
K
Kallikrates von Leontion
Kallisthenes, Sohn des Dades aus Olbia (VC/AC)
Kallisthenes, Sohn des Kallisthenes aus Olbia (VC/AC)
Kaphis of Titheora (i.V. FS)
Kassignatos, Dynast der (tolistobogischen?) Galater (i.V. AC)
Kastor (I.) Tarkondarios, Tetrarch der galatischen Tektosagen [Var. Kastor
Saokondar(i)os] (AC)
Kastor (II.), Sohn des Tetrarchen der Tektosagen (AC)
Kastor (III.), König von Paphlagonien (AC)
Kastor (IV.), Augustus-Priester von Ankyra (AC)
Kastor, Dynast von Phanagoreia (i.V. AC)
Kastoris Sotira, Dynastin von Eumeneia (AC)
Kephalos von Epeiros
Kleon, Dynast von Eumeneia, Sohn des Agapetos (i.V. AC)
Kleon = Iulios Kleon, Dynast von Eumeneia (i.V. AC)
Kleon, Dynast von Gordiukome/Iuliopolis und Hohepriester von Komana Pontike (AC)
Kleopatra II., Königin von Ägypten (i.V. SLA)
Kleopatra III. Thea, Königin von Ägypten (i.V. SLA)
Kleopatra IV., Königin von Ägypten bzw. im Seleukidenreich (i.V. AL)
Kleopatra V. Selene, Königin von Ägypten (i.V. SLA)
Kleopatra VI. Tryphaina, Königin von Ägypten (i.V. SLA)
Kleopatra VII. Thea Nea Philadelphos, Königin von Ägypten (i.V. HH)
Kleopatra Berenike III., Königin von Ägypten (i.V. SLA)
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
15
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Kleopatra Tryphaina, Königin von Ägypten bzw. im Seleukidenreich (i.V. SLA)
Kleopatra Selene, Königin von Ägypten bzw. im Seleukidenreich (i.V. SLA)
Kleopatra Selene, Königin von Mauretanien (i.V. AL)
Kotys, König der Odrysen zur Zeit des Perseus-Krieges (KP 3, 320, Nr. 3 = DNP 6, 784,
[I 3]) (i.V. VC & MD)
Kotys, Fürst der Asten (KP 3, 320 Nr. 4 = DNP 6, 784, [I 4]) (i.V. VC & MD)
Kotys, König der Asten und Odrysen (KP 3, 320, Nr. 5 = DNP 6, 784, [I 5]) (i.V. VC &
MD)
Kotys, König der Asten und Odrysen (KP 3, 320, Nr. 6 = DNP 6, 784, [I 6]) (i.V. VC &
MD)
Kotys, König der Asten und Odrysen (KP 3, 320, Nr. 8 = DNP 6, 784, [I 8]) (i.V. VC &
MD)
Kotys VIII., König der Thraker bzw. der Sapäer und Odrysen [Var. Cotys] (VC &
AVLG)
Kotys, Sohn Kotys’ VIII., König von Kleinarmenien (i.V. VC & MD)
Kotys I., König des thrakischen Bosporos (i.V. VC & MD)
Kotys II., König des thrakischen Bosporos (i.V. VC & MD)
Kotys III., König des thrakischen Bosporos (i.V. VC & MD)
Krates of Priene (i.V. FS)
Kriton von Herakleia Salbake = T. Statilius Criton
L
Lakon von Sparta = C. Iulius Lacon (i.V. AL)
Leonippos (‘Satrap’ of Mithridates VI. of Pontus) (i.V. FS)
Lepison von Tralleis
Lykomedes, Priester von Komana Pontike
Lykortas von Megalopolis
Lysanias, Tetrarch und Hohepriester von Chalkis (am Libanon) (AC)
Lysanias (II.), Tetrarch von Abilene (AC)
M
Machares, Prinzregent von Bosporanien (MT)
Malichos, König der Nabatäer (i.V. AL)
Mannos, Sohn des Izates, König von Osrhoene (AL)
Mannos Philorhomaios, König von Osrhoene (AL)
Matthatias Antigonos, Sohn des Königs Aristobulos’ II. von Judäa (i.V. JW)
Meherdates, parthischer Prinz (i.V. AL)
Menedemos, makedonischer Aristokrat (Freund Caesars)
Menedemos of Priene (i.V. FS)
Menephron of Ilion (i.V. FS)
Menippos of Kolophon (i.V. FS)
Meniskos of Priene (i.V. FS)
Meniskos of Miletos (AR)
Menodotos, Priester von Pergamon (WKK)
Menyllos von Alabanda
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
16
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Mercello aus Italica (JL)
Metrodoros von Skepsis (MT)
Metrodoros of Pergamon (i.V. FS)
Micipsa, König Numidiens
Misacenes, regulus der Numider [Var. Mysagenes (cod. V), Misagenes (ed. Fr.)]
Mithradates I. Kallinikos, König von Kommagene [Var. Mithridates] (MT)
Mithradates II., König von Kommagene [Var. Mithridates] (MT)
Mithradates III., König von Kommagene (i.V. MF)
Mithradates II., König des Partherreichs (DaE)
Mithradates III., König des Partherreichs (i.V. DaE)
Mithradates IV Philopator Philadelphos, King of Pontos [Var. Mithridates] (LBP)
Mithradates V Euergetes, King of Pontos [Var. Mithridates] (LBP)
Mithradates VI Eupator Dionysos, King of Pontos and Bosporos [var. Mithridates] (LBP)
Mithradates (VII) of Pergamon, King of the Trokmoi, King Designate of Kolchis and
Bosporos [var. Mithridates] (LBP)
Mithradates (VIII) Philopator, King of Bosporos [var. Mithridates, Philopatris,
Philosymmachos] (LBP)
Mithradates, Dynast von Kleinarmenien (i.V. DaE)
Moagetes of Kibyra (i.V. AD)
Moaphernes, Satrap von Kolchis (MT)
Moschion of Priene (i.V. FS)
Muse, Tochter des Orsobaris, Königin von Prusias am Meer
N
Nearchos of Tarentum (AR)
Nestor von Tarsos (JE)
Niger aus Italica = Q. Pompeius Niger (JL)
Nikomedes II. Epiphanes, König von Bithynien (i.V. AC & TS)
Nikomedes III., König von Bithynien
Nikomedes IV. Philopator, König von Bithynien (i.V. AC & TS)
O
Obodas III., König der Nabatäer (i.V. AL)
Olthakos, Dynast der Dandarier [Var. Olkabas]
Olympichos, Priest of Amphiaraos, Roman ‘Ally’ of Oropos
Omolochos (i.V. FS)
Onesimos, Son of Pithon, Macedonian Nobleman (AR)
Orodaltis, Tochter des Lykomedes, Königin von Prusias am Meer
Orodes I. Philopator Epiphanes Philhellen, König des Partherreichs (DaE)
Orodes II., König des Partherreichs (i.V. DaE)
Orodes III., König des Partherreichs (i.V. AL)
Orontas, Sohn des Ababos, aus Olbia (i.V. VC/AC)
Orophernes Nikephoros, King of Kappadokia [Var. Holophernes] (LBP)
Ortiagon, regulus der galatischen Tolistobogier (i.V. AC)
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
17
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
P
Pacciaecus (I.) aus Hispania Ulterior = Vibius Pacciaecus [Var. Paciaecus] (JL)
Pacciaecus (II.) aus Hispania Ulterior = C. Vibius Pacciaecus [Var. Paciaecus] (JL)
Pacciaecus (III.) aus Hispania Ulterior = L. Vibius Pacciaecus [Var. Paciaecus] (JL)
Pakoros (I.), Sohn des Königs Orodes von Parthien (i.V. AL)
Pakoros (II.), König des Partherreichs (i.V. AL)
Panaitios von Rhodos (AF)
Parthamaspates, König von Parthien (i.V. AL)
Perseus, König Makedoniens (i.V. DoE ?)
Pharnakes (I), King of Pontos (LBP)
Pharnakes (II), King of the Bosporos (and of Pontos) (LBP)
Pharzanes, König des thrakischen Bosporos
Phasael, Tetrarch von Judäa = Iulius Phasael (JW)
Pheroras, Tetrarch von Peräa = Iulius Pheroras (JW)
Philon aus Hispalis
Philippos, Tetrarch von Gaulanitis, Trachonitis, Batanäa und Panias = Iulius Philippus
(JW)
Philippos I. Epiphanes Philadelphos, König des Seleukidenreichs (i.V. DaE)
Philippos II. Philorhomaios, König des Seleukidenreichs (DaE)
Philippos V., König Makedoniens (i.V. DoE ?)
Philippos, Stratopedarch von Bataneia (i.V. AC)
Philopoimen von Megalopolis
Phraatakes, König des Partherreichs (i.V. AL)
Phraates II., König des Partherreichs
Phraates III Euergetes Epiphanes Philhellen, König des Partherreichs (DaE)
Phraates IV., König des Partherreichs (i.V. DaE)
Pleuratos, illyrischer König
Polemaios of Kolophon (i.V. FS)
Polemon I. Eusebes, König von Pontos und des thrakischen Bosporos
Polemon II., König von Pontos und des thrakischen Bosporos
Polemon von Laodikeia = Antonius Polemon
Polybios von Megalopolis
Polystratos of Priene (i.V. FS)
Polystratos of Karystos (AR)
Poseidonios von Apameia, Gelehrter auf Rhodos (MT)
Potamon von Mytilene (WKK)
Propylos of Herakleia (FS)
Prusias I., König von Bithynien
Prusias II., König von Bithynien
Ptolemaios II. Philadelphos, König von Ägypten (SP & ST)
Ptolemaios III. Euergetes I. Tryphon, König von Ägypten (SP & ST)
Ptolemaios IV. Philopator, König von Ägypten (SP & ST)
Ptolemaios V. Epiphanes, König von Ägypten (SP & ST)
Ptolemaios VI. Philometor, König von Ägypten (SP & ST)
Ptolemaios Eupator, König von Ägypten (ST)
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
18
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Ptolemaios (VII.) Memphites, Neos Philopator (?), König von Ägypten (?) (ST)
Ptolemaios VIII. Euergetes II. (Physkon), König von Ägypten (SP & ST)
Ptolemaios IX. Philometor II. Soter II. (Lathyros), König von Ägypten [Var. Physkon]
(HP)
Ptolemaios X. Alexandros I., König von Ägypten (HP)
Ptolemaios XI. Alexandros II., König von Ägypten (KC)
Ptolemaios XII. Theos (Auletes), König von Ägypten (KC)
Ptolemaios XIII. Theos Neos Philadelphos, König von Ägypten (ST)
Ptolemaios XIV. Theos Neos Philadelphos, Philopator II., König von Ägypten (ST)
Ptolemaios XV. Theos Kaisar (Kaisarion), König von Ägypten [Var. Caesar] (ST)
Ptolemaios Apion, König der Kyrenaika (ST)
Ptolemaios, König von Zypern (KC)
Ptolemaios von Megalopolis
Ptolemaios, Sohn des Mennaios, König bzw. Tetrarch und Hohepriester von Chalkis
(am Libanon) (AC)
Ptolemaios, Sohn des Sohaimos (AC)
Pyrrakhos of Alabanda (i.V. FS)
Pylaimenes, Dynast von Paphlagonien (AC)
Pylaimenes, Sebastos-Priester von Galatien, Sohn des Königs Amyntas (AC)
Pythodoris I., Queen of Pontos and the Bosporan Kingdom (LBP)
Pythodoris II., Queen of Thrace (LBP)
Pythodoros (II.) von Nysa und Tralleis (WKK)
Pythodoros (III.) von Tralleis
Q
Quadratus von Pergamon = C. Antius A. Iulius Quadratus
R
Rhadamasadios, König des thrakischen Bosporos
Rhaskos, King (?) of the Sapaioi / Sapaeans (ca. 42 BC) (i.V. KB)
Rhaskupolis I, King of the Sapaioi / Sapaeans (ca. 48-42 BC) (i.V. KB)
Rhaskupolis II, King of the Sapaioi / Sapaeans (ca. 11 BC) (i.V. KB)
Rhaskupolis III, King of the Sapaioi / Sapaeans (ca. 13-19 AD) (i.V. KB)
Rhaskuporis I., König der thrakischen Sapäer
Rhaskuporis II., König der thrakischen Sapäer und Besser
Rhaskuporis (III.), Herrscher über die Ripa Thraciae
Rheskuporis I., König des thrakischen Bosporos
Rheskuporis II., König des thrakischen Bosporos
Rheskuporis III., König des thrakischen Bosporos
Rheskuporis IV., König des thrakischen Bosporos
Rheskuporis V., König des thrakischen Bosporos
Rhoemetalkas, King (?) in Thrakia / Thrace (ca. 80 BC) (i.V. KB)
Rhoimetalkes III., König der Thraker (Var. Rhoemetalces) (i.V. VC)
Rholes, getischer König (LR)
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
19
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
S
Sadalas II., König der Thraker (i.V. LR)
Sadalas III., König der Thraker (i.V. LR)
Salome, Schwester Herodes’ I. von Judäa (i.V. JW)
Salvianus = Calpurnius Salvianus (JL)
Sampsigeramos I., Phylarch oder König von Emesa [Var. Sampsikeramos] (MT)
Sampsigeramos II., König von Emesa (AL)
Sanabares, Usurpator im Partherreich (i.V. AL)
Satalas I., König der Thraker (i.V. VC)
Satyros = C. Iulius Satyrus
Sauromates I., König des thrakischen Bosporos
Sauromates II., König des thrakischen Bosporos
Sauromates III., König des thrakischen Bosporos
Sauromates IV., König des thrakischen Bosporos
Saxa (I.) aus Hispanien = L. Decidius Saxa (AC)
Saxa (II.) aus Hispanien = Decidius Saxa, Bruder des L. (JL)
Scapula (I.) aus Hispania Ulterior = Annius Scapula (JL)
Scapula (II.) aus Hispania Ulterior (?) = T. Quinctius Scapula (JL)
Scerdilaides, illyrischer Dynast
Scribonius, Usurpator oder König des Bosporos
Seleukos Kybiosaktes (KC)
Seleukos von Rhosos
Seleukos III. Soter Keraunos, König des Seleukidenreichs (DaE)
Seleukos IV. Philopator, König des Seleukidenreichs (DaE)
Seleukos V., König des Seleukidenreichs (DaE)
Seleukos VI. Epiphanes Nikator, König des Seleukidenreichs (i.V. DaE)
Silo aus Hispanien = Minucius Silo (JL)
Simon, Hohepriester von Judäa (i.V. JW)
Sinatrukes Euergetes Epiphanes Philhellen, König des Partherreichs (DaE)
Sitas, King of the Dentheletes (KB)
Skerdilaides, illyrischer König
Skopelianos von Klazomenai
Sohaimos, König von Emesa und Sophene
Sohaimos, Tetrarch in der Umgebung des Libanon [Var. Soemos] (i.V. AC)
Solovettios, regulus der galatischen Tolistobogier (AC)
Squillus aus Hispanien = L. Licinius Squillus (JL)
Strabon aus Amaseia (i.V. JE)
Straton, Dynast von Amisos (AC)
Straton = C. Iulius Straton
Syllaios, Kanzler des Nabatäerkönigs Obodas III. (i.V. AL)
T
Tarkondimotos I. Philantonios, König des Ebenen Kilikien [Var. Tarkondemos] (MT)
Tarkondimotos II. Philopator, König des Ebenen Kilikien (MT)
Teiranes, König des thrakischen Bosporos
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
20
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Teuta, illyrische Königin
Theophanes von Mytilene = Cn. Pompeius Theophanes (MT)
Theopompos von Knidos = C. Iulius Theopompus (MT)
Thorius aus Italica = T. Thorius (JL)
Thothorses, König des thrakischen Bosporos
Thrasymedes of Heraclea Pontica (FS)
Tigranes I., Großkönig von Armenien [Var.: Tigranes II., Tigranes Theos] (HP)
Tigranes II. Philopator, König von Armenien [Var.: Tigranes III.] (HP)
Tigranes, Sohn Tigranes’ I., König der Sophene (HP)
Timarchos, Satrap and King of Media (i.V. AD)
Tiridates I. Philorhomaios, Usurpator im Partherreich (AL)
Tiridates II., Usurpator im Partherreich (i.V. AL)
Tiridates III., Usurpator im Partherreich (i.V. AL)
Titius (I.) aus Hispanien = L. Titius (JL)
Titius (II.) aus Hispanien, Bruder von Titius (I.) (JL)
Titius (III.) aus Hispanien, Sohn des L. Titius (JL)
Trebellius aus Hasta (JL)
Ti. Tullius (JL)
Turrinus aus Baetica = Clodius Turrinus (JL)
Tusculus = Manilius Tusculus (JL)
Tuta, King (?) in Thrace (ca. 80 BC) (i.V. KB)
U/V/W
A. Valgius (JL)
Vardanes I., König des Partherreichs (i.V. AL)
Vardanes (II.), Usurpator im Partherreich (i.V. AL)
Varus, Tetrarch in der Umgebung des Libanon [Var. Noaros] (i.V. AC)
T. Vasius aus Italica (JL)
Viriatus, dux of the Lusitani [Var. Viriathus] (ESM)
Vologaises I., König des Partherreichs (i.V. AL)
Vologaises II., König des Partherreichs (i.V. AL)
Vologaises III., König des Partherreichs (i.V. AL)
Vologaises IV., König des Partherreichs (i.V. AL)
Vologaises V., König des Partherreichs (i.V. AL)
Vologaises VI., König des Partherreichs (i.V. AL)
Vonones I., König des Partherreichs (i.V. AL)
Vonones II., König des Partherreichs (i.V. AL)
Worod, Adliger in Hatra (i.V. AL)
X
Xenolles von Adramyttion
Xenophon von Kos = C. Stertinius Xenophon
Z
Zarbienos, König von Gordyene (MT)
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
21
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Zenodoros, Tetrarch und Hohepriester von Chalkis (ad Libanum) (AC)
Zenon von Laodikeia
Zenon-Artaxias, König von Armenien
Zmertorix (I.) von Eumeneia, Sohn des Philonides (AC)
Zmertorix (II.) = Valerios Zmertorix von Eumeneia (AC)
Zoilos of Aphrodisias (i.V. FS)
Zosimos of Priene (i.V. FS)
Zyraxes, getischer König (LR)
AC/30.04.12
1.2 Liste anonymer Romfreunde
List of the Anonymous Friends of the Romans
Anonymus JL 001 aus Hispania Ulterior, Großvater des Clodius Turrinus
Anonymus JL 002 aus Hispania Ulterior, Vater des Clodius Turrinus
Anonymus JL 003 aus Baetica, Sohn des Clodius Turrinus
Anonymus MT001, Großvater Strabons
AC/17.04.10
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
22
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
2. Prosopographie der Romfreunde
Prosopography of the Friends of the Romans
2.1 Namentlich erfasste Romfreunde
Friends of the Romans Known by Name
Ababos, Sohn des Kallisthenes, aus Olbia
0. Onomastisches / Namenvarianten
Bekannt aus einem Ehrendekret von Byzantion für Orontes, Sohn des Ababos, aus Olbia (CIG
II 2060 = IOSPE I2 79 = IK 58,3, Mitte des 1. Jhs. n.Chr.). Weitere Träger eines solchen
Namens kennen wir weder im Nordschwarzmeerraum noch in anderen Regionen der
griechisch-römischen Welt. Erst in Südsyrien ist Ababos wieder belegt (vgl. IK 58, S. 29) und
gilt deswegen als semitischer Personenname (Wuthnow 1930, 6, 138f.; vgl. Lidzbarski 1902,
218, Nr. 19; ders. 1908, 22; Vidman 1961, 157). Im Fall des Olbiopoliten bezweifelt Zgusta
1955, § 591 aber eine semitische Deutung. Dabei verweist er einerseits auf Parallelen aus
Kleinasien wie Aba, Abas, Abēbas, nimmt aber andererseits eher eine Entstehung aus
Kinderwörtern an, die sich in den unterschiedlichsten Sprachgemeinschaften oft ähneln (S. 293).
Zgusta beruft sich vor allem auf Ababa, die als femina Alanica bezeichnete Mutter des
Kaisers Maximinus Thrax (Iord. Get. 15,83; vgl. SHA V.Maximin. 1,4-6 Hababa). Dagegen
lehnt Vidman 1961, 158 die Existenz einer femina Alanica Ababa oder Hababa ab (vgl.
Robert 1962, Nr. 82), ohne freilich tragfähige Gründe anzuführen (vgl. auch Lippold 1991,
204). Folglich bleibt es ein statthafter Vorschlag, Ababas als einen iranischen Namen zu
deuten. Wer demgegenüber eine semitische Herkunft annimmt, müsste erklären, wie eine aus
Syrien stammende Familie in dem nach getischer Zerstörung wiederbegründeten Olbia zu
einer so hohen Stellung kommen konnte.
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
Die Herkunft des Ababos, Sohn des Kallisthenes (griechischer Name, s.u.), und Vater des
Orontas/Orontes (persischer Name, s. Zgusta 1955, § 550) ist wohl unter ‚hellenisierten
Barbaren‘ oder ‚barbarisierten Griechen‘ der nordwestlichen Schwarzmeerküste zu suchen.
Seine Familie könnte nach der Eroberung Olbias durch die Geten (um 55 v.Chr.) und bis zum
Wiederaufbau (Ende 1. Jh. v. Chr. – Anf. 1. Jh. n. Chr., s. Vinogradov 1995, 143) als
mixobarbaros aus dem olbischen Adel hervorgegangen sein. Gerade während dieser
Übergangszeit, in welcher die städtische Gemeinschaft bei den Steppennachbarn oder in
anderen Poleis unterkommen musste, könnte der Vater Kallisthenes eine Frau aus der
sarmatischen Oberschicht geheiratet haben. Zwar sind Mischehen im nordwestlichen
Schwarzmeerraum schon aus früherer Zeit bekannt (z.B. Hdt. IV 78; vgl. dazu Ruscu 2002,
51ff.); allerdings ist der Name Kallisthenēs in den Poleis der nördlichen und nordwestlichen
Schwarzmeerküste nicht vor der Getenzeit bezeugt (s. Cojocaru 2004, Katalog; vgl. LGPN IV
183f.). Alternativ wäre zu erwägen, dass Kallisthenes aus einer west- oder südpontischen
Stadt oder gar aus einem außerpontischen griechischen oder griechisch-semitischen Milieu
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
23
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
eingewandert ist. Mithin kann auch nicht ausgeschlossen werden, dass Ababos selbst von dort
nach Olbia migriert ist. Die Teilnahme des Vaters oder des Sohnes an der Wiederbegründung
Olbias könnte der Familie den Weg zur städtischen Aristokratie eröffnet haben.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom / Römern und Karriereverlauf
Ababos wird in der o.g. Inschrift aus Byzanz als mechri tas tōn Sebastōn gnōseōs
prokopsantos bezeichnet. Diese Stellung dürfte er durch seine Teilnahme an einer
Gesandtschaft entweder nach Rom oder zum römischen Statthalter der Provinz Moesia erlangt
haben. Dabei könnte es um den Schutz Olbias gegen die Angriffe barbarischer Stämme
gegangen sein. Als ein einflussreicher Mann könnte er außerdem die römischen Interessen in
seiner Heimat vertreten haben (vgl. Diehl 1939, 1166). Vinogradov 1997, 342 vermutet sogar,
dass Ababos möglicherweise einen herausgehobenen Posten im kaiserlichen Dienst bekleidet
hat. Jedoch wäre in diesem Fall ein entsprechender Beleg in den Inschriften zu erwarten
gewesen. Den Erfolg der Gesandtschaftsreise scheint die Errichtung einer Säulenhalle zu
Ehren des vergöttlichten Augustus, des lebenden Kaisers Tiberius und des römischen Volkes
durch den Olbiopoliten Ababos, Sohn des Kallisthenes, (IOSPE I2 181) zu implizieren.
Der Name des Vaters begegnet erneut in zwei olbischen Ehrendekreten aus der Zeit des
Septimius Severus: Kallisthenēs Kallisthenu (IOSPE I2 42) und Kallisthenēs Dadu (IOSPE I2
43). Beide Geehrten bekleiden nicht nur das höchste Amt des archōn epōnymos, sondern – was
für uns besonders interessant ist – sind auch vorgestellt als an[ēr gen]omenos progonōn
episēmōn te / kai sebastognōstōn kai ktisantōn tēn polin bzw. genus genomenos lampru kai
sebastognōstu. Wäre eine genealogische Verbindung zur Familie des Orontas bzw. Ababos
möglich, wie schon oft und zuletzt von A. Łajtar, IK 58, S. 29, vermutet wurde, hätten wir
hier einen deutlichen Hinweis darauf, dass Ababos der erste sebastognōstos jener Familie
war. In einem solchem Fall wäre auch seine eigene oder seines Vaters Teilnahme bei der
Neugründung Olbias nach der Zerstörung durch die Geten wahrscheinlich. Darüber hinaus ist
denkbar, aber keineswegs sicher, dass der Titel bald erblich wurde, obwohl ihn weder Orontas
zum Zeitpunkt seiner Ehrung in Byzantion noch die vermutlichen severerzeitlichen
Nachfahren selbst getragen zu haben scheinen.
Zum Titel des Ababos erklärt Nadel 1962, 298: „Thus, the title sebastognōstos was used not
by the highest stratum of the Roman society, but by rich provincial or mighty inhabitants of
half-independent territories, and if even they were Roman citizens, they most probably got
this citizenship not earlier than after having got acquainted with the emperor. Therefore the
view is founded that the title “acquainted with the Emperor”, although less honourable than
the title “the Emperor’s friend” and concerning only a definite stratum of provincial gentry,
was highly esteemed; and as far as we can conclude on the grounds of inscriptions conserved
up to our times, the Roman rulers accorded this title rather seldom“. Vgl. Robert 1970, 227228; ferner Meyer 1975, 400f.; Wörrle 1988, 52 mit Anm. 40.
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Diehl, E.: Orontes [8], RE 18,1, 1939, 1166.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
24
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
IK 58: Die Inschriften von Byzantion (Inschriften griechischen Städte aus Kleinasien, Bd. 58). Teil I: Die
Inschriften, hg. von A. Łajtar, Bonn 2000.
IOSPE I2: Inscriptiones orae septentrionalis Ponti Euxini Graecae et Latinae, Vol. I2. Inscriptiones Tyrae, Olbiae,
Chersonesi Tauricae aliorum locorum a Danubio usque ad Regnum Bosporanum. Iterum edidit Basilius
Latyschev, St. Petersburg 1916.
LGPN IV: A Lexicon of Greek Personal Names, vol. IV: Macedonia, Thrace, Northern Regions of the Black Sea,
ed. by P.M. Fraser and E. Matthews, assist. ed. R.W.V. Catling, Oxford 2005, 1.
Cojocaru, V.: Populaţia zonei nordice şi nord-vestice a Pontului Euxin în secolele VI–I a. Chr. pe baza izvoarelor
epigrafice (Die Bevölkerung der nördlichen und nordwestlichen Schwarzmeerküste vom 6. bis 1. Jh. v. Chr.
auf Grundlage des Inschriftenmaterials), Iaşi 2004.
Cojocaru, V.: Von Byzantion nach Olbia: Zur Proxenie und zu den Außenbeziehungen auf der Grundlage einer
Ehreninschrift, in: Arheologia Moldovei 32, Bukarest 2009 (im Druck, erwartet im Frühjahr 2010).
Lidzbarski, M.: Ephemeris für semitische Epigraphik, Bde. I-II, Giessen 1902/08.
Lippold, A.: Kommentar zur Vita Maximini Duo der Historia Augusta, Bonn 1991.
Meyer, E.: Augusti, Chiron 5, 1975, 393-402.
Nadel, B.: A Note about Óåâáóôьгнщуфпт, Eos 52, 1962, 295-298.
Robert, L.: BE 1962, Nr. 82, in: REG 75, 1962, 140.
Robert, L.: Documents de Bithynie et de Paphlagonie. 3. Inscription honorifique, in: ders.: Études anatoliennes.
Recherches sur les inscriptions grecques de l’Asie Mineure, Amsterdam 1970, 227-228.
Ruscu, L.: Relaţiile externe ale oraşelor greceşti de pe litoralul românesc al Mării Negre (Die Außenbeziehungen
der griechischen Städte der rumänischen Schwarzmeerküste). Cluj-Napoca 2002.
Vidman, L.: Ababa und Áâáâïò. Ein Beitrag zur Onomastik der nördlichen Schwarzmeerküste, in: J.
Irmscher/D.B. Schelow (Hgg.): Griechische Städte und einheimische Völker des Schwarzmeergebietes, Berlin
1961, 155-158.
Vinogradov, Ju.G.: Geschichtlicher Hintergrung, in: Ju.G. Vinogradov/S.D. Kryžickij: Olbia. Eine altgriechische
Stadt im nordwestlichen Schwarzmeerraum, Leiden 1995, 127-148.
Vinogradov, Ju.G.: Olbia und Traian, in: ders.: Pontische Studien. Kleine Schriften zur Geschichte und
Epigraphik des Schwarzmeerraumes, hg. in Verbindung mit Heinz Heinen, Mainz 1997, 341-345.
Wörrle, M.: Stadt und Fest im kaiserzeitlichen Kleinasien: Studien zu einer agonistischen Stiftung aus Oinoanda,
München 1988.
Wuthnow, H.: Die semitischen Menschennamen in griechischen Inschriften und Papyri des vorderen Orients, Leipzig
1930.
Zgusta, L.: Die Personennamen griechischer Städte der nördlichen Schwarzmeerküste, Prag 1955.
VC /27.01.09–r/14.03.10
Abgar (I.), osrhoenischer Phylarch zur Zeit des Crassus [Var. Abgar (I.) Piqā (?) ‚der
Stumme‘, Abgar (II.) Ariamnes (?), Augaros, Mazaras, Mazzarus]
0. Onomastisches / Namenvarianten / Homonyme
Griechisch Augaros „der Osrhoener“ nach Cassius Dio (40,20,1ff.); entspricht syrisch ’BGR =
Abgar. Nach Plutarch (Crass. 21,1), der freilich von einem „Phylarchos der Araber“ spricht,
lautete die Namensform Ariamnes. Florus (1,46,7) bezeichnet ihn als Mazarae Syro (Dat.),
vgl. Fest. brev. 17 Mazzarus / Mazorus. In der modernen Forschung wurde er bis vor kurzem
als Abgar II. Ariamnes bar Abgar bezeichnet, während Mazaras als Ethnikon gilt (vgl. z.B.
von Rohden 1894, 94 [2]: reg. 68-53 v.Chr. Tatsächlich hieß aber der Vater eines früheren
Fürsten von Edessa MZ‛WR [Ps.-Dionysius p. 51: ‛Abdu bar Maz‛ur], was der
Namensvariante Mazorus bei Florus entspricht). Eventuell ist er aber identisch mit einem
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
25
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
osrhoenischen Fürsten namens ’BGR PYQ’ = Abgar Piqā, ‚der Stumme‘ (Belege unter 1.),
der traditionell als Abgar I. gezählt wird (vgl. z.B. von Rohden 1894, 94 [1]: reg. 94/92-68
v.Chr.).
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemma Osrhoener
Belegt 53 v.Chr. Falls identisch mit Abgar Piqā, dann ist von einer Herrschaftszeit von ca.
75/4-49 v.Chr. auszugehen (Ps.-Dionysius p. 52; vgl. Luther 1999; Sommer 2005, 232f.).
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Seit dem Aufenthalt des Pompeius im Orient stand er mit Rom in einem Vertragsverhältnis
(Cass. Dio 40,20,1) und war deswegen auch womöglich als amicus populi Romani anerkannt,
auch wenn die Formulierung Plutarchs (Crass. 21,2: doxanta philorhōmaion einai) Fragen
nach seinem offiziellen Status offen lässt. Jedenfalls war die Osrhoene hierdurch wohl nicht
aus dem parthischen Reichsverband ausgeschieden. Denn offenbar stellte der Euphrat die
Grenze des Partherreiches zu Beginn des Crassus-Feldzuges 54 v.Chr. dar; vgl. Plut. Crass.
19,4; Cass. Dio 40,12,2; 40,17,3; 40,28,1. Dasselbe ist auch in der Version des Florus (1,46,6)
impliziert: simulato transfugae cuidam Mazarae Syro.
Gab gegenüber dem Proconsul Crassus a. 53 vor, romfreundlich zu sein, und Pompeius lobte
er gar als seinen euergetēs (Plut. Crass. 21,3). Jedoch unterstützte er nach Aussage römischer
Quellen insgeheim die parthische Seite (Cass. Dio 40,20,2ff.). Er soll Crassus zu einem
Zusammentreffen mit den Truppen des parthischen Feldherrn Surenas geraten haben, mit dem
er konspiriert habe (Cass. Dio 40,20,4ff.; vgl. Plut. Crass. 21; Flor. 1,46,6ff.; Fest. brev. 17).
Während der Kampfhandlungen bei Carrhae wechselte er nach Cassius Dio erst verdeckt und
dann offen die Seiten (40,21-23).
Falls identisch mit dem bei Ps.-Dionysius genannten Abgar Piqā (s.o.), hat er nach dem Ende
des Crassus wohl noch einige Jahre, bis ca. 49 v.Chr., unter parthischer Oberhoheit herrschen
können.
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Vgl. von Rohden: Abgar [1] I. Pêqâ (der Stumme); [2] II. Ariamnes bar Agbar, RE 1,1, 1894, 94.
Vgl. Schottky, Martin: Abgar [1] II Ariamnes bar Abgar, DNP 1, 1996, 15.
Arnaud, P.: Les guerres parthiques de Gabinius et de Crassus et la politique occidentale des Parthes Arsacides
entre 70 et 53 av. J.-C., Electrum 2, 1998, 13-34.
Lerouge, C.: L’image des Parthes dans le monde gréco-romain du début du premier siècle av. n.-è. jusqu’à la fin
du Haut-Empire romain, Stuttgart 2007, bes. 67ff.
Luther, A.: Die ersten Könige von Osrhoene, Klio 81.2, 1999, 437-454.
Sommer, M.: Roms orientalische Steppengrenze, Stuttgart 2005, 232f.
Timpe, D.: Die Bedeutung der Schlacht von Carrhae, MH 19, 1962, 104-129.
AL/08.12.08–r/03.03.10
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
26
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Abgar (V.) Ukkāmā ‚der Schwarze‘, König von Osrhoene [Var. Abgaros, Acbarus]
0. Onomastisches / Namenvarianten / Homonyme
Syrische Namensform ’BGR ’WKM’ = Abgar Ukkāmā. Griechisch Abgaros (Eus. HE).
Lateinisch Acbarus (Tac. ann. 12,12,2f.; lies Abcarus).
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemma Osrhoener
Herrschte wohl 22-25 und 31-65/6 n.Chr. Die früher vermuteten Herrschaftsjahre 4 v.Chr.-7
n.Chr. und 13-50 n.Chr. (vgl. z.B. von Rohden 1894, 94) sind durch die Daten bei Elias Nisib.
überholt. Vgl. Luther 1999a; Luther 1999b; Ramelli 2006, § 4.
Nach christlich-hagiographischer Überlieferung Sohn eines Königs Mannos (Doctrina Addai p.
A). Neffe des Königs Abgar ‚des Weißen‘ (Elias Nisib. p. 73f.). Tacitus bezeichnet ihn als rex
Arabum.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Wird von manchen Forschern für einen römischen ‚Klientelkönig‘ gehalten (Pani 1972, 63).
Von seinem Onkel Abgar ‚dem Weißen‘ a. 25 vertrieben, kehrte er nach dessen Tod a. 31 wieder
auf den Thron zurück (Elias Nisib. p. 73f.; Ps.-Dionysius p. 93f.). Er soll nach der ‚AbgarLegende‘ a. 31 eine Gesandtschaft zu den römischen Behörden nach Palästina geschickt haben,
um „Angelegenheiten des Königreiches“ zu verhandeln (Doctrina Addai p. A); ein anderes
Datum überliefert Eus. HE 1,13,22: a. 28/9. Die Historizität des Ereignisses ist jedoch unsicher;
Ramelli 2006, § 7 neigt aber dazu, einen realen historischen Hintergrund anzunehmen.
Stand um a. 49 auf der Seite der parthischen Adelsfraktion, die von Kaiser Claudius die
Entsendung des parthischen Prinzen Meherdates erwirkte. Jedoch trat er vor der Schlacht am
Fluß Corma zur Gegenpartei über, die den parthischen König Gotarzes unterstützte (Tac. ann.
12,12f.).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
von Rohden: Abgar [5] V. Ukkâmâ (der Schwarze), RE 1,1, 1894, 94.
Schottky, Martin: Abgar [2] V. Ukkāmā (der Schwarze), DNP 1, 1996, 15.
Vgl. Markschies, Christoph: Abgarlegende, DNP 1, 1996, 15f.
PIR² A 0005 Abgarus (agnomine Ukkama)
Bautz, F.W.: Art. Abgar V, in: BBKV 1, 1990, 8-9. URL: http://www.bbkl.de/a/abgar.shtml [19.02.2010].
Luther, A.: Elias von Nisibis und die Chronologie der edessenischen Könige, Klio 81.1, 1999a, 180-198.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
27
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Luther, A.: Die ersten Könige von Osrhoene, Klio 81.2, 1999b, 437-454.
Pani, M.: Roma e i re d’oriente da Augusto a Tiberio, Bari 1972.
Ramelli, I.: Abgar Ukkāmā e Abgar il Grande alla luce di recenti apporti storiografici, Aevum 78.1, 2004, 103108.
Ramelli, I.: Possible historical traces in the Doctrina Addai, Hugoye 9,1, 2006 .
URL: http://syrcom.cua.edu/Hugoye/Vol9No1/HV9N1Ramelli.html [19.02.2010].
AL/08.12.08–r/03.03.10
Abgar (VII.), Sohn des Izates, König von Osrhoene [Var. Augaros]
0. Onomastisches / Namenvarianten / Homonyme
Griechisch Augaros (Arr.; Cass. Dio); entspricht syrisch ’BGR = Abgar.
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemma Osrhoener
Angehöriger der osrhoenischen Königsfamilie, eventuell – die Zusammenhänge sind
weitgehend unklar – identisch mit dem König ’BGR BR ’ZYṬ /’YZṬ = Abgar bar Izaṭ ,
‚Abgar, Sohn des Izates‘, den Ps.-Dionysius p. 118f. erwähnt. In diesem Fall wäre er als
Onkel des späteren Königs Mannos Philorhomaios anzusehen. Vgl. Luther 1999.
Die Vermutung von Potter 1999, 281, daß der Osrhoenerkönig mit einem Arbaces zu
identifizieren sei, der nach Fronto (Princ. hist. 19 p. 212,20ff.) Trajans Feldherrn Appius
Santra ermordet habe, hat keinen Anklang gefunden (Gerhardt/Hartmann 2000, 134).
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Abgar soll sich (nach Arr. Parth. F*45 Roos) sein Reich vom Partherkönig Pakoros II. (reg.
77/78-110/115) zurückgekauft haben. Er schickte 113/4 eine Gesandtschaft an Kaiser Trajan
nach Antiochien, um seine freundschaftliche Haltung gegenüber Rom im Vorfeld des
geplanten Partherfeldzuges zu bekunden, wünschte aber Neutralität zu wahren (Cass. Dio
68,18,1). Als Trajan im Frühjahr 115 (?) nach Nordmesopotamien vorrückte, machte er ihm
auf dem Weg die Aufwartung, konnte sich vor dem Kaiser erfolgreich für seine
Zurückhaltung rechtfertigen und wurde Freund des Kaisers. Er bewirtete Trajan anschließend
in der Hauptstadt Edessa (Cass. Dio 68,21; vgl. Arr. Parth. F 42-48 Roos).
Mit anderen Mesopotamiern empörten sich die Osrhoener 116 gegen die römischen
Besatzungen, wurden aber durch den Feldherrn Lusius Quietus besiegt. Dieser ließ Edessa
plündern und niederbrennen (Cass. Dio 68,29,4; 68,30,2). Über Abgars Rolle hierbei (und
über sein späteres Schicksal) ist nichts Sicheres bekannt. Möglicherweise geht auf ihn die
Kennzeichnung römischer Münzen durch countermarks mit der Legende ’BGR / MLK’
(König Abgar) zurück, vgl. Howgego 1985, 244 Nr. 696.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
28
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Falls der König den Römern die Treue gehalten und den Untergang Edessas a. 116/7 überlebt
hatte, dürfte er doch nicht länger als bis a. 123 geherrscht haben, weil wohl spätestens zu
diesem Zeitpunkt der frühere parthische König Parthamaspates in Edessa herrschte (Luther
1999).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
von Rohden: Abgar [7] VII. bar Izât, RE 1,1, 1894, 94f.
DNP Angeli Bertinelli, M.G.: I Romani oltre l’Eufrate nel II secolo d.C., in: ANRW II 9.1, 1976, 3-45.
Luther, A.: Elias von Nisibis und die Chronologie der edessenischen Könige, Klio 81.1, 1999, 180-198.
Gerhardt, Th./Hartmann, U.: Ab Arsace caesus est. Ein parthischer Feldherr aus der Zeit Trajans und Hadrians,
GFA 3, 2000, 125-142.
Howgego, C.J.: Greek Imperial Countermarks. Studies in the Provincial Coinage of the Roman Empire, London
1985.
Potter, D.: The Inscriptions on the Bronze Herakles from Mesene: Vologeses IV’s War with Rome and the Date
of Tacitus’ Annales, ZPE 88, 1991, 277-290.
Sommer, M.: Roms orientalische Steppengrenze, Stuttgart 2005, bes. 235ff.
AL/08.12.08–r/03.03.10
Abgar (IX.) = L. Aelius Aurelius Septimius Abgarus, König von Osrhoene [Var.
Abgaros; Abgar, Sohn des Mannos]
0. Onomastisches / Namenvarianten / Homonyme
Syrische Namensform ’BGR BR M‛NW = Abgar bar Ma‛nu, ,Abgar, Sohn des Mannos‘.
Griechisch Abgaros (z.B. Cass. Dio). Der römische Name ist durch die Münzlegenden
rekonstruierbar: Bas(ileus) L(ukios) Ail(ios) Sep(timios) Abgaros bzw. Basileus Ail(ios)
Aurel(ios) Sep(timios) Abgaros (Babelon 1893, 252-3 Nr. 21-24; vgl. Hill 1922, c-ci).
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten / Familienverhältnisse
 Stemma Osrhoener
Sohn eines osrhoenischen Königs Mannos (Chron. Edessenum I), wohl des Mannos
Philorhomaios. Trotz einer heute weit verbreiteten Ansicht (Drijvers 1982, 168f.; Millar 1994,
159f.; Drijvers/Healey 1999, 37; vgl. Healey 2009, 244) ist unsicher, ob der in einem
Grabmosaik aus Urfa/Edessa abgebildete ’BGR BR / M‛NW = Abgar bar Ma‛nu, ‚Abgar,
Sohn des Mannos‘ mit diesem König Abgar identisch ist.
Er war vermutlich Vater des späteren Königs Abgar (X.) Severus. Zu zwei weiteren
möglichen Söhnen namens Abgar und Antoninus s. unter 2. Überdies war er Vater eines
Mannos (Ma‛nu), der den Titel PṢ GRYB’ = etwa: paṣ gribā (‚designierter Thronfolger‘),
trug und auf seinen Münzen abgebildet wurde (Babelon 1893, 258-260 Nr. 34 und 35, Pl. V
8-9; Hill 1922, ci und 96 Nr. 36 und 37, Pl. XIV 8-9). Wenn Abgar (IX.) mit dem König
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
29
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Abgar identisch ist, dem der christliche Gelehrte Iulius Africanus einen Besuch abstattete,
dann handelt es sich bei Mannos um denselben Königssohn, dessen Jagdkünste bewundert
wurden (Iul. Afric. kestoi 1,20). Über diesen Mannos oder den gleichnamigen Sohn des Abgar
(X.) Severus war Abgar entweder Großvater oder Urgroßvater des Königs Abgar (XI.) =
Aelius Septimius Abgarus (s. dort) sowie eventuell auch Großvater bzw. Urgroßvater der
Königin ŠLMT = Šalmat; vgl. Luther 1998, 350-351 Anm. 18; Drijvers/Healey 1999, As 1
[D27] mit S. 47.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Abgar gelangte a. 177/178 auf den osrhoenischen Thron (Elias Nisib. p. 89). Ob er zuvor den
Posten eines Gouverneurs der Provinz Arabia bekleidete (so Drijvers/Healey 1999, 136), lässt
sich nicht positiv belegen.
Nutzte die Auseinandersetzungen zwischen Pescennius Niger und Septimius Severus 193194 aus, um gemeinsam mit den Adiabenern die Festung Nisibis zu belagern. Er wurde aber
durch Severus (195?) besiegt; seinen Angriff rechtfertigte er als Unterstützung für Severus im
Kampf gegen Niger (Cass. Dio 75,1,2, Exc. UG 69 p. 413).
Er sandte seine Kinder als Zeichen seiner pistis als Geiseln an Severus (Herod. 3,9,2). Nach
Angeli Bertinelli 1976, 37 erfolgte dies erst im Krieg von 197/198. Ein osrhoenischer Prinz
namens Abgaros, der in Rom verstarb, sowie sein Bruder Antoninus (CIG 6196 = IGUR 3 Nr.
1142), gehören möglicherweise zu diesen Geiseln. Anders von Rohden 1894, 95, der ersteren
mit Abgar (X.) Severus identifiziert.
Abgars Herrschaftsgebiet wurde offenbar in der Folge beschnitten, es entstand noch a. 195 die
Provincia Osrhoena. Die neugezogene Grenze westlich der Hauptstadt Edessa wurde durch röm.
Posten und eine Militärstraße zum Euphrat befestigt (AE 1984 Nr. 918-920).
Abgar unterstützte den Severus während der Partherfeldzüge (a. 197/198?) mit einem
Kontingent Bogenschützen (Herod. 3,9,2). Er besuchte Severus in Rom (Cass. Dio 80,16,2,
Xiph. 351). Chron. Edessenum I belegt den Titel MLK’ RB’ = ‚großer König‘ zum Jahr 201.
Für 205 ist er als Träger des römischen Bürgerrechts bezeugt (AE 1984 Nr. 920). Abbildungen
der Kaiser Commodus und Septimius Severus finden sich auf dem Avers seiner Münzen
(Babelon 1893, 252-3 Nr. 21-24; vgl. Hill 1922, c-ci).
Das Ende seiner Herrschaft fällt ins Jahr 212/213 (Ps.-Dionysius p. 125f.), eventuell konkret
in die Zeit zwischen September 212 und Mai 213, da damals seine Residenzstadt Edessa in
eine römische colonia umgewandelt wurde. Vgl. Luther 2008; Luther 1999, 454; P.Dura 28
(von a. 243); P.Euphr. Syr./P.Mesopotamia B (vom Sept. 242); Drijvers/Healey 1999, P1 und
P3.
3. Auswahlbibliographie
von Rohden: L. Ael.(ius) Sep(timius) Abgar [9] IX., RE 1,1, 1894, 95.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
30
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Schottky, Martin: Abgar [3] VIII., der Große, DNP 1, 1996, 15. (Vater des Abgar IX. Severus).
PIR² A 0008 L. Ael(ius) Aurel(ius) Sep(timius) Abgarus
Angeli Bertinelli, M.G.: I Romani oltre l’Eufrate nel II secolo d.C., in: ANRW II 9.1, 1976, 3-45.
Babelon, E.: Numismatique d’Édesse en Mésopotamie, Paris 1893.
Baum, W.: König Abgar bar Manu (ca. 177-212) und die Frage nach dem „christlichen“ Staat Edessa, in: Der
Christliche Orient und seine Umwelt. Gesammelte Studien zu Ehren J. Tubachs (Studies in Oriental
Religions 56), Wiesbaden 2007, 99-116.
Drijvers, H.J.W.: Hatra, Palmyra und Edessa. Die Städte der syrisch-mesopotamischen Wüste in politischer,
kulturgeschichtlicher und religionsgeschichtlicher Beleuchtung, in: ANRW II 8, 1977, 799-905.
Drijvers, H.J.W.: A Tomb for the Life of a King. A Recently Discovered Edessene Mosaic with a Portrait of
King Abgar the Great, Le Muséon 95, 1982, 167-189.
Drijvers, H.J./Healey, J.F.: The Old Syriac Inscriptions of Edessa and Osrhoene. Texts, Translations and
Commentary (HdO 1, 42), Leiden 1999.
Gawlikowski, M.: The Last Kings of Edessa, in: René Lavenant (Hg.): Symposium Syriacum VII, Roma 1998,
421-428.
Healey, J.F.: Aramaic Inscriptions and Documents of the Roman Period, Oxford 2009.
Hill, G.F.: Catalogue of the Greek Coins of Arabia, Mesopotamia and Persia in the British Museum, London
1922.
Luther, A.: Abgar Prahates filius rex (CIL VI,1797), Le Muséon 111, 1998, 345-357.
Luther, A.: Elias von Nisibis und die Chronologie der edessenischen Könige, Klio 81.1, 1999, 180-198.
Luther, A.: Nordmesopotamien, in: Klaus-Peter Johne (Hg.): Die Zeit der Soldatenkaiser. Krise und
Transformation des Römischen Reiches im 3. Jahrhundert n.Chr. (235-284), Berlin 2008, 501-509.
Millar, F.: The Roman Near East 31 BC – AD 337, Cambridge/Mass. 1994.
Ross, S.K.: Roman Edessa. Politics and Culture on the Eastern Fringes of the Roman Empire, 114-242 CE,
London 2001.
Sommer, M.: Roms orientalische Steppengrenze, Stuttgart 2005, bes. 239ff.
AL/07.03.10–r/08.03.10
Abgar (X.) Severus = Severus Abgarus, König von Osrhoene [Var. Abgaros]
0. Onomastisches / Namenvarianten / Homonyme
Syrische Namensform ’BGR SWRS (Ps.-Dionysius p. 128) und ’BGR SWRWS (Jacob. Edess.
p. 282); griechisch Abgaros (Cass. Dio).
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemma Osrhoener
Mitglied des osrhoenischen Königshauses, vermutlich jüngerer Sohn des Königs Abgar (IX.) =
L. Aelius Aurelius Septimius Abgarus (Luther 2008, 506). Möglicherweise identisch mit Abgar
dem ‚Schönen‘?
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
31
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Er gelangte a. 212/213 an die Macht und herrschte bis ca. 213/4. Vgl. Ps.-Dionysius p. 125f.:
Herrschaftsdauer 1 Jahr und 7 Monate; dazu Luther 1999; Luther 2008, 505f.; anders Millar
1994, 561: Herrschaft 211/12-212/13; vgl. Gawlikowski 1998, 425f.
Er prägte Münzen mit dem Bild des Caracalla (Avers) und seinem eigenen Bild (Revers) mit
der Legende Seue(ros): Babelon 1893, 260-264, Nr. 36-38; Pl. V, 10-12; Hill 1922, 96, Nr.
38; Pl. XIV, 10.
Nach Cassius Dio (78,12,12 [Xiph. 332]; 78,12,1a [Exc. Val. 369 p. 746]) wurde er anläßlich
eines Besuches bei dem Kaiser Caracalla gefangen genommen und abgesetzt, weil er seine
Untertanen misshandelt habe. Möglicherweise bezieht sich hierauf die Nachricht des
syrischen Liber Legum Regionum § 45, dass ein König Abgar die rituelle Selbstkastration
unter schwere Strafe stellte; ob sich der König zum Christentum bekannte, wie der syr. Text
nahezulegen scheint (im syr. Text wird die Verbform HYMN ‚er glaubte‘ verwendet, die ein
Bekenntnis zum Christentum implizieren könnte), bleibt unsicher; ablehnend Millar 1994,
475f. mit Eus. praep. ev. 6,44. Eine syrische Tradition weiß hingegen davon, daß er vertrieben
wurde, weil er sich gegen die Römer erheben wollte (Jacob. Edess. p. 282).
Nach Cass. Dio (78,12,12 [Xiph. 332] blieb das Königreich zunächst ohne König, eine
Thronvakanz ist zumindest bis a. 218/9 anzunehmen. Offenbar wurde die Osrhoene in dieser
Zeit durch einen in römischen Diensten stehenden Amtsträger namens Aurelianus, Sohn des
Ḥapsay (ḤPSY), verwaltet: Jacob. Edess. p. 282 (vgl. Luther 2008, 505 Anm. 44).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
von Rohden: Severus Abgar [10] X., RE 1,1, 1894, 95.
Vgl. Schottky, Martin: Abgar [3] VIII., der Große, DNP 1, 1996, 15. (Vater des Abgar IX. Severus).
Babelon, E.: Numismatique d’Édesse en Mésopotamie, Paris 1893.
Hill, G.F.: Catalogue of the Greek Coins of Arabia, Mesopotamia and Persia in the British Museum, London
1922.
Luther, A.: Elias von Nisibis und die Chronologie der edessenischen Könige, Klio 81.1, 1999, 180-198.
Luther, A.: Nordmesopotamien, in: Klaus-Peter Johne (Hg.): Die Zeit der Soldatenkaiser. Krise und
Transformation des Römischen Reiches im 3. Jahrhundert n.Chr. (235-284), Berlin 2008, 501-509.
Millar, F.: The Roman Near East 31 BC – AD 337, Cambridge/Mass. 1994.
Gawlikowski, M.: The Last Kings of Edessa, in: René Lavenant (Hg.): Symposium Syriacum VII, Roma 1998,
421-428.
Ross, S.K.: The Last King of Edessa, ZPE 97, 1993, 187-206.
Ross, S.K.: Roman Edessa. Politics and Culture on the Eastern Fringes of the Roman Empire, 114-242 CE,
London 2001.
AL/08.12.08–r/03.03.10
Abgar (XI.) = Aelius Septimius Abgarus, König von Osrhoene [Var. Abgaros, Abgar
Prahates (?)]
0. Onomastisches / Namenvarianten / Homonyme
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
32
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Syrische Namensform ’LYWS SPṬ MYWS ’BGR. Auf Münzen Abgaros basileus. Eine
stadtrömische Inschrift bezeugt Abgar Prahates filius rex principis Orrhenoru(m) (CIL VI
1797). Bislang wurde er überwiegend mit Abgar (XI.), bisweilen aber auch mit Abgar
(IX.)/(X.) gleichgesetzt (vgl. z.B. von Rohden 1894, 95f.), jedoch fehlen hierfür hinreichende
Indizien. Vgl. Luther 1998; C. Ricci, in: CIL VI 8,3 p. 4763f.
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemma Osrhoener
Sohn des designierten Thronfolgers (PṢ GRYB’) Ma‛nu, welcher entweder als der Sohn oder
der Enkel des Königs Abgar (IX.) = L. Aelius Aurelius Septimius Abgarus anzusehen ist
(P.Euphr. Syr. / P.Mesopotamia A / Drijvers/Healey 1999, P2; vgl. Ps.-Dionysius p. 128).
Bruder der Königin ŠLMT = Šalmat; vgl. Luther 1998, 350-351 Anm. 18; Drijvers/Healey
1999, As 1 [D27] mit S. 47).
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Wurde a. 239 (zur Datierung: Luther 2008, 506) wahrscheinlich im Kontext der röm.
Abwehrmaßnahmen gegen die Sasanidengefahr durch Gordian III. wohl bei einem Besuch
des Kaisers im Orient als osrhoenischer König eingesetzt (Ross 2001, 75ff.). Auf seinen
Münzen wird die Investitur durch den Kaiser abgebildet (Babelon 1893, 286-292, Nr. 91-102;
Pl. VIII, 4-8; Hill 1922, 113-117, Nr. 136-165; Pl. XVI, 7-11; XVII, 1-4). Er residierte
vermutlich zunächst in Anthemusia[s], dem späteren Markopolis (zur Identifizierung des
Ortes vgl. Luther 2003). Denn der frühere osrhoenische Hauptort Edessa war seit 212/3 röm.
colonia.
Wurde offenbar von Gordian III. durch die ornamenta consularia geehrt. Dies ist wohl der
Sinn der Wendung in P.Euphr. Syr. / P.Mesopotamia A (vom Dez. 240) / Drijvers/Healey
1999, P2: DMYQR BHPṬ Y’ B’RHY = ‚der geehrt worden ist mit dem Konsulat in Edessa‘.
Vgl. Hartmann 2001, 442 Anm. 41; anders Gnoli 2007, 41-44.
Das Ende seiner Herrschaft wird üblicherweise a. 241/2 angesetzt (Ross 1993, 192; Sommer
2005, 245; Luther 2008, 506ff.). Doch herrschte er vielleicht noch bis a. 248/9, da Jacob.
Edess. p. 282f. = Michael Syrus p. 77f. den Untergang des osrhoenischen Königreiches in
diese Zeit verlegt (a. 560 der seleukidischen Ära). Zudem bezeugt der sonst als Terminus ante
quem zitierte Beleg (P.Euphr. Syr. / P.Mesopotamia B [vom Sept. 242] / Drijvers/Healey
1999, P3) nur die Angliederung der ehedem zum Königreich gehörigen Stadt
Anthemusia/Markopolis zur römischen Provinz Osrhoena. Die Hintergründe für das Ende des
osrhoenischen Königreiches sind unklar. Möglicherweise gibt es einen Zusammenhang mit
dem Usurpationsversuch des Iotapianus (a. 248/9) im syrischen Raum (vgl. Luther 1999,
195f.).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
33
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Vgl. von Rohden: Abgar [11] XI. (Phraates), RE 1,1, 1894, 95f. (reg. ca. 242-244).
Vgl. Schottky, Martin: Abgar [4] X. Frahad, DNP 1, 1996, 15.
PIR² A 428
Hartmann, U.: Das palmyrenische Teilreich, Stuttgart 2001.
Gnoli, T.: Roma, Edessa e Palmira nel III sec. d.C. Problemi istituzionali. Uno studio sui papiri dell’Eufrate, Pisa
2000.
Gnoli, T.: The Interplay of Roman and Iranian Titles in the Roman East (Veröffentlichungen zur Iranistik 43,
Sitzungsberichte der phil.-hist. Klasse 765), Wien 2007.
Luther, A.: Abgar Prahates filius rex (CIL VI, 1797), Le Muséon 111, 1998, 345-357.
Luther, A.: Elias von Nisibis und die Chronologie der edessenischen Könige, Klio 81.1, 1999, 180-198.
Luther, A.: Marcopolis in Osrhoene und der Tod des Kaisers Caracalla, Electrum 7, 2003, 101-110.
Luther, A.: Nordmesopotamien, in: Klaus-Peter Johne (Hg.): Die Zeit der Soldatenkaiser. Krise und
Transformation des Römischen Reiches im 3. Jahrhundert n.Chr. (235-284), Berlin 2008, 501-509.
Millar, F.: The Roman Near East 31 BC – AD 337, Cambridge/Mass. 1994.
Ross, S.K.: The Last King of Edessa, ZPE 97, 1993, 187-206.
Ross, S.K.: Roman Edessa. Politics and Culture on the Eastern Fringes of the Roman Empire, 114-242 CE,
London 2001.
Sommer, M.: Roms orientalische Steppengrenze, Stuttgart 2005.
AL/07.03.10–r/08.03.10
Abgar ‚der Schöne‘ (?), König von Osrhoene [Var. Abgar ‚der Heilige‘ (?); Augaros]
0. Onomastisches / Namenvarianten / Homonyme
Syrisch ’BGR (Elias Nisib. p. 91). Lateinisch Abgar (Hieron. Ol. 249,2c). Griechisch Augaros
(Sync. 676 nach Iul. Africanus). Er wird in den auf eine Nachricht des Iulius Africanus
zurückgehenden Quellen als „heiliger Mann“ bezeichnet: Hier. chron. Ol. 249c (vir sanctus)
und Sync. 676 p. 439 Mossh. (hieros aner). Auf Africanus geht wohl Jacob. Edess. p. 282f. =
Michael Syrus p. 78 zurück; vgl. Liber Calipharum p. 125 (GBR’ ŠPYR’ ’BGR = ‚Abgar, der
schöne Mann‘); Elias (’BGR ŠPYR’ = ‚Abgar, der Schöne‘).
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemma Osrhoener
Mitglied des osrhoenischen Königshauses. Eventuell identisch mit Abgar (X.) Severus? Vgl.
Luther 2008, 506.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Er herrschte a. 218/9-220/1: Elias Nisib. p. 91; Hieron. chron. Ol. 249,2c; Chron. Edess. II mit
Ps.-Dionysius p. 131; vgl. dazu Luther 1999, 192ff.; Gnoli 2000, 76f.; Luther 2008, 506. Er
dürfte nicht ohne römische Zustimmung den osrhoenischen Thron bestiegen haben, auch wenn
über sein Verhältnis zu Rom nichts Näheres bekannt ist.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
34
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
3. Auswahlbibliographie
RE –.
Vgl. Schottky, Martin: Abgar [3] VIII., der Große, DNP 1, 1996, 15. (Vater des Abgar IX. Severus).
Vgl. Markschies, Christoph: Abgarlegende, DNP 1, 1996, 15f.
Gnoli, T.: Roma, Edessa e Palmira nel III sec. d.C. Problemi istituzionali. Uno studio sui papiri dell’Eufrate, Pisa
2000.
Luther, A.: Elias von Nisibis und die Chronologie der edessenischen Könige, Klio 81.1, 1999, 180-198.
Luther, A.: Nordmesopotamien, in: Klaus-Peter Johne (Hg.): Die Zeit der Soldatenkaiser. Krise und
Transformation des Römischen Reiches im 3. Jahrhundert n.Chr. (235-284), Berlin 2008, 501-509.
Millar, F.: The Roman Near East 31 BC – AD 337, Cambridge/Mass. 1994.
AL/08.12.08–r/03.03.10
Abrupolis, King of the Thracian Sapaioi / Sapaeans
0. Onomastic Issues
The compound male personal name Abroupolis/Abrupolis is of Thracian origin (Tomaschek
1894/1980, 3, 21; Detschew 1957, 3, 374; Georgiev 1977, 63, 90). By-forms of the name appear
in the manuscript tradition (cf. Polyb. 22.18.2 ed. Buettner-Wobst IV app. crit. 118.4: Abrouporis
through a single l/r dissimilation) and inscriptions (80 BC; cf. RDGE no. 20, 21: Ablouporis
through a double l/r dissimilation). Its etymology remains uncertain varying from a “horse
mounted fighter” (“Kämpfer zu Ross”, “Rossschlächter”; cf. Tomaschek 1894/1980, 21) to a
“mighty son” (“мощен син”; cf. Georgiev 1977, 63). Tomaschek 1894/1980, 21 associates the
name with Aulouporis and Detschew 1957, 3 with Efriporis (cf. AEM 15, 1892, 216 no. 98,
inscription from Nicopolis ad Istrum). Since all the attempts at explaining the name are
exclusively based on the second lexeme –poris/-poros (Tomaschek 1894/1980, 21; Detschew
1957, 374; Georgiev 1977, 90), Ablouporis might be considered closer to the genuine
pronunciation of the Sapaean name.
1. Central Biographical Data and Family Relations
Abrupolis is mentioned in a variety of literary narratives (Polyb. 22.18.2-3; Diod. 29.33; Liv.
42.13.5; 42.40.5; 42.41.10-11; App. Mac. 11.2; Paus. 7.10.6-7) and a letter of the Roman
Senate to the Delphian Amphictyones from 171/170 BC preserved in an inscription (Syll.3
643 = RDGE no. 40; cf. Sherk, RGEDA no. 19). His biography, however, remains scattered
over mostly contextually dubious fragments. Polybius associates his power with a dynasteia
(22.18.2) and archē (22.18.3), as Appian does (App. Mac. 11.2: archē), whereas other ancient
authorities more convincingly ascribe him the title of “king” or a “kingdom” (cf. Diod. 29.33:
basileia; Liv. 42.13.5: regnum; 42.40.5: regnum; Paus. 7.10.6: basileus). The inscription from
Delphi seems to be closer to the international reputation of Abrupolis during his life-time,
since the Sapaean ruler is mentioned there as one who had been expelled from his basileia by
Perseus (ll. 16-17).
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
35
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Abrupolis is considered to have ruled over the Sapaeans after 200 BC (Gundel 1979, 19) and,
in 196 BC, to have been included in the treaty with Philip V as a friend and ally of the
Romans: RGEDA no. 19, l. 16 after the restorations of G. Colin (1909, IV 75); cf. Gruen
1984, 403 n. 30; see also Liv. 42.13.5; 42.30.10; 42.40.5; 42.41.10-11; App. Mac. 11.2; Paus.
7.10.6-7. As such, he may have had to check the Macedonians, as Geyer 1937, 1000 suggests;
cf. Wilcken 1894, 116; Walbank 1979, 206; Danov 1979, 91; Gundel 1979, 19. “After the
death of Philip” (Polyb. 22.18.2, 179 BC), Abrupolis pillaged the rich mines on Mount
Pangaeus, laid waste the areas of Perseus’ kingdom “as far as Amphipolis, and carried off
many free citizens, a large number of slaves, and many thousand cattle”. Perseus accused him
of even threatening Pella (Liv. 42.41.10-11). In response, the Macedonian king not only
defended his country but utterly routed the Sapaeans, made their country desolate (Polyb.
22.18.3; Paus. 7.10.6) and expelled Abrupolis from his own kingdom. Perseus’ dedication to
Artemis Tauropolos after his campaign into Thrace may be connected to these events.
Hatzopoulos (1996, I 262 n. 4; II 49-50, Epigraphic Appendix no. 29) dates the inscription to
179 (?) BC, while others prefer 179/171 (Pleket / Stroud 1986, 585; without date: Voutiras
1986, 351-352). Later on, Perseus invaded Dolopia in the early summer of 174 BC and then
went to Delphi (Walbank 1979, 206).
According to Polybius (22.18.2-4, 8, cf. Walbank 1979, 206-208), these were all pretexts for
the Romans to declare war on Macedon. The plot against King Eumenes at Delphi (March
172 BC), and the murder of the envoys from Boeotia (173 BC) served a similar purpose
(Polyb. 22.18.5, 8). Polybius (22.18.9-10) goes on to claim that the war against the Romans
had already been planned by Philip, with Perseus being no more than the executor of his
father’s design. Arguing against some now unidentifiable authors (cf. Walbank 1979, 205;
Gruen 1984, 410-411), he emphasizes that the expulsion of such a lower-ranking dynast as
Abrupolis without distinguished ancestors could not be the true cause for the war. Thus
Polybius does not attach a patronymic to Abrupolis’ name and refuses to call him a king (see
above). He further omits to mention the threat to Amphipolis by Abrupolis (cf. Liv. 42.41.1011) and his fate after his expulsion. Most importantly, he deliberately conceals that Abrupolis
was a friend and ally of the Romans.
There is no positive evidence of Abrupolis’ life and career during or after the exchange of the
diplomatic missions between Rome and Pella on the eve of the Third Macedonian War (172171 BC). But the Roman ultimatum to Perseus that urged him to re-instate Abrupolis (Diod.
29.33) requires that the latter was still alive, probably being hosted by one of the pro-Roman
Greek cities or royalties.
Later sources provide us with some further evidence for the existence of a Sapaean royal
lineage after Abrupolis by mentioning Sapaean rulers called Abluporis (in a letter of L.
Cornelius Sulla to Thasos from 80 BC; RDGE no. 20); Rhoemetalkas, Abluporis, and Tuta (in
a letter of Cn. Cornelius Dolabella to Thasos from 80 BC; RDGE no. 21; RGEDA no. 64);
Rhaskupolis and Rhaskos who were two “brothers of the royal family of Thrace” ruling
together the Sapaean country at the time of the battle of Philippi (42 BC; App. civ. 4.87, 103,
136); as well as all the members of the later Sapaean-Odrysian royal house in Thrace (cf.
Sullivan 1990, Stemma 1: The Dynasty of Thrace).
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
36
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
2. Relations with Rome / Romans and Career.
Gruen (1984, 403 n. 30) assumes that Abrupolis was not an ally of Rome, but simply a
signatory to the peace of 196 with Philip V and only this must have been indicated in the lost
part of the letter to the Delphian Amphictyones from 171/170 BC. However, Walbank (1979,
206) accepts that Abrupolis was amicus et socius of the Roman people, but asks two open
questions: 1) whether or not a foedus existed at all, and 2) whether Abrupolis “had the title at
the time of his attack on Perseus, or was granted it later”.
Unlike Polybius, the remaining literary sources label Abrupolis as amicus et socius: thus, in a
rhetorical context, Liv. 42.13.5; 42.40.5; 42.41.10-11; App. Mac. 11.2; in a descriptive
context, Paus. 7.10.6-7. However, the inscription from Delphi will have mentioned that he
was included in a treaty with the Macedonians at the instigation of the Romans (RDGE no.
40, l. 16). It would thus appear that Abrupolis was regularly given not only the more flexible
title of an amicus (on its ample meanings and especially its distinct elastic quality, cf. Coşkun
2008, 11-13; Williams 2008, 32, 41), but also socius, specifically when in the context of
military actions (Liv. 42.41.10; Paus. 7.10.6; cf. Coşkun 2008, 218; Williams 2008, 37 on
foedus and socius). Thus the reason mostly invoked for the outbreak of the Third Macedonian
War would barely have been plausible without a formal alliance between Rome and
Abrupolis, whether through a foedus between the two or through the less formal adscription of
the Sapaean king to a treaty with Macedon. Cf. also the official version proclaimed on the
comitia centuriata in 171 BC: “whereas Perseus, the son of Philip and the king of Macedonia,
had attacked allies of the Roman people, in contravention of the treaty made with Philip and
renewed with Perseus after Philip’s death, whereas he had devastated lands and occupied
cities, and whereas he had entered into plans to prepare war against the Roman people,
readying weapons, an army, and a fleet to this end, unless he should give satisfaction for these
actions, they would go to war with him” (Liv. 42.30.10).
Apart from the general statement, however, that Perseus had renewed his father’s treaty with
Rome (cf. Liv. 42.40.5; RDGE no. 40, l. 14) and the dubious reconstruction of the lacuna in ll.
15-17 by Colin (RGEDA no. 19), there is no explicit evidence for the inclusion of Abrupolis
in the peace of 196, as proposed by Gruen (1984, 403 n. 30). On the contrary, it is rather to be
assumed that there had been open hostility between Roman and Sapaean troops still in 188
BC, when Cn. Manlius Vulso was returning from his Galatian campaign. His army was
attacked by plundering Thracians composed of Astians, Caenians, Maduatians, and Corelians,
and somewhat later by the Thrausians (Liv. 38.40.7; 38.41.6). In respect of the lands of the
Sapaeans which lay westwards, Livy continues: “From this post there was one day’s march to
Apollonia, whence they proceeded through the territory of Abdera to Neapolis. All this march
through the Greek colonies was performed in security. The rest of their march through the
midst of the Thracians, though not harassed, was full of apprehension, by day and night, until
they arrived in Macedon. This same army, when it proceeded on the same route under Scipio
(i.e. Asiaticus in 190 BC), had found the Thracians more peaceable, but for no other reason,
than because it had then less booty, which was the object of their attack: although Claudius
writes, that, even on that occasion, a body of fifteen thousand Thracians opposed Mutines, the
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
37
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Numidian, who had advanced to reconnoitre the country” (Liv. 38.41.9-11,13; transl. by
William A. McDevitte). It is not a mere coincidence that Livy, who most consistently calls
Abrupolis a ‘friend and ally’ of the Romans, is silent about his ancestor’s name and
allegiance. Therefore, the inclusion of Abrupolis in the Roman treaty with Macedonia may be
dated after 188 and most likely between 184 and 179, when Philip’s army was regaining
strength and campaigned in Thrace at Philippopolis and along the Strymon valley (Polyb.
23.8; Liv. 40.21-22; cf. Danov 1979, 90-91).
The expulsion of Abrupolis appears to have been the first of Perseus’ wrongings that the
Romans reproached him of (Polyb. 22.18.2-3; Liv. 42.13.5; 42.40.5; 42.41.10-11; App. Mac.
11.2). In fact, Polybius reports that Abrupolis pillaged the mines on Mount Pangaeus right
after the death of Philip (22.18.2; cf. Walbank 1979, 206-207; Peter 2002, 34). But his
conflict with Perseus seems to date only after the latter’s renewal of friendship with Rome in
179 (cf. Liv. 42.40.5; RDGE no. 40, l. 14; RGEDA no. 19). Perseus’ invasion of Dolopia in
the early summer of 174 is a certain terminus ante quem for the dethronement of the Sapaean
king. At any rate, the long gap between the expulsion of Abrupolis and the ultimatum in his
favor suggests that the Romans had refused to take action on his behalf for many years (Gruen
1984, 403; cf. Wilcken 1894, 116).
What, then, had motivated Abrupolis to campaign against Mount Pangaeus and Amphipolis?
Was it a response to the weakness after Philip’s death, to the overexploitation of the mines by
Perseus, or even to the latter’s concealed military plans against Rome and her allies? A
geopolitical digression may at least help to venture a suggestion:
The Sapaeans seem to have gained control over the road connection to Philippopolis and
Abdera on the Aegean coast in the early-2nd century BC, when at least initially they did not
meet with Macedonian resistance. But, eventually, Perseus was sent to Amphipolis in 181 to
take hostages from Thrace (Liv. 40.24). And just before his father died, he was sent once
again to Thrace with a secret mission (40.56). Most importantly, Livy does not mention
Abrupolis’ invasion and dethronement among the events upon Philip’s death (40.57.2).
The traditional location of Abrupolis’ kingdom is east of the Nestus and north of Abdera (cf.
Peter 2002, 34), but in fact the territory of the Sapaean kingdom was much larger than the
narrow hinterland of Abdera. According to Strabo, it was adjacent to the Odrysians and the
Bessae, for he ascribes them vast parts of the Rhodope Mountains. The geographer is most
likely drawing on the lost accounts of Polybius (Strab. 7, frg. 47 Kramer = 7, frg. 20a Radt;
cf. Boshnakov 2003, 200-204). But the 2nd-century scholar Demetrios of Skepsis may be
behind Strabo’s identification of the Sapaeans with the Homeric Sinties or Sintioi from the
island of Lemnos, the Saioi from Samothrake, the Sintoi from the Strymon valley, and the
Sapai, inhabitants of the North Aegean coast (Strab. 7, frg. 45; 12.3.20; cf. Boshnakov 2003,
281-285). In his narrative of the Battle of Philippi (42 BC), Appian (civ. 4.103) gives us some
further information about the northern extension of the Sapaean territory into the Rhodope
Mountains. The Sapaean brothers Rhaskos and Rhaskupolis, who had taken up arms for
Antony and for Cassius respectively, were in control of the land at least up to the Harpessus
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
38
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
River (the present-day Arda), a tributary of the Hermos (also called Hebros; cf. Detschew
1957, 26).
Suggestive for the resources of the Sapaeans is the fact that, in 42 BC, Rhaskos and
Rhaskupolis were still able to recruit 3,000 horsemen each (App. civ. 4.87). The comparison
with Perseus’ cavalry is striking. According to Livy (42.51), the Macedonian cavalry
numbered 3,000, whereas Kotys, son of Seuthes and King of the Odrysians, had 1,000 select
horsemen at his disposition.
Against this background, the Sapaeans not only posed a real threat to the Macedonians, but
must have been desired by the Romans to become their allies.
Select Bibliography
Boshnakov, Konstantin: Die Thraker südlich vom Balkan in den Geographika Strabos. Quellenkritische
Untersuchungen (= Palingenesia 81, ed. S. Koster), Wiesbaden – Stuttgart 2003.
Colin, G.: Fouilles de Delphes III, Paris 1909, 4.75.
Coşkun, Altay: Freundschaft, persönliche Nahverhältnisse und das Imperium Romanum. Eine Einführung, in:
ders. (Hg.): Freundschaft und Gefolgschaft in den auswärtigen Beziehungen der Römer (2. Jahrhundert
v.Chr. – 1. Jahrhundert n. Chr.), Frankfurt am Main 2008, 11-28.
Coşkun, Altay: Anhang: Rückkehr zum Vertragscharakter der amicitia? Zu einer alt-neuen
Forschungskontroverse, in: ders. (Hg.): Freundschaft und Gefolgschaft in den auswärtigen Beziehungen der
Römer (2. Jahrhundert v.Chr. – 1. Jahrhundert n. Chr.), Frankfurt am Main 2008, 209-230.
Danov, Christo: The Thraker auf dem Ostbalkan von der hellenistischen Zeit bis zur Gründung Konstantinopels,
ANRW II 7.1, 1979, 21-185, especially 91.
Detschew, Dimiter: Die thrakischen Sprachreste, Wien 1957.
Georgiev, Vladimir: The Thracians and Their Language, Sofia 1977 (Bulgarian, with French summary).
Geyer, Fritz: Perseus (5), RE 19.1, 1937, 996-1021.
Gruen, Erich: The Hellenistic World and the Coming of Rome, Berkeley – Los Angeles – London 1984.
Gundel, Hans Georg: Abrupolis, KlP, 1, 1979, 19.
Günter, Linda-Marie: Perseus [2], BNP 10, 2007, 819-820.
Hatzopoulos, M.B.: Macedonian Institutions under the Kings, vol. I: A Historical and Epigraphic Study; vol. II:
Epigraphic Appendix (= MELETHMATA 22), Athens 1996.
Peter, Ulrike: Abroupolis, BNP 1, 2002, 34.
Pleket, H.W. / Stroud, R.S.: Amphipolis. Dedications to Artemis Tauropolos, 179-171 (and 167 ?) B.C., SEG,
36, 1986, 585.
Reinach, Adolphe-J.: Delphes et les Bastarnes, BCH, 34, 1910, 249-330.
Sherk, Robert: Roman Documents from the Greek East (RDGE), Baltimore 1969.
Sherk, Robert: Rome and the Greek East to the Death of Augustus (RGEDA) (= Translated Documents of
Greece and Rome, 4, ed. E. Badian and R. Sherk), Cambridge 1984.
Sullivan, Richard: Near Eastern Royalty and Rome, 100-30 BC, Toronto – Buffalo – London 1990.
Tomaschek, Wilhelm: Die alten Thraker. Eine ethnologische Untersuchung II.2 (= Sitzungsberichte der
philosophisch-historischen Klasse der kaiserlichen Akademie der Wissenschaften, 131, I. Abh.), Wien
1894/1980, 1-102.
Voutiras, Emmanuel: Victa Macedonia : remarques sur une dédicace d'Amphipolis, BCH, 110, 1986, 347-355.
Walbank, Frank W.: A Historical Commentary on Polybius, III, Oxford 1979.
Wilcken, Ulrich: Abrupolis, RE, 1, 1894, 116.
Williams, Craig: Friends of the Roman People. Some Remarks on the Language of amicitia, In: Freundschaft
und Gefolgschaft in den auswärtigen Beziehungen der Römer (2. Jahrhundert v.Chr. - 1. Jahrhundert n. Chr.).
Inklusion/Exklusion Bd. 9 (Hg. A. Coşkun), Frankfurt am Main 2008, 29-44.
KB/07.04.2012 – r/19.04.12
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
39
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Adiatorix, Dynast von Herakleia Pontike
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemma Galater / Tosioper
Sohn des Domnekleios (†48), des Tetrarchen der galatischen Tosioper (Strab. geogr. 12,3,6
[542f.]). Vater des Dyteutos (Strab. geogr. 12,3,35 [558f.]) und wohl auch des Ateporix (vgl.
Coskun 2007, Teil E.III.2 zu Strab. geogr. 12,3,37 [560]). Wurde a. 29 zusammen mit seinem
(namentlich unbekannten) zweitältesten Sohn in Rom hingerichtet.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Erstmals bezeugt ihn Cic. fam. 2,12,2=95 ShB a. 50 als Geschäftspartner des M. Caelius,
dessen Mittelsmänner Diogenes und Philon er in Pessinus traf. Daraus kann freilich nicht
geschlossen werden, dass Adiatorix Hohepriester von Pessinus gewesen sei (so aber Devreker
1984, 17f.; Syme 1995, 132). Da auch der Tetrarchentitel nicht für ihn bezeugt ist, muß ihm
nach dem Tod seines Vaters sein Erbe mit der Duldung des C. Iulius Caesar verweigert
worden sein (s. Kastor [I.] Tarkondarios).
Daß ihn M. Antonius ca. a. 41 zum Dynasten der griechischen Gemeinde von Herakleia
einsetzte, legt nahe, daß Adiatorix ihn vor Philippoi unterstützt hatte. Während der Schlacht
von Aktion a. 31 ließ er die Angehörigen der römischen Kolonie von Herakleia töten. Hierfür
ließ ihn der junge Caesar zusammen mit einem Sohn a. 29 hinrichten. Vgl. Strab. geogr.
12,3,6 (542f.); zudem Bowersock 1964, 255f. zu Anth. Pal. 7,638. Seine beiden überlebenden
Söhne wurden begnadigt und mit kleineren Herrschaften in Südwest-Pontos ausgestattet. –
Stähelin 1907/73, 109 unterscheidet ohne Grund den in Pessinus bezeugten Adiatorix von
demjenigen in Herakleia.
3. Auswahlbibliographie
von Rhoden, P.: Adiatorix, RE 1,1, 1893, 361.
DNP –.
Bowersock, G.W.: Anth. Pal. VII 638 (Crinagoras), Hermes 92, 1964, 255f.
Coskun, Altay: Von der ‘Geißel Asiens’ zu ‘kaiserfrommen’ Reichsbewohnern. Studien zur politischen und
gesellschaftlichen Entwicklung der Galater unter besonderer Berücksichtigung der amicitia populi Romani
und der göttlichen Verehrung des Augustus (3. Jh. v.–2. Jh. n.Chr.), unveröff. Habil. Trier 2007, Teil
E.II/III.
Devreker, John: L’histoire de Pessinonte, in: ders./ Waelkens (Hgg.): Les Fouilles de la Rijksuniversiteit te Gent
a Pessinonte, 1967-1973. Hommage à Pieter Lambrechts, Brügge 1984, I 13-37.
Hoben, Wolfgang: Untersuchungen zur Stellung kleinasiatischer Dynasten in den Machtkämpfen der
ausgehenden römischen Republik, Diss. Mainz 1969, 82; 95.
Magie, David: Roman Rule in Asia Minor to the End of the Third Century after Christ, Princeton/N.J. 1950, I
435; II 1287 Anm. 27.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
40
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Mitchell, Stephen: Anatolia. Land, Men, and Gods in Asia Minor, Bd. 1: The Celts in Anatolia and the Impact of
Roman Rule, Oxford 1993, 35; 40f.
Stähelin, Felix: Geschichte der kleinasiatischen Galater, 21907, Nd. Osnabrück 1973, 109.
Sullivan, Richard D.: Near Eastern Royalty and Rome, 100-30 B.C., Toronto 1990, 171.
Syme, Ronald: Anatolica. Studies in Strabo, hg. von Anthony Birley, Oxford 1995, 132.
AC/03.07.07/06.03.10
Adobogiona (I.), Schwester des Brogitaros Philorhomaios [Var. Abadogiona]
0. Onomastisches
Ado-bogiona wird allgemein als A(n)do-bogiona ‚in/hinein kämpfend‘ erklärt, wobei ande/ando- auch intensivierende Bedeutung haben kann (Schmidt, KGPN 126). Die Basis Bogios
‚Schmetterer, Sieger‘ wird mit vielen Präpositionen zusammengesetzt, so z.B. auch mit di‚von, weg‘, vgl. Di-bugius (CIL III 4595: Pannonia; Schmidt, KGPN 152; Delamarre, DLG2
81f.). Im vorliegenden Fall könnte etwa als ‚(Tochter des) Draufschlägers‘ gedeutet werden
(Coskun 2007, Teil E). Offenbar keltischer Leitname in der tolistobogisch-trokmischen
Führungsschicht, deren drei bezeugte Trägerinnen erstmals Ippel 1912, 294-296
ausdifferenziert hat. Zu weiteren Belegen vgl. Hahland 1953, 148f. – Die Variante
Abadogiona ist in der Inschrift von Didyma überliefert (s.u.).
[Nachtrag AC & JZ / 07.03.10]
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemma Galater / Deiotaros
Tochter eines Deiotaros, der nicht mit Deiotaros I. zu verwechseln ist, und Schwester des
Königs Brogitaros Philorhomaios nach den Inschriften von Pergamon (Ippel 1912, 294-296
Nr. 20) und Didyma (s.u.). Seit ca. 86 Gattin des Pergamener Priesters Menodotos und durch
diesen Vater des Mithradates (VII.) von Pergamon, den Caesar 47 v.Chr. zum König der
Trokmer und des Bosporanischen Reiches erhob. Dessen Name erklärt Strab. geogr. 13,4,3
(625) damit, daß sie sich als Courtisane am Hof Mithradates’ VI. Eupators aufgehalten hatte
und ihr Sohn nach Gerüchten gar von diesem gezeugt worden sein soll. Vgl. Heinen 1994,
66f., der die Geburt ihres Sohnes schon ca. 87/86 v.Chr. datiert. Jedoch ist das Massaker, das
der König von Pontos im Jahr 86 in Pergamon an der galatischen Elite veranstaltete,
keineswegs zwingend als Terminus ante quem zu betrachten (s. unter Brogitaros).
Um 90 v.Chr. stiftete sie gemeinsam mit ihrem Bruder drei Phialen in Didyma; vgl. IvDidyma
475 (Rehm/ Harder S. 277f.) = Bringmann/ von Steuben I 1995, 329-331 Nr. 276, bes. Z. 3541: „Brogitaros, Sohn des Deiotaros, Tetrarch der galatischen Trokmer, und seine Schwester
Abadogiona (sic) (haben mich) dem Apoll von Didyma, dem schon ihr Vater verbunden
gewesen war (Apollōni Didymei patrōiōi), als Dankesgeschenk (gestiftet).“ Zur Datierung vgl.
neben Rehm (um 100, vor 89) auch Coskun 2007, Teil B.
Etwa gleichzeitig, jedenfalls vor ihrer Heirat, wurde sie auch andernorts in Westkleinasien als
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
41
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Euergetin geehrt (OGIS I 348: Methymna; Ippel 1912, 294-296 Nr. 20: Pergamon).
Allerdings vermutet Mitchell I 1993, 35 eine Dislozierung der ersteren Inschrift vom
äolischen Festland, während Chaniotis 1997, 20f. die Identität der Laudandin ohne Grund in
Frage stellt.
Nachtrag zu einem vermeintlichen Porträt der Adobogiona
Hinzuweisen ist ferner auf eine oberhalb des Gymnasions von Pergamon in Richtung
Heratempel (Ippel 1912, Taf. 25; Inan/Rosenbaum 1966/70, 112 Nr. 115, mit Pl. LXVIII 2-3;
Arachne Nr. 8061) bzw. in einer Niesche des östlichen Annexbaus des Heraions (Radt 1999,
186-188) gefundene weibliche Porträtbüste (jetzt: Izmir, Museum Kültürpark, Inv. Nr. 534).
Denn diese ist wiederholt als Darstellung der Adobogiona gedeutet worden. Dabei wird dem
Bildhauer sogar unterstellt, bewusst eine nichthellenische Physiognomie gewählt zu haben
(Hahland 1953 mit Abb.; Strobel 2007, 386: 63/58 v.Chr.). Diese Ansicht muss aber
verworfen werden. Denn die im Heraion gefundene Statuenbasis, auf welcher die Pergamener
die o.g. Ehreninschrift für Adiobogona einmeißeln ließen (Ippel 1912, 294-296 Nr. 20), steht
in keinem ersichtlichen Fundzusammenhang mit der Büste (vgl. auch Radt 1999, 186-188),
dies um so weniger, als letztere als Einsatzbüste für eine Herme gearbeitet wurde. Die
Technik verweist zudem in die spätaugusteische Zeit bzw. das 1. Jh. n.Chr. (Inan/Rosenbaum
1966/70, 112 Nr. 115, mit Pl. LXVIII 2-3). Das Porträt ist also mindestens ein halbes
Jahrhundert jünger, als Hahland und Strobel vermuten. Auch die weiteren Aspekte entziehen
sich einer ‚rassischen‘ Interpretation. (In seiner Interpretation folgt der Verfasser Barbara
Borg, Exeter, der zudem für die Literaturhinweise zu danken ist).
[AC 19.03.10]
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Direkte Verbindung mit Römern sind für Adobogiona nicht bezeugt.
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Stähelin, F.: Adobogiona, RE Suppl. 1, 1903, 10.
DNP –. KP –.
Arachne – DAI Images. Zentrale Objektdatenbank an der Universität zu Köln, Nr. 8061: Porträt einer
Frauenbüste.
URL:
http://www.arachne.unikoeln.de/arachne/index.php?view[section]=uebersicht&view[layout]=objekt_item&view[caller][project]=&
view[page]=11&view[category]=overview&search[data]=ALL&search[mode]=meta&view[active_tab]=ov
erview&search[constraints]=%2B8061%2A (07.03.2010).
Bringmann, Klaus/ von Steuben, Hans (Hgg.): Schenkungen hellenistischer Herrscher an griechische Städte und
Heiligtümer, T. 1, Berlin 1995.
Chaniotis, Angelos: New Inscriptions from Old Books. Inscriptions of Aigon, Delphi and Lesbos Copied by
Nicholas Biddle and Stavros Táxis, Tekmhpia 3, 1997, 7-21, 19-21.
Coskun, Altay: Von der ‘Geißel Asiens’ zu ‘kaiserfrommen’ Reichsbewohnern. Studien zur politischen und
gesellschaftlichen Entwicklung der Galater unter besonderer Berücksichtigung der amicitia populi Romani
und der göttlichen Verehrung des Augustus (3. Jh. v.–2. Jh. n.Chr.), unveröff. Habil. Trier 2007.
Delamarre, Xavier: Dictionnaire de la langue gauloise, Paris 2001, 22003. (DLG2)
Hahland, Walter: Bildnis der Keltenfürstin Adobogiona, in: FS für Rudolf Egger. Beiträge zur älteren
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
42
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
europäischen Kulturgeschichte, Bd. 2, Klagenfurt 1953, 137-157, 148-152.
Hoben, Wolfgang: Untersuchungen zur Stellung kleinasiatischer Dynasten in den Machtkämpfen der
ausgehenden römischen Republik, Diss. Mainz 1969, 74; 96f.; 119.
Inan, Jale/Rosenbaum, Elisabeth: Roman and Early Byzantine Portrait Sculpture in Asia Minor, London 1966,
repr. 1970.
Ippel, A.: Die Arbeiten zu Pergamon 1910–1911, Kap. II, MDAI (A) 37, 1912, 277-303, 294-296 Nr. 20.
Mitchell, Stephen: Anatolia. Land, Men, and Gods in Asia Minor, Bd. 1: The Celts in Anatolia and the Impact of
Roman Rule, Oxford 1993, 28; 35.
Radt, Wolfgang: Pergamon. Geschichte und Bauten einer antiken Metropole. Mit Fotos von Elisabeth Steiner,
Darmstadt 1999.
Schmidt, Karl Horst: Die Komposition in gallischen Personennamen, ZCP 26, 1957, 33-301. (KGPN)
Stähelin, Felix: Geschichte der kleinasiatischen Galater, 21907, Nd. Osnabrück 1973, 108.
Strobel, Karl: Die Galater und Galatien: Historische Identität und ethnische Tradition im Imperium Romanum,
Klio 89.2, 2007, 356-402.
Sullivan, Richard D.: Near Eastern Royalty and Rome, 100-30 B.C., Toronto 1990, 164 und Stemma 3.
AC/29.07.08–r/31.07.08/07.03.10
Adobogiona (II.), Tochter des Deiotaros Philorhomaios
0. Onomastisches
S.o. zu Adobogiona (I.).
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemma Galater / Deiotaros
Tochter des (Königs) Deiotaros I. (Philorhomaios, des Tetrarchen der Tolistobogier,) und seit
ca. 85/80 v.Chr. Gattin des Königs Brogitaros (Philorhomaios), des Tetrarchen der Trokmer;
vom Demos der Pergamener als Euergetin durch eine (vollständig erhaltene und mit BasisInschrift versehene) Portraitbüste geehrt: IGR IV 1683 = Ippel 1912, 294-296; zum Bildnis
vgl. auch Hahland 1953. Weder der Vater noch der Gatte tragen hier den Königstitel, den sie
a. 64 bzw. 58 erhielten. Adobogiona (I.), die Schwester des Gatten, war übrigens mit dem
Pergamener Priester Menodotos verheiratet. Beides zusammen bezeugt einen engen Kontakt
des trokmischen Tetrarchenhauses mit der Elite von Pergamon.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Direkte Verbindung mit Römern sind für Adobogiona nicht bezeugt. Nicht überzeugend ist
aber die Vermutung Hahlands 1953, 152, daß sie ihre Ehrung in Pergamon dem Einfluß des
Pompeius, eines Freundes sowohl ihres Vaters als auch ihres Gatten, verdanke.
3. Auswahlbibliographie
RE –. KP –. DNP –.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
43
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Coskun, Altay: Von der ‘Geißel Asiens’ zu ‘kaiserfrommen’ Reichsbewohnern. Studien zur politischen und
gesellschaftlichen Entwicklung der Galater unter besonderer Berücksichtigung der amicitia populi Romani
und der göttlichen Verehrung des Augustus (3. Jh. v.–2. Jh. n.Chr.), unveröff. Habil. Trier 2007.
Hahland, Walter: Bildnis der Keltenfürstin Adobogiona, in: FS für Rudolf Egger. Beiträge zur älteren
europäischen Kulturgeschichte, Bd. 2, Klagenfurt 1953, 137-157.
Hoben, Wolfgang: Untersuchungen zur Stellung kleinasiatischer Dynasten in den Machtkämpfen der
ausgehenden römischen Republik, Diss. Mainz 1969, 67; 74.
Ippel, A.: Die Arbeiten zu Pergamon 1910–1911, Kap. II, MDAI (A) 37, 1912, 277-303, 294-296 Nr. 20.
Mitchell, Stephen: Anatolia. Land, Men, and Gods in Asia Minor, Bd. 1: The Celts in Anatolia and the Impact of
Roman Rule, Oxford 1993, 28.
Sullivan, Richard D.: Near Eastern Royalty and Rome, 100-30 B.C., Toronto 1990, Stemma 3.
AC/29.07.08–r/01.08.08
Adobogiona (III.), Königin von Prusias
0. Onomastisches
Zum Namen s. Adobogiona (I.).
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemma Galater / Deiotaros
Das einzige Zeugnis für sie, das Revers einer wohl zwischen 14 und 6 v.Chr. geprägten
Münze Deiotaros’ (III.) Philadelphos’, des letzten Königs von Paphlagonien, umschreibt ihr
Bildnis mit der Legende Basilissēs Prusiados Adobogiōnas (RPC I S. 537 Nr. 3508). Mehrere
unter dem Eintrag Deiotaros III. gesammelte Indizien legen nahe, daß es sich um dessen
Schwester, also eine Tochter Kastors’ III., eine Enkelin Deitaros’ II. Philopators (I.) und eine
Urenkelin Deiotaros’ I. Philorhomaios, handelt und sie folglich den in jener Familie üblichen
dynastischen Namen fortsetzt. Dies wäre freilich auch der Fall, wenn sie eine Tochter oder
Enkelin von Adobogiona (II.) wäre; vgl. Hoben 1969, 118f. mit Anm. 320 zu der Erwägung,
daß sie eine Tochter des Mithradates (VII.) von Pergamon gewesen sei. Gegen die
Interpretation von Prusiados als Patronym (so Burnett, RPC I S. 537: „daughter of a Prusias,
otherwise unknown“) spricht auch die Stellung vor dem Eigennamen, so daß es sich um ein
Genitiv-Attribut zum Königinnen-Titel handelt (s.u. 2). Vielleicht war sie gar die Gattin ihres
Bruders (so auch Stähelin 1907, 109), es sei denn, dessen Beiname Philadelphos drückt eine
andere Form der Verbundenheit oder dynastischen Legitimation aus. Ob sie die Mutter
Deiotaros’ (IV.) Philopators (II.) war, ist mithin nicht völlig gewiß. Lediglich die Gattin des
Philadelphos, aber nicht seine Schwester, war sie nach Hahland 1953, 155; 157.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Ob Adobogiona als Königin über Prusias am Meer oder Prusias am Hypios herrschte, ist
ungewiß; Strab. geogr. (z.B. 12,4,3 [564]) gibt keinen verwertbaren Hinweis. Jedenfalls lag es
im früheren Königreich Bithynien bzw. bildete eine Enklave der damaligen Provinz Pontus et
Bithynia. Die Einsetzung galatischer Dynasten in dortigen Städten erinnert nicht nur an die
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
44
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
von M. Antonius überantwortete Herrschaft des Adiatorix in Herakleia Pontike und des
Straton in Amisos, sondern vor allem an die ebenfalls nur numismatisch belegten Königinnen
Muse, Tochter des Orsobaris, und Orodaltis, Tochter des Lykomedes von Komana Pontike,
die beide in Prusias am Meer nachgewiesen sind; vgl. Marek 1993, 49 mit Anm. 347-349; S.
60. Im übrigen sanktionierte der junge Caesar beispielsweise die lokalen Herrschaften des
Kleon von Gordiukome in derselben Provinz, so daß nicht einmal der Urheber der
Königswürde zweifelsfrei bestimmt werden kann.
Allerdings könnte Adobogiona ihren Rang nicht durch eine Ehe mit Deiotaros (III.)
Philadelphos, sondern infolge eines von diesem unabhängigen Erbanspruchs erlangt zu haben.
Dabei bleibt freilich offen, ob ihr Vater Kastor (III.) selbst jemals über jenes Prusias
geherrscht hatte (dann dürfte es sich wohl um Prusias am Hypios westlich von Paphlagonien
handeln) oder ob hier ohne dynastische Legitimation über Prusias entschieden wurde.
War sie tatsächlich die Schwestergattin Deiotaros’ (III.) Philadelphos, dann wäre sie auch
Königin von Paphlagonien gewesen, freilich ohne eine tatsächliche Herrschaftsbefugnis wie
in Prusias.
3. Auswahlbibliographie
RE –. KP –. DNP –. Fehlt auch bei Marek 1993 und 2003.
Coskun, Altay: Von der ‘Geißel Asiens’ zu ‘kaiserfrommen’ Reichsbewohnern. Studien zur politischen und
gesellschaftlichen Entwicklung der Galater unter besonderer Berücksichtigung der amicitia populi Romani
und der göttlichen Verehrung des Augustus (3. Jh. v.–2. Jh. n.Chr.), unveröff. Habil. Trier 2007, Teil E.
Hahland, Walter: Bildnis der Keltenfürstin Adobogiona, in: FS für Rudolf Egger. Beiträge zur älteren
europäischen Kulturgeschichte, Bd. 2, Klagenfurt 1953, 137-157, 153; 155-157.
Hoben, Wolfgang: Untersuchungen zur Stellung kleinasiatischer Dynasten in den Machtkämpfen der
ausgehenden römischen Republik, Diss. Mainz 1969, 118f.
Marek, Christian: Stadt, Ära und Territorium in Pontus-Bithynia und Nord-Galatia, Tübingen 1993.
Marek, Christian: Pontus et Bithynia. Die römischen Provinzen im Norden Kleinasiens, Mainz 2003.
Mitchell, Stephen: Anatolia. Land, Men, and Gods in Asia Minor, Bd. 1: The Celts in Anatolia and the Impact of
Roman Rule, Oxford 1993, 28.
RPC I: Burnett, Andrew M./ Amandry, Michel/ Ripollès, Pere Pau: Roman Provincial Coinage, Vol. I (Part I-II),
London 1992.
Stähelin, Felix: Geschichte der kleinasiatischen Galater, 21907, Nd. Osnabrück 1973, 190.
Sullivan, Richard D.: Near Eastern Royalty and Rome, 100-30 B.C., Toronto 1990, 170 und Stemma 3.
AC/29.07.08–r/31.07.08
Agrippa I. Philorhomaios Philokaisar, König von Judäa = Iulius Agrippa
0. Onomastisches
Praenomen wahrscheinlich Gaius (Braund 1984, 44; Stein 1992, 144; 147f.). Der in Apg 12
verwendete Herodes-Name ist unhistorisch.
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
45
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
 Stemmata Herodianer
Geboren ca. 11 v.Chr. als Sohn des Aristobulos (III.), Sohn Herodes’ I. und Berenikes (I.);
Bruder des Aristobulos und der Herodias. Verheiratet mit Kypros, Kinder Agrippa (II.),
Berenike (II.), Drusilla, Mariamme. Stirbt 44 n.Chr. überraschend in Caesarea Maritima (Ios.
bell. Iud. 2,219; ant. Iud. 19,346-353; Apg 12,21-23).
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Nach der Hinrichtung des Vaters Aristobulos (III.) 7 v.Chr. kommt er in die Obhut seines
Großvaters Herodes’ I. und geht gemeinsam mit seiner Mutter Berenike und wahrscheinlich
seinen Geschwistern nach Rom, wo er u.a. gemeinsam mit dem jüngeren Nero Claudius
Drusus / Drusus Iulius Caesar (cos. 15, 21 n.Chr. PIR2 J 219) erzogen wird (Ios. ant. Iud.
18,143.191; Kokkinos 1998, 304f.). Nach dem Tod der Mutter und des Drusus verschuldet er
sich als junger Mann so sehr, dass er Rom fluchtartig verlassen muss und nach Palästina flieht
(Ios. ant. Iud. 18,143-147). Seine Ehefrau Kypros kann ihn vom Suizid abhalten (Ios. ant. Iud.
18,148).
Auf Bitten seiner Schwester Herodias nimmt deren Ehemann und ihr gemeinsamer Onkel,
Herodes Antipas, Agrippa in seinem Reich in Galiläa auf und setzt ihn als agoranomos in
Tiberias ein (Ios. ant. Iud. 18,148f.; vgl. Stein 1992). Infolge eines Streites mit Herodes
Antipas verlässt Agrippa Galiläa und lebt fortan in Syria bei dem römischen Legaten L.
Pomponius Flaccus (cos. 17. PIR2 P 715) (Ios. ant. Iud. 18,150f.). Sein ebenfalls dort
lebender Bruder Aristobulos beschuldigt ihn der Bestechung und Agrippa muss (auch wegen
der fortdauernden finanziellen Probleme) erneut fliehen (Ios. ant. Iud. 18,152-154).
In Anthedon versucht C. Herennius Capito, procurator in Iudaea, (PIR2 H 103) ihn wegen
seiner Schulden gegenüber dem Kaiser festzusetzen (Ios. ant. Iud. 18,158). In Alexandria leiht
er sich erneut auf Vermittlung seiner Gattin Kypros Geld bei dem Alabarchen Alexander und
kehrt a. 36 nach Rom zurück (Ios. ant. Iud. 18,159f.). Mithilfe eines Darlehens der Antonia
minor kann Agrippa dort seine Schulden bei Tiberius zurückzahlen (Ios. ant. Iud. 18,161-166,
vgl. Ios. ant. Iud. 18,143). In deren Umkreis schließt er sich dem jungen C. (Iulius) Caligula
an, dem er in einem unvorsichtigen Moment den Tod des Tiberius wünscht, damit dieser
selbst zum Princeps aufsteigen könne (Ios. ant. Iud. 18,166-169). Nachdem ein Freigelassener
dies dem Tiberius berichtete, lässt dieser Agrippa inhaftieren, obwohl sich Antonia für ihn
verwendet (Ios. bell. Iud. 2,178-180. ant. Iud. 18,179-193).
A. 37 befreit Gaius Caligula ihn nach seiner Thronerhebung aus der Haft und überträgt ihm
als basileus die ehemalige Tetrarchie seines wenige Jahre zuvor verstorbenen Onkels
Philippos sowie das Reich des Lysanias. Agrippa erhält zudem die ornamenta praetoria (Ios.
bell. Iud. 2,181; ant. Iud. 18,237; Philo, Flacc. 40). Nach der Verbannung des Herodes
Antipas und der Herodias wird dessen Tetrarchie dem Königreich Agrippas angeschlossen
(Ios. 2,182f.; ant. Iud. 18,252). Bei einem Besuch in Alexandria wird Agrippa von den Juden
der Stadt offenbar begeistert empfangen, von den judenfeindlichen Griechen dagegen
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
46
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
verhöhnt; der praefectus Aegypti A. Avillius Flaccus (PIR2 A 1414) empfängt ihn offiziell
freundlich, fühlt sich nach dem Bericht Philos jedoch von Agrippas Anwesenheit in seiner
Autorität bedroht (Philo, Flacc. 25-40).
Agrippa interveniert gegen den Plan des Caligula, im jüdischen Tempel in Jerusalem seine
Statue aufstellen zu lassen (Ios. ant. Iud. 18,289-301; Philo, leg. 261-333). Zur Zeit der
Ermordung Caligulas hält Agrippa sich in Rom auf und birgt dessen Leichnam (Ios. ant. Iud.
19,237). Er unterstützt in den nachfolgenden politischen Wirren Ti. Claudius Nero
Germanicus und wird von diesem nach der erfolgreichen Erhebung zum Princeps mit den
ornamenta consularia sowie der Restitution des herodianischen Gesamtreiches inklusive
Judäas belohnt (Ios. bell. Iud. 2,206-210.215f.; Ios. ant. Iud. 19,236-246.265.274-275; Cass.
Dio 60,8,2-3).
Sein Bauprojekt einer neuen Stadtmauer in Jerusalem wird nach einem Bericht des syrischen
Statthalters C. Vibius Marsus offensichtlich auf Befehl des Claudius abgebrochen (Ios. ant.
Iud. 19,326-327, vgl. Ios. bell. Iud. 2,218). Ein von Agrippa initiiertes Treffen von fünf
Klientelkönigen in Tiberias (neben ihm Antiochos IV. von Kommagene, Sampsigeramos II.
von Emesa, Kotys von Kleinarmenien, Polemon II. von Pontos sowie Herodes II. von
Chalkis) wird auf Verlangen des C. Vibius Marsus beendet (Ios. ant. Iud. 19,338-342). In
Jerusalem geht er gegen Teile der christlichen Gemeinde vor, lässt Johannes Zebedaios
enthaupten und Petrus verhaften (Apg 12,1-11.19). In Berytos errichtet Agrippa neben Bädern
und Portiken ein Amphitheater sowie ein Theater, die er mit prächtigen Vorführungen und
Spielen einweihen lässt (Ios. ant. Iud. 19,335-337).
3. Auswahlbibliographie:
Rosenberg, A.: Iulius Agrippa [53], RE 10,1, 1917, 143-146.
Bringmann, K.: Herodes [8] Iulius Agrippa, DNP 5, 1998, 461.
PIR2 I 131.
Jones, A.H.M.: The Herods of Judea, Oxford 1938.
Kokkinos, N.: The Herodian Dynasty. Origins, Role in Society and Eclipse, Sheffield 1998.
Schürer, E.: Geschichte des jüdischen Volkes im Zeitalter Jesu Christi, Band I, Leipzig 31901 (ND Hildesheim
1964).
Schwartz, D.: Agrippa I. The Last King of Judea, Tübingen 1990.
Stein, A.: Gaius Iulius, an Agoranomos from Tiberias, ZPE 93, 1992, 144-148.
Wilker, J.: Für Rom und Jerusalem. Die herodianische Dynastie im 1. Jahrhundert n.Chr., Frankfurt/M. 2007.
JW/05.08.08–r/07.08.08
Agrippa II. Philorhomaios Philokaisar, König von Chalkis u.a. = M. Iulius Agrippa
0. Onomastisches
Der zuweilen in der Literatur auftauchende Herodes-Name ist unhistorisch.
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
47
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
 Stemmata Herodianer
Geboren 27/28 n.Chr. als Sohn von Agrippa I. und Kypros; Geschwister Drusus, Berenike
(II.), Mariamme und Drusilla (Ios. bell. Iud. 2,220; ant. Iud. 19,354). Gestorben wohl am
Ende des 1. Jhs., das Todesjahr ist jedoch umstritten (zur Diskussion vgl. Schwartz 1992;
Kokkinos 1998, 396ff.; Kokkinos 2003; Wilker 2007, 462f.).
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Agrippa wird als designierter Nachfolger Agrippas I. in Rom am Kaiserhof erzogen (Ios. ant.
Iud. 20,12), nach dem plötzlichen Tod des Vaters wird er von Claudius jedoch nicht zum
König ernannt. Im Streit zwischen dem neuen Statthalter von Iudaea Cuspius Fadus (PIR2 C
1636) und den Juden um die Kontrolle der hohepriesterlichen Gewänder interveniert er
gemeinsam mit seinem Onkel Herodes von Chalkis und dessen Sohn Aristobulos zugunsten
der Juden beim Kaiser (Ios. ant. Iud. 20,9-14). Nach dem Tod des Herodes von Chalkis a. 48
überträgt Claudius Agrippa II. die Oberaufsicht über den jüdischen Tempel mit der Kontrolle
über den Tempelschatz und dem Recht, den Hohepriester zu ernennen, und ernennt ihn
überdies zum König von Chalkis (Ios. bell. Iud. 2,223; ant. Iud. 20,104.179; Wilker 2007,
215).
Im Konflikt zwischen den Juden und dem judäischen Statthalter Ventidius Cumanus
verschafft Agrippa den Juden über die jüngere Agrippina Fürsprache am Kaiserhof (Ios. bell.
Iud. 2,245; ant. Iud. 20,135f.; Wilker 2007, 285f.). Ca. a. 53 tauscht Claudius sein Königreich
Chalkis gegen die Königsherrschaft über die ehemalige Tetrarchie seines Großonkels
Philippos, das „Reich“ des Lysanias und die Tetrarchie des Varus ein (Ios. bell. Iud. 2,247;
ant. Iud. 20,138). Nero erweitert a. 56 sein Herrschaftsgebiet um die Städte Tiberias und
Tarichäa in Galiläa sowie Iulias und Abila in Peräa samt der zugehörigen Dörfer (Ios. bell.
Iud. 2,252; ant. Iud. 20,159; vita 38).
Den Armenienfeldzug des Cn. Domitius Corbulo (cos. suff. 39; PIR2 D 142) unterstützt
Agrippa mit Truppen (Tac. ann. 13,7,1). Gemeinsam mit seiner Schwester Berenike besucht
Agrippa Ende der 50er oder Anfang der 60er Jahre den neuen Statthalter Iudaeas Porcius
Festus (PIR2 P 858) in Caesarea und wird von diesem um Hilfe im Verfahren gegen den
Apostel Paulus gebeten, den sie gemeinsam verhören (Apg 24,13-26,32). A. 66 reist Agrippa
nach Alexandria, um Tib. Iulius Alexander (PIR2 A 500, vgl. PIR2 J 141) als neuem
praefectus Aegypti zu gratulieren, kehrt aber nach Ausbruch der Unruhen umgehend nach
Jerusalem zurück.
Auf dem Weg trifft er mit Neapolitanus, dem Gesandten des syrischen Statthalters C.
Cestius Gallus (cos. suff. 42. PIR C 691), zusammen, den er durch Jerusalem führt, um ihn
von den friedlichen Absichten der Bevölkerung zu überzeugen (Ios. bell. Iud. 2,335-342). Es
gelingt ihm jedoch letztlich nicht, die Juden vom Aufstand abzubringen, sondern er und
Berenike werden gewaltsam von den Aufständischen aus Jerusalem vertrieben (Ios. bell. Iud.
2,335-406). Er unterstützt Cestius Gallus beim ersten Feldzug gegen die aufständischen Juden
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
48
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
und nimmt mit seiner Armee unter dem Kommando des T. Flavius Vespasianus und seines
Sohnes Titus Flavius Vespasianus an der Niederschlagung des jüdischen Aufstandes teil. A.
67 verbringen Vespasian und Titus mitsamt den römischen Truppen drei Wochen in Agrippas
Hauptstadt Caesarea Philippi, anschließend helfen sie, den auch im Reich Agrippas
ausgebrochenen Aufstand niederzuschlagen (Wilker 2007, 402-420).
Nach der Thronerhebung Galbas reist Agrippa nach Rom und setzt im Gegensatz zu Titus die
Reise auch fort, nachdem sie in Korinth von der Ermordung Galbas Nachricht erhalten (Ios.
bell. Iud. 4,498). In Rom wird er heimlich von der bevorstehenden flavischen Erhebung
informiert und kehrt in den Osten des Reiches zurück (Tac. hist. 2,81). Bei der Belagerung
Jerusalems a. 70 ist er anwesend (Tac. hist. 5,1). Wahrscheinlich reist er a. 75 gemeinsam mit
seiner Schwester Berenike nach Rom und wird von Vespasian mit den ornamenta praetoria
ausgezeichnet (Cass. Dio 65,15,1-3). Zudem wird sein Herrschaftsgebiet vergrößert (Phot.
Bibl. 33 [6b]), ohne dass die tatsächlichen Grenzziehungen bekannt sind. Teile seines
Herrschaftsgebietes werden wahrscheinlich um a. 85 provinzialisiert (vgl. Wilker 2007, 465).
Noch während des Prinzipat des Nero baut Agrippa II. Caesarea Philippi weiter aus und
benennt es in Neronias um (Ios. ant. Iud. 20,211). Wohl in Fortsetzung der dynastischen
Tradition fördert er auch Berytus durch die Ausschmückung einer unbekannten Baustruktur
(AE 1928, Nr. 82, vgl. Haensch 2006) sowie nach Flavius Josephus dem Bau eines Theaters
(Ios. ant. Iud. 20,211f., eventuell handelt es sich dabei auch um einen Ausbau des von
Agrippa I. errichteten Bauwerks), und stiftet jährliche Spiele. Zudem versorgte er die Stadt
mit Getreide und Öl sowie Statuen (Ios. ant. Iud. 20,212). Die Inschrift IGLS VI 2759, die
einen König Agrippa als patronus coloniae von Heliopolis nennt, ist wahrscheinlich auf
Agrippa II., eventuell aber auch auf seinen Vater zu beziehen (so Kokkinos 1998, 299).
3. Auswahlbibliographie:
Rosenberg, A.: Iulius Agrippa [54], RE 10,1, 1917, 146-150.
Bringmann, K.: M. Iulius [II 5] Agrippa II, DNP 6, 1999, 24.
PIR2 I 132.
Haensch, R.: Die deplazierte Königin. Zur Inschrift AE 1928, 82 aus Berytus, Chiron 36, 2006, 141-149.
Jones, A.H.M.: The Herods of Judea, Oxford 1938,
Kokkinos, N.: The Herodian Dynasty. Origins, Role in Society and Eclipse, Sheffield 1998.
Kokkinos, N.: Justus, Josephus, Agrippa II and His Coins, Scripta Classica Israelica 22, 2003, 163-180.
Schürer, E.: Geschichte des jüdischen Volkes im Zeitalter Jesu Christi, Band I, Leipzig 31901 (ND Hildesheim
1964).
Schwartz, D.: Texts, Coins, Fashions and Dates. Josephus’ Vita and Agrippa II’s Death, in: Ders., Studies in the
Jewish Background of Christianity, Tübingen 1992, 243-282.
Wilker, J.: Für Rom und Jerusalem. Die herodianische Dynastie im 1. Jahrhundert n.Chr., Frankfurt/M. 2007.
JW/05.08.08–r/07.08.08/03.03.12
Akornion, Sohn des Dionysios, aus Dionysopolis
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
49
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Belegt a. 48 (IGB I2 13 = Syll3 762 = IGRR I 662). Priester des Theos Megas, des Sarapis, des
Dionysos, der samothrakischen Götter, aus Dionysopolis. Bei dem Getenkönig Burebista en tē
prōtē kai megistē philia.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Zwischen Juni und August 48 v.Chr. Gesandter des Getenkönigs Burebista an Pompeius,
während dieser sich im Lager in Herakleia am Lykos aufhielt. Erreichte das Wohlwollen der
Römer für den König und führte auch die vorteilhaftesten Verhandlungen für seine Stadt.
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Wilhelm, A.: Zu einem Beschlusse der Dionysopoliten, in: Neue Beiträge zur griechischen Inschriftenkunde VI,
Wien 1921, 36-39.
Holleaux, M.: Décret de Dionysopolis, RÉA 19, 1917, 252-254 = Études d’épigraphie et d’histoire grecques I,
Paris 1938, 285-287.
Siehe auch unter Burebista.
LR/15.02.2006–r/29.07.08
Alchaudonios, König der Rhambäer [Var. Alchaidamnos]
0. Onomastisches
Alchaudonios bei Cassius Dio, Alchaidamnos bei Strabon (Belege unter 2.).
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
Belegt für die Mitte des 1. Jhs. (s. unter 2.).
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Machte L. Licinius Lucullus procos. Ciliciae (et Asiae) 73-66/63 nach dessen Sieg bei
Tigranokerta a. 69 seine Aufwartung und wurde dabei in seiner Herrschaft bestätigt (Cass.
Dio 36,2,5). Ging im Zuge der militärischen Unternehmungen des M. Licinius Crassus
procos. Syriae 54-53 auf die parthische Seite über (Cass. Dio 40,20,1f.). Wohl identisch mit
dem von Strab. geogr. 16,2,10 (753) als philos Rhōmaiōn bezeichneten Alchaidamnos, der a.
46-43 Q. Caecilius Bassus unterstützte.
3. Auswahlbibliographie
RE –; DNP –.
Sullivan, Richard D.: Near Eastern Royalty and Rome, 100-30 B.C., Toronto 1990, 281f.; 307.
MT/24.11.06–r/30.06.07
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
50
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Vgl. jetzt auch Scharrer, Ulf: The Problem of Nomadic Allies in the Roman Near East, in: Ted
Kaizer/Margherita Facella: Kingdoms and Principalities in the Roman Near East, Stuttgart 2010, 241-335,
314f.
AC/06.02.11
Alexandra Salome, Königin von Judäa
0. Onomastisches
Hebräisch Shelamzion, Salina (Ios. ant. Iud. 13,320).
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemmata Hasmonäer, Makkabäer
Lebte a. 140-067. In erster Ehe mit dem jüdischen Hohepriester und König Aristobulos I.,
danach mit dessen Bruder Alexandros Iannaios verheiratet. Mutter von Aristobulos II. und
Hyrkanos II.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Nach dem Tod des Alexandros Iannaios a. 76 Königin von Judäa; Hohepriester wurde ihr
Sohn Hyrkanos. Zum Konflikt mit ihrem Sohn Aristobulos s. zu eben diesem. Über
Beziehungen zu Rom liegen keine Nachrichten vor.
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Wilcken, Ulrich: Alexandra [2], RE 1,1, 1893, 1376.
Bringmann, Klaus: Alexandra Salome, DNP 1, 1996, 462f.
Baltrusch, Ernst: Königin Salome Alexandra (76-67 v.Chr.) und die Verfasssung des hasmonäischen Staates,
Historia 50, 2001, 163-79.
Schürer, Emil: The History of the Jewish People in the Age of Jesus Christ (175 B.C.-A.D. 135). A New English
Version Revised and Edited by Geza Vermes and Fergus Millar, Bd. 1, Edinburgh 1973, 229-32.
JW/12.09.2006–r/03.07.07
Alexandros Iannaios, König von Judäa
0. Onomastisches
Iannaios ist eine Ableitung vom hebräischen Yonathan/Yehonathan.
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemmata Hasmonäer, Makkabäer
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
51
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Lebte a. 129-076. Sohn des Königs Iohannes Hyrkanos I., Gatte der Alexandra Salome, der
Witwe seines Bruders Aristobulos I.; Vater von Aristobulos II. und Hyrkanos II. Ab a. 103
König und Hohepriester.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Alexandra Salome ernannte ihn zum Hohepriester und König von Judäa. Über Beziehungen
zu Rom liegen keine Nachrichten vor. Er wird in einer Inschrift auf einem Kunstwerk
genannt, das nach Strab., FGrH 91 F 14 = Ios. ant. Iud. 14,34-35 sein Sohn Aristobulos II.
Pompeius zum Geschenk machte.
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Wilcken, Ulrich: Alexandros [24], RE 1,1-2, 1893/94, 1439-41.
Bringmann, Klaus: Alexandros [16], DNP 1, 1996, 477.
Schürer, Emil: The History of the Jewish People in the Age of Jesus Christ (175 B.C.-A.D. 135). A New English
Version Revised and Edited by Geza Vermes and Fergus Millar, Bd. 1, Edinburgh 1973, 219-28.
JW/12.09.2006–r/03.07.07
Alexandros I., Phylarch oder König von Emesa
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemmata Emesener
Sohn des Sampsigeramos I., Bruder des Iamblichos I.; a. 29 getötet. Zum Titel vgl. Sullivan
1990, 199; 202.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Klagte seinen Bruder Iamblichos I. a. 31 bei M. Antonius an und wurde daraufhin mit der
Herrschaft über Emesa belohnt. Wurde anschließend vom jungen Caesar im Triumph
mitgeführt und getötet (Cass. Dio 51,2,2).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Vgl. Stein: Iamblichos [1], RE 9,1, 1914, 639f.
DNP –.
Sullivan, Richard D.: The Dynasty of Emesa, ANRW II 8, 1977, 210f.
Sullivan, Richard D.: Near Eastern Royalty and Rome, 100-30 B.C., Toronto 1990, 202.
MT/06.12.06–r/30.06.07
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
52
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Alexandros I. Balas, König des Seleukidenreichs
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemmata Seleukiden
Angeblich Sohn Antiochos’ IV. Epiphanes’. Vater Antiochos’ VI. Epiphanes’ Dionysios’.
Um 170 v.Chr. geboren; bekämpfte seit 153 Demetrios’ I. Soter und erlangte 150 die
Alleinherrschaft; 146 durch seinen Nachfolger Demetrios II. Theos Philadelphos Nikator
vertrieben; 145 ermordet.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Die Herkunft des Alexandros ist unsicher; den einen galt er als obskurer Usurpator (Liv. per.
52 homo ignotus incertae stirpis aus Smyrna), den anderen als natürlicher Sohn Antiochos’
IV. (1 Makk 10,1f. und 49f.; Ios. ant. Iud. 13,35f.). Seit 158 wurde er von Eumenes II. und
Attalos II. von Pergamon unterstützt und konnte sich dank der Unterstützung eines lokalen
Fürsten, Zenophanes, im Taurusgebirge eine Herrschaft errichten (Diod. 31,32a). 153 wurde
Alexandros durch den Bruder des unter Demetrios I. geschlagenen Usurpators Timarchos,
Herakleides, dem römischen Senat präsentiert. Hierbei wurde seine Rolle als Sohn des amicus
et socius Antiochos IV. unterstrichen, woraufhin der Usurpator ein positives senatus
consultum erhielt (Polyb. 33,18,6-14), welches sicherlich auch eine amicus-Klausel enthielt.
Unterstützt wurde Alexandros neben Rom und Pergamon auch von Ariarathes V. von
Kappadokien, Ptolemaios VI. Philometor von Ägypten und sogar den Makkabäern (Iust.
35,1,6f.), deren Führer Ionathan er 152 zum Hohepriester ernannte (1 Makk 10,15-21).
Demetrios erlitt seit 153 mehrere Niederlagen gegen Alexandros und kam im Winter 151/150
in einer Schlacht bei Antiocheia ums Leben (Polyb. 33,19; Diod. 31,32a; Ios. ant. Iud. 13,35f.;
58f.; Iust. 35,1,6f.).
150 heiratete Alexandros Kleopatra Thea, die Tochter Ptolemaios’ VI. (1 Makk 10,51f.), und
geriet unter den Einfluß Ägyptens. Dies belegt auch die Münzprägung, auf der Kleopatra im
Vordergrund erscheint (SNG Cop. 267) und auch der ptolemaische Adler abgebildet wurde
(SNG Israel 1536). Alexandros scheint die Staatsgeschäfte weitgehend vernachlässigt, die
Regierung dem wohl ägyptischen Ammonios und die Verwaltung Antiocheias Hierax und
Diodotos überlassen zu haben (Liv. per. 50; Iust. 35,2,2; Diod. 33,3 und 5; Athen. 168e).
Außenpolitisch war Alexandros I. eher erfolglos: Die Makkabäer bewahrten ihre weitgehende
Autonomie, wenn auch der Hohepriester Jonathan in den Rang eines königlichen philos und
eines strategos Judäas erhoben (1 Makk 10,15f. und 59-65) und somit wenigstens formal ins
Seleukidenreich eingebunden wurde. Auch im Osten des Reiches scheint die königliche
Autorität, die noch von Demetrios I. nach seinem Sieg über Timarchos wiederhergestellt
worden war, geschwunden zu sein, wurden doch um 148/7 Medien und Westiran von den
Parthern annektiert (Colledge 1967, 29).
Anfang 147 erhob sich der ältere Sohn Demetrios’ I., Demetrios II. Theos Philadelphos
Nikator, mit Unterstützung des kretischen Söldnerführers Lasthenes gegen Alexandros und
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
53
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
landete in Kilikien (Ios. ant. Iud. 13,86-90). Schnell erklärte sich Apollonios, der Statthalter
Koilesyriens, für Demetrios, wurde aber von Jonathan geschlagen, der weiterhin zu
Alexandros hielt (1 Makk 10,67-89; Ios. ant. Iud. 13,88-102). Ptolemaios VI. brach zunächst
auf, um Alexandros zu unterstützen, und besetzte – sicherlich auch im Eigeninteresse – die
syrische Küste (1 Makk 11,1-8; Ios. ant. Iud. 13,104), gab seinen Schwiegersohn aber bald
auf, als er angeblich hörte, dieser habe einen Anschlag auf ihn geplant (Ios. ant. Iud. 13,106108) – sicherlich eine später vorgeschobene Ausrede (Volkmann 1925, 410f.). Zum Zeichen
seiner neuen Politik versprach Ptolemaios VI. Demetrios II. die Hand seiner noch mit
Alexandros verheirateten Tochter Kleopatra Thea und schloß ein Bündnis mit seinem neuen
Schwiegersohn (1 Makk 11,9; Ios. ant. Iud. 13,109f.; Diod. 32,9c). Nachdem die Antiochener
Alexandros vertrieben hatten und Demetrios nicht aufnehmen wollten, da sie seine Rache für
die Vertreibung seines Vaters Demetrios’ I. fürchteten, zog Ptolemaios VI. zunächst selbst in
Antiocheia ein und ließ sich zum König Asiens krönen, übertrug dann aber aus Rücksicht auf
die Römer die Herrschaft definitiv dem Demetrios (Ios. ant. Iud. 13,113f.); vielleicht im
Austausch für Koilesyrien (Diod. 32,9c).
Alexandros hatte nun jede Unterstützung verloren; weder in Pergamon, das 149 erst mühsam
Prusias II. von Bithynien bekämpft hatte, noch in Rom, das 149-148 Andriskos in
Makedonien bekriegen mußte, scheint er noch Rückhalt gehabt zu haben. Nachdem er sich
zeitweise nach Kilikien zurückgezogen hatte, wurde er 146 in einer Schlacht am Oinoparas
von Demetrios II. vernichtend geschlagen. Bei dieser wurde auch Ptolmaios VI. tödlich
verwundet (Iust. 35,2,3f.; Strab. 16,2,8; App. Syr. 67; Ios. ant. Iud. 13,112-116). Alexandros
floh daraufhin zu dem arabischen Fürsten Zabdiel/Diokles, welcher ihn 145 ermordete (1
Makk 11; Diod. 32,27,9d/10,1; Ios. ant. Iud. 13,117f.; vgl. auch Liv. per. 52).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Wilcken, Ulrich: Alexandros [22] I. Balas, RE 1,1, 1893, 1437f.
Mehl, Andreas: Alexandros [13] Balas, DNP 1996, 476.
Bevan, Edwyn R.: The House of Seleucus, London 1902, 212-222.
Bouché-Leclercq, Auguste: Histoire des Séleucides (323-64 avant J.-C.), Bd. 1, Paris 1913, 338-346.
Colledge, Malcolm A.R.: The Parthians, London 1967.
Grainger, John D.: A Seleukid Prosopography and Gazetteer, Leiden/New York/Köln 1997, 6f.
Schmitt, Hatto H.: Art. Seleukidenreich II 7 (Alexandros I. Balas), LH 2005, 977.
Volkmann, Hans: Demetrios I. und Alexander I. von Syrien, Klio 19, 1925, 373-412.
DaE/30.07.08–r/01.08.08
Ammonios, Stellvertreter Ptolemaios’ XII. [Var. Hammonios]
0. Onomastisches
Hammonius nach Cic. fam. 1,1,1=12 ShB a. 56.
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
54
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Stellvertreter Ptolemaios’ XII. a. 56 in Rom; eventuell identisch mit dem Unterhändler
Königin Kleopatras VII. a. 44 in Rom (Cic. Att. 15,15,2=393 ShB).
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Nach der Vertreibung aus Ägypten a. 58 erbat König Ptolemaios XII. Hilfe in Rom, mußte die
Stadt aber nach begangenen Verbrechen Ende 57 verlassen. Sein Vertrauter Ammonios
verblieb dort als königlicher Gesandter. Zu seinen Bestechungsversuchen vgl. Cic. fam.
1,1,1=12 ShB Hammonius, regis legatus, aperte pecunia nos oppugnat. Setzte sich für eine
Beauftragung des Cn. Pompeius Magnus (Cic. fam. 1,1,1=8 ShB) ein und arbeitete damit
gegen P. Cornelius Lentulus Spinther cos. 57.
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Wilcken, Ulrich: Ammonios [8] und [9], RE 1,2, 1894, 1862.
Ameling, Walter: Ammonios, DNP 1, 1996, 600.
Bloedow, Edmund: Beiträge zur Geschichte Ptolemaios’ XII., Diss. Würzburg 1964, 62.
Christmann, Kathrin: Ptolemaios XII. von Ägypten, Freund des Pompeius, in: Altay Coskun (Hg.): Roms
auswärtige Freunde in der späten Republik und im frühen Prinzipat, Göttingen 2005, 113-26, 115f.
Olshausen, Eckart: Rom und Ägypten von 116 bis 51 v.Chr., Diss. Erlangen 1963, 52.
KC/19.09.04–r/25.09.04/28.06.07
Amyntas (I.), König und Tetrarch von Galatien
0. Onomastisches
Noch in Unkenntnis des keltischen Vatersnamen (s. 1) erwogen Zwintscher 1892, 26f. und
Buchheim 1960, 58 mit Anm. 140 (unter Berufung auf seine Besitzungen: Strab. geogr. 12,5,4
[568]; 12,6,3 [569]; 12,8,14 [577]) eine griechische bzw. makedonische Abstammung des
Amyntas. Contra bereits Stähelin 1907, 98 mit Anm. 2. Wenig überzeugend ist indes der
Versuch von Holder, ACS I 134; III 601 s.v. Amytos, eine keltische Etymologie für Amyntas
zu erweisen. Auch die Annahme eines lautlichen Anklangs an keltische Namen auf Am- bzw.
Amu- (vgl. ACS I 111-33; III 580-600) hat wenig für sich, solange entsprechende Parallelen
in Galatien fehlen. Näher liegt eine geneaologische Verbindung mit der paphlagonischen
Dynastie der Pylaimeniden (s. 1), bei denen auch der makedonische Name Attalos bezeugt ist.
Weiteres bei Coskun 2007, Teil E.V.
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemma Galater / Deiotaros
Sohn des Dyïtalos (Inschr. bei Mitchell 1994a,b) und Vater des dritten bzw. elften Ankyraner
Sebastos-Priesters Pylaimenes (2/1 v. bzw. 7/8 n.Chr.: OGIS II 533=Bosch, QGA 51, mit der
Chronologie von Coskun 2007, Teil G). Vermutlich zudem Schwiegervater des Königs
Brigatos und Großvater des Tetrarchen Amyntas (II.) (Coskun 2007, Teil E.IV und
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
55
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Stammbaum in Teil J.VI.1). König von Pisidien ab ca. a. 41 sowie Tetrarch und König von
Galatien a. 37/36 bis zu seinem Tod 26/25 (s. 2).
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Erstmals belegt als Stellvertreter des Deiotaros (I.) Philorhomaios a. 42 vor der zweiten
Schlacht von Philippoi, als er mit den von ihm geführten Galatern von C. Cassius Longinus
procos. Orientis 43-42 zu den Triumvirn abfiel (Cass. Dio 47,48,2; vgl. Vell. 2,84,1; zum
Kontingent auch App. civ. 4,88,373). M. Antonius setzte ihn vermutlich schon a. 41/40 als
König über Pisidien ein (vgl. Strab. geogr. 12,7,3 [571], ohne Datum); die Bestätigung durch
den Senat ließ bis a. 39 auf sich warten (App. civ. 5,319 [75]). Im Laufe der Folgejahre
eroberte er dort weitere Städte hinzu, darunter Kremna (Strab. geogr. 12,6,4f. [569]).
A. 37/36 erhielt er zudem die Herrschaft über Galatien (Strab. geogr. 12,5,1 [567]), obwohl er
nur der „Sekretär“ (grammateus) des Deiotaros (I.) gewesen war (Cass. Dio 49,32,3).
Womöglich erbte er – gewiß auf Weisung des Antonius – als Schwiegervater des Königs
Brigatos (s. auch Amyntas [II.]). Bei anderen genealogischen Voraussetzungen vermutet
dagegen Sullivan 1990, 169f., daß Kastor (II./III.) zu Gunsten des Amyntas abgesetzt worden
sei. Antonius unterstellte Amyntas damals ferner Lykaonien und Pamphylien (Cass. Dio
49,32,3; RPC I S. 536f.; Leschhorn 1993, 396f.). Ob er a. 36-34 dessen Kriegführung in
Parthien und Armenien direkt unterstützte, ist nicht bezeugt. Jedenfalls sicherte er
Zentralkleinasien für Rom. Vor a. 31 vernichtete er die Herrschaft des Antipatros von Derbe
in Lykaonien/ Isaurien (Strab. geogr. 12,6,3 [569]).
Aber noch vor der Schlacht von Aktion wechselte er auf die Seite des jungen Caesar (Plut.
Ant. 61,3.5; 63,5; Cass. Dio 50,13,8). Dieser übertrug ihm die Kilikia Tracheia nach dem Tod
Kleopatras VII. a. 30 (Strab. geogr. 14,5,6 [671]; vgl. dazu auch 12,1,4 [534f.]).
Er starb 26/25 v.Chr. durch eine List der bereits geschlagenen Homonadenser, nachdem er
große Teile Pisidiens und Isauriens erobert hatte (Strab. geogr. 12,5,1 [567]; 12,6,3-5 [569];
Cass. Dio 53,26,3; Mitchell 1994a,b). Vgl. Syme 1939/79, 144-48; S. 144f.: „It was the duty
of Amyntas to control, conquer, and pacify the southern mountain zone, regions that no
empire yet had subjugated“; Mitchell 1994b, 102-4: „By 31 BC Amyntas was an
acknowledged expert in this type of warfare“.
3. Auswahlbibliographie
von Rhoden, P.: Amyntas [21], RE I,2, 1894, 2007f.
Olshausen, Eckart: Amyntas [9], DNP 1, 1996, 637.
RPC I S. 536f. Nr. 3501-7.
Buchheim, Hans: Die Orientpolitik des Triumvirn Marcus Antonius, Heidelberg 1960, bes. 51; 59 mit Anm. 143.
Coskun, Altay: Von der ‘Geißel Asiens’ zu ‘kaiserfrommen’ Reichsbewohnern. Studien zur politischen und
gesellschaftlichen Entwicklung der Galater unter besonderer Berücksichtigung der amicitia populi Romani
und der göttlichen Verehrung des Augustus (3. Jh. v.–2. Jh. n.Chr.), unveröff. Habil. Trier 2007, Teil C.VI;
E.IV/V; F.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
56
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Coskun, Altay: Das Ende der ‚romfreundlichen‘ Herrschaft in Galatien und das Beispiel einer ,sanften‘
Provinzialisierung in Zentralanatolien, in: A.C. (Hg.): Freundschaft und Gefolgschaft in den auswärtigen
Beziehungen der Römer (2. Jh. v.Chr. – 1. Jh. n.Chr.), Frankfurt/M. 2008, 133-164 (mit Karten 3-4).
Hoben, Wolfgang: Untersuchungen zur Stellung kleinasiatischer Dynasten in den Machtkämpfen der
ausgehenden römischen Republik, Diss. Mainz 1969, 121-38.
Leschhorn, Wolfgang: Antike Ären. Zeitrechnung, Politik und Geschichte im Schwarzmeerraum und in
Kleinasien nördlich des Tauros, Stuttgart 1993, 396f.
Magie, David: Roman Rule in Asia Minor to the End of the Third Century after Christ, Princeton/N.J. 1950, bes.
I 433.453.
Mitchell, Stephen: Anatolia. Land, Men, and Gods in Asia Minor, Bd. 1: The Celts in Anatolia and the Impact of
Roman Rule, Oxford 1993, bes. 72-74.
Mitchell, Stephen: Amyntas in Pisidien. Der letzte Krieg der Galater, in: Elmar Schwertheim (Hg.): Forschungen
in Galatien, Bonn 1994a, 97-103.
Mitchell, Stephen: Termessos, King Amyntas, and the War with the Sandaliôtai. A New Inscription from Pisidia,
in: David French (Hg.): Studies in the History and Topography of Lycia and Pisidia. In Memoriam A.S.
Hall, Ankara 1994b, 95-105 und Taf. 6,1-2.
Stähelin, Felix: Geschichte der kleinasiatischen Galater, 21907, Nd. Osnabrück 1973, 110.
Stein-Kramer, Michaela: Die Klientelkönigreiche Kleinasiens in der Außenpolitik der späten Republik und des
Augustus, Berlin 1988.
Sullivan, Richard D.: Near Eastern Royalty and Rome, 100-30 B.C., Toronto 1990, 171-74.
Syme, Ronald: Pamphylia from Augustus to Vespasian (1937), in: ders.: Roman Papers I, Oxford 1979, 42-46.
Zwintscher, Artur: De Galatarum tetrarchis et Amynta rege quaestiones, Diss. Leipzig 1892, bes. 32-35; 39-42.
AC/03.07.07/20.02.10
Amyntas (II.), galatischer Tetrarch
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemma Galater / Deiotaros
Bezeugt als Sohn des (Königs) Brigatos unter den Ahnen des G. Iulios Severos cos. suff. 138
(OGIS II 544=Bosch, QGA 105f. a. 114/138 nC). Durch genealogische Kombination erweist
er sich väterlicherseits als Enkel des Deiotaros (II.) Philopator und mütterlicherseits als Enkel
des Königs und Tetrarchen Amyntas (I.). Seine Herrschaftszeit fällt also etwa in die 30er oder
20er Jahre v.Chr.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Aus 1. ergibt sich, daß er seine Stellung M. Antonius (ab a. 37/36) oder Augustus (ab 26/25)
verdankte. In Verbindung mit der Tavianer Weihinschrift eines Amyntas (RECAM II 413)
und der trokmischen Sonderära (Beginn ca. a. 20 gegenüber der Ankyraner Ära von a. 25, vgl.
Leschhorn 1992) ist erwägenswert, daß er Tetrarch der Trokmer 37/26-21/20 war.
3. Auswahlbibliographie
RE –. DNP –.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
57
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Coskun, Altay: Von der ‘Geißel Asiens’ zu ‘kaiserfrommen’ Reichsbewohnern. Studien zur politischen und
gesellschaftlichen Entwicklung der Galater unter besonderer Berücksichtigung der amicitia populi Romani
und der göttlichen Verehrung des Augustus (3. Jh. v.–2. Jh. n.Chr.), unveröff. Habil. Trier 2007, Teil E.V;
F.II.
Leschhorn, Wolfgang: Die Anfänge der Provinz Galatia, Chiron 22, 1992, 315-36.
Mitchell, Stephen: Anatolia. Land, Men, and Gods in Asia Minor, Bd. 1: The Celts in Anatolia and the Impact of
Roman Rule, Oxford 1993, 38.
Settipani, Christian: Continuité gentilice et continuité familiale dans les familles sénatoriales romaines à
l’époque impériale. Mythe et réalité, Oxford 2000, 463-67.
AC/03.07.07
Antigonos, Gesandter Deiotaros’ (I.)
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
Vermutlich galatischer Aristokrat; belegt a. 45; s. 2.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Allein bezeugt im Kontext der von Blesamios geleiteten Gesandtschaft, die Deiotaros (I.)
Philorhomaios Anfang a. 45 zu C. Iulius Caesar nach Tarraco schickte (Bittgesuch um die
Rückgabe der Trokmertetrarchie). Sie begleiteten Caesar nach Rom, verbürgten sich dort im
Nov. 45 für ihren König, der Attentats- und Verratsklagen ausgesetzt wurde (Cic. Deiot. 38;
41). Damals vermutlich Gäste des Cn. Domitius Calvinus cos. 54, procos. Asiae 48-46 (Cic.
Deiot. 32). M. Tullius Cicero, Caesar und anderen in Kleinasien tätig gewesenen Beamten
schon von früher gut bekannt (Cic. Deiot. 41): corpora sua pro salute regum suorum hi legati
tibi regii tradunt, Hieras et Blesamius et Antigonus, tibi nobisque omnibus iam diu noti.
3. Auswahlbibliographie
von Rohden, P.: Antigonos [15], RE 1,2,1894, 2421.
DNP –.
Stähelin, Felix: Geschichte der kleinasiatischen Galater, 21907, Nd. Osnabrück 1973, 94 Anm. 2.
Coskun, Altay: Amicitiae und politische Ambitionen im Kontext der causa Deiotariana, in: ders. (Hg.): Roms
auswärtige Freunde in der späten Republik und im frühen Prinzipat, Göttingen 2005, 127-54, 129.
Coskun, Altay: Von der ‘Geißel Asiens’ zu ‘kaiserfrommen’ Reichsbewohnern. Studien zur politischen und
gesellschaftlichen Entwicklung der Galater unter besonderer Berücksichtigung der amicitia populi Romani
und der göttlichen Verehrung des Augustus (3. Jh. v.–2. Jh. n.Chr.), unveröff. Habil. Trier 2007.
AC/14.09.04–r/23.06.07
Antiochos III. Megas, König des Seleukidenreichs
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemmata Seleukiden
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
58
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Sohn Seleukos II, jüngerer Bruder und Nachfolger Seleukos III., Vater Seleukos’ IV. und
Antiochos’ IV. 242 geboren, regierte ab 223 das Seleukidenreich und starb 187.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom/ Römern und Karriereverlauf
Da zahlreiche Aspekte der politischen Biographie Antiochos’ III (Schmitt 1964, Ma 1999)
wie auch sein Verhältnis zu Rom (Grainger 2002, Dreyer 2007) oft genug zum Inhalt teils
umfangreicher monographischer Untersuchungen geworden sind, soll in der Folge das
Problem nur skizzenhaft und ohne jeden Anspruch auf Vollständigkeit der Bibliographie wie
auch der Quellenlage umrissen werden, und die Vorgeschichte, allem voran der MolonAufstand 220 (Polyb. 5,40ff.), die Eroberung der Atropatene im selben Jahr (Polyb. 5,55), der
Vierte Syrische Krieg 219-217 mit der Niederlage von Raphia 217 (Polyb. 5.79ff.), die
Auseinandersetzung mit seinem Schwager Achaios 216-213 in Kleinasien mit der Belagerung
von Sardeis (Polyb. 5,57; 7,15-18; 8,17-23) sowie schließlich die Anabasis zur
Rückgewinnung der Oberen Satrapien von 212-205 (Polyb. 10,28ff.; 11.34; 13,9,4f.; Iust.
41,5,7; vgl. auch Engels 2012), ausgelassen werden. Auch würde es zu weit führen, hier die
umfangreiche Forschungsdiskussion, welche mit der Erwerbung des Epithetons „der Große“
und möglichen Assoziationen mit dem großköniglichen Titel verbunden ist, neu aufzurollen;
es sei hier nur auf die nützliche Quellenzusammenstellung und Diskussion bei Ma 1999 (272276) verwiesen.
Erste direkte Kontakte zwischen Rom und Antiochos III. ergaben sich, nachdem der
Seleukidenkönig sich im Winter 203/2 mit Philipp V. von Makedonien verband, um in einem
sog. Raubvertrag (Polyb. 3,2,8; 15,20,1-3; Liv. 31,14,15; Iust. 30,2,8; Trog. prol. 30) die
auswärtigen Gebiete des Ptolemaierreiches aufzuteilen, welches nach dem Tod Ptolemaios
IV. 204 und dem Herrschaftsantritt des unmündigen Ptolemaios V. in eine innenpolitische
Krise geraten war (wohl fehlerhaft oder propagandistisch verzerrt App. Mak. 4,1, der von
einer Aufteilung auch Ägyptens und Kyrenaikas spricht). Wohl bald nachdem Antiochos III.
Anfang 202 (Grainger 2010, 246) oder 201/0 (Errington 2008) im Fünften Syrischen Krieg
Koilesyrien und Teile Kleinasiens besetzte, sandte Ptolemaios V. eine Gesandtschaft mit
einem Hilfegesuch nach Rom (Just. 30,3), welcher bald eine ähnliche motivierte
Gesandtschaft von Rhodos und Attalos I. von Pergamon folgte, die sich über Philipps
Ausgreifen in die Ägäis beschwerten (Polyb. 16,24,3; Liv. 31,2,1-2; App. Mak. 4; Iust. 30,3).
Rom übernahm nun angeblich offiziell die Vormundschaft des Königs (Iust. 30,3) und wollte
durch C. Claudius Nero (cos. 207), M. Aemilius Lepidus (cos. 187 und 175) und P.
Sempronius Tuditanus (cos. 204) zunächst bei Ptolemaios V. in Alexandria bezüglich eines
möglichen Bündnisses gegen Philipp V. sondieren (Iust. 30,3; Liv. 31,2,1-4), welcher seit
dem Ersten Makedonischen Krieg von den Römern aufgrund seines Bündnisses mit den
Karthagern mit Argwohn betrachtet wurde. Auf die Nachricht von der Belagerung von Athen
faßten Senat und Volk dann aber 200 den Beschluß, Philipp V. mit einem Ultimatum zu
konfrontieren (Liv. 31,5-6) und der bereits abgeschickten Gesandtschaft diese Pflicht
aufzutragen. Diese stellte daraufhin M. Aemilius Lepidus ab, um sich unmittelbar mit dem
römischen Ultimatum und der Forderung nach Rückgabe pergamenischer und sonstiger
Eroberungen an Philipp zu wenden (Polyb. 16,34,3-4). Die Weigerung des Makedonen löste
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
59
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
sogleich den Zweiten Makedonischen Krieg aus. Hierauf reiste die Gesandtschaft zunächst
weiter nach Syrien, um Antiochos III. – offensichtlich in weniger ultimativer Form – darum
zu bitten, Frieden mit den Ptolemaiern zu schließen, und reiste dann nach Alexandria weiter
(Polyb. 16,27,5). Es dürfte wohl spätestens hier gewesen sein, daß Antiochos III. den Status
eines amicus des römischen Volkes erhielt, als den wir ihn wenig später erwähnt finden (s.u.).
Während in Griechenland der Zweite Makedonische Krieg die Truppen Philipps V. band,
setzte Antiochos III., der 198 die Eroberung Koilesyriens abgeschlossen hatte, 198/197 zur
(meist friedlichen) Eroberung der teils freien, teils vordem ptolemaisch, dann makedonisch
besetzten und nun von Philipp geräumten Städte Kleinasiens an, in Kilikien, Lykien, Karien,
Ionien und Äolien. 197 scheint er auch pergamenisches (oder zumindest von den Attaliden als
gegenwärtig pergamenisch betrachtetes) Gebiet bedroht zu haben, glaubt man einer
pergamenischen Gesandtschaft, welche Rom um Hilfe gegen Antiochos bat. Der Senat
beantwortete diese Bitte unter Verweis auf beider amicitia mit Rom allerdings abschlägig,
entschloß sich aber immerhin zur Sendung einer Gesandtschaft, welche Antiochos um
Räumung dieser Territorien bitten sollte (Liv. 32,8; v.a.16: gratum eum facturum senatui si
regno Attali abstineat belloque absistat; aequum esse socios et amicos populi Romani reges
inter se quoque ipsos pacem seruare; vgl. auch Coşkun 2008, 221-223) und hiermit
anscheinend Erfolg hatte (Liv. 32,27,1). Eine rhodische Gesandtschaft, welche Antiochos III.
im selben Jahr das Segeln über die chelidonischen Inseln hinaus verwehren wollte, angeblich
um zu verhindern, daß dieser sich mit Philipp V. verband und somit zu einer Bedrohung für
Rom wurde, beschwichtigte der Seleukidenkönig unter Verweis auf die Freundschaft, die
auch ihn mit Rom verband (Liv. 33,20,6: nam Romanorum amicitiam se non uiolaturum
argumento). Zur selben Zeit und wie zur Bestätigung dieser Aussage soll dann auch eine
kürzlich nach Rom geschickte seleukidische Gesandtschaft nach Kleinasien zurückgekehrt
sein, welche am Tiber mit allen Ehren empfangen und verabschiedet worden war (Liv.
33,20,9: tum forte legati redierant ab Roma comiter auditi dimissique) und wahrscheinlich die
Antwort des König auf die Erkundigungen der eben erwähnten, mit pergamenischen
Angelegenheiten befaßten römische Gesandtschaft überbracht haben dürfte.
Nach dem Ende des Zweiten Makedonischen Kriegs und der Verkündung der griechischen
Freiheit 196 (Polyb. 18,44) waren tatsächlich graduell die römischen Truppen aus den
besetzten Gebieten abgezogen worden. Jedoch wurde schnell deutlich, daß die zahlreichen,
nun umso stärker aufbrechenden innerstädtischen Rivalitäten ohne Roms Vermittlung und
somit dessen indirekte Hegemonie nicht zu überwinden waren. Herdurch erschien die Parole
von der „Freiheit“ Griechenlands in zweifelhaftem Licht, und die mit den Friedensregelungen
Unzufriedenen, v.a. der Aitolerbund, blickte sehnsüchtig nach Osten, wo sie in Antiochos III.
ein Gegengewicht gegen Rom zu finden hofften. Eine ganz ähnliche Situation herrschte in
Kleinasien: Auch Antiochos III. hatte hier die in vielfachen Abhängigkeitsverhältnissen
befindlichen Poleis unter Vorgabe ihrer „Befreiung“ dem seleukidischen Bündnissystem
meist friedlich angegliedert, scheiterte aber 197/6 vor Smyrna, Lampsakos und Ilion in der
Troas, die sich seinem Vordringen zu entziehen suchten (Liv. 33,38,1-9; 35,42; 37,35,3) und
nun ihrerseits an Rom appellierten (Smyrna: Tac. ann. 4,56,1; Lampsakos: ILampsakos 4).
Diese Lage, in welcher die römische und seleukidische Einflußsphäre einander zu überlappen
begannen und einzelne Bündner, mit der „Freiheit“ des eigenen Systems enttäuscht, an die
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
60
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
jeweils andere Hegemonialmacht appellierte, wurde dadurch noch komplizierter, daß
Antiochos III. im Jahre 196 unter Berufung auf Besitzansprüche, die auf Seleukos I.
zurückgingen (Polyb. 18,51), küstennahe Teile Thrakiens besetzte und die Dardanellenstadt
Lysimacheia neuaufbauen ließ (Liv. 33,38,10-14; App. Syr. 2), die seleukidische Herrschaft
also wieder auf den europäischen Kontinent ausdehnte und römische Interessen wie auch die
indirekte Kontrolle über das soeben besiegte Makedonien zu bedrohen schien, dies
gleichzeitig aber propagandistisch als „Befreiung“ der Griechen von den barbarischen
Thrakern darstellte (App. Syr. 6). Gleichzeitig bemühte sich Eumenes II., seit 197 neuer
König des pergamenischen Reiches und traditioneller Bündnispartner Roms gegen
Makedonien, durch römische Unterstützung eine auswärtige Festigung seines von
seleukidischen Besitzungen fast ganz umgebenen Territoriums zu finden. Die aus dieser
gegenseitigen Verklammerung sich ergebenden diplomatischen Reibungen führten zu einer
graduellen Erkältung der bis dahin recht positiven römisch-seleukidischen Beziehungen und
einer teils nicht zu Unrecht als „Kalter Krieg“ (Badian 1959) bezeichneten Phase zunehmend
drohender sich gebärdender Gesandtschaften. Die Übersiedlung Hannibals an Antiochos’ Hof
im Jahre 195 (Liv. 33,49,5-8; vgl. Diod. 28,10; Iust. 31,2,5; App. Syr. 4) und dessen
Aufnahme in den Kreis der philoi des Königs belastete das Verhältnis zu Rom dann zusätzlich
und weckte bei den Römern Angst vor einer punisch-seleukidischen Umklammerung.
Die Aufeinanderfolge dieser Gesandtschaften kann hier nur in aller Kürze rekonstruiert
werden, ist aber in den Geschichtswerken des Polybios und des Titus Livius in seltener
Vollständigkeit erhalten. Nach Ende des Zweiten Makedonischen Kriegs hatte, wie erwähnt,
der römische Feldherr T. Quinctius Flamininus (cos. 198) bei den Isthmischen Spielen 196
die „Freiheit“ aller griechischen Poleis und Bundesstaaten verkündet; eine Freiheit, die sich
auch auf die ehemals von Philipp besetzten, nun aber dem Seleukidenreich angeschlossenen
kleinasiatischen Städte bezog (Polyb. 18,44). Glaubt man Polybios und Livius, teilten
Flamininus und eine mit der Friedensregelung beauftragte zehnköpfige Senatskommission
daher schon im Sommer 196 den seleukidischen Gesandten Hegesianax und Lysias, welche
die Römer in Korinth aufsuchten, mit, ihr König solle alle vormals freien, ptolemaischen oder
makedonischen Städte freilassen und von einem Ausgreifen auf Europa absehen (Polyb.
18,47,1-4 und Liv. 33,34,1-4). Die Römer beantworteten die seleukidische Gesandtschaft
dann ihrerseits mit der Sendung dreier der zehn erwähnten Senatoren – es handelte sich hier
um P. Cornelius Lentulus (praet. 203), L. Terentius (praet 187) und P. Villius (cos. 199) –
denen sich dann noch L. Cornelius (Lentulus) (cos. 199) zugesellte, welcher ursprünglich
vom Senat zur Versöhnung von Ptolemaios und Antiochos ausgesandt worden war (Polyb.
18,49). Ort der Verhandlungen war das von Antiochos zum Sitz seines Sohnes Seleukos IV.
bestimmte (Polyb. 18,51,8; Liv. 33,40f.; App. Syr. 3), wiedererrichtete thrakische
Lysimacheia, wo sich der König 196 aufhielt und wohin soeben Hegesianax und Lysias
zurückgekehrt waren. Inhaltlich brachten die Römer dieselben Forderungen vor wie bereits in
Korinth (Polyb. 18,49-51; Liv. 33,39-40; Diod. 28,12; App. Syr. 2-3) und drangen energisch
auf einen Friedensschluß mit Ptolemaios V. und die Rückgabe der ptolemaischen
Besitzungen. Die Verhandlungen wurden unterbrochen, nachdem Antiochos den Römern
zusicherte, keinen weiteren Einbruch in ihre Interessenssphäre unternehmen zu wollen (Liv.
33,41,4-5), ihnen die geplante Heirat Kleopatras I., der Tochter Antiochos’, mit Ptolemaios V.
(Polyb. 18,51,10; Liv. 33,40,3) ankündigte und somit ihre Forderungen auf territoriale
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
61
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Restitutionen als gegenstandslos erwies. 195 kam es, zusammen mit der offiziellen
Verlobung, zu einem Friedensschluß, bei dem die Ptolemaier den Status quo anerkannten; im
Winter 194/3 wurde die Eheschließung dann in Raphia vollzogen und der Fünfte Syrische
Krieg offiziell beendet (Polyb. 16,18ff.; 39,3; 28,1,4; Liv. 35,13,5).
Ein Jahr später griff Antiochos dann die Verhandlungen wieder auf und schickte im Herbst
195 eine Gesandtschaft zu Flamininus, welche dieser allerdings aufgrund der Abwesenheit
der zehn Senatskommissare nach Rom verwies (Liv. 34,25,1-2); ob die Gesandten aber
tatsächlich in die Hauptstadt weiterreisten, ist unsicher. Im Winter 194/3 ergriff Antiochos
dann erneut die Initiative und sandte Menippos und Hegesianax nach Rom, wo sie mit der
bereits genannten Senatskommission zusammentrafen, der sich auch Flamininus zugesellte
(Liv. 34,57,1-59,8). Das Ziel dieser Mission beschreibt Livius (34,57,6) mit den Worten
„Freundschaft zu erbitten und ein Bündnis zu schließen“ (cum ad amicitiam petendam
iungendamque societatem venissent). Rom beantwortete diese Gesandtschaft dann 193 mit
einer Gegengesandtschaft unter P. Sulpicius (cos. 211), wiederum P. Villius und P. Aelius
(cos. 201) (Liv. 34,49,8; in 35,13,6 wird Aelius aber nicht mehr erwähnt). Die Gesandten
nahmen zunächst einen Umweg über Pergamon, wo sie mit König Eumenes zusammentrafen,
der sie erneut gegen Antiochos einzunehmen suchte und Sulpicius, der krank geworden war,
seine Gastfreundschaft gewährte (Liv. 35,13,6-10). Villius traf danach mit Hannibal in
Ephesos zusammen (35,14,1-4) und erreichte im Spätsommer den König im pisidischen
Apameia. Die Verhandlungen wurden aber unterbrochen, als die Nachricht vom Tod
Antiochos’, des gleichnamigen Sohns des Königs, eintraf (Liv. 35,15,1-7). Im Herbst
desselben Jahres kam es dann zu einer Besprechung zwischen Villius, dem wieder genesenen
Sulpicius und Minnion, einem Vertrauten des Königs, in Ephesos (Liv. 35,16,1-17,2; App.
Syr. 12), ohne daß weitere Resultate gezeitig wurden. Allerdings gilt es zu bedenken, daß wir
hier in so großem Maße von der rhetorischen Ausgestaltung der Verhandlungen durch Livius
abhängen, daß es schwer fällt, eventuelle tatsächliche Fortschritte der Besprechungen konkret
zu messen.
Gleichzeitig mit diesen Verhandlungen begann die Verquickung der Ereignisse mit der Lage
in Griechenland: Die Aitoler, unzufrieden mit den ihrer Ansicht nach unbefriedigenden
territorialen Zugewinnen im Zweiten Makedonischen Krieg, suchten seit Ende 194 ein
antirömisches Bündnis zwischen den Antigoniden und Sparta zustandezubringen (35,12,113,1), das sie auch auf Antiochos ausweiten wollten, scheiterten aber vorläufig mit ihren
Bemühungen an der Vorsicht des Königs. Nach dem Scheitern der Verhandlungen von 193
aber scheint es, glaubt man Livius, im Kriegsrat des Seleukidenkönigs zu einem Kurswechsel
gekommen zu sein, der nicht zuletzt dadurch hervorgerufen wurde, daß der Akarnane
Alexander dem König garantierte, sein Kommen nach Griechenland würde automatisch ein
Bündnis mit Sparta und Makedonien hervorrufen. Auch die Hoffnung, Hannibal würde die
Karthager zu einem erneuten Kampf gegen Rom motivieren können, soll maßgeblich zur
Entscheidungshilfe beigetragen haben (Liv. 35,17,3-19,7), wobei es schwer fällt, hier Realität
und römischen metus Punicus mit der Furcht vor einer neuen Verheerung Italiens (Liv.
34,60,3-6) zu unterscheiden. Im Frühjahr 192 versuchten die Aitoler dann, die Verhältnisse in
Griechenland tatsächlich zu ihren Gunsten zu beeinflussen, indem ihre Volksversammlung ein
Dekret verabschiedete, welches Antiochos als Schiedsrichter zwischen dem Aitolerbund und
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
62
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Rom nach Griechenland bestellte (35,32,1-33,8). Um das Terrain hierfür vorzubereiten
unterstützten sie im Frühjahr und Sommer 192 innere Revolten in Chalkis (Liv. 35,37,338,14), Demetrias (Liv. 35,34,6-11) und Sparta (35,35,1-19), die freilich nur in Demetrias
gelangen.
Als die Römer dann eine Restitution der Verhältnisse forderten, appellierten die Aitoler an die
Hilfe Antiochos III., den sie zum Feldherrn ihres Bundes bestimmten (App. Syr. 12; Liv.
35,43-45). Antiochos III. allerdings setzte im Herbst 192 mit einer nur verhältnismäßig
schwachen Streitmacht von 10.000 Mann nach Griechenland über (Liv. 35,43,6). Diese
geringe Truppenstärke soll römischerseits als Beispiel für die Schwäche und
Unzuverlässigkeit des Königs hervorgehoben worden sein – Flamininus habe den Achaiern
gesagt: uideretis uix duarum male plenarum legiuncularum instar in castris regis (Liv.
35,49,9) –; wie der Erfolg der Anabasis und die Truppenstärke von Magnesia zeigen, ist aber
kaum zu leugnen, daß Antiochos III. sowohl die erforderlichen strategischen Talente als auch
die nötige Truppenstärke gehabt hätte, weitaus umfangreichere Kontingente nach
Griechenland zu senden oder zumindest nachkommen zu lassen, wenn er es gewünscht hätte.
Es wird daher meist angenommen, die geringe Truppenstärke sei ein Zeichen für Antiochos’
Unterschätzung der Ernsthaftigkeit des römischen Engagements in Griechenland; auch habe
er die Bereitschaft der Spartaner und Makedonen zur Unterstützung der Aitoler zu positiv
eingeschätzt und daher Truppen sparen wollen. Gleichzeitig kann aber auch angenommen
werden, daß der König mit seinen nur geringen Truppen gegenüber Rom wie auch den
anderen griechischen Städten zu demonstrieren suchen mochte, daß nur eine Unterstützung
des Aitolischen Bundes gegenüber seinen inneren griechischen Feinden beabsichtigt war,
keinesfalls aber eine ständige Besatzung Griechenlands durch die Seleukiden oder gar eine
Gefährdung Italiens, wie dies römischerseits seit langem suggeriert worden war (Liv. 33,39,7;
Liv. 34,60,3). Auch mag er gehofft haben, hierdurch Sparta wie Makedonien eher zum
Bündnis gewinnen und die Achaier zur Neutralität bewegen zu können als durch ein
sofortiges Auftreten als neue erdrückende Hegemonialmacht und potentieller Konkurrent.
Dieses vorsichtige Kalkül ging allerdings nicht auf: Nur Amynander, der König der
Athamanen, fand sich zu einem Bündnis mit Antiochos III. bereit, während Makedonien, auf
das sich die Hoffnungen Antiochos’ III. gerichtet hatten, neutral blieb, und der Achaierbund
sich infolge der Warnungen des Flamininus gegen die aitolischen Bündnisgesuche aussprach
(Liv. 35,48,1-50,2). Bald erfolgte dann auch die römische Kriegserklärung (Liv. 36,1,1-2,2),
welcher sich auch Rhodos und Pergamon anschlossen, und in deren Folge 191 die
seleukidisch-aitolischen Truppen bei den Thermopylen durch die überlegenen römischen
Legionen des diesjährigen Consuls M’. Acilius Glabrio (cos. 191) geschlagen wurden (App.
Syr. 17ff.; Liv. 36,15ff.; Iust. 31,6,5). Antiochos III. zog sich nach Kleinasien zurück und
versuchte – letztlich erfolglos – zwischen Herbst 191 und Sommer 190, in den Seeschlachten
von Korykos, Panormos, Side und Myonessos, das römische Eindringen in die Ägäis zu
verhindern. Die Seeherrschaft ermöglichte dem römischen Befehlshaber L. Cornelius Scipio
(cos. 190), in dessen Begleitung sich auch der Hannibalgegner P. Cornelius Scipio
Africanus (cos. 205 und 194) befand, das Übersetzen nach Kleinasien. Ein Friedensangebot
des Antiochos, der wesentlich den gegenwärtigen territorialen Status quo mit Räumung zu
benennender kleinasiatischer Städte und Erstattung der Hälfte der römischen Kriegskosten
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
63
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
vorschlug, wurde von den Römern abgelehnt, während der König seinerseits die nunmehr von
den Römern geforderte Aufgabe des transtaurischen Asiens nicht akzeptieren konnte (Liv.
37,35). Ende 190 kam es dann zur Entscheidungsschlacht von Magnesia, die mit einer
seleukidischen Niederlage endete (Liv. 37,38-40; App. Syr. 31ff.; Iust. 31,8).
In der Folge wurden die Kampfhandlungen wesentlich eingestellt und mit Hilfe einer
zehnköpfigen Senatskommission (Liv. 37,55-56,5; Polyb. 21,24) Friedensverhandlungen
eingeleitet (Polyb. 21,16-17; Liv. 37,45,3-21; App. Syr. 38), die 188 in den Friedensvertrag
von Apameia mündeten. Antiochos III. verlor sämtliche Besitzungen jenseits des Tauros, die,
sofern es sich um Poleis handelte, welche rechtzeitig von Antiochos abgefallen waren, in die
Unabhängigkeit entlassen wurden, ansonsten aber größtenteils an Pergamon und in kleinerem
Maße auch an Rhodos fielen. Gleichzeitig wurde auch die seleukidische Flotte auf 10 Schiffe
beschränkt, und der Besitz von Kriegselephanten wie auch die Rekrutierung von Söldnern aus
den Gebieten jenseits des Tauros gänzlich verboten. Rom erlegte den Seleukiden auch die
Zahlung schwerer Reparationen auf, indem Antiochos III. und seine Nachfolger in den
nächsten 12 Jahren insgesamt 15.000 Talente Silber aufbringen mußte (Polyb. 21,43 und
46,9f.; Liv. 38,38; App. Syr. 39). Dies bedeutete zwar wahrscheinlich „nur“ die gesamten
Steuereinkünfte eines einzigen Jahres, implizierte aber in Anbetracht der Tatsache, daß ein
Großteil der seleukidischen Tribute in Naturalien bezahlt worden sein dürften, eine erhebliche
logistische Belastung, welche es dem Seleukidenreich für lange Zeit unmöglich gemacht
haben dürfte, einen ausreichenden Staatsschatz in Edelmetall zu unterhalten, der zur raschen
Deckung militärischer oder diplomatischer Bedürfnisse unumgänglich war. Es dürfte daher
wohl dieser sprunghaft angestiegene Bedarf nach Silber gewesen sein, welcher Antiochos III.
zur Konfiskation von Tempelschätzen wie in einem Heiligtums in der Elymais bewogen hat,
wo er einem überraschenden Aufstand der ansässigen Bevölkerung 187 zum Opfer fiel (Diod.
28,3; 29,15; Iust. 32,2,1f.).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Wilcken, Ulrich: Antiochos [25] III, RE I 2, 1894, 2459-2470.
Ameling, Walter: Antiochos [5] III. Megas, DNP 1, 1996, 768-796.
Badian, Ernst: Rome and Antiochos the Great: A Study in Cold War, CPh 54, 1959, 81-99.
Bevan, Edwyn R.: The House of Seleucus, London 1902.
Bickerman, Elias: Bellum Antiochicum, Hermes 67, 1932, 47-76
Bouché-Leclercq, Auguste: Histoire des Séleucides (323–64 avant J.-C.), Bd. 1, Paris 1913, 123-226
Coşkun, Altay: Rückkehr zum Vertragscharakter der amicitia? Zu einer alt-neuen Forschungskontroverse, in:
ders. (Hg.): Freundschaft und Gefolgschaft in den auswärtigen Beziehungen der Römer (2. Jh. v.Chr. – 1. Jh.
n.Chr.), Frankfurt/M. 2008, 209-230.
Dreyer, Boris: Die römische Nobilitätsherrschaft und Antiochos III. (205-188 v.Chr.), Hennef 2007.
Engels, David: Antiochos III. der Große und sein Reich. Überlegungen zur "Feudalisierung" der seleukidischen
Peripherie, erscheint in: K.S. Schmidt et al. (Hgg.): Orient und Okzident – Antagonismus oder Konstrukt?
Machtstrukturen, Ideologien und Kulturtransfer in hellenistischer Zeit, Marburg 2012.
Errington, Robert M.: The Alleged Syro-Macedonian Pact and the Origins of the Second Macedonian War,
Athenaeum 49, 1971, 336-354.
Errington, Robert M.: Rome against Philip and Antiochos, CAH VIII 2, 1989, 244-289.
Grainger, John D.: Antiochos III in Thrace, Historia 15, 1996, 329-343.
Grainger, John D.: A Seleukid Prosopography and Gazetteer, Leiden/New York/Köln 1997.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
64
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Grainger, John D.: The Roman War of Antiochos the Great, Leiden/Boston 2002.
Grainger, John D.: The Syrian Wars, Leiden/Boston 2010.
Gruen, Erich S.: Rome and Rhodes in the Second Century B.C., CQ 69, 1975, 58-81.
Gruen, Erich S.: The Hellenistic World and the Coming of Rome, Los Angeles 1984.
Ma, John: Antiochos III and the Cities of Western Asia Minor, Oxford 1999.
Magie, David: The „Agreement“ between Philip V and Antiochos III for the Partition of the Egyptian Empire,
JRS 29, 1939, 32-44.
Mastrocinque, Attilio: Osservazioni sull’Attivita di Antiochi III nel 197 e nel 196 A.C., La Parola del Passato 31,
1976, 307-322.
McDonald, A.H.: The Treaty of Apamea (188 B.C.), JRS 57, 1967, 1-8.
Mehl, Andreas: Zu den diplomatischen Beziehungen zwischen Antiochos III und Rom 200-193 v.Chr., in C.
Borker/M. Donderer (Hgg.): Das antike Rom und der Osten, Nürnberg 1990, 143-155.
Schmitt, Hatto H.: Untersuchungen zur Geschichte Antiochos’ des Großen und seiner Zeit, Wiesbaden 1964.
Schmitt, Hatto H.: Seleukidenreich II 7 (Antiochos III), LH 2005, 968-972
DaE/20.02.12 – r/20.02.12
Antiochos IV. Epiphanes, König des Seleukidenreichs [Var. Mithridates]
0. Onomastisches
Antiochos IV. ist unter dem Namen Antiochos erst zum Zeitpunkt seiner Geiselhaft in Rom
belegt. Da aber überliefert ist, daß Antiochos III. neben seinem ältesten Sohn Antiochos (†193
v.Chr.; Liv. 35,15,2; App. Syr. 12) und Seleukos IV. Philopator auch einen dritten Sohn
namens Mithridates hatte (SEG 37, 1987, 859 Z. 3; Liv. 33,19,9f.), und weitere Söhne nicht
bekannt sind, ist zu vermuten, daß Antiochos IV. und Mithridates identisch sind und die
Annahme des dynastischen Namens auf den Tod des erstgeborenen Sohnes Antiochos folgte
(Grainger 1997, 22; Schmitt 2005, 972).
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemmata Seleukiden
Sohn Antiochos’ III. des Großen, Bruder und Nachfolger Seleukos’ IV. Philopators, Vater
und Vorgänger Antiochos’ V. Eupators; angeblich auch Vater Alexandros’ I. Balas’. Regierte
ab 175 das Seleukidenreich; starb 164 auf einem Feldzug in der Persis an einer Krankheit.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Ist Antiochos IV. mit dem Sohn Antiochos’ III. mit Namen Mithridates identisch, so
kommandierte er 197 das seleukidische Landheer (Liv. 33,19,9f.). Aufgrund der Bedingungen
des Vertrags von Apameia verbrachte er die Zeit von 189 bis um 175 als Geisel in Rom und
durfte als einzige Geisel auch nach Ablauf der üblichen Dreijahresfrist nicht ausgelöst werden
(App. Syr. 39). Die Haft scheint eine äußerst ehrenvolle gewesen zu sein, errichtete ihm der
römische Staat doch sogar einen eigenen Sitz (Ascon. in Pison. p. 127), so daß Antiochos sich
auch später mit Dankbarkeit an seine Behandlung erinnerte (Liv. 42,6,9; Iust. 34,3,2). Hier
lernte er wohl auch die Stärken des römischen Staatswesens aus eigener Anschauung kennen,
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
65
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
wie seine späteren Maßnahmen vermuten lassen.
175 wurde er – vielleicht auf Druck Roms (Will 1972, 617; Mittag 2006, 40) – von seinem
Bruder und Vorgänger Seleukos IV. durch die Stellung seines eigenen Sohnes Demetrios I.
ausgelöst (Polyb. 31,12,1; App. Syr. 45). Als Seleukos IV. angeblich einem Giftanschlag
erlag, befand sich Antiochos IV. gerade in Athen. Mit Hilfe Eumenes’ II. von Pergamon und
seines Bruders Attalos (II.) (OGIS I 248) gelangte er nach Syrien, wo der Kanzler Seleukos’
IV., Heliodoros, geschlagen und getötet werden konnte (App. Syr. 45); vielleicht wurde
Heliodor auch erst jetzt die Ermordung seines Königs untergeschoben (Grainger 1997, 23).
Zu Beginn seiner Regierung herrschte Antiochos IV. wohl als Vormund des Antiochos
Eupator, des minderjährigen ältesten Sohns Seleukos’ IV., in dessen Namen eine kurze Zeit
auch Münzen geprägt wurden (Abb. Mørkholm 1964). Schon bald aber ließ Antiochos IV.
seinen Mitregenten durch Andriskos töten (Diod. 30,7,2; Ioh. Ant. frg. 58 = FHG IV 558;
Porphyr. FGrH 260 F 32,11), so daß schon um 170 die gemeinsame Münzprägung aufhörte
(Mørkholm 1966).
Die Beziehungen zu Rom, welches vielleicht sogar die Ermordung Seleukos’ IV. veranlaßt
hatte (Bouché-Leclercq 1913, 240f.), waren zunächst recht gut. So schickte Antiochos IV. 173
eine unter Führung des Apollonios stehende Gesandtschaft nach Rom mit Bitte um eine
Erneuerung der amicitia, wie sie seit dem Vertrag von Apameia mit seinem Vater Antiochos
III. bestanden hatte (Liv. 38,38,12-18). Auch erstattete der Gesandte die aus der
Regierungszeit Seleukos’ IV. noch ausstehenden, im Vertrag von Apameia festgesetzten
Kriegsschuldzahlungen und verehrte dem römischen Staat Goldgefäße im Wert von 500
Pfund, um sich für die Verspätung von Zahlung und amicitia-Anfrage zu entschuldigen (Liv.
42,6,8 und 10): Petere regum, ut, quae cum patre suo societas atque amicitia fuisset, ea
secum renovaretur, imperaretque sibi populus Romanus, quae bono fidelique socio regi
essent imperanda [...]. Legatis benigne responsum, et societatem renovare cum Antiocho,
quae cum patre eius fuerat, A. Atilius praetor urbanus iussus. Trotz der engen Beziehungen
zu Perseus, welcher Antiochos’ IV. Cousine Laodike geheiratet hatte (Liv. 42,12,3; IG XI 4,
1074), ließ sich Antiochos bei Ausbruch des Dritten Makedonischen Kriegs 172 ungeachtet
der Werbungen des Perseus nicht zu einer Auseinandersetzung mit Rom hinreißen und
versicherte einer nach Antiocheia entsendeten Senatsgesandtschaft seine fides (Liv. 42,26,7f.).
Der von Ägypten angefachte (2 Makk 4,21; Diod. 30,2) Sechste Syrische Krieg, in welchem
es Antiochos IV. von 171 bis 168 gelang, Zypern und große Teile Ägyptens zu besetzen und
sich als Vormund des Ptolemaios VI. Philometor zum Pharao krönen zu lassen (Porphyr. 260
frg. 49), brachte allerdings Rom und das Seleukidenreich an den Rand einer Krise, wenn auch
Antiochos IV. sich 171 (Polyb. 27,19; Liv. 42,29,6) und 169 (Polyb. 28,1) Rom gegenüber für
seine Unternehmungen ausdrücklich rechtfertigte. Da der Besitz Ägyptens und seiner
Getreidereserven das Machtgleichgewicht im östlichen Mittelmeer gefährlich zu Gunsten der
Seleukiden verschoben hätte, versuchte bereits 169 eine römische Gesandtschaft unter T.
Numisius Tarquiniensis (169 Xvir zur Neuordnung Makedoniens), Frieden zu vermitteln
(Polyb. 29,25,3), mußte allerdings unverrichteter Dinge wieder Antiocheia verlassen. Daß
Antiochos allerdings am Wohlwollen Roms weiterhin gelegen war, beweist seine
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
66
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Gesandtschaft nach Rom aus dem Jahr 169, welche dem Senat 50 Talente als Geschenk
brachte (Polyb. 28,22), und seine fortgesetzte Weigerung, sich mit Perseus zu verbünden
(Polyb. 29,4,9).
Erst als der Perseuskrieg mit der Schlacht bei Pydna am 22.6.168 beendet werden konnte, sah
Rom sich wohl imstande, angemessen auf die Situation zu reagieren, und sandte 168 C.
Popillius Laenas cos. 172 und 158 zu Antiochos nach Ägypten. Dieser forderte am „Tag von
Eleusis“ bei Alexandreia Anfang Juli 168 unter Verweis auf ein Senatus consultum ultimativ
von Antiochos IV. noch vor der protokollarischen Begrüßung, sofort das Land zu räumen
oder den Krieg mit Rom zu riskieren, indem er am Boden einen Kreis um den König
zeichnete und ihm nur so lange Bedenkzeit einräumte, wie er innerhalb dieses Kreises
verharre. Antiochos IV. erklärte daraufhin seinen Abzug aus Ägypten und Zypern (Polyb.
29,27; Cic. Phil. 8,23; Liv. 45,12,1-6; Diod. 31,2; Vell. 1,10; App. Syr. 66; Iust. 34,3,1f.; Val.
Max. 6,4,3; Plin. nat. 34,24; Plut. mor. 202f-203a; Porph. FGrH 260 F 50; Zon. 9,25). Erst
danach wurde er von Laenas als amicus und socius begrüßt (Liv. 45,12,6): Obstupefactus tam
violento imperio parumper cum haesitasset, 'faciam' inquit 'quod censet senatus'. Tum demum
Popilius dextram regi tamquam socio atque amico porrexit.
Durch demotische Zeugnisse wissen wir, daß Antiochos IV. sein Versprechen tatsächlich hielt
und schon am 30.7.168 Ägypten verließ (ostr. dem Hor 2 recto Z. 4-7). Unklar bleiben muß
allerdings, ob er eine dauerhafte Annektion Ägyptens angestrebt hatte oder lediglich die
Staatsfinanzen durch die ägyptische Beute entlasten wollte, und inwieweit Laenas’
provokatives Verhalten die Kriegsbereitschaft Roms oder lediglich sein eigenes Interesse an
einer militärischen Auseinandersetzung spiegelt (vgl. hierzu Mittag 2006, 214-222 mit Lit.).
Trotz dieser diplomatischen Erniedrigung oder gerade, um diese zu verschleiern, entsandte
Antiochos Botschafter nach Rom, um seine Glückwünsche zum Sieg über Perseus
auszudrücken und dem Senat gegenüber, dessen Order er wie göttliche Befehle betrachte,
erneut seine Ergebenheit auszudrücken (Liv. 45,13,2f.): Antiochi legati referentes omni
victoria potiorem pacem regi, senatui quae placuisset, visam, eumque haud secus quam
deorum imperio legatorum Romanorum iussis paruisse; gratulati dein de victoria sunt, quam
ope s<ua>, si quid imperatum foret, adiuturum regem fuisse. Der Senat dankte ihm
seinerseits für sein Einlenken (Liv. 45,13,6): Responsum ab senatu est Antiochum recte atque
ordine fecisse, quod legatis paruisset, gratumque id esse senatui populoque Romano.
Auch die 166 in Daphne veranstaltete Militärparade (Polyb. 30,25-26) erhellt die
Ambivalenzen römisch-seleukidischer Beziehungen unter Antiochos IV. So ist etwa explizit
überliefert, daß Antiochos IV. mit der Parade angeblich die 167 in Amphipolis abgehaltene
Feier des L. Aemilius Paullus Macedonicus cos. 182 und 168 nach seinem Sieg bei Pydna
(Liv. 45,32,8) übertreffen wollte (Polyb. 30,25,1). Interessanterweise ließ Antiochos IV.
zudem als ersten Truppenteil eine 5000 Mann starke Abteilung von Soldaten vorbeiziehen,
welche nach römischem Vorbild bewaffnet waren (Polyb. 30,25,3). Gleichzeitig wurden auch
Truppenteile vorgeführt, deren Unterhalt ganz offen gegen den Vertrag von Apameia verstieß
(Elephanten: Polyb. 30,25,11 und 27,1; kleinasiatische Söldner: Polyb. 30,25,4f.). Bedenkt
man, daß sich neben griechischen sicherlich auch römische Vertreter im Publikum befanden,
wird das ganze Ausmaß der gezielten Provokation deutlich, bewies die Parade doch die
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
67
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Eigenständigkeit des Seleukidenreichs, fand aber im Rahmen diplomatischer Beziehungen
größter Herzlichkeit statt, welche eine römische Intervention zu diesem Zeitpunkt unmöglich
machten, sicherlich aber die später durch die Gesandtschaft des Cn. Octavius cos. 165
betriebene Kontrolle der Vertragsbedingungen im Jahr 162 wesentlich bedingte (Polyb. 31,2
und 11; App. Syr. 46).
Daß Antiochos daher später nachgesagt wurde, um 166 zusammen mit Eumenes II. gegen
Rom komplottiert zu haben (Liv. per. 46: Legati Prusiae regis questi sunt de Eumene quod
fines suos popularetur dixeruntque eum conspirasse cum Antiocho adversus populum R.), ist
daher sowohl in Anbetracht seiner Bewunderung für Rom als auch der umfangreichen
logistischen Vorbereitungen zur Rückeroberung des Ostens seines Reiches unwahrscheinlich.
Zwar dürften die seit 175 bestehenden engen Beziehungen zwischen den ehemaligen
Erzfeinden Pergamon und dem Seleukidenreich den Römern mit ihrer Politik des divide et
impera nicht gefallen haben (Bevan 1902, 133), doch selbst eine bald nach der Parade von
Daphne eigens nach Antiocheia gereiste römische Gesandtschaft unter Tib. Sempronius
Gracchus cos. 177 und 163 vermochte keinerlei Indizien über etwaige antirömische
Vorbereitungen festzustellen und wußte nur von dem überaus freundlichen Empfang des
Königs zu berichten (Polyb. 31,3.5.6,7; Diod. 31,16). Die amicitia wird dementsprechend
wohl bis zum Tod des Königs bestanden haben, da Alexandros I. Balas 153 noch hierauf
verweisen sollte (Polyb. 33,18,7).
Die bereits durch die Vorführung römisch ausgerüsteter Soldaten deutlich werdende
Bewunderung für Rom scheint trotz aller Rivalität echt gewesen zu sein, da Antiochos IV.
nicht nur das römische Militär, sondern auch das Staatswesen als überlegen anerkannte und
versuchte, zum Teil auf seine Hauptstadt Antiocheia zu übertragen. So ist überliefert, der
König habe Aedilität und Volkstribunat eingeführt und, in eine Toga gekleidet, selbst um
diese Ämter kandidiert und diese auch gewissenhaft ausgeübt. Auch ließ er in Antiocheia
einen Tempel des Iuppiter Capitolinus errichten (Liv. 41,20; Gran. Licin. 28). In Anbetracht
dieser Exzentrizitäten sowie seines für einen hellenistischen Monarch oft sehr
unprotokollarischen Gebarens wurde sein Kultbeiname Epiphanes von den verständnislosen
Zeitgenossen in den Spitznamen Epimanes, „der Verrückte“, umgeändert (Polyb. 26,1,5;
30,25,1).
Außenpolitisch war die Regierung Antiochos’ IV. vor allem durch den Versuch einer
vorsichtigen strategischen Arrondierung des bereits durch Seleukos IV. finanziell und
diplomatisch gefestigten Seleukidenreichs gekennzeichnet. Zum einen bemühte Antiochos IV.
sich daher um eine Vereinheitlichung durch Gründung bzw. Statuserhöhung zahlreicher
Städte. Wenn diese auch generell kaum auf Widerstände stieß, löste er allerdings mit der
Einsetzung einer Besatzung in Jerusalem 168 und mit seinem hellenisierenden Opferedikt 167
den Makkabäeraufstand aus (1 Makk 1; 2 Makk 5), welcher bis zu seinem Tod fortdauern
sollte, wenn auch 164 fast eine Einigung erzielt werden konnte und auch von einer nach
Antiocheia reisenden römischen Gesandtschaft gutgeheißen wurde (2 Makk 11,34-38). Zum
anderen suchte Antiochos nach einer Sicherung der Nord- und Ostgrenzen des Reiches durch
Rückgewinnung der verlorenen Klientelkönigreiche. So brachte er 165 das unter Artaxias,
einem Strategen Antiochos’ III., abgefallene Armenien (Strab. 11,528) wieder unter
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
68
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
seleukidische Herrschaft (App. Syr. 45 und 66; Diod. 31,17a) und versuchte (vergeblich), den
Schatz des Anaïtis-Tempels in der Elymais einzuziehen (Polyb. 31,9; 1 Makk. 6,1-3; 2 Makk.
1,13-17; Diod. 31,18a). Antiochos IV. starb Ende 164 während des Versuchs der
Rückeroberung der Oberen Satrapien in der Persis an einer Krankheit (2 Makk. 9,5f.; App.
Syr. 66).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Wellmann, Max: Antiochos [27] IV. Epiphanes, RE 1,2, 1894, 2470-2476.
Mehl, Andreas: Antiochos [6] IV., DNP 1, 1996, 769.
Aymard, André: Autour de l’avènement d’Antiochos IV, Historia 2, 1951, 49-72.
Bevan, Edwyn R.: The House of Seleucus, London 1902, 126-177.
Bouché-Leclercq, Auguste: Histoire des Séleucides (323-64 avant J.-C.), Bd. 1, Paris 1913, 244-306.
Bunge, Jochen G., Theos Epiphanes. Zu den ersten 5 Regierungsjahren Antiochos’ IV. Epiphanes, Historia 23,
1974, 57-85.
Bunge, Jochen G., Die Feiern Antiochos’ IV. Epiphanes in Daphne im Herbst 166, Chiron 6, 1976, 53-71.
Grainger, John D.: A Seleukid Prosopography and Gazetteer, Leiden/New York/Köln 1997, 22-27.
Gruen, Erich S.: Rome and the Seleucids in the Aftermath of Pydna, Chiron 6, 1976, 73-95.
Mittag, Peter: Antiochos IV. Epiphanes. Eine politische Biographie, Berlin 2006.
Morgan, M.Gwyn, The Perils of Schematism: Polybius, Antiochus Epiphanes and the „Day of Eleusis“, Historia
39, 1990, 37-87.
Mørkholm, Otto: The Accession of Antiochos IV of Syria. A Numismatical Comment, ANSMN 11, 1964, 63-76
(A3/P22).
Mørkholm, Otto: Antiochus IV of Syria, Kopenhagen 1966.
Paltiel, Eliezer: Antiochos IV and Demetrios I of Syria, Antichthon 13, 1979, 42-47.
Paltiel, Eliezer: Antiochus IV Epiphanes and Roman Politics, Latomus 41, 1982, 229-254.
Schmitt, Hatto H.: Seleukidenreich II 8 (Antiochos IV.), LH 2005, 973f.
Swain, Joseph W.: Antiochus Epiphanes and Egypt, CPh 39, 1944, 73-94.
Will, Edouard: Rome et les Séleucides, ANRW I 1, 1972, 590-632.
Zambelli, M.: L’Ascesa al trono di Antioco IV Epifane di Siria, RivFil 88, 1960, 363-389.
DaE/28.07.08–r/01.08.08
Antiochos V. Eupator, König des Seleukidenreichs
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemmata Seleukiden
Sohn und Nachfolger Antiochos’ IV. Epiphanes. Um 173 v.Chr. geboren; regierte als
Mitregent ab 170, als König ab 164 das Seleukidenreich; wurde 162 auf Befehl seines
Cousins und Nachfolgers Demetrios I. Soter ermordet.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Antiochos’ IV. hatte seinen minderjährigen Sohn Antiochos V. schon um 170 nominell zum
Mitregenten gemacht, um die berechtigten Herrschaftsansprüche des späteren Demetrios I.,
des seit 175 im römischen Exil befindlichen Sohns Seleukos’ IV., zu verhindern (Polyb.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
69
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
31,12,1; App. Syr. 45). Als er 165 zur Rückeroberung Armeniens und der Oberen Satrapien
aufbrach, hinterließ er seinen Sohn unter der Vormundschaft des epi ton pragmaton Lysias,
der mit der Niederschlagung des Makkabäeraufstands betraut worden war (1 Makk 3,32; 2
Makk 10,11 und 11,1). Kurz vor seinem Tod 164 bestimmte Antiochos IV. allerdings
angeblich seinen philos Philippos zum tropheus des Knaben und gab ihm Diadem,
Purpurmantel und Siegelring als Herrschaftszeichen (1 Makk 6,14f. und 55-63; Ios. ant. Jud.
12,360f.); wobei diese Nachricht vielleicht nur eine Fiktion ist, die der Selbstlegitimierung
des Philippos dienen sollte (Gruen 1976, 80).
Als der Tod Antiochos’ IV. bekannt wurde, rief Lysias den Sohn des Königs als Antiochos V.
zum König aus. Antiochos V. wurde auch von Rom anerkannt, welches die Ansprüche des
Demetrios nicht berücksichtigte (Polyb. 31,12,9; App. Syr. 46), da eine
Vormundschaftsregierung willkommene Gelegenheit bot, das unter Antiochos IV. gefährlich
erstarkte und außenpolitisch aktive Seleukidenreich besser zu kontrollieren (Polyb. 31,2,10)
und auf die Einhaltung der Vertragsbestimmungen von Apameia zu drängen. Ob anläßlich der
Anerkennung Antiochos’ V. die amicitia erneuert wurde, ist nicht explizit überliefert, aber
höchstwahrscheinlich.
Lysias war zwar 162 militärisch so erfolgreich, den aufständischen Iudas Makkabaios zu
schlagen und gegen Jerusalem zu ziehen (1 Makk 6,18-54; Ios. ant. Iud. 12,361-378), konnte
die Situation strategisch aber nicht ausnutzen, da in der Zwischenzeit bekannt wurde, daß
Philippos, der das seleukidische Heer aus dem Osten zurückführte, einen Aufstand angezettelt
hatte und gegen Antiocheia zog. Dies zwang Lysias zu einem Friedensvertrag mit dem
Makkabäer, in welchem der bei Lysias befindliche Antiochos V. das von seinem Vater
angeordnete Opferedikt (1 Makk 1; 2 Makk 5) wieder aufhob (1 Makk 6,57-60; Ios. ant. Iud.
12,379-382). Somit konnten die nötigen Truppen freigestellt werden, um im selben Jahr
Philippos zu schlagen, der in der Zwischenzeit die Hauptstadt besetzt hatte (1 Makk 6,18f.; 2
Makk 11f.; Ios. ant. Iud. 12,362f.).
162 traf auch eine römische Gesandtschaft ein, welche aus Cn. Octavius cos. 165, Sp.
Lucretius praet. 172 und L. Aurelius Orestes cos. 157 bestand und die Einhaltung der
Vertragsbestimmungen von Apameia kontrollieren sollte, gegen die Antiochos IV. bei seiner
166 veranstalteten Militärparade von Daphne (Polyb. 30,25-26) und der Vorführung von
Elephanten (Polyb. 30,25,11. 27,1; Einsatz von Elephanten gegen die Makkabäer auch bei 1
Makk 6,30) und kleinasiatischen Söldnern (Polyb. 30,25,4f.) so flagrant verstoßen hatte.
Octavius ließ daher die Elephanten lähmen und die überzähligen Kriegsschiffe verbrennen
(Polyb. 31,2,8-11; App. Syr. 46); sicherlich wurde auch auf die Einhaltung der Klausel
geachtet, welche eine Anwerbung transtaurischer Söldner verbot. Diese Maßnahmen lösten
den Zorn der syrischen Bevölkerung aus, so daß Octavius im Gymnasium von Laodikeia am
Meer von einem gewissen Leptines ermordet wurde (Polyb. 31,11; Liv. per. 46; App. Syr.
46).
Hieraus entstand ein diplomatischer Zwischenfall ersten Ranges, welchem Antiochos V.
durch eine Entschuldigungsgesandtschaft gegenüber dem Senat zu begegnen suchte (Polyb.
31,11,2), welche sicherlich auch die amicitia beschwor, wenn dies auch nicht wörtlich
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
70
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
belegbar ist. Der Senat unterließ es allerdings zunächst, Stellung zu beziehen, versagte
allerdings dem Demetrios auf seine offizielle Anfrage hin erneut seine Entsendung als König
nach Syrien (Polyb. 31,2,6). Da zudem die Verantwortlichen der Ermordung nicht ausgeliefert
wurden (dies geschah erst 160: Polyb. 32,33,5), mußte die ganze Situation den Römern die
Instabilität der politischen Lage im Seleukidenreich vor Augen führen, die auch sonst durch
Gesandte gemeldet wurde (Polyb. 31,12,3). Nicht zufällig glückte es daher auch Demetrios,
mit Hilfe des Polybios und des ptolemaischen Botschafters Menyllos von Alabanda aus dem
römischen Exil zu flüchten und Syrien zu erreichen (Polyb. 31,11-15; App. Syr. 47; Diod.
18). Hier gelang es ihm rasch, viele Anhänger zu finden und sowohl Lysias als auch seinen
Cousin Antiochos V. gefangenzunehmen und hinzurichten (OGIS I 252; 1 Makk 6f.; 2 Makk
14; Ios. ant. Iud. 12,389f.; Liv. per. 46; App. Syr. 47).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Wellmann, Max: Antiochos [28] V. Eupator, RE 1,2, 1894, 2476f.
Mehl, Andreas: Antiochos [7] V. Eupator, DNP 1, 1996, 769f.
Bevan, Edwyn R.: The House of Seleucus, London 1902, 178-187.
Bouché-Leclercq, Auguste: Histoire des Séleucides (323-64 avant J.-C.), Bd. 1, Paris 1913, 307-315.
Ehling, Kay: Untersuchungen zur Geschichte der späten Seleukiden (164-63 v.Chr.), Stuttgart 2008, 111-121.
Grainger, John D.: A Seleukid Prosopography and Gazetteer, Leiden/New York/Köln 1997, 27-28.
Gruen, Erich S.: Rome and the Seleucids in the Aftermath of Pydna, Chiron 6, 1976, 73-95.
Marasco, Gabriele: L’uccisione del legato Gn. Ottavio (162 aC) e la politica Romana in Siria, Prometheus 1986,
226-238.
Schmitt, Hatto H.: Seleukidenreich II 7 (Antiochos V.), LH 2005, 974.
Will, Edouard: Rome et les Séleucides, ANRW I 1, 1972, 590-632.
DaE/29.07.08–r/01.08.08/06.03.10
Antiochos VI. Epiphanes Dionysos, König des Seleukidenreichs [Var. Alexandros]
0. Onomastisches
Appian bezeichnet Antiochos VI. als Alexandros (App. Syr. 68). Ob es sich hierbei um den
ursprünglichen Geburtsnamen handelt, der später zugunsten des dynastischen Namens
Antiochos aufgegeben wurde, ist nicht klar. Nach Erfolgen gegen Demetrios II. nahm
Antiochos die Beinamen Epiphanes Dionysos an (Newell, SMA S. 62, Nr. 216ff.; Houghton,
CSE 232ff.; Wildwinds, Art. Antiochus VI), so daß hier zum erstenmal ein Seleukidenkönig
mit einem der olympischen Götter gleichgesetzt wurde (Taeger 1957, Bd. 1, S. 322). Zum
Beinamen Epiphanes vgl. auch Diod. 33,4a. Ios. ant. Iud. 13,218 nennt ihn Theos, wohl in
Anspielung auf Epiphanes.
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemmata Seleukiden
Um 147 v.Chr. geboren; Sohn des Alexandros I. Balas und der Kleopatra Thea (Liv. per. 52;
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
71
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
App. Syr. 68; hier Alexandros). Er wurde von dessen General Diodotos Tryphon 145 als
Usurpator gegen Demetrios’ II. Theos Philadelphos Nikator eingesetzt und kontrollierte
größere Teile Südsyriens bzw. nach der Gefangenschaft des Demetrios auch den Norden.
142/1 oder 139/8 wurde er von Diodotos ermordet, als dieser selbst die Herrschaft übernahm.
2. Verhältnis zu den Römern und Karriereverlauf
Antiochos VI. wurde bei dem Araberfürst Iamblichos (1 Makk 1,39f.; Diod. 33,4a) bzw.
Malchos/Malichos (Ios. ant. Iud. 13,131) aufgezogen. Als sich 145 nach dem Tod
Alexandros’ I. dessen General Diodotos erhob, nahm dieser das Kleinkind zu sich und rief ihn
als Antiochos VI. zum Herrscher aus (1 Makk 11,54; Diod. 33,4a; Ios. ant. Iud. 13,144; vgl.
Houghton 1992 und 1993). Nach einer Niederlage Demetrios’ II. besetzten die Truppen des
Diodotos Südsyrien sowie Antiocheia (zur Frage, ob die Krönung erst hier stattfand, vgl.
Ehling 2008, 166). Dank einer Allianz mit dem Makkabäer Ionathan (1 Makk 11,57f.; Ios.
ant. Iud. 13,145f.) reduzierten sie Demetrios II. ganz auf Nordsyrien, Kilikien, Mesopotamien
und Medien. Damals nahm Antiochos die Beinamen Epiphanes Dionysos an (s.o. 0.).
Nach der Gefangennahme und Ermordung des Jonathan und dem Seitenwechsel der Juden,
die sich unter Simon nunmehr Demetrios II. anschlossen, wurde die Situation für Antiochos
VI. und Diodotos schwierig; 142/1 scheinen die beiden von Demetrios II. aus Antiocheia
vertrieben worden zu sein (Ehling 2008, 178f.).
Bald hierauf starb Antiochos VI., angeblich von Diodotos ermordet, der selbst die
Königswürde usurpierte. Der Mord mag allerdings auch der Diodotos-feindlichen Propaganda
zugeschrieben werden und somit die von ihm verbreitete Version, der Knabe sei an den
Folgen eines ärztlichen Eingriffs verstorben, der Wahrheit entsprechen (hierzu Grainger 1997,
28 und Ehling 2008, 179). Das Datum ist umstritten: Die letzte antiochenische Münzprägung
trägt das Datum 143/2, die letzte Münze Antiochos’ VI. aus Ptolemais 142/1. Auch in den
babylonischen Tafeln wird Antiochos VI. nur noch für das Jahr 141 erwähnt (Sachs/Hunger
1996, III 153, Nr. 140, Z. 36). Vielleicht war der Kinderkönig also schon 141/40 tot, es sei
denn, man nimmt mit Kolbe 1926, 63ff. an, daß Diodotos zwar 142 den Königstitel
übernommen, Antiochos VI. aber noch 4 Jahre lang eine untergeordnete Mitregentschaft
zugestanden habe. Dem würde entsprechen, daß Diodotos seinen Schützling nach Liv. per. 52
und 55; Diod. 33,28; Ios. ant. Iud. 13,218 und Iust. 36,1,7 erst ermordete, als Demetrios II.
während seines Partherfeldzugs 139/8 in längere Gefangenschaft geriet. 1 Makk. 13,31
präzisiert allerdings, der Mord habe vor Beginn des Partherkriegs stattgefunden, und Ios. ant.
Iud. 13,218 schreibt dem König ausdrücklich eine 4jährige Regierungszeit zu, was deutlich
auf 142/1 als letztes Regierungsjahr verweist. Vgl. Fischer 1972; Brodersen 1989, 229f.; vor
allem Ehling 2008, 178f.
Da die Beziehungen zu den Römern angesichts des Alters des Königs ohnehin ausschließlich
der Initiative seines Förderers Diodotos Tryphon zuzuschreiben sind, werden diese im Eintrag
zu letzterem behandelt.
3. Auswahlbibliographie
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
72
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Wellmann, Max: Antiochos [29] VI. Epiphanes Dionysios, RE 1,2, 1894, 2477f.
Mehl, Andreas: Antiochos [8] VI. Epiphanes Dionysios, DNP 1, 1996, 770.
Schmitt, Hatto H.: Art. Seleukidenreich II 12 (Diodotos Tryphon; sic), in: LH 2005, 977-978.
Baldus, Hans R.: Der Helm des Tryphon und die seleukidische Chronologie der Jahre 146-138 v.Chr., in: JNG
20, 1970, 217-239.
Bevan, Edwyn R.: The House of Seleucus, London 1902, 226-330.
Bouché-Leclercq, Auguste: Histoire des Séleucides (323-64 avant J.-C.), Bd. 2, Paris 1913, 353-357.
Brodersen, Kai: Appians Abriss der Seleukidengeschichte (Syriake 45,232-70,369). Text und Kommentar,
München 1989.
Ehling, Kay: Untersuchungen zur Geschichte der späten Seleukiden (164-63 v.Chr.), Stuttgart 2008, 165-180.
Fischer, Thomas: Zu Tryphon, in: Chiron 2, 1972, 201-213.
Grainger, John D.: A Seleukid Prosopography and Gazetteer, Leiden/New York/Köln 1997, 28f.
Houghton, Arthur: The Revolt of Tryphon and the Accession of Antiochos VI at Apamea, SNR 71, 1992, 119141.
Houghton, Arthur: The Accession of Antiochos VI at Apamea: the Numismatic Evidence, in: Tony Hackens
(Hg.), Proceedings of the XIth International Numismatic Congress, Leuven 1993, Bd. 1, 277-280.
Houghton, Arthur: Coins of the Seleucid Empire from the Collection of Arthur Houghton, The American
Numismatic Society, New York 1983, 232ff. (CSE)
Kolbe, Walther: Beiträge zur syrischen und jüdischen Geschichte, Stuttgart 1926.
Newell, E.T.: The Seleucid Mintof Antioch, New York 1918, S. 62, Nr. 216ff. (SMA)
Sachs, Abraham J./Hunger, Hermann: Astronomical Diaries and Related Texts from Babylonia, vol. III: Diaries
from 164 B.C. to 61 B.C., Wien 1996.
Taeger, Fritz: Charisma. Studien zur Geschichte des antiken Herrscherkults, 2 Bde., Stuttgart 1957.
Wildwinds: Art. Ancient Coinage of Seleucia, Antiochos VI.
URL: http://www.wildwinds.com/coins/greece/seleucia/antiochos_VI/i.html [09.03.2010]
DaE/08.11.09–r/09.03.10
Antiochos VII. Megas Soter Euergetes Kallinikos (Sidetes), König des Seleukidenreichs
0. Onomastisches
Antiochos wuchs im pamphylischen Side auf, weswegen er inoffiziell Sidetes genannt wurde.
Zu den weiteren Herrscherbeinamen s. unter 2.
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemmata Seleukiden
Antiochos VII. wurde 164 als zweiter Sohn Demetrios’ I. Soter und Bruder des Demetrios II.
Theos Philadelphos Nikator geboren (Euseb. chron. 1,255 Schoene). Nach (oder kurz vor) der
Gefangennahme seines Bruders durch die Parther 138 erhob er sich gegen den Usurpator
Diodotos Tryphon und erlangte 137 die Alleinherrschaft, die er bis 129 ausübte. Damals starb
er im Kampf gegen die Parther, und die Macht fiel wieder an seinen aus der Gefangenschaft
freigelassenen Bruder zurück. Antiochos VII. war Vater des Antiochos IX. Kyzikenos und
angeblicher Adoptivvater von Alexandros II. (Zabinas).
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
73
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
2. Verhältnis zu den Römern und Karriereverlauf
Nach der Usurpation Antiochos’ VI. und Diodotos’ Tryphon 145 und der Gefangennahme
Demetrios’ II. 138 durch die Parther (1 Makk 14,1ff.; Ios. ant. Iud. 13,219; App. Syr. 67; Iust.
38,9; zum Datum vgl. Sachs/Hunger 1996, III S. 167, Nr. 137, Z. 10) drohte das Reich an den
Usurpator Diodotos zu fallen. Jedoch versuchte Antiochos VII. im Frühjahr 138, die Partei
seines Bruders erneut zu vereinen und somit die Dynastie zu retten. Möglicherweise ist aber
die Intention der Machtergreifung nicht nach (so die übliche Ansicht: Grainger 1997, 29),
sondern bereits vor der Gefangennahme seines Bruders zu datieren und somit als Usurpation
zu werten (Ehling 2008, 184). Auf Rhodos warb Antiochos VII. zahlreiche Söldner an (1
Makk 15,3) und überzeugte einige Truppenteile des Diodotos, zu ihm überzugehen (Ios. ant.
Iud. 13,221f.; 1 Makk 15,10). Zudem konnte er gegen weitreichende Zugeständnisse (1 Makk
15,3-9; allerdings in ihrer Historizität umstritten, vgl. Ehling 2008, 186f.) die Unterstützung
des Makkabäers Simon gewinnen. Überdies warb er mit großzügigen Offerten um den
Anschluß der wichtigen syrischen Städte; daher stammt wohl auch der Beiname Euergetes,
der seit Beginn der Münzprägung erscheint.
Die Unterstützung der syrischen Städte erfolgte allerdings eher zögerlich (Ios. ant. Iud.
13,222), bis Kleopatra Thea 138 das Heiratsangebot Antiochos VII. annahm. Angeblich war
sie wegen der Heirat ihres Ehemanns Demetrios II. mit der parthischen Prinzession
Rhodogune erzürnt (1 Makk. 14,1-3; Ios. ant. Iud. 13,219; App. Syr. 67f.; Iust. 38,9). Dessen
Bruder gebar sie nun fünf Kinder, von denen das letzte (Antiochos IX.) später Bedeutung
erlangte (Euseb. chron. 1,257 Schoene). Vielleicht hat Antiochos VII. zumindest diplomatisch
die Unterstützung der Römer genossen: Es ist unsicher, ob P. Cornelius Scipio Aemilianus
(cos. I 147, cos. II 134) bei seiner Mission im Osten zusammen mit L. Caecilius Metellus
Calvus (cos. 142), Sp. Mummius (leg. 146) sowie dem Philosophen Panaitios von Rhodos
im Jahr 139 (Diod. 33,28b; Athen. 12,549d–e = Poseidon. FGrH 87 F 6 [= F 126 Theiler = p.
249 Malitz]; Iust. 38,8,8-11) Demetrios II. (Ehling 2008, 182), Diodotos (vgl. Cavaignac
1951) oder sogar Antiochos VII. aufgesucht hat (Bilz 1935, 46; Will 1972, 625), war das Ziel
doch inspicienda sociorum regna (Iust. 38,8,8). Hierbei mag Scipio den späteren Antiochos
VII. sogar schon auf Rhodos (Cic. rep. 3,47) besucht haben und entscheidenden Anteil an
dessen Machtergreifung und offiziellen Anerkennung gehabt haben.
In diesem Sinne vermutete Liebmann-Frankfort sogar einen gezielten Politikwechsel der
Römer, die sich nunmehr mit dem Schwächezustand des Seleukidenreichs zufrieden zeigten
und angesichts der parthischen Ausdehnung Syrien zu einem Pufferstaat umfunktionieren
wollten (Liebmann-Frankfort 1969, 128-132). Dies ließe sich mit der Information in
Verbindung bringen, Antiochos VII. habe Scipio Africanus im Jahr 134 Geschenke nach
Numantia gesandt; diese habe der römische Feldherr keineswegs zurückgesandt, sondern mit
Freuden akzeptierte und zur Belohnung verdienter Soldaten verwandt, was immerhin eine
offizielle Anerkennung des Seleukidenkönigs impliziert (Liv. per. 57): Scipio amplissima
munera missa sibi ab Antiocho, rege Syriae, cum celare aliis imperatoribus regum munera
mos esset, pro tribunali accepturum se esse dixit omniaque ea quaestorem referre in publicas
tabulas iussit: ex his se viris fortibus dona esse daturum (vgl. auch App. Iber. 84). Doch mag
es sich hierbei nicht unbedingt nur um eine Dankesbezeugung für die Anerkennung der
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
74
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Herrschaft gehandelt haben (Astin 1967, 127; 138; 177), sondern zugleich um die Suche des
neuen Königs nach einem einflußreichen Interessenvertreter in Rom.
Antiochos VII. gewann allmählich Nordsyrien, dann Phoinikien zurück und schloß Diodotos
zuerst in Dora, darauf in Apameia ein (Ios. ant. Iud. 13,224). Dort gab dieser sich wohl noch
137 den Tod gab oder wurde getötet (Strab. 14,5,2 [668C]; App. Syr. 68; Iust. 36,1,8; 1 Makk
15,39). Die darauffolgende Zeit nutzte Antiochos zunächst dazu, das Reich wieder zu einen
(Iust. 36,1,9 und 38,10,1) und die Juden zu bekriegen. Hier ist vor allem die wohl von 135 bis
134 andauernde (zur Datierung Ehling 2008, 195f.) Belagerung des Makkabäers Hyrkanos in
Jerusalem zu erwähnen, welche mit der Unterwerfung der Eingeschlossenen und der
Schleifung der Mauern beendet werden konnte (Diod. 34,1; Ios. ant. Iud. 13,236-248; Iust.
36,1,10). Dabei trugen ihm seine ostentative Wertschätzung ihres Kultes (Ios. ant. Iud.
13,242; Plut. mor. 184d-f) und seine Weigerung, die Juden vernichten (Diod. 35/4, 5 =
Poseid. FGrH 87 F 109), die Sympathien der Belagerten und den Beinamen Eusebes ein. Eine
jüdische Gesandtschaft an den römischen Senat mit Bitte um Unterstützung der
Rückerstattung abgetretener Gebiete fand scheinbar keine günstige Aufnahme (Ios. ant. Iud.
13,259-266), was eine positive Politik Roms Antiochos VII. gegenüber implizieren mag (erst
unter Antiochos IX. sollte die Gesandtschaft Auswirkungen zeigen). Teils wird aber auch
vermutet, die Milde des Herrschers den Juden gegenüber sei ein tangibles Resultat römischer
Vermittlung gewesen (Rajak 1981).
Nach der Befriedung des Reiches nahm Antiochos VII. zusätzlich zu Euergetes auch die Titel
Megas (OGIS 255f.; Iust. 13,10,1), Soter (Ios. ant. 13,10,1), Kallinikos (SEG 19,9094) und
Eusebes (Ios. ant. 13,8,2) an. Hierbei bezieht sich Megas sicher nicht nur auf die Größe der
Wohltaten den Städten gegenüber (Houghton 1986), sondern – in bewußter Anspielung auf
Antiochos III. – vor allem auf den geplanten Feldzug zur Rückgewinnung des
Zweistromlands und des iranischen Plateaus (hierzu ausführlich Fischer 1970). Nachdem er
seinen (freilich schon 129 verstorbenen) Sohn Antiochos mit dem Beinamen Epiphanes zum
Mitkönig ausgerufen hatte (vgl. Ehling 1996), wandte er sich Anfang 131 mit einem großen
Heer (Diod. 34,17) gegen die Parther unter Phraates II., gewann das Zweistromland zurück
(Ios. ant. Iud. 13,251) und nahm Ende 131 den Großkönigstitel an (Syll.4 244f.; Iust. 38,10,6).
Als Antiochos VII. ein Friedensangebot des Phraates mit den Bedingungen beantwortete, den
Bruder auszuliefern, alle eroberten Gebiete zu restituieren und Tribut für Parthien zu zahlen
(Diod. 34,15), kam es zur Ablehnung dieser Bedingungen und zur Fortsetzung der
Kampfhandlungen. Antiochos VII. gelangte 130 bis nach Medien (Athen. 10,439e).
Anfang 129 erlag er aber aufgrund des Aufstands städtischer Bevölkerungen gegen Übergriffe
seleukidischer Truppen und aufgrund des Verrats seiner Bundesgenossen (Diod. 34,16f.; Ios.
ant. Iud. 13,253; App. Syr. 38; Iust. 38,10,8-10). Sein Sohn Seleukos (nicht zu verwechseln
mit Seleukos V.) geriet in parthische Gefangenschaft (vgl. Fischer 1970, 49ff.); der Leiche
Antiochos’ VII. erwies der Partherkönig jedoch königliche Ehren und sandte sie in einem
silbernen Sarg nach Syrien (Iust. 38,10,9); der Versuch der Parther, Syrien zu besetzen,
gelang allerdings nicht, da skythische Hilfstruppen sich in diesem Moment gegen Phraates
erhoben (Iust. 42,1,3; Diod. 34/35,18).
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
75
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
130/29, also noch vor dem Entscheidungskampf, hatte der Partherkönig – sei es, um
Antiochos VII. entgegenzukommen, sei es, um Bruderzwist zu provozieren (Iust. 38,10,7) –
Demetrios II. aus der Gefangenschaft freigelassen. Bei seiner Rückkehr nach Syrien stellte
sich diesem Alexandros II. (Zabinas), der angebliche Adoptivsohn des Antiochos VII. (Iust.
39,1,6), entgegen.
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Wellmann, Max: Antiochos [30] VII. Euergetes, RE 1,2, 1894, 2478-2480.
Mehl, Andreas: Antiochos [9] VII. Euergetes, DNP 1, 1996, 770.
Schmitt, Hatto H.: Art. Seleukidenreich II 13 (Demetrios II.; sic), in: LH 2005, 978-983.
Astin, Alan E.: Scipio Aemilianus, Oxford 1967.
Bevan, Edwyn R.: The House of Seleucus, London 1902, 236-245.
Bouché-Leclercq, Auguste: Histoire des Séleucides (323-64 avant J.-C.), Bd. 2, Paris 1913, 370-384.
Cavaignac, Eugène: À propos des monnaies de Tryphon, L’ambassade de Scipio Émilien, Rev Num 13, 1951,
131-138.
Colledge, Malcolm A.R.: The Parthians, London 1967.
Dabrowa, Edward: Könige Syriens in der Gefangenschaft der Parther, in: Tyche 7, 1992, 45-54.
Ehling, Kay: Untersuchungen zur Geschichte der späten Seleukiden (164-63 v.Chr.), Stuttgart 2008, 185-205.
Ehling, Kay: Die Nachfolgeregelung des Antiochos VII. vor seinem Aufbruch in den Partherkrieg (131 v. Chr.),
JNG 46, 1996, 31-38.
Fischer, Thomas: Untersuchungen zum Partherkrieg Antiochos’ VII. im Rahmen der Seleukidengeschichte,
München 1970.
Grainger, John D.: A Seleukid Prosopography and Gazetteer, Leiden/New York/Köln 1997, 29-31.
Houghton, Alfred: A „Victory“ Coin of Antiochus VII, in: Proceedings of the 10th International Congress of
Numismatics 1, 1986, 65.
Liebmann-Frankfort, Thérèse: La frontière orientale dans la politique extérieure de la république romaine depuis
le traité d’Apamée jusqu’à la fin des conquêtes asiatiques de Pompée, Brüssel 1969.
Rajak, Tessa: Roman Intervention in a Seleucid Siege of Jerusalem?, GRBS 22, 1981, 65-81.
Sachs, Abraham J./Hunger, Hermann: Astronomical Diaries and Related Texts from Babylonia, vol. III: Diaries
from 164 B.C. to 61 B.C., Wien 1996.
Will, Édouard: Rome et les Séleucides, ANRW I 1, 1972, 590-632.
DaE/08.11.09–r/23.02.10
Antiochos VIII. Epiphanes Philometor Kallinikos (Grypos), König des Seleukidenreichs
0. Onomastisches
Der inoffizielle Beiname Grypos bezog sich auf seine ausgeprägte Nase: Iust. 39,1,9; Athen.
12,540a. Zu den weiteren Beinamen s. unter 2.
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienvrhältnisse
 Stemmata Seleukiden
Um 142/1 v.Chr. (Ios. ant. Iud. 13,365) wurde er als jüngerer Sohn des Demetrios II. Theos
Philadelphos Nikator und der Kleopatra Thea geboren. Folgte 125 seinem älteren Bruder
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
76
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Seleukos V. als Herrscher des Seleukidenreichs nach. Bald darauf heiratete er zuerst
Kleopatra Tryphaina, dann Kleopatra Selene, beides Töchter seines Onkels Ptolemaios VIII.
Euergetes. Er besiegte den Usurpator Alexandros II. (Zabinas) und kämpfte seit 113 mit
seinem Halbbruder Antiochos IX. Philopator Kyzikenos um die Herrschaft, bevor er 98/97
starb. Seine Söhne Seleukos VI. Epiphanes Nikator und Demetrios III. Theos Philopater Soter
(Eukairos) traten nun als neue Bewerber um das seleukidische Erbe an.
2. Verhältnis zu den Römern und Karriereverlauf
Aufgezogen in Athen (App. Syr. 68), gelangte Antiochos VIII. im Jahr 125 auf den Thron,
nachdem seine Mutter Kleopatra Thea seinen Bruder Seleukos V. ermordet hatte (Euseb.
chron. 1,257f. = Porphyr. FGrH 260 F 32,22; Iust. 39,1,9).
124/23 verbündete er sich mit seinem Onkel Ptolemaios VIII. Euergetes II., der zuvor den
Usurpator Alexandros II. (Zabinas) unterstützt hatte (Ios. ant. Iud. 13,269; Iust. 39,2,2-6;
Euseb. chron. 1,257f. = Porphyr. FGrH 260 F 32,22), nun aber Antiochos seine Tochter .
Kleopatra Tryphaina in die Ehe gab (Iust. 39,2,3). 123 wurde Alexandros II. durch Verrat
oder in der Schlacht gefangengenommen und hingerichtet bzw. beging Selbstmord (Ios. ant.
Iud. 13,269; Iust. 39,2,6; Euseb. chron. 1,257f. = Porphyr. FGrH 260 F 32,22). Damit fiel
Syrien ganz in Antiochos’ Hand. Wahrscheinlich war es anläßlich seines Einzugs in
Antiocheia, daß er den Beinamen Kallinikos annahm (vgl. Ehling 2008, 214). Das Verhältnis
zu Kleopatra Thea verschlechterte sich mit seinen zunehmenden Erfolgen und
Unabhängigkeitsbestrebungen. Ein Vergiftungsversuch der Mutter, die um ihren Einfluß
fürchtete, endete 121 mit ihrem eigenem Tod (App. Syr. 69; Iust. 39,2,7f.); trotzdem legte der
König den Titel Philometor nicht ab (Bellinger 1949, 66 Anm. 31).
Die Usurpation des Antiochos IX. Kyzikenos bestimmte nach einigen Jahren des Friedens (in
den Quellen als Untätigkeit gebrandmarkt: Athen. 210e und 540a-b) spätestens seit 113 (Iust.
39,2,9; irrig Liv. per. 62; vgl. auch Ehling 2008, 217) einen Großteil seiner Regierungszeit
(Ios. ant. Iud. 13,270-272). Nach der überraschenden Besetzung Syriens durch Antiochos IX.
im Jahr 113 mußte Antiochos VIII. (Grypos) nach Aspendos in Verbannung gehen (Euseb.
chron. 1,257f. = Porphyr. FGrH 260 F 32,22; Iust. 39,2,9). Hier wurde er offensichtlich von
der römischen Verwaltung geschützt, zu deren Territorium das Gebiet gehörte (belegt durch
einen zwischen 129 und 126 zu datierenden Meilenstein; vgl. Nollé 1990, 68). Hierauf ist
vielleicht auch Antiochos’ Statuenweihung zu Ehren von Cn. Papirius Carbo cos. 113
zurückzuführen (OGIS I 260), den Antiochos wohl von dessen Statthalterschaft in Asia 115
kannte und der ihm als Consul den Aufenthalt auf römischem Territorium ermöglicht hatte
(Ehling 1997, 218).
Antiochos IX. hatte in der Zwischenzeit Kleopatra (IV), die Schwester der Tryphaina und
ehemalige Frau des Ptolemaios IX. Soter II., geheiratet (vgl. Iust. 39,3,3) und von dieser
militärische Unterstützung erhalten. Um 112 (vgl. Ehling 2008, 218f.) kehrte Antiochos VIII.
zurück und gewann Nordsyrien, indem er Antiochos IX. vor Antiocheia schlug. Gleichzeitig
ermordete Kleopatra Tryphaina ihre Schwester Kleopatra (IV.) (Iust. 39,3,5-11). Bald darauf,
um 111-110/09, gelang es Antiochos IX. (Kyzikenos) aber, Antiocheia zurückzugewinnen
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
77
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
und seinerseits Tryphaina gefangenzunehmen und zu ermorden (Iust. 39,3,12). Daraufhin kam
es zu einer faktischen Reichsteilung, wobei Antiochos IX. Koilesyrien, Antiochos VIII. aber
Syrien erhielt (Euseb. 1,259f. = Porphyr. FGrH 260 F 32,24; die Existenz eines solchen
expliziten Abkommens ist allerdings umstritten).
Trotzdem brachen die Kämpfe wieder aus, waren 104 in vollem Gange (Liv. per. 62; Ios. ant.
Iud. 13,325) und verquickten sich, als beide Seleukidenkönige jeweils für einen der ebenfalls
miteinander rivalisierenden Ptolemaierherrscher Partei ergriffen (Iust. 39,4,3: Antiochos VIII.
für Ptolemaios X.; Antiochos IX. für Ptolemaios IX.; hierzu Van’t Dack 1989). Antiochos
VIII. heiratete um 104 Kleopatra Selene, die Schwester und ehemalige Ehefrau Ptolemaios’
IX. Soter II. (Iust. 39,4,4). Diese Kämpfe waren auch bei der Ermordung Antiochos’ VIII. im
Alter von 45 Jahren (Ios. ant. Iud. 13,365), also um 98/7 (zum umstrittenen Datum vgl. Ehling
2008, 231-233) durch den General Herakleion (Athen. 153b = Poseidon. FGrH 87 F 24) noch
nicht beendet. Seine Söhne Seleukos VI. und Demetrios III. wurden zu seinen politischen
Erben.
Die Schwächung des Reichs seit den Flottenabrüstungsbestimmungen von Apameia, dem
Niedergang von Rhodos und vor allem dem Verlust des Gewaltmonopols der
Seleukidenkönige während der langanhaltenden Bürgerkriege bewirkte eine zunehmende
Unsicherheit der Seewege. Diese Entwicklung hatte sich seit der Usurpation des Diodotos
Tryphon in besonderem Maße verstärkt (Strab. 14,5,2 [668]; vgl. Ormerod 1924; Maróti
1962), da die Piraten nunmehr ungestört feste Stützpunkte an der zum Seleukidenreich
gehörigen, faktisch aber ohne stärkere Flotte unkontrollierbaren kilikischen Küste errichten
konnten. Dieser Zustand fortdauernder Unsicherheit bewog die Römer, 102 mit M. Antonius
Orator (cos. 99) vorübergehend einen Praetor mit proconsularischer Gewalt über die
kilikische Küste zum allgemeinen Schutze der Seefahrt zu ernennen (Liv. per. 68,1). Wenn
Obseq. 44 auch von einer Vernichtung der Seeräuber spricht, wurde doch 99 oder 98 die lex
de provinciis praetoriis erlassen (auch lex de piratis persequendis genannt; hierzu
Hassal/Crawford/Reynolds 1974 und Blümel 1992, S. 13ff.). Diese forderte die Könige von
Cypern, Ägypten, Cyrene und Syrien zur Bekämpfung des Seeräuberunwesens auf und
verordnete die Errichtung eines dauerhaften kilikischen Militärbezirks (eparcheía strategiké).
Die Ostgrenze dieses kilikischen Militärbezirks respektierte bis zu Beginn der 70er Jahre zwar
die Territorialbestimmungen des Vertrags von Apameia, welcher die Taurusgrenze festgelegt
hatte (Pol. 21,42,14; Liv. 38,38,9). So war Seleukeia am Kalykadnos noch 98/7 Residenzstadt
von Seleukos VI. (Ehling 2008, 229) und Ostkilikien somit in seleukidischer Hand verblieben.
Doch implizierte die unmittelbare Festsetzung der Römer in einer traditionell zur
seleukidischen Einflußsphäre gehörenden Region auch konstitutionell eine Gefahr, da die
Seleukiden sich scheinbar gezwungen sahen, zumindest in Ostkilikien das von den Römern
praktizierte System weitgehender lokaler Privilegien zu übernehmen (belegt für das Isis- und
Sarapisheiligtum in Mopsuhestia: Sayar/Siewert/Taeuber 1994), um nicht hinter den Römern
zurückstehen zu müssen (so Ehling 1997, 230). Erst zwischen 78 und 76, also nach dem Tod
von Philipp I. Epiphanes Philadelphos, der vor allem Kilikien kontrollierte, besetzten die
Römer dann unter P. Servilius Vatia Isauricus cos. 79 ostkilikische Städte wie Korykos, um
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
78
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
die Piraten zu bekämpfen, und überschritten dabei erstmals den Taurus (vgl. Flor. 3,6; Eutrop.
6,3,1).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Wellmann, Max: Antiochos [31] VIII. Epiphanes Philometor Kallinikos, RE 1,2, 1894, 2480-2483.
Mehl, Andreas: Antiochos [9] VII. Euergetes, DNP 1, 1996, 770.
Schmitt, Hatto H.: Art. Seleukidenreich II 13 (Demetrios II.; sic), in: LH 2005, 978-983.
Bellinger, Alfred R.: The End of the Seleucids. Transactions and Proceedings of the Connecticut Academy 38,
1949, 51-102.
Bevan, Edwyn R.: The House of Seleucus, London 1902, 250-259.
Blümel, Wolfgang (Hg.): Die Inschriften von Knidos, Teil 1 (IK 41), Bonn 1992.
Bouché-Leclercq, Auguste: Histoire des Séleucides (323-64 avant J.-C.), Bd. 2, Paris 1913, 395-416.
Ehling, Kay: Untersuchungen zur Geschichte der späten Seleukiden (164-63 v.Chr.), Stuttgart 2008, 213-231.
Grainger, John D.: A Seleukid Prosopography and Gazetteer, Leiden/New York/Köln 1997, 31-32.
Hassall, Marc/Crawford, Michael/Reynolds, Joyce: Rome and the Eastern Provinces at the End of the Second
Century B.C., JRS 64, 1974, 195-220.
Houghton, Alfred: The Reigns of Antiochos VIII and Antiochos IX at Antioch and Tarsus, SNR 72, 1993, 87106.
Maróti, E.: Diodotos Tryphon et la piraterie, Acta Antiqua 10, 1962, 187-194.
Nollé, Johannes: Side. Zur Geschichte einer kleinasiatischen Stadt in der römischen Kaiserzeit im Spiegel ihrer
Münzen, Antike Welt 21, 1990, 244-265.
Ormerod, Henry A.: Piracy in the Ancient World, London 1924.
Sayar, Mustafa Hamdi/Siewert, Peter/Taeuber, Hans: Asylie-Erklärungen des Sulla und des Lucullus für das
Isis- und Serapisheiligtum von Mopsuhestia (Kilikien), Tyche 9, 1994, 113-130.
E. Van’t Dack et al.: The Judaean Syrian-Egyptian Conflict of 103-101 B.C. A Multilingual Dossier Concerning
a “War of Sceptres”, Brüssel 1989.
DaE/08.11.09–r/23.02.10
Antiochos IX. Philopator (Kyzikenos), König des Seleukidenreichs
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemmata Seleukiden
Um 135 v.Chr. als jüngster Sohn des Antiochos VII. Megas Soter Euergetes Kallinikos
(Sidetes) und der Kleopatra Thea geboren (Euseb. chron. 1,259f.). Er kämpfte ab 113 mit
seinem Halbbruder Antiochos VIII. Epiphanes Philometor Kallinikos (Grypos) und von 98/97
bis 96 mit dessen Sohn Seleukos VI. Epiphanes Nikator um die Herrschaft im
Seleukidenreich. Unter anderem war er mit Kleopatra (IV.) in erster und Kleopatra Selene in
dritter Ehe verheiratet, später zudem mit der parthischen Prinzessin Britanne.
2. Verhältnis zu den Römern und Karriereverlauf
Nach dem Tod des Vaters im Partherkrieg und der Rückkehr des Demetrios II. Theos
Philadelphos Nikator aus parthischer Gefangenschaft wurde er von seiner Mutter nach
Kyzikos in Sicherheit gebracht (Ios. ant. Iud. 13,217; App. Syr. 68; Euseb. chron. 1,257=
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
79
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Porphyr. FGrH 260 F 32,22; daher auch der Beiname). Seit 113 (Iust. 39,2,9; Liv. per. 62 laut
Ehling 2008, 217 irrig) versuchte er nach Annahme des Beinamens Philopator (vgl. etwa
Houghton 1983 Nr. 332), seinen Halbbruder Antiochos VIII. aus der Herrschaft zu
verdrängen (vgl. allgemein Ios. ant. Iud. 13,270-272). Er legitimierte sein Vorgehen durch die
Behauptung, Antiochos VIII. habe ihn vergiften wollen (Iust. 39,2,19). Nach der
überraschenden Besetzung Syriens durch Antiochos IX. im Jahr 113 mußte Antiochos VIII.
(Grypos) nach Aspendos in Verbannung gehen (Euseb. chron. 1,257,38; Iust. 39,2,9).
Antiochos IX. heiratete in der Zwischenzeit Kleopatra (IV.), die Schwester der Kleopatra
Tryphaina und ehemalige Frau Ptolemaios’ IX. Soters (vgl. Iust. 39,3,3) und erhielt von dieser
militärische Unterstützung. Um 112 (vgl. Ehling 2008, 218f.) kehrte Antiochos VIII. zurück
und gewann Nordsyrien. Er schlug Antiochos IX. (Kyzikenos) vor Antiocheia, und Kleopatra
Tryphaina ermordete ihre Schwester Kleopatra (IV.) (Iust. 39,3,5-11). Bald darauf, um 111110/09, gelang es Antiochos IX. aber, Antiocheia zurückzugewinnen und seinerseits
Tryphaina gefangenzunehmen und zu ermorden (Iust. 39,3,12). Daraufhin kam es zu einer
faktischen Reichsteilung, wobei Antiochos IX. (Kyzikenos) Koilesyrien, Antiochos VIII.
(Grypos) Syrien kontrollierte (Euseb. chron. 1,259f. = Porphyr. FGrH 260 F 32,24).
In Koilesyrien gerieten Antiochos IX. und Iohannes Hyrkanos wegen der Kontrolle Samarias
in Konflikt. Der Versuch, das von den Juden belagerte Samaria zwischen 111 und 108 zu
entsetzen, schlug fehl. Die Unterstützung durch Ptolemaios IX. Soter II. bewirkte zwar keine
dauerhaften Erfolge (Ios. ant. Iud. 13,275-281), ermöglichte den Seleukiden aber eine
Verwüstung Judäas und die Einnahme einiger befestigter Orte. In dieser heiklen Situation
warf der römische Senat sein Gewicht in die Waagschale, indem er um 106 ein senatus
consultum zugunsten des Johannes erließ. Es verlangte den Abzug der Seleukiden aus allen
von den Juden eroberten Festungen und Häfen, einschließlich Joppe (Ios. ant. Iud. 14,247ff.).
Der König zog sich daraufhin nach Tripolis zurück (Ios. ant. Iud. 13,279) und ließ den Krieg,
nunmehr begrenzt auf Samaria, von seinen Generälen Kallimandros und Epikrates
weiterführen. Dabei gaben der Tod des ersteren und die Bestechung des letzteren (Ios. ant.
Iud. 13,280-283) den faktischen Ausschlag für die Einnahme von Samarias und Skythopolis.
104 war der Krieg mit Antiochos VIII. dann wieder in vollem Gange (Liv. per. 62; Ios. ant.
Iud. 13,325). Er verband sich mit den Ereignissen in Ägypten, als Antiochos VIII. für
Ptolemaios X. Alexander I. und Antiochos IX. für Ptolemaios IX. Soter II. Partei ergriff (Iust.
39,4,3, vgl. Van’t Dack 1989). Wenig ist bekannt bis auf die Nachricht von der Hochzeit
Antiochos’ IX. mit Britanne, der Tochter des Partherkönigs Mithridates II. (Ioh. Malal.
208,26). Auch der Tod Antiochos’ VIII. im Jahre 98/7 (im Alter von 45 Jahren: Ios. ant. Iud.
13,365) und die darauffolgende Heirat Antiochos’ IX. mit dessen Witwe Kleopatra Selene
(App. Syr. 69), bewirkte keine Änderung, da der Sohn des Antiochos VIII., Seleukos VI.
Epiphanes Nikator, Haupt seiner Partei wurde. Nachdem Antiochos IX. Antiocheia
eingenommen hatte, kam es zur Entscheidungsschlacht, in der Seleukos VI. siegte. Antiochos
gab sich inmitten der Feinde selbst den Tod (Diod. 34/35,34,1; Ios. ant. Iud. 13,366; App. Syr.
69; Trog. prol. 40; Euseb. chron. 1,259 = Porphyr. FGrH 260 F 32,24).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
80
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Wellmann, Max: Antiochos [32] IX. Philopator, RE 1,2, 1894, 2483f.
Mehl, Andreas: Antiochos [11] IX. Euergetes, DNP 1, 1996, 770f.
Schmitt, Hatto H.: Art. Seleukidenreich II 13 (Demetrios II.; sic), in: LH 2005, 978-983.
Bellinger, Alfred R.: The End of the Seleucids. Transactions and Proceedings of the Connecticut Academy 38,
1949, 51-102.
Bevan, Edwyn R.: The House of Seleucus, London 1902, 253-259.
Bouché-Leclercq, Auguste: Histoire des Séleucides (323-64 avant J.-C.), Bd. 2, Paris 1913, 402-416.
Ehling, Kay: Untersuchungen zur Geschichte der späten Seleukiden (164-63 v.Chr.), Stuttgart 2008, 217-235.
Grainger, John D.: A Seleukid Prosopography and Gazetteer, Leiden/New York/Köln 1997, 32–33.
Houghton, A.: Coins of the Seleucid Empire from the Collection of Arthur Houghton, New York 1983.
Houghton, Alfred: The Reigns of Antiochos VIII and Antiochos IX at Antioch and Tarsus, SNR 72, 1993, 87106.
Van’t Dack, E. u.a.:, The Judaean Syrian-Egyptian Conflict of 103-101 B.C. A Multilingual Dossier Concerning
a “War of Sceptres”, Brüssel 1989.
DaE/08.11.09–r/23.02.10
Antiochos I. Theos Dikaios Epiphanes Philorhomaios Philhellen, König von Kommagene
0. Onomastisches
Belege für die Beinamen z.B. in OGIS I 383-405.
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemma Orontiden
Sohn des Mithradates I. Kallinikos, Vater des Antiochos II. und des Mithradates II. Regierte
ab ca. a. 70, starb vor a. 31. Ließ die prächtige Grabanlage vom Nemrud-Dagh errichten.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Machte L. Licinius Lucullus procos. Ciliciae (et Asiae) 73-66/63 nach dessen Sieg bei
Tigranokerta seine Aufwartung und wurde dabei in seiner Herrschaft bestätigt (Cass. Dio
36,2,5). Sein Machtbereich wurde von Cn Pompeius Magnus procos. 66-62/61 erweitert und
anerkannt (App. Mithr. 114,559). Erhielt a. 59 das Recht, die toga praetexta zu tragen (Cic.
Q. fr. 2,11,2=15 ShB). Informierte M. Tullius Cicero procos. Ciliciae 51/50, von dem er als
unzuverlässig eingeschätzt wurde, über die Aktivitäten der Parther (Cic. fam. 15,1,2=104
ShB; 15,4,3=110), denen er sich später zuwandte. Unterstützte Pompeius im Bürgerkrieg
gegen C. Iulius Caesar (App. civ. 2,49,202). Wurde von P. Ventidius Bassus procos. Syriae
40-38 und M. Antonius belagert, konnte aber eine Übereinkunft mit letzterem schließen
(Plut. Ant. 34,4-7; Cass. Dio 49,20,5; 49,22,1f.; Zonaras 10,26).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Wilcken: Antiochos [37] I. Theos Dikaios Epiphanes Philorhomaios Philhellen, RE 1,2, 1894, 2487-2489.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
81
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Mehl, Andreas: Antiochos [16] I. Theos Dikaios Epiphanes Philorhomaios Philhellen, DNP 1, 1996, 771f.
Facella, Margherita:
. Roman Perception of Commagenian Royalty, in:
Olivier Hekster/ Richard Fowler (Hgg.): Imaginary Kings. Royal Images in the Ancient Near East, Greece
and Rome, München 2005, 87-103.
Facella, Margherita: La dinastia degli Orontidi nella Commagene ellenistico-romana, Pisa 2006, 225-97.
Sanders, Donald H. (Hg.): Nemrud Dagi. The Hierothesion of Antiochus I of Commagene, 2 Bde., Winona
Lake/Ind. 1996.
Sullivan, Richard D.: The Dynasty of Commagene, ANRW II 8, 1977, 763-770.
Sullivan, Richard D.: Near Eastern Royalty and Rome, 100-30 B.C., Toronto 1990, 193-197.
MT/24.11.06–r/30.06.07
Antiochos II., König (?) von Kommagene
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemma Orontiden
Sohn des Antiochos I. Theos; Bruder und Rivale des Mithradates II.; a. 29 hingerichtet.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Nach Ermordung eines Mitgesandten vom jungen Caesar a. 29 nach Rom befohlen,
verurteilt und hingerichtet (Cass. Dio 52,43,1).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Wilcken: Antiochos [38] II., RE 1,2, 1894, 2489f.
Mehl, Andreas: Antiochos [17] II., DNP 1, 1996, 772.
Facella, Margherita: La dinastia degli Orontidi nella Commagene ellenistico-romana, Pisa 2006, 299f.
Sullivan, Richard D.: The Dynasty of Commagene, ANRW II 8, 1977, 778.
Sullivan, Richard D.: Near Eastern Royalty and Rome, 100-30 B.C., Toronto 1990, 198.
MT/24.11.06–r/30.06.07
Antiochos von Askalon
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
Philosoph, Mittelplatoniker, geboren in Askalon, Syria, zu einem Zeitpunkt zwischen 130 und
120 v.Chr. Er wurde etwa nach 110 v.Chr. in Athen Schüler des Philosophen Philon von
Larissa, des Leiters der Akademie, (Cic. Luc. 69). Vermutlich war er auch Schüler des
Stoikers Mnesarchos (August. Acad. 3,41), möglicherweise Schüler des Dardanos (Cic. Luc.
69), und ohne Zweifel ein Freund des Sosos von Askalon, nach dem er eine spätere
Abhandlung benannt hat. Um 88 v.Chr. ging er von Athen nach Alexandria. In dieser Zeit traf
er sich mit dem Römer Licinius Lucullus (s.u.). Zu Beginn seiner Karriere, als Schüler
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
82
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Philons, war Antiochos Skeptiker. Er lehnte jedoch die Lehre Philons bis 87 v.Chr. ab (Cic.
Luc. 64, Plut. Cic. 4,2 usw.). Zurück in Athen, leitete er die so genannte ‘Alte’ oder ‘Fünfte’
Akademie. Um 68/7 v.Chr. starb er im Osten (Cic. Luc. 61; Philodemos, Index Academicorum
34). Sein Bruder Aristos (Plut. Brut. 2,3), rückte auf Antiochos in Athen nach. Vier
philosophische Werktitel sind überliefert: Sosus, Kanonika, De Deorum, und der so genannte
liber ad Balbum missus.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom und den Römern und der Verlauf seiner Karriere
Antiochos hatte eine besondere Beziehung zu L. Licinius Lucullus (cos. 74 v.Chr.).
Antiochos traf sich mit ihm während der ersten Anreise des Lucullus in den Osten. Wir
wissen nicht genau, wo sie sich zuerst getroffen haben, doch Ciceros Lucullus erzählt, dass
Antiochos 87 v.Chr. in seinem Gefolge in Alexandria war (Cic. Luc. 11). Die Quellen
berichten, dass sie enge Freunde wurden, die oft philosophische Themen erörterten (Cic. Luc.
61; Plut. Luc. 42,3f. φίλον ... καὶ συμβιωτὴ ν). Antiochos war wahrscheinlich auch ein
politischer Ratgeber des Lucullus. Denn 68/7 v.Chr. befand er sich „kurz vor seinem Tod“ mit
Lucullus in Syria (Cic. Luc. 61), im Zuge der östlichen militärischen Unternehmungen des
Lucullus.
Auch Cicero traf sich während seines Aufenthaltes in Athen im Jahre 79 v.Chr. mit
Antiochus, wo er seine Vorlesungen im Ptolemaeum hörte (Cic. fin. 5,1, Brut. 315; cf. nat.
deor. 1,6), aber kein Anhänger der Philosophie des Antiochos wurde. Ciceros Freund Atticus
hatte ebenfalls Verbindungungen zu Antiochos (Cic. Acad. 14; leg. 1,54). Ferner sind M.
TerentiusVarro als sein Anhänger (Cic. Att. 13,12,3; Acad. 12) und M. Pupius Piso als sein
Schüler (Cic. fin.5,1) belegt.
3. Auswahlbibliographie
H. v. Arnim.: Antiochos [62], RE 1.2,2493f.
K.-H. Stanzel: Antiochos [20], DNP 1,773f.
Barnes, Jonathan: Antiochus of Ascalon, in: M. Griffin/J. Barnes (eds.): PhilosophiaTogata: Essays on
Philosophy and Roman Society, Oxford 1989, 51–96.
Glucker, John: Antiochus and the Late Academy (=Hypomnemata 56), Göttingen 1978.
Karamanolis, George E.: Plato and Aristotle in Agreement: Platonists on Aristotle from Antiochus to
Porphyry, Oxford 2006, 44–84.
Luck, Georg: Der Akademiker Antiochos (=NoctesRomanae 7), Stuttgart 1953.
Lueder, Annemarie: Die philosophische Persönlichkeit des Antiochos von Askalon, Stuttgart 1940.
Mette, Hans Joachim: Philon von Larisa und Antiochos von Askalon, Lustrum 28/9, 1986/7, 30–55.
AF 05/12/11 – r/05/12/11
Antipatros, Strategos von Judäa
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
83
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
 Stemmata Herodianer
Erstmals a. 67 als Sohn des Antipatros, des ehemaligen strategos des Alexandros Iannaios
von Idumäa, bezeugt. Verheiratet mit Kypros, Vater von Phasael, Herodes, Joseph, Pheroras
und der Salome. Gefolgsmann und engster Berater des Hyrkanos II. A. 47 von C. Iulius
Caesar zum epitropos tōn pragmatōn ernannt. A. 43 ermordet. (Belege unter 2.)
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Überzeugte a. 67/66 Hyrkanos II., gegen Aristobulos II. um das judäische Königtum und das
Hohepriesteramt zu kämpfen; vermittelte dazu die Hilfe des Nabatäerkönigs Aretas III.
Vertrat die Anliegen des Hyrkanos vor Cn. Pompeius Magnus (Ios. bell. Iud. 1,131; ant. Iud.
14,37.43). Gewann nach dessen Ernennung a. 63 zum Hohepriester und Herrscher von Judäa
zunehmend politischen Einfluß.
Unterstützte auf Befehl des Hyrkanos M. Aemilius Scaurus proquaest. pro praet. Syriae 6361 bei dessen Feldzug gegen Aretas mit Getreide, konnte aber schließlich einen Frieden
zwischen beiden vermitteln (Ios. bell. Iud. 1,159; ant. Iud. 14,80f.). A. 57 kämpfte er mit dem
praef. equitum (und künftigem Triumvirn) M. Antonius unter dem Oberkommando des A.
Gabinius cos. 58, procos. Syriae 57-54 gegen Alexandros, den aufständischen Sohn des
Aristobulos (Ios. bell. Iud. 1,162; ant. Iud. 14,84). Antonius bezeichnete ihn deswegen später
als Gastfreund (Ios. bell. Iud. 1,244; ant. Iud. 14,326.381). Gemeinsam mit Hyrkanos
unterstützte Antipatros Gabinius ebenso bei dessen Zug nach Ägypten mit
Getreidelieferungen, Geld, Waffen und Hilfstruppen. Er konnte die Juden in Pelusion zu
dessen Unterstützung bewegen (Ios. bell. Iud. 1,175; ant. Iud. 14,99).
Gabinius orientierte sich bei der Neuordnung Judäas an seinen Wünschen (Ios. bell. Iud.
1,178; ant. Iud. 14,103). C. Cassius Longinus proquaest. Syriae 52 ließ auf seinen Rat hin
mit Peitholaos einen Gefolgsmann des Aristobulos töten (Ios. bell. Iud. 1,180; ant. Iud.
14,120f.).
Im Bürgerkrieg zwischen Pompeius und Caesar unterstützte Antipatros wohl zunächst
Pompeius, schloß sich nach dessen Niederlage aber Caesar an (Ios. bell. Iud. 1,187.195f.).
Unterstützte a. 47 Mithradates von Pergamon bei dessen Zug nach Alexandreia mit Truppen,
um Caesar zu helfen, kämpfte persönlich mit und überredete Ptolemaios von Chalkis,
Iamblichos I. von Emesa und den Nabatäer Malichos sowie die ägyptischen Juden zur
Unterstützung Caesars (Ios. bell. Iud. 1,187-94; ant. Iud. 14,127-36; 16,52-54. Strab., FGrH
91 F 17). Iosephos nennt die Hilfe des Antipatros für Caesar als Grund für die Unterstützung
des Herodes durch Octavian (Ios. ant. Iud. 14,383).
A. 47 erhielt er als Dank von Caesar das römische Bürgerrecht und Abgabenfreiheit und
wurde zum epitropos tōn pragmatōn/ epitropos Ioudaias unter dem Ethnarchen Hyrkanos II.
ernannt (Ios. bell. Iud. 1,195.199f.; ant. Iud. 14,137.141-43; 16,53). A. 46/45 stellte er sich
den Caesarianern beim Kampf gegen Caecilius Bassus in Apameia zur Verfügung (Ios. bell.
Iud. 1, 216f.; ant. Iud. 14,269).
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
84
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Entrichtete a. 43 die von C. Cassius Longinus geforderten Zahlungen (Ios. bell. Iud.
1,220.222; ant. Iud. 14,273.276). Rettete aufgrund der Vermittlung seiner Söhne Herodes und
Phasael den Söldnerführer Malichos (der vom gleichnamigen Nabatäerkönig zu unterscheiden
ist) vor den Verfolgungen des L. Staius Murcus procos. Syriae 44-43 (Ios. bell. Iud. 1,224).
Malichos ließ ihn jedoch vergiften.
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Wilcken, Ulrich: Antipatros [17], RE 1,2, 1894, 2509-11.
Bringmann, Klaus: Antipatros [4], DNP 1, 777.
Baltrusch, Ernst: Die Juden und das Römische Reich. Geschichte einer konfliktreichen Beziehung, Darmstadt
2002, 128-56.
Baumann, Uwe: Rom und die Juden. Die römisch-jüdischen Beziehungen von Pompeius bis zum Tode des
Herodes (63 v.Chr.-4 v.Chr.), Frankfurt/M. 1983, 1-123.
Günther, Linda-Marie: Herodes der Große, Darmstadt 2005, 37-53.
Schalit, Abraham: König Herodes. Der Mann und sein Werk. Mit einem Vorwort von Daniel R. Schwartz, Berlin
2
2001, 25-52.
Schürer, Emil: The History of the Jewish People in the Age of Jesus Christ (175 B.C.-A.D. 135). A New English
Version Revised and Edited by Geza Vermes and Fergus Millar. Vol. 1, Edinburgh 1973, 267-77.
JW/23.11.06–r/03.07.07
Antonia Tryphaena, Königin von Pontos [Var. Tryphaina]
 Stammbaum der Antonia Tryphaina
0. Onomastisches/ Namenvarianten
Der römische Vorname erinnert an Antonia Hybrida Minor, zweite Frau des Triumvirn
Marcus Antonius, sowie an ihre Tochter Antonia, die Ehefrau von Pythodoros von Tralleis
und Großmutter von Antonia Tryphaena. Braund (2005, 268) betrachtet eine Eheschließung
zwischen Pythodoros und der Tochter des Triumvirn als eine moderne Phantasie, stützt sich
dafür aber nur auf Strabons Schweigen: „But Strabo’s noisy silence surely demonstrates that
the notion that Pythodoris revelled in descent from Antony is misguided“ (Braund 2005, 260).
Der griechische Name Trýphaina bedeutet „die Üppige“ < trypháō = „üppig leben“; vgl. Frisk
1960 s.v. thrýptō; Chantraine 1968 s.v. thrýptō, mit Hinweis auf PN Trýphon. Er wurde auch
von Ptolemäerinnen getragen. So erinnert auch der Beiname ihrer Mutter Pythodoris
Philometor (IGRP IV 144) an die Ptolemäerkönigin Kleopatra II. Philometor (IG II2 3433).
Außerdem ist der Name Trýphaina in Makedonien (LGPN IV 335 – fünf Belege zwischen
145 v.Chr. und 134 n.Chr.) und besonders in den Küstenregionen Kleinasiens (LGPN VA 436
– 35 Belege, fast alle kaiserzeitlich) epigraphisch gut bezeugt. Hervorzuheben sind drei
Ehrendekrete aus Kyzikos für Antonía Trýphaina, basiléōs Polémōnos kaì b[asilís]sēs
Pythodōrídos thygátēr, und für ihre Söhne (IGRP IV 144-146). Bechtel 1917, 508; 617
erwähnt nur eine Tryphē bei den „Personennamen aus Bezeichnungen von Abstracta“ sowie
einen Trýphon als „Namen aus Lebensführung und Verhältnis zur Gesellschaft“.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
85
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
Als Königin von Pontos war die Urenkelin von M. Antonius in der 1. Hälfte des 1. Jhs. n.Chr.
eine der einflussreichsten Frauen im kleinasiatischen und pontischen Raum. Als
Königstochter, Königsgattin und Mutter von Königen spielte sie eine Hauptrolle in der
verwandtschaftlichen Verflechtung der Herrscherkreise in julisch-claudischer Zeit. Obwohl
der Name in der Fachliteratur nicht ohne Beachtung blieb (vgl. Rohden 1894, 2641f.; PIR I2
A 900; Hanslik 1964; Sullivan 1980, 922-923; Saprykin 1995, 199-203; Schwemer 1996,
801; Lightman 2000), erscheint Tryphaena zu Unrecht eher als eine Nebenfigur und ist von
zahlreichen Ungenauigkeiten und Spekulationen begleitet.
Die Mutter Pythodoris Philometor wurde mit dem pontischen und bosporanischen König
Polemon I. um 12 v.Chr. vermählt (Strab. 12,3,29; vgl. Saprykin 2002, 130, mit Anm. 13, der
gegen eine frühere Eheschließung argumentiert). Da Polemon im Jahre 8. v.Chr. schon tot war
(Saprykin 2002, 130), wird seine Tochter Antonia Tryphaena zwischen 12 und 8 v.Chr.
geboren worden sein; 15 v.Chr. (so Wikipedia.de) scheidet als Geburtsjahr aus. Um 12 n.Chr.
heiratete sie den Thrakerkönig Kotys VIII. (Strab. 12,3,29), dem sie vier Kinder gebahr:
Rhoimetalkes III. von Thrakien, Polemon II. von Pontos, Kotys (der König von Armenia
Minor wurde) und Pythodoris II.. Nachdem ihr Gatte von seinem Onkel Rhaskuporis III.
(Tačeva 1987, 210; vgl. Eder 2004, 190) ermordet worden war (ausführlich: Danov 1979,
133ff.), klagte Antonia den Mörder 19 n.Chr. vor dem Senat an (Tac. ann. 2,67,2; cf. Vell.
2,129). Rhaskuporis musste in die Verbannung nach Alexandrien gehen und wurde bei einem
Fluchtversuch ermordet (Tac. ann. 2,67,3). Thrakien wurde zwischen Rhoimetalkes II., dem
Sohn des Rhaskuporis III., und den noch unmündigen Söhnen des Kotys VIII. geteilt. Als
Tutor wurde Trebellenus Rufus benannt (Tac. ann. 2,67,2; 3,38,3 – wo er Trebellienus
heißt).
Dank ihrer römischen Abstammung mütterlicherseits konnte Antonia Tryphaena trotzdem
ihre Kinder im Haus der Livia Drusilla unterbringen, wo sie mit dem jungen Caligula erzogen
wurden; in Syll.3 798 werden Rhoimetalkes, Polemon und Kotys als „Mitzöglinge und
Begleiter“ (sýntrophoi kaì hetaĩroi) des C. Caesar Augustus Germanicus bezeichnet; vgl.
Cass. Dio 59,12,2. Antonia selbst ging nach der Ermordung des Ehegatten nach Kyzikos, wo
sie sich jahrelang als Euergetin betätigte (IGRP IV 144-146; vgl. Syll.3 798f.).
Falls Reinach 1902, 146f. Recht hat (ihm folgt Saprykin 1993, 32; 1995, 199), regierte
Tryphaena nach dem Tod ihrer Mutter schon 22/23 n.Chr. in Pontos. Marek 1993, 60 datiert
ihre Regierungszeit ca. 21-36 n.Chr. Als Caligula Imperator wurde, ernannte er die Söhne von
Tryphaena zu Königen von Thrakien (Rhoimetalkes III.), von Kleinarmenien und einem Teil
Arabiens (Kotys IV.) sowie von Pontos und Kilikien (Polemon II.). Obwohl der
Letztgenannte zunächst auch einen Anspruch auf das Bosporanische Reich stellte (Cass. Dio
59,12,2; 60,8,2), sind seine dortige Regierung oder auch nur Anwesenheit zu Recht abgelehnt
worden (Braund 1984, 42; Anochin 1999, 134; Saprykin 2002, 239, alle unter Berufung auf
numismatische Zeugnisse). Wie aus gemeinsamen Prägungen hervorgeht (Baldus 1983, mit
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
86
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
weiterer Literatur), herrschte Antonia Tryphaena zusammen mit ihrem Sohn Polemon nicht
über das Bosporanische Reich, sondern nur über Pontos.
Ihr Todesjahr liegt völlig im Dunkeln. Das Datum um 49 n.Chr. (so Saprykin 1993, 38; 1995,
202; vgl. Wikipedia.de) stützt sich auf die Vermutung, dass die Münzprägung Polemons II.
als Alleinherrscher ab 49/50 den Tod seiner Mutter voraussetze. Ganz ohne Grundlage scheint
ferner das Jahr 55 n.Chr. (so Wikipedia.org) zu sein. Später wurde eine „Tryphaina von
Kyzikos“ als christliche Heilige verehrt. Man mag darüber spekulieren, ob dieser (legendäre?)
Übertritt zum Christentum an die Erinnerung ihrer Euergesien gegenüber den Kyzikenern
anknüpft oder ob ein Zusammenhang mit dem Übertritt ihres Sohnes Polemon zum Judentum
besteht. Trotz der Herkunft des Paulus aus Tarsus in Kilikien wird kaum ein Zusammenhang
mit der im Römerbrief genannten Tryphaina bestehen (Röm 16,12).
2. Verhältnis zu Rom / Römern und Karriereverlauf
Als Tochter Polemons I. und durch diesen Enkelin des Rhetors Zenon aus Laodikeia (Strab.
11,8,16) repräsentierte Antonia Tryphaina die ausgehende hellenistische Tradition in
Kleinasien. Zugleich war sie als Verwandte des römischen Kaiserhauses mütterlicherseits
hervorragend geeignet, um als amica populi Romani die zunehmend offensive Grenzpolitik
der Kaiser im pontischen und ost-antatolischen Raum zu unterstützen. Schon ihr Vater, den
M. Antonius 37/36 v.Chr. zum König von Pontos gemacht hatte, wurde 26 v.Chr. durch
Augustus ein amicus et socius populi Romani (Cass. Dio 53,25,1). 14 v.Chr. wurde er zudem
noch König des Bosporos. 12 v.Chr. folgte die Ehe mit Pythodoris, der Tochter des
Pythodoros von Tralleis und einer Tochter des M. Antonius. Als Polemon starb, übernahm
Pythodoris die Regierung im pontischen Reich (Strab. 11,2,18; Marek 1993, 52 mit Literatur).
Ihre zweite Ehe mit Archelaos, König von Kappadokien, wurde im Jahre 8. n.Chr. mit
Sicherheit nicht ohne Zustimmung Roms geschlossen.
Gleiches muss für die Heirat Antonias mit dem thrakischen Köng Kotys VIII. um 12 n.Chr.
angenommen werden. Dass sie sich später als Witwe in Kyzikos niederließ, geschah nicht aus
sentimentalen Gründen, wie Saprykin 1995 mit Blick auf die früheren Beziehungen zum
thrakischen Königshaus meint, sondern eher wegen der Lage dieser Stadt, von der aus Rom,
Thrakien und Pontos günstig zu erreichen war. 38/39 n.Chr. wurde sie von den Kyzikenern als
Königstochter, Königin und Mutter von Königen (Syll.3 798; IGPR IV 147) sowie wegen
ihrer pietas dem Kaiserhaus gegenüber geehrt: hē kratístē kaì philosé/bastos Antōnía
Trýphaina pãsan aeì hosían tēs eis tòn Sebastòn / eusebeías epheurískousa epínoian (Syll.3
7993-5). Nach der Consecratio der Iulia Drusilla am 23. September (?) 38 (Kienast 1996, 87)
ist Tryphaena in Kyzikos als ihre Priesterin bezeugt (Syll.3 79812-13), nicht aber als Priesterin
für Livia Drusilla, die Großmutter des Kaisers Claudius, ab 42 n.Chr. (so Wikipedia.de, mit
Verweis auf Lightman 2000).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Schwemer, Anna Maria: Antonia Tryphaena [7], DNP 1, 1996, 801.
Hanslik, R.: Antonius 18. A(ntonia) Tryphaena, Kl.P. 1, 1964, 415.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
87
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Hanslik, R. / Schmitt, H.: Pythodoris [1], RE 24.1, 1963, 581-586.
von Rohden, P.: Antonia Tryphaena [130], RE 1.2, 1894, 2641-2642.
IGBulg I2: Mihailov, G. (Hg.): Inscriptiones Graecae in Bulgaria repertae. Bd. I: Inscriptiones orae Ponti Euxini.
Editio altera emendata, Sofia 1970.
IGRP IV: Cagnat, R. / Lafaye, G. (Hgg.): Inscriptiones Graecae ad res Romanas pertinentes. Bd. IV, Paris 1927,
Nd. Rom 1964.
IOSPE II: Latyšev, V.V. (Hg.): Inscriptiones antiquae orae septentrionalis Ponti Euxini Graecae et Latinae. Vol.
2. Inscriptiones regni Bosporani Graecae et Latinae, St. Petersburg 1890.
LGPN IV: Fraser, P.M. / Matthews, E. (Hgg.): A Lexicon of Greek Personal Names. IV: Macedonia, Thrace,
Northern Regions of the Black Sea, Oxford 2005.
LGPN VA: Corsten, Th. (Hg.): A Lexicon of Greek Personal Names. VA: Coastal Asia Minor: Pontos to Ionia,
Oxford 2010.
PIR I2: Groag, E./ Stein A. (Hgg.): Prosopographia Imperii Romani. Saec. I. II. III. Pars I. Editio altera,
Berlin/Leipzig 1933.
Syll.3: Dittenberger, W. (Hg.): Sylloge inscriptionum Graecarum. 3. Aufl. bearb. von F. Hiller von Gaertringen
u.a., Leipzig, Bd. I (1915), Bd. II (1917), Bd. III (1920), Bd. IV (1921-1924) (Nd. Hildesheim 1960).
Anochin, V.A.: Istorija Bospora Kimmerijskogo (Geschichte des Kimmerischen Bosporos), Kiew 1999.
Baldus, H.R.: Die Daten von Münzprägung und Tod der Königin Pythodoris von Pontus, Chiron 13, 1983, 537543.
Bechtel, F.: Die historischen Personennamen des Griechischen bis zur Kaiserzeit, Halle 1917.
Braund, D.: Rome and the Friendly King. The Character of the Client Kingship, London 1984.
Braund, D.: Polemo, Pythodoris and Strabo. Friends of Rome in the Black Sea Region, in: A. Coşkun (Hg.):
Roms auswärtige Freunde in der späten Republik und im frühen Prinzipat, Göttingen 2005, 253-270.
Chantraine, P.: Dictionnaire étymologique de la langue grecque : Histoire des mots. Vol. I, Paris 1968.
Danov, Chr.M.: Die Thraker auf dem Ostbalkan von der hellenistischen Zeit bis zur Gründung Konstantinopels,
in: ANRW II 7.1, 1979, 21-185.
Eder, W.: X.4. Thrakien, in: W. Edler / J. Renger (Hgg.): Herrscherchronologien der antiken Welt. Namen,
Daten, Dynastien (DNP, Suppl. Bd. 1), Stuttgart 2004, 186-190.
Frisk, H.: Griechisches Etymologisches Wörterbuch, Bd. 1, Heidelberg 1960.
Kienast, D.: Römische Kaisertabelle. Grundzüge einer römischen Kaiserchronologie. Darmstadt 21996.
Latyšev, V.V.: Kratkij očerk istorii Bosporskogo carstva, in: ders.: Pontica. Sbornik naučnych i kritičeskich
stat’ej po istorii, archeologii, geografii i ėpigrafike Skifii, Kavkaza i grečeskich kolonij na poberež’jach
Černogo Morja. St. Petersburg 1909, S. 60-128 [= Brevis conspectus historiae Regni Bosporani, in: IOSPE
II, S. IX-LVI].
Lightman, M. und B.: Biographical Dictionary of Greek and Roman Women: Notable Women from Sappho to
Helena, New York 2000 (s.v. Antonia Tryphaena, S. 21-22).
Marek, Ch.: Stadt, Ära und Territorium in Pontus-Bithynia und Nord-Galatia, Tübingen 1993.
Reinach, Th.: L’histoire par les monnaies: essais de numismatique ancienne, Paris 1902.
Saprykin, S.Ju.: Iz istorii pontijskogo carstva Polemonidov (po dannym ėpigrafiki) [From the History of the
Pontic Kingdom under the Polemonides], VDI 1993.2, 25-49.
Saprykin, S.Ju.: Ženščiny-pravitel’nicy Pontijskogo i Bosporskogo carstva (Dinamia, Piphodorida, Antonija
Trifena) [Die Frauen-Regentinnen des pontischen und bosporanischen Reichen (Dynamis, Pythodoris,
Antonia Trypaena)], in: Marinovič, L.P. – S.Ju. Saprykin (Hg.): Ženščina v antičnom mire, Moskau 1995.
Saprykin, S.Ju.: Bosporskoe carstvo na rubeže dvuch ėpoch (The Kingdom of Bosporus on the Verge of Two
Epochs), Moskau 2002.
Sullivan, R.D: Dynasts in Pontus, in: ANRW II 7.2, 1980, 913-930.
Tačeva, M.: Corrigenda et addenda ad PIR (III, 1898: R 40-42, 50-52; II2, 1936: C 1552-1554; IV2, 1966, J 517)
pertinentia, in: Actes du IX2 Congrès international d’épigraphie grecque et latine I = Acta Centri Historiae
„Terra antiqua Balcanica” 2, 1987, 210-213.
Wikipedia.de: Art. Antonia Tryphaina. URL: http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antonia_Tryphaina [22.04.12].
Wikipedia.org: Art. Antonia Tryphaena. URL: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antonia_Tryphaena [22.04.12].
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
88
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
VC/03.10.11 – r/30.04.12
Q. Aponius aus Lusitanien (?)
0. Onomastisches
Bei Elvers 1996, 907 als Q. Apponius aufgeführt. Für die Ansicht eines lusitanisch-römischen
Interferenznamen vgl. Zeidler 2005, 176f.
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
Belegt a. 46. Römischer Ritter. Castillo García 1975, 635 weist auf die Häufigkeit der Aponii
in Lusitanien hin und vermutet die Abstammung von einer italischen Familie.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Kämpfte a. 46 auf der Seite des jungen Cn. Pompeius Magnus und hetzte die Bevölkerung
der Baetica gegen C. Iulius Caesar auf (Cass. Dio 43,29,3).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Klebs: Q. Aponius, RE 2,1, 1895, 172.
DNP –.
Caballos Rufino, Antonio: Los senadores de origen hispano durante la república romana, in: Julián González
(Hg.): Estudios sobre Urso Colonia Iulia Genetiva, Sevilla 1989, 233-79, bes. 266.
Castillo García, Carmen: Städte und Personen der Baetica, ANRW II 3, 1975, 601-654, bes. 635f.
Wiegels, Rainer: Die römischen Senatoren und Ritter aus den hispanischen Provinzen bis Diokletian, Diss.
Solingen 1971, Nr. 222.
Zeidler, Jürgen: Onomastic Studies on Some Roman Amici in Hispania, in: Altay Coskun (Hg.): Roms
auswärtige Freunde in der späten Republik und im frühen Prinzipat, Göttingen 2005, 175-200, 176f.
JL/29.09.04–r/28.06.07
Archelaos, Priester von Komana Pontike und König von Ägypten
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemmata Archelaiden
Gestorben a. 55. Sohn des Archelaos, des Strategen des Mithradates VI. Eupator; gab sich
selbst aber als Sohn des letzteren aus. Gatte Berenikes IV. von Ägypten.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom/ Römern und Karrierverlauf
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
89
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Von Cn. Pompeius Magnus a. 63 als Priesterfürst im pontischen Komana eingesetzt (App.
Mithr. 114,560); Bot A. Gabinius militärische Hilfe für dessen Partherkrieg an. Heiratete
dann aber a. 56 Berenike, die anstelle ihres vertriebenen Vaters Ptolemaios’ XII. a. 58-55 in
Ägypten herrschte. Archelaos wurde a. 56 zum König von Ägypten erhoben (Cass. Dio
39,57). Kam im Kampf a. 55 gegen A. Gabinius, der Ptolemaios XII. auf Geheiß des Cn.
Pompeius Magnus nach Ägypten zurückführte, ums Leben. M. Antonius, Offizier des A.
Gabinius, gewährte ihm königliche Bestattung (Cic. Rab. Post. 8; 20; Strab. geogr. 12,3,34,
wo er als philos des Gabinius bezeichnet ist; Cass. Dio 39,57f.; Plut. Ant. 3,10).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Wilcken, Ulrich: Archelaos [13], RE 2,1, 1895, 450.
Schottky, Martin: Archelaos [5], DNP 1, 1996, 986.
Bloedow, Edmund: Beiträge zur Geschichte Ptolemaios’ XII., Diss. Würzburg 1964, 70f.; 74.
Hölbl, Günther: Geschichte des Ptolemäerreiches, Darmstadt 1994, 201; 203.
Huß, Werner: Ägypten in hellenistischer Zeit, 332-30 v.Chr., München 2001, 693f.
Olshausen, Eckart: Rom und Ägypten von 116 bis 51 v.Chr., Diss. Erlangen 1963, 59-61.
Siani-Davies, Mary: Ptolemy XII Auletes and the Romans, Historia 46, 1997, 306-40, 324f.
Sullivan: Richard D: Near Eastern Royalty and Rome, 100-30 B.C., Toronto 1990, 241-43.
KC/30.09.04–r/30.09.04/21.06.07
Archelaos (I.) Sisines (?) Philopatris, König von Kappadokien
0. Onomastisches
Belege für den Beinamen Philopatris in OGIS I 357-61; Simonetta 1977, 46. Syme 1995
bestreitet die Identität von Archelaos (Philopatris) und Sisines.
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemmata Archelaiden
Nachkomme von Priesterfürsten aus Komana; verheiratet mit Pythodoris I. (Strab. geogr.
12,3,29 [556]); Vater Archelaos’ II.; regierte 36 v.-17 n.Chr. Hinterließ ein chorographisches
Werk (FGrH 123).
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Von M. Antonius a. 41 zum König bestimmt, angeblich seiner schönen Mutter Glaphyra
zuliebe (App. civ. 5,7,31; Cass. Dio 49,32,3; ferner Martial 11,20), doch konnte er sich erst
nach der Niederlage seines Rivalen Ariarathes X. Eusebes Philadelphos a. 36 endgültig
durchsetzen. Unterstütze Antonius bei Actium (Plut. Ant. 61,2), wechselte aber anschließend
die Seiten und behielt seine Herrschaft (Cass. Dio 51,2,1). A. 20 wurde sein Gebiet um
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
90
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Kleinarmenien und Teile Kilikiens erweitert (Cass. Dio 54,9,2; Strab. geogr. 12,1,4 [535];
12,2,7 [537]; 12,2,11 [540]; 14,5,6 [671]).
Lag im Streit mit M. Titius procos. Syriae ab ca. a. 13/12 (Ios. ant. Iud. 16,270). Während der
Herrschaft des Augustus von seinen Untertanen in Rom angeklagt und von Tiberius
verteidigt (Cass. Dio 57,17,3; Suet. Tib. 8). Später (17 n.Chr.) von Tiberius vor dem Senat
angeklagt, bald darauf gestorben, woraufhin sein Reich als Provinz eingezogen wurde (Tac.
ann. 2,42,2-4; Cass. Dio 57,17,3-7; Suet. Tib. 37,4; Eutr. 7,11,2; ferner Suet. Calig. 1,2).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Wilcken/ Berger: Archelaos [15], RE 2,1, 1895, 451f.
Schottky, Martin: Archelaos [7] Sisines Philopatris, DNP 1, 1996, 986.
Hoben, Wolfgang: Untersuchungen zur Stellung kleinasiatischer Dynasten in den Machtkämpfen der
ausgehenden römischen Republik, Diss. Mainz 1969, 176-194.
Pani, Mario: Roma e i re d’Oriente da Augusto a Tiberio (Cappadocia, Armenia, Media Atropatene), Bari 1972,
91-145.
Simonetta, Bono: The Coins of the Cappadocian Kings, Freiburg/Ü. 1977, 45f.
Stein-Kramer, Michaela: Die Klientelkönigreiche Kleinasiens in der Außenpolitik der späten Republik und des
Augustus, Berlin 1988, 161-76.
Sullivan, Richard D.: The Dynasty of Cappadocia, ANRW II 7,2, 1980, 1147-1161.
Sullivan, Richard D.: Near Eastern Royalty and Rome, 100-30 B.C., Toronto 1990, 182-185.
Syme, Ronald: The Accession of Archelaus Philopatris, in: ders.: Anatolica. Studies in Strabo, Oxford 1995,
148-52.
van Dam, Raymond: Kingdom of Snow. Roman Rule and Greek Culture in Cappadocia, Philadelphia 2002, 1719.
MT/20.12.06–r/30.06.07
Aretas IV., König der Nabatäer [Var. Haretat]
0. Onomastisches/Namenvarianten
Die griechische Namenvariante Aretas ist nur in den literarischen Texten bezeugt (s.u.). Die
epigraphischen und numismatischen Quellen führen dagegen nur den nabatäischen Namen
des Herrschers (Belege in Hackl/Jenni/Schneider 2003). In zahlreichen Inschriften und auf
vielen Münzen wird der König als ḤRTT MLK NBṬW RḤM ‘MH, ‚Haretat, König der
Nabatäer, der sein Volk liebt‘, bezeichnet (z.B. Meshorer 1975, 94-105;
Hackl/Jenni/Schneider 2003). Das Epitheton RḤM ‘MH (‚der sein Volk liebt‘) entspricht
möglicherweise dem griechischen Titel philodemos oder philopatris. Iosephus stellt fest, dass
der König erst nach seiner Thronbesteigung 9/8 v.Chr. den Namen Aretas angenommen habe,
und vorher als Aineias bekannt gewesen sei (Ios. ant. Iud. 16,294). Die griechische Variante
Aineias könnte dem nabataïschen Namen HNʼW oder vielleicht HNYʼW entnommen sein
(Bowersock 1983, 51-52 Anm. 26).
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
91
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Ein unleugbares Familienverhältnis zwischen Aretas und seinen Vorgängern kann auf Grund
der Quellen nicht erwiesen werden. Trotzdem lässt sich eine mögliche Verwandtschaft
zwischen Aretas und dem König Malichos I. aus einer beschädigten Inschrift von Petra
rekonstruieren, in der die Namen ḤRTT und MNKW erwähnt werden (Starcky 1971, 151159; Bowersock 1983, 52; Hackl/Jenni/Schneider 2003, 248-250; vgl. Dijkstra 1995, 65). Auf
Grund von Konjekturen für die Lücken in diesem epigraphischen Text hat Starcky behauptet,
Aretas könne der Enkel oder Großneffe des Malichos I. gewesen sein (Starcky 1971, 156).
Wie plausibel diese Deutung auch sein mag, mit Sicherheit kann ein verwandtschaftliches
Verhältnis zwischen Aretas IV. und seinen Vorgängern nicht festgestellt werden.
Er war bis zum vierundzwanzigsten Jahr seiner Regierung (15/16 n.Chr.) mit Ḥuldu
verheiratet (Hackl/Jenni/Schneider 2003, 250; Meshorer 1975, 52, 55). Aus dieser Ehe gingen
die Kinder Maliku, ʻUbdat, Rabb᾿ el, Fasa᾿ el, Šaʻudat und vermutlich auch Hagaru (so
Kokkinos 1997, 376) hervor. Die zweite Gemahlin des Aretas war Šuqailat. Es ist nicht
auszuschließen, dass die soeben erwähnte Hagaru eine Tochter dieser neuen Gattin Aretas᾿
war (Hackl/Jenni/Schneider 2003, 65, 278; vgl. Dijkstra 1995, 56-58; Healey 2009, 57).
Aretas starb 39/40 n.Chr. Nachfolger wurde sein Sohn Maliku (Malichos II.).
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Aretas geriet nach dem Tode des Obodas III. 9/8 auf den nabatäischen Thron und zog sich den
Zorn des Augustus zu, als er es versäumte, dessen Genehmigung für den Herrschaftsantritt
einzuholen (Ios. ant. Iud. 16,294-295; 298; 353). Trotz dieser Missachtung wurde er letztlich
von Augustus als König anerkannt (Ios. ant. Iud. 16,355). Einem Konkurrenten namens
Syllaios, dem ehemaligen Kanzler des Obodas III., war es offenbar nicht gelungen, Augustus
davon zu überzeugen, Aretas abzusetzen und ihm selbst das nabatäische Königtum zu
verleihen (Ios. ant. Iud. 16,295). Ebenso soll Augustus den Vorschlag abgelehnt haben,
Arabien dem Herodes I. zu schenken, als er über die Zwietracht zwischen diesem judäischen
Herrscher und seinen Söhnen informiert wurde (Ios. ant. Iud. 16,353-355). Die Anerkennung
des Aretas IV. als König könnte durch eine Inschrift auf dem Capitol bezeugt sein (SEG 47,
Nr. 1502; Bowersock 1997).
Aretas stellte 4 v.Chr. dem Statthalter von Syrien, P. Quinctilius Varus, cos. 13 v.Chr., eine
erhebliche Anzahl von Infanteristen und Reitern zur Verfügung, um die nach dem Tod
Herodes᾿ I. ausgebrochenen politischen Unruhen in Judäa niederzuschlagen (Ios. ant. Iud.
17,287; vgl. bell. Iud. 2,68). Iosephus erklärt (ant. Iud. 17,287), Aretas habe aus Hass gegen
Herodes eine philia mit den Römern geschlossen und auch wegen dieser Aversion Varus
Hilfe geleistet (bell. Iud. 2,68). Diese Hilfstruppen wurden jedoch laut Iosephus wegen
Freveltaten nach dem Ende des Aufstandes in Judäa von Varus zurückgeschickt (Ios. ant. Iud.
17,296; bell. Iud. 2,76).
Im Jahr 3 v.Chr. soll Aretas – nach Bowersock 1983, 53-56 – von den Römern vorübergehend
abgesetzt und das nabatäische Königreich in eine römische Provinz umgewandelt worden
sein, da Augustus die Aufteilung des herodianischen Reiches nicht als stabil betrachtet und
mit der Provinzialisierung Nabatäas gehofft habe, die politische Lage in Judäa besser
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
92
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
kontrollieren zu können. Erst Gaius Caesar habe Aretas 1 n.Chr. im Rahmen seines
Arabienfeldzugs (Plin. nat. 2,168; 6,141; 12,55) wieder an die Macht gebracht. Bowersock
stützt seine Annahme auf die Aussage Strabons, die Nabatäer seien den Römern unterworfen
(geogr. 16,4,21 [779]). Zudem verweist er auf den Mangel an Münzen aus dem siebten bis
neunten Herrschaftsjahr des Aretas (3-1). Obgleich diese Ansicht keineswegs mit den Quellen
im Widerspruch steht, ist sie nicht plausibel. Hätte Augustus nämlich nicht auf die
Neuordnung des Herodes-Reiches vertraut, dann hätte er wohl gleich besser Judäa statt
Nabatäa annektiert. Der numismatische Befund kann auch dem Zufall geschuldet sein. Eine
Provinzialisierung hätte jedenfalls deutlichere Spuren in den Quellen hinterlassen
(Hackl/Jenni/Schneider 2003, 571-572; Fiema 1987, 25; Funke 1989, 10-11).
Kaiser Tiberius gebot kurz vor seinem Tod 37 n.Chr. dem L. Vitellius, cos. 34 n.Chr., einen
Krieg gegen die Araber zu führen (Ios. ant. Iud. 18,115). Vitellius verzichtete jedoch auf
diesen Feldzug, als er später auf dem Weg nach Petra vom Tod des Kaisers erfuhr (Ios. ant.
Iud. 18,120-124). Als Erklärung für den geplanten Krieg wird von Iosephus auf die
Strafexpedition verwiesen, die Aretas gegen Herodes Antipas, Tetrarch von Galiläa und
Peräa, geführt hatte. Denn Letzterer hatte ca. 27 n.Chr. seine Gemahlin, eine Tochter
Aretas᾿ , heimgeschickt, um Herodias, zuvor die Gattin seines Stiefbruders, zu heiraten (Ios.
ant. Iud. 18,109-114). Iosephus fügt hinzu, dass der Streit zwischen Aretas und Herodes
Antipas durch einen Streit über die Festsetzung der Grenzen der Gamalitis verschärft worden
sei (Ios. ant. Iud. 18,113). Es ist nicht ausgeschlossen, dass der letzgenannte Grund der
primäre und wichtigste war. Die Gamalitis war ein Teil der Tetrarchie von Philippos, die nach
dessen Tod 34 n.Chr. Rom zufiel. Der neue Statthalter traf jedoch erst 35 n.Chr. in Syrien ein.
Wahrscheinlich versuchten also Aretas und Herodes, in dieser Übergangsphase Einfluss in der
ehemaligen Tetrarchie zu gewinnen (Bowersock 1983, 65-68; Hackl/Jenni/Schneider 2003,
45-46, 536-537; Starcky 1966, 914; Negev 1977, 568-569).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Wilcken, U.: Aretas [4], RE II, 1986, 674.
Bringmann, K.: Aretas [4], DNP I, 1996, 1052-1053.
Bowersock, G.: Roman Arabia, Cambridge [Mass.] 1983, 51-69.
Bowersock, G.: Nabataeans on the Capitoline, Hyperboreus, 3, 1997, 347-352.
Dijkstra, K.: Life and Loyalty: a Study in the Socio-Religious Culture of Syria and Mesopotamia in the GraecoRoman Period Based on Epigraphical Evidence, Leiden 1995.
Fiema, Z.T.: The Roman Annexation of Arabia: a General Perspective, AncW, 15, 1987, 25-35.
Fiema, Z.T., Jones, R.N.: The Nabataean King-List Revisited: Further Observations on the Second Nabataean
Inscription from Tell esh-Shuqafiya, Egypt, ADAJ, 34, 1990, 239-248.
Funke, P.: Rom und das Nabatäerreich bis zur Aufrichtung der Provinz Arabia, in: H.J. Drexhage/J. Sünskes
(Hgg.): Migratio et commutatio. Studien zur alten Geschichte und deren Nachleben. Thomas Pekáry
zum 60. Geburtstag am 13. September 1989, dargebracht von Freunden, Kollegen und Schülern, St.
Katharinen 1989, 1-18.
Hackl, U./Jenni, H./Schneider, C.: Quellen zur Geschichte der Nabatäer. Textsammlung mit Übersetzung und
Kommentar, Göttingen 2003.
Hammond, C.: The Nabataeans: Their History, Culture and Archaeology, Göteborg 1973.
Kokkinos, N.: The Herodian Dynasty: Origins, Role in Society and Eclipse, Sheffield 1998.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
93
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Lindner, M.: Die Geschichte der Nabatäer, in: ders. (Hg.): Petra und das Königreich der Nabatäer: Lebensraum,
Geschichte und Kultur eines arabischen Volkes der Antike, München 1970,71-134.
Meshorer, Y.: Nabataean Coins, Jerusalem 1975.
Negev, A.: The Nabataeans and the Provincia Arabia, in: ANRW II.8, Berlin 1977, 521-686.
Schürer, E.: The History of the Jewish People in the Age of Jesus Christ (175 B.C. – A.D. 135), a new English
version revised and edited by G. Vermes and F. Millar, vol. I, Edinburgh 1973, 581-583.
Starcky, J.: Pétra et la Nabatène, DB Supp. VII, 1966, 886-1017.
Starcky, J.: Une inscription nabatéenne de l’an 18 d’Arétas IV, in: J. Amusin (Hg.): Hommages à André DupontSommer, Paris 1971, 151-159.
Wenning, R.: Eine neuerstellte Liste der nabatäischen Dynastie, Boreas, 16, 1993, 25-38.
RvW/27.06.11-r/28.06.11
Ariarathes IV Eusebes, King of Kappadokia [Var. Ariamenes, Ariaratus]
0. Onomastic Issues
The name derives from *wratha, recorded in the Avesta as urwatha, ‘friend’ (Justi 1895, 519).
The abbreviated form Arathes appears on inscriptions from Tanais and Olbia (Portanova 1988,
236, 426 n. 94). Arathes, although relating to Ariarathes VII, also appears in Memn. FGrH 434 F
22.1 and Trog. prol. 38. Coins of Ariarathes I bear the legend Ariorath in Aramean (Reinach
1886, 326ff.). This king is mentioned as Ariakes by Arrian (anab. 3.8.5; Reinach 1886, 327;
Breglia Pulci Doria 1978, 117). Coins of Ariarathes III bear the legend Ariamenes or Artamenes
(Reinach 1886, 331). Ariarathes IV appears mentioned as Ariamenes in Trogus (prol. 27) and
Justin (27.3.7), and as Eprafax by Rufus Festus (brev. 11.4). Eutropius (4.6) records the variant
Ariaratus.
1. Central Biographical Dates and Family Relations
 Stemmata Ariarathids / Ariobarzanids
King of Kappadokia, ca. 220-163. Son of Ariarathes III, king of Kappadokia, and Stratonike, the
daughter of Antiochos II Theos (Diod. 31.19.6). In ca. 196/5, he married Antiochis, daughter of
Antiochos III Megas (Diod. 31.9.7; App. Syr. 5.18). Father of the kings Ariarathes V Eusebes
Philopator and Orophernes Nikephoros (probably), as well as of Stratonike, wife of Eumenes II
of Pergamon, and thereafter of Attalos II of Pergamon. Whether he had another son or stepson
called Mithradates remains doubtful (cf. Diod. 31.19.7; Will 1967, 313f.; Ballesteros Pastor
2008, 47 n. 7).
2. Relations with Rome / Romans and Career
He was the first Kappadokian king to establish friendship with Rome (Polyb. 21.45; Liv.
38.39.6; Fest. brev. 11.4).
In a. 190, he supported Antiochos III Megas in his war against Rome, sending him 2,000 men for
the battle of Magnesia (Liv. 37.31.4; 37.40.10; 38.37.5; App. Syr. 32.164; 42.223).
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
94
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
After the defeat of Antiochos, Ariarathes sent an embassy to Cn. Manlius Vulso (cos. 189,
procos. Asiae 188-187), who imposed on the king a fine of 600 talents. Eumenes II of Pergamon
interceded for Ariarathes, and the sum was reduced to its half (Liv. 38.37.5f.; 38.39.6). The
Kappadokian ruler was then regarded as a friend and ally of Rome (Polyb. 21.41.4f.; Liv. 38,39,6
in amicitiam est acceptus; Zonar. 9.20.14; cf. Fest. brev. 11.4). Appian (Syr. 42.223), speaks of
only 200 talents given to Manlius in order to avoid a Roman invasion of his kingdom.
Between a. 183/2 and 179, he fought, together with the kings of Paphlagonia and Pergamon,
against Pharnakes I of Pontus. Ariarathes sent an embassy to Rome in 181 (Polyb. 24.1.1-3; Liv.
40.20.1), and probably another one in the next year (Diod. 29.22; Canali de Rossi 1997, 473).
Rome dispatched several missions to stop this conflict, and the Republic probably took part in
the treaty which ended the war (Heinen 2005; Primo 2006).
In ca. 172, he sent his son, the future Ariarathes V Eusebes Philopator, to Rome. He was meant
to familiarize himself with Roman culture and to establish relations with important Roman
families (Diod. 31.19; Liv. 42.19.3-6).
He met with Ti. Sempronius Gracchus (cos. I 177, cos. II 163, cens. 169), who visited
Kappadokia on his inspection of the eastern kingdoms in 166/65 (MRR I 438). Apparently, he
gained a favourable impression, for when Ariarathes V sent an embassy to the Senate upon his
father’s death in winter 164/63 and asked for the renewal of the former friendship, this was
granted on the basis of Gracchus’ positive report (Polyb. 31.3.4; Diod. 31.28 refers to later
embassies, see under Ariarathes V Eusebes Philopator).
It is not entirely clear whether it was Ariarathes IV or V who repelled the Trocmi from
Kappadokian territory. The latter sent ambassadors to Rome to complain, and M. Iunius
(Brutus) (cos. 178) was dispatched by the Senate to arbitrate. When he arrived in Kappadokia in
spring or summer 163, Ariarathes V had already succeeded to the throne (Polyb. 31.2.13; 31.8
with Walbank 1979, III 468-472).
3. Select Bibliography
Niese, Benedictus: Ariarathes [4], RE 2,1, 1895, 817f.
DNP –.
Cf. McGing, Brian: Ariarathes, OCD3 1996/2003, 156f.
Badian, Ernst: Foreign Clientelae (264-70 B.C.), Oxford 1958.
Ballesteros Pastor, Luis: Cappadocia and Pontus, Client Kingdoms of the Roman Republic. From the Peace of
Apamea to the Beginning of the Mithridatic Wars (188-89 B.C.), in A. Coskun (ed.): Freundschaft und
Gefolgschaft in den auswärtigen Beziehungen der Römer (2. Jhr. v.Chr. – 1 Jhr. n. Chr.), Stuttgart 2008, 4563.
Breglia Pulci Doria, Luisa: Diodoro e Ariarate V. Conflitti dinastici, tradizione e propaganda politica nella
Cappadocia del II secolo a.C., PP 33, 1978, 104-129.
Canali de Rossi, Filippo: Le ambascerie dal mondo greco a Roma in età repubblicana, Roma 1997.
de Callataÿ, François: L’histoire des Guerres Mithridatiques vue par les monnaies, Louvain-la-Neuve 1997.
Gruen, Erich S.: The Hellenistic World and the Coming of Rome, Berkeley 1984.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
95
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Henke, Michael: Kappadokien in hellenistischer Zeit, Diss. Münster 2005.
Justi, Ferdinand: Iranisches Namenbuch, Marburg 1895.
Michels, Christoph: Kulturtransfer und monarchischer “Philhellenismus”. Bithynien, Pontos und Kappadokien in
hellenistischer Zeit, Göttingen 2009.
Portanova, Joseph John: The Associates of Mithridates VI of Pontus. Diss. Columbia Univ., New York 1988.
Primo, Andrea: Il ruolo di Roma nella guerra pontico-pergamena del 183-179: Giustino XXXVIII, 6, 1, in: B.
Virgilio (ed.): Studi Ellenistici 19, 2006, 617-628.
Pugliese Carratelli, Giovanni: La regina Antiochide di Cappadocia, PP 27, 1972, 182-185.
Reinach, Théodore: Essai sur la numismatique des rois de Cappadoce, RN s. 3, 4, 1886, 301-335, 452-483.
Walbank, Frank W.: Historical Commentary to Polybius, vol. III, Oxford 1979.
Will, Édouard: Histoire politique du monde hellénistique, 323-30 av. J.-C., Nancy 1966/7.
LBP 16.07.09–r/06.03.10
Ariarathes V Eusebes Philopator, King of Kappadokia [Var. Mithridates]
0. Onomastic Issues
Diodorus 31.19.7 affirms that he was firstly called Mithridates, but when the prince reached
manhood he would have changed his name. For his wide knowledge of Hellenic culture, he has
been called Philhellen only by modern scholars (see above all Panichi 2005).
1. Central Biographical Dates and Family Relations
 Stemmata Ariarathids / Ariobarzanids
King of Kappadokia from ca. 163 to 130. Son of Ariarathes IV Eusebes and of Antiochis,
daughter of Antiochos III Megas. Brother of Orophernes Nikephoros and of Stratonike, wife of
Eumenes II of Pergamon, and thereafter of Attalos II of Pergamon. Husband of Nysa (as she is
called on coin legends, while wrongly named Laodice by Iust. 37.1.4); she would have belonged
to the Seleukid house (Iust. 37.1.4f.; cf. OGIS 352; Reinach 1890, 53; 90; de Callataÿ 1998, 188
n. 21; Michels 2009, 312). Father of Demetrios, mentioned as leader of Kappadokian troops in
ca. 155/54 (Polyb. 33.12.1, with Walbank 1979, III 55), Ariarathes VI Epiphanes Philopator, and
five other sons killed by their own mother Nysa/Laodice (Iust. 37.1.4; Henke 2005, 73). It has
been proposed that Demetrios, who would have been far older than Nysa/Laodice’s sons, could
have been born from a former marriage of Ariarathes with one sister of Antiochis who would
have died (Günther 1995, 59f.; Michels 2009, 312 n. 1627).
2. Relations with Rome / Romans and Career
In a. 172, Ariarathes was in Rome. He had been sent there by his father in order to learn about
Roman civilization, and to establish ties with families of the Roman nobilitas (Liv. 42.19.3-6).
When his father died in a. 163, Ariarathes was confirmed as king by the Roman Senate, and
renewed his father’s friendship with the Roman people (Polyb. 31.3; 31.7.1; Liv. per. 46).
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
96
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
In a. 163, he received M. Iunius (Brutus) (on his identity see MRR I 441), who had been sent to
Kappadokia by the Senate. Soon thereafter, his kingdom was reached by another Roman mission
headed by Cn. Octavius (cos. 165), together with Sp. Lucretius (pr. 172) and L. Aurelius
(Orestes) (cos. 157). These Roman legates had come to supervise the affairs of Ariarathes and
his territorial disputes with the Galatian Trocmi, who did not meet their demands. Ariarathes
offered Octavius an escort for his travel to Syria, but the Roman refused it (Polyb. 31.2.13;
31.8). Polybius does not specify which Kappadokian king received those missions: Broughton
(MRR I 441) thought that the ruler may have been Ariarathes IV, but the account of Polybius
(31.3.1) states that both of the embassies reached Kappadokia after Ariarathes V had renewed
friendship with Rome; cf. also Walbank 1979, III 472 on the chronology.
Around 162/1, he received another Roman mission headed by Ti. Sempronius Gracchus (cos. I
177, cos. II 163, cens. 169), together with L. Cornelius Lentulus Lupus (cos. 156) and
Servilius Glaucia. These had been dispatched to settle the conflicts between the Galatians and
the kings of Asia Minor, and to ascertain their loyalty, after Demetrios I Soter had escaped from
Rome (Polyb. 31.15; 31.32f.; cf. also Diod. 31.28 referring to a. 160; MRR I 438; 443).
Ariarathes refused to marry a sister of Demetrios I Soter, king of Syria (Iust. 35.1.2), in order to
prevent arousing Roman suspicions. In a. 161/60, Ariarathes had this reported to the Senate and
promised to act as they would wish, thereby offering a golden crown worth 10,000 drachmae. Ti.
Sempronius Gracchus and his fellow-commissioners testified to the loyalty of Ariarathes. The
Senate then accepted his gift and presented him in return a sella curulis of ivory and a sceptre
(Polyb. 31.32; 32.1.1-3; Diod. 31.28; Breglia Pulci Doria 1978, 128 n. 3).
In a. 158/57, Ariarathes was expelled from the throne by his brother Orophernes Nikephoros,
who was supported by Demetrios I Soter. Ariarathes went to Rome in order to claim his rights.
(Polyb. 3.5.2; 32.10; Zonar. 9.24.8f.; App. Syr. 47.244). The exiled king found the support of
important aristocrats, among whom one may expect Ti. Sempronius Gracchus (Breglia Pulci
Doria 1978, 126; Ballesteros Pastor 2008, 47). But nevertheless, the Senate decreed the joint rule
of both princes (App. Syr. 47.245; Zonar. 9.24). Soon thereafter, Orophernes expelled his brother
once more. However, around 155/54, Ariarathes recovered the kingdom thanks to the aid of
Attalos II, king of Pergamon (Polyb. 33.6.1-3; Iust. 35.1.2-4; Trog. prol. 34; Breglia Pulci Doria
1978, 121; cf. also Diod. 31.19.7f.; 31.32-32b). According to Liv. per. 47.7, it was the Senate
who restored the king, but this notice is doubtful (Magie 1950, II 1096 n. 7).
Once Ariarathes had regained the Kappadokian throne, he demanded back the treasure from
Priene that Orophernes had deposited there. Both Ariarathes and Eumenes invaded the territory
of the city. The people of Priene sent an embassy first to Rhodes, and thereafter to Rome, but the
Senate did not pay attention to this problem (Polyb. 33.6; cf. Diod. 31.32; Michels 2009, 126ff.).
In the course of Ariarathes’ reign, Rome ordered him to indemnify the Galatians after the break
of a dam in Kappadokia had flooded their territory (Strab. geogr. 12.2.8 [539C]).
Together with other Kings, he received a Roman decree ordering that the Jews be respected (I
Macc 15.22).
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
97
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Rome requested his aid in her war against Perseus (App. Mac. 11.4; Eutr. 4.6; Oros. 4.20.36; cf.
Fest. brev. 11.4).
In 131/130, Ariarathes supported P. Licinius Crasus Dives Mucianus cos. 131, procos. Asiae
130 in the war against Aristonikos (Strab. geogr. 14.1.38 [646C]; Eutr. 4.20; Oros. 5.10.2; cf.
Fest. brev. 11.4). He died in this conflict. As a reward, Rome gave Ariarathes’ sons the territories
of Lykaonia and Kilikia (Iust. 37.1.2).
3. Select Bibliography
Niese, Benedictus, Ariarathes [5], RE 2,1, 1895, 818-819.
DNP –.
Cf. McGing, Brian: Ariarathes, OCD3 1996/2003, 156f.
Badian, Ernst: Foreign Clientelae (264-70 B.C.), Oxford 1958.
Ballesteros Pastor, Luis: Cappadocia and Pontus, Client Kingdoms of the Roman Republic. From the Peace of
Apamea to the Beginning of the Mithridatic Wars (188-89 B.C.), in A. Coşkun (ed.): Freundschaft und
Gefolgschaft in den auswärtigen Beziehungen der Römer (2. Jhr. v.Chr. – 1 Jhr. n. Chr.), Stuttgart 2008, 4563.
Breglia Pulci Doria, Luisa: Diodoro e Ariarate V. Conflitti dinastici, tradizione e propaganda politica nella
Cappadocia del II secolo a.C., PP 33, 1978, 104-129.
Broughton, Thomas R.S.: The Magistrates of the Roman Republic, vol. I, New York 1951.
Canali de Rossi, Filippo: Le ambascerie dal mondo greco a Roma in età repubblicana, Roma 1997.
de Callataÿ, François: L’histoire des Guerres Mithridatiques vue par les monnaies, Louvain-la-Neuve 1997.
Gruen, Erich S.: The Hellenistic World and the Coming of Rome, Berkeley, Los Angeles, 1984.
Günther, Linda-Maria: Kappadokien, die seleukidische Heiratspolitik und die Rolle der Antiochis, Tochter
Antiochos’ III., in: Studien zum antiken Kleinasien III, Bonn 1995, 47-61.
Henke, Michael: Kappadokien in hellenistischer Zeit, Diss. Münster 2005.
Magie, David: Roman Rule in Asia Minor to the End of the Third Century after Christ, Princeton 1950.
Michels, Christoph: Kulturtransfer und monarchischer “Philhellenismus”. Bithynien, Pontos und Kappadokien in
hellenistischer Zeit, Göttingen 2009.
Panichi, Silvia: Sul ‘filellenismo’ di Ariarate V, in: B. Virgilio (ed.): Studi Ellenistici 16, Pisa 2005, 241-259.
Pugliese Carratelli, Giovanni: La regina Antiochide di Cappadocia, PP 27, 1972, 182-185.
Reinach, Théodore: Essai sur la numismatique des rois de Cappadoce, RN s. 3, 4, 1886, 301-335, 452-483.
Sullivan, Richard D.: Near Eastern Royalty and Rome 100-30 BC, Toronto 1990.
Schwartz, Daniel R.: Scipio’s Embassy and Simon’s Ambassadors, SCI 12, 1993, 114-126.
Walbank, Frank W.: Historical Commentary to Polybius, vol. III, Oxford 1979.
Will, Édouard: Histoire politique du monde hellénistique 323-30 av. J.-C., vol. II. Nancy 1967.
LBP 16.07.09–r/06.03.10
Ariarathes VI Epiphanes Philopator, King of Kappadokia [Var. Ariarathes Theos (?)
Philopator]
0. Onomastic Issues
For Ariarathes, see under Ariarathes IV Eusebes. A unique drachma with the legend Basileos
Ariarathou Theou [Philo]patoros has been related to this king, even though an identification
with Ariarathes IV cannot be ruled out completely (Michels 2009, 244 fig. 44, cf. pp. 229f.).
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
98
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
1. Central Biographical Dates and Family Relations
 Stemmata Ariarathids / Ariobarzanids
Ariarathes VI ruled ca. a. 130-116. Son of Ariarathes V Eusebes Philopator and of Nysa, who
probably belonged to the Seleukid house (Michels 2009, 312). On the fate of his brothers, see
under Ariarathes V. At the beginning of his reign, his mother acted as regent, but this period may
have been short, because there are coins dated in the first regnal year of Ariarathes (de Callataÿ
1998, 189). Married to Laodike, daughter of Mithradates V Euergetes of Pontus. Father of
Ariarathes VII Philometor and Ariarates VIII Epiphanes Eusebes.
2. Relations with Rome / Romans and Career
The Romans gave him (and his brothers) Lykaonia and Kilikia, as a reward for his father’s death
in the war against Aristonikos (Iust. 37.1.2).
He probably renewed his father’s friendship with the Sempronii Gracchi. At least, C.
Sempronius Gracchus (tr. pl. 123-122) accused both Mithradates V Euergetes and
Nikomedes III Euergetes of having bribed M.’ Aquillius cos. 129, procos. Asiae 128-126,
perhaps to obtain territories in Greater Phrygia. But the tribune did not claim back the lands
given to the Kappadokian royal house (Ballesteros Pastor 2008).
He died at the hands of a Kappadokian noble called Gordios. Mithradates VI Eupator was
accused of having instigated this crime, but the Pontic king denied these allegations (Iust. 38.1.1;
38.1.6; 38.5.8; Ballesteros Pastor 2008, 54ff.).
3. Select Bibliography
Niese, Benedictus: Ariarathes [6], RE 2,1, 1895, 819.
DNP –.
Cf. McGing, Brian: Ariarathes, OCD3 1996/2003, 156f.
Badian, Ernst: Foreign Clientelae (264-70 B.C.), Oxford 1958.
Ballesteros Pastor, Luis: Mitrídates Eupátor, rey del Ponto, Granada 1996.
Ballesteros Pastor, Luis: Cappadocia and Pontus, Client Kingdoms of the Roman Republic. From the Peace of
Apamea to the Beginning of the Mithridatic Wars (188-89 B.C.), in A. Coşkun (ed.): Freundschaft und
Gefolgschaft in den auswärtigen Beziehungen der Römer (2. Jhr. v.Chr. – 1 Jhr. n. Chr.), Stuttgart 2008, 4563.
Broughton, Thomas R.S.: The Magistrates of the Roman Republic, vol. I, New York 1951.
Canali de Rossi, Filippo: Le ambascerie dal mondo greco a Roma in età repubblicana, Roma 1997.
de Callataÿ, François: L’histoire des Guerres Mithridatiques vue par les monnaies, Louvain-la-Neuve 1997.
Dmitriev, Sviatoslav: Cappadocian Dynastic Rearrangements on the Eve of the First Mithridatic War, Historia
55, 2006, 285-297.
Gruen, Erich S.: The Hellenistic World and the Coming of Rome, Berkeley 1984.
Henke, Michael: Kappadokien in hellenistischer Zeit, Diss. Münster 2005.
Magie, David: Roman Rule in Asia Minor to the End of the Third Century after Christ, Princeton 1950.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
99
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Michels, Christoph: Kulturtransfer und monarchischer “Philhellenismus”. Bithynien, Pontos und Kappadokien in
hellenistischer Zeit, Göttingen 2009.
Reinach, Théodore: Mithridate Eupator, roi de Pont, Paris 1890.
Sullivan, Richard D.: Near Eastern Royalty and Rome 100-30 BC, Toronto 1990.
Will, Édouard: Histoire politique du monde hellénistique 323-30 av. J.-C., vol. II, Nancy 1967.
LBP 16.07.09–r/06.03.10
Ariarathes VII Philometor, King of Kappadokia
0. Onomastic Issues
See under Ariarathes IV Eusebes.
1. Central Biographical Dates and Family Relations
 Stemmata Ariarathids / Ariobarzanids
Son of Ariarathes VI Epiphanes Philopator and of Laodike, sister of Mithradates VI Eupator
Dionysos of Pontus. Brother of Ariarathes VIII Epiphanes Eusebes, king of Kappadokia.
2. Relations with Rome / Romans and Career
He might have renewed the ancestral friendship with Rome. In fact, the Senate will have been
alerted about the ambitions of Pontus and the weakness of the Kappadokian dynasty.
Probably around 116 a.C., when his father died, Rome withdrew Lykaonia from the
Kappadokian rule (Ballesteros Pastor 2008, 52 n. 31).
He appears together with phíloi and other allies of Mithradates VI in a monument from Delos
dedicated around 101 on behalf of the Athenian and Roman peoples (Durrbach 1921-22, 221 nº
136g). This has been regarded as a proof of Ariarathes’ good relations with Pontus, but soon
thereafter he was slain by Mithradates (Iust. 38.1.8-10; 38.7.9).
3. Select Bibliography
Niese, Benedictus, Ariarathes [7], RE 2,1, 1895, 819-820.
DNP –.
Cf. McGing, Brian: Ariarathes, OCD3 1996/2003, 156f.
Badian, Ernst: Foreign Clientelae (264-70 B.C.), Oxford 1958.
Ballesteros Pastor, Luis: Mitrídates Eupátor, rey del Ponto, Granada 1996.
Ballesteros Pastor, Luis: Influencia Helénica y vida ciudadana en el reino del Ponto: la difícil búsqueda de una
identidad, in: D. Plácido / M. Valdés / F. Echevarría / M.Y. Montes (eds.): La construcción ideológica de la
ciudadanía. Identidades culturales y sociedades en el mundo griego antiguo, Madrid 2006, 381-394.
Ballesteros Pastor, Luis: Cappadocia and Pontus, Client Kingdoms of the Roman Republic. From the Peace of
Apamea to the Beginning of the Mithridatic Wars (188-89 B.C.), in A. Coşkun (ed.): Freundschaft und
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
100
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Gefolgschaft in den auswärtigen Beziehungen der Römer (2. Jhr. v.Chr. – 1 Jhr. n. Chr.), Stuttgart 2008, 4563.
Broughton, Thomas R.S.: The Magistrates of the Roman Republic, vol. I, New York 1951.
Canali de Rossi, Filippo: Le ambascerie dal mondo greco a Roma in età repubblicana, Roma 1997.
de Callataÿ, François: L’histoire des Guerres Mithridatiques vue par les monnaies, Louvain-la-Neuve 1997.
Dmitriev, Sviatoslav: Cappadocian Dynastic Rearrangements on the Eve of the First Mithridatic War, Historia
55, 2006, 285-297.
Durrbach, Félix: Choix d’inscriptions de Délos. Avec traduction et commentaire, Paris 1921-1922.
Henke, Michael: Kappadokien in hellenistischer Zeit, Diss. Münster 2005.
Magie, David: Roman Rule in Asia Minor to the End of the Thrid Century after Christ, Princeton 1950.
McGing, Brian: The Foreign Policy of Mithridates VI Eupator, King of Pontus, Leiden 1987.
Mastrocinque, Attilio: Studi sulle Guerre Mitridatiche, Stuttgart 1998.
Michels, Christoph: Kulturtransfer und monarchischer “Philhellenismus”. Bithynien, Pontos und Kappadokien in
hellenistischer Zeit, Göttingen 2009.
Portanova, Joseph John: The Associates of Mithridates VI of Pontus. Diss. Columbia Univ., New York 1988.
Reinach, Théodore: Mithridate Eupator, roi de Pont, Paris 1890.
Sullivan, Richard D.: Near Eastern Royalty and Rome 100-30 BC, Toronto 1990.
Will, Édouard: Histoire politique du monde hellénistique 323-30 av. J.-C., vol. II. Nancy 1967.
LBP 16.07.09–r/06.03.10
Ariarathes VIII Epiphanes Eusebes, King of Kappadokia
0. Onomastic Issues
See under Ariarathes IV Eusebes. On his coins his epithet appears as either Epiphanes or
Eusebes (de Callataÿ 1998, 199f.).
1. Central Biographical Dates and Family Relations
 Stemmata Ariarathids / Ariobarzanids
Son of Ariarathes VI Epiphanes Philopator and of Laodike, sister of Mithradates VI Eupator
Dionysos, king of Pontus. Brother of Ariarathes VII Philometor, king of Kappadokia.
Ruled over a part of Kappadokia ca. 100-98.
He had been sent to the Roman province of Asia to receive Greek education. A faction of the
Kappadokian nobility, dissatisfied with the rule of Ariarathes IX Eusebes, requested this prince
to go back to Kappadokia. Ariarathes may have resided in Tyana (thus the hypothesis of
Mørkholm 1968, 256f.). For his coin issues cf. de Callataÿ 1998, 196. He was defeated by
Mithradates VI Eupator and expelled from the kingdom. Soon thereafter, Ariarathes became
depressed and died (Iust. 38.2.1f.).
2. Relations with Rome / Romans and Career
Rome was certainly alerted because of Kappadokian affairs at this time. In fact, some Roman
missions to the East seem to have been concerned with the problems of this kingdom,
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
101
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
especially the one of C. Marius (cos. 106, 104-100) who warned Mithridates VI Eupator with
the famous words “either to try to be stronger than Rome, or to obey her commands in
silence” (Plut. Mar. 31.2f.; Ballesteros Pastor 1996, 69; id. 1999; id. 2008, 54f.; Dmitriev
2006).
3. Select Bibliography
Niese, Benedictus, Ariarathes [8], RE 2,1, 1895, 820.
DNP –.
Cf. McGing, Brian: Ariarathes, OCD3 1996/2003, 156f.
Badian, Ernst: Foreign Clientelae (264-70 B.C.), Oxford 1958.
Ballesteros Pastor, Luis: Mitrídates Eupátor, rey del Ponto, Granada 1996.
Ballesteros Pastor, Luis: Marius’ Words to Mithridates Eupator, Historia 48, 1999, 506-508.
Ballesteros Pastor, Luis: Cappadocia and Pontus, Client Kingdoms of the Roman Republic. From the Peace of
Apamea to the Beginning of the Mithridatic Wars (188-89 B.C.), in A. Coşkun (ed.): Freundschaft und
Gefolgschaft in den auswärtigen Beziehungen der Römer (2. Jhr. v.Chr. – 1 Jhr. n. Chr.), Stuttgart 2008, 4563.
Broughton, Thomas R.S.: The Magistrates of the Roman Republic, vol. I, New York 1951.
de Callataÿ, François: L’histoire des Guerres Mithridatiques vue par les monnaies, Louvain-la-Neuve 1997.
Dmitriev, Sviatoslav: Cappadocian Dynastic Rearrangements on the Eve of the First Mithridatic War, Historia
55, 2006, 285-297.
Henke, Michael: Kappadokien in hellenistischer Zeit, Diss. Münster 2005.
Kallet-Marx, Robert: Hegemony to Empire. The Development of the Roman Imperium in the East from 148 to
62 B.C., Berkeley 1995.
McGing, Brian: The Foreign Policy of Mithridates VI Eupator, King of Pontus, Leiden 1987.
Mastrocinque, Attilio: Studi sulle Guerre Mitridatiche, Stuttgart 1998.
Michels, Christoph: Kulturtransfer und monarchischer “Philhellenismus”. Bithynien, Pontos und Kappadokien in
hellenistischer Zeit, Göttingen 2009.
Mørkholm, Otto: The Coinages of Ariarathes VIII and Ariarathes IX of Cappadocia, in: C.M. Kraay / G.K.
Jenkins (eds.): Essays in Greek Coinage Presented to Stanley Robinson, Oxford 1968, 241-258.
Portanova, Joseph John: The Associates of Mithridates VI of Pontus. Diss. Columbia Univ., New York 1988.
Reinach, Théodore: Mithridate Eupator, roi de Pont, Paris 1890.
Sullivan, Richard D.: Near Eastern Royalty and Rome 100-30 BC, Toronto 1990.
Will, Édouard: Histoire politique du monde hellénistique 323-30 av. J.-C., vol. II. Nancy 1967.
LBP 16.07.09–r/06.03.10
Ariarathes IX. Eusebes Philopator, König von Kappadokien
0. Onomastisches
In App. Mithr. teilweise (17,63-18,68; 35,137; 41,156) als Arkathias bezeichnet.
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemmata Ariarathiden / Ariobarzaniden
Sohn des Mithradates VI. Eupator; starb ca. a. 86.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
102
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Mithradates versuchte ihn zwischen a. 101/100 und 88 mehrfach, aber vor allem wegen des
Widerstands der Römer, die ab a. 96 seinen Rivalen Ariobarzanes I. unterstützten, letztlich
erfolglos als König einzusetzen (Iust. 38,1,10; 38,2,5; App. Mithr. 10,33; 15,50). Er diente
seinem Vater als Heerführer, u.a. in Thrakien und Makedonien, wo er ca. a. 86 starb (App.
Mithr. 35,137; 41,156; Plut. Sull. 11,4).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Niese: Ariarathes [9] IX., RE 2,1, 1895, 820.
Schottky, Martin: Ariarathes [9] (IX.) Eusebes Philopator, DNP 12,2, 2002, 905.
Dmitriev, Sviatoslav: Cappadocian Dynastic Rearrangements on the Eve of the First Mithridatic War, Historia
55, 2006, 286-89.
Hoben, Wolfgang: Untersuchungen zur Stellung kleinasiatischer Dynasten in den Machtkämpfen der
ausgehenden römischen Republik, Diss. Mainz 1969, 146f.
Mastrocinque, Attilio: Studi sulle guerre mitridatiche, Stuttgart 1999, 11-17; passim.
Simonetta, Bono: The Coins of the Cappadocian Kings, Freiburg/SUI 1977, 36-39.
Sullivan, Richard D.: The Dynasty of Cappadocia, ANRW II 7,2, 1980, 1127-32.
Sullivan, Richard D.: Near Eastern Royalty and Rome, 100-30 B.C., Toronto 1990, 53f.
MT/20.12.06–r/03.07.07
Ariarathes X. Eusebes Philadelphos, König von Kappadokien
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemmata Ariarathiden / Ariobarzaniden
Sohn des Ariobarzanes II. Philopator; Bruder des Ariobarzanes III. Eusebes Philorhomaios.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Während der Herrschaft seines Bruders Ariobarzanes III. Eusebes Philorhomaios von
einflußreichen Anhängern gegen diesen unterstützt (Cic. fam. 15,2,6=105 ShB a. 51). Befand
sich im Lager des Cn. Pompeius Magnus bei Pharsalos (App. civ. 2,71,295).
Möglicherweise von C. Iulius Caesar mit der Herrschaft über Kleinarmenien betraut (bell
Alex. 66,5), kam er a. 45 nach Rom, um ein von seinem Bruder unabhängiges Königreich zu
kaufen (Cic. Att. 13,2a,2=301 ShB). Avancierte nach der Beseitigung seines Bruders durch C.
Cassius Longinus procos. Orientis 43-42 zum König von Kappadokien. Anschließend geriet
er in Konflikt mit dem von M. Antonius protegierten Archelaos I. Sisines (?) Philopatris, der
wohl a. 36 mit seiner endgültigen Vertreibung endete (Cass. Dio 49,32,2; ferner App. civ.
5,7,31 ad a. 41; daneben Val. Max. 9,15 ext. 2).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
103
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Niese: Ariarathes [10] X., RE 2,1, 1895, 820f.
Schottky, Martin: Ariarathes [10] IX. (X.) Eusebes Philadelphos, DNP 12,2, 2002, 905.
Hoben, Wolfgang: Untersuchungen zur Stellung kleinasiatischer Dynasten in den Machtkämpfen der
ausgehenden römischen Republik, Diss. Mainz 1969, 171-79.
Simonetta, Bono: The Coins of the Cappadocian Kings, Freiburg/Ü. 1977, 45.
Stein-Kramer, Michaela: Die Klientelkönigreiche Kleinasiens in der Außenpolitik der späten Republik und des
Augustus, Berlin 1988, 158-60.
Sullivan, Richard D.: The Dynasty of Cappadocia, ANRW II 7,2, 1980, 1145-1149.
Sullivan, Richard D.: Near Eastern Royalty and Rome, 100-30 B.C., Toronto 1990, 179-82.
Syme, Ronald: The Accession of Archelaus Philopatris, in: ders.: Anatolica. Studies in Strabo, Oxford 1995,
145-48.
MT/20.12.06–r/30.06.07
Ariobarzanes I. Philorhomaios, König von Kappadokien
0. Onomastisches
Als erster Herrscher mit dem Beinamen Philorhomaios belegt. Vgl. OGIS I 354f.; Simonetta
1977, 40-42.
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemmata Ariarathiden / Ariobarzaniden
Lebte in der ersten Hälfte des 1. Jhs; s. 2.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Nach dem Aussterben des kappadokischen Herrscherhauses ca. a. 96 zum König gewählt
(Strab. geogr. 12,2,11 [540]). Vor und während der Mithradatischen Kriege mindestens
sechsmal von Mithradates VI. Eupator und Tigranes I. aus seinem Reich vertrieben und
jeweils mit römischer Hilfe zurückgeführt, u.a. von L. Cornelius Sulla propr. Ciliciae
zwischen ca. a. 96 und 92 (Plut. Sull. 5,6-10; App. Mithr. 57,231; Liv. per. 70,6; weitere
Quellen zu den einzelnen Vertreibungen bei Hoben 1969, 148 Anm. 46). Zahlreiche
Bewohner seines Reiches wurden von Tigranes deportiert (Strab. geogr. 11,14,15 [532];
12,2,9 [539]; Plut. Luc. 21,4; 26,1; App. Mithr. 67,285).
Versöhnte sich nach dem Zweiten Mithradatischen Krieg unter römischer Vermittlung mit
Mithradates (App. Mithr. 66,279f.). Unterstützte im Dritten Mithradatischen Krieg die
Operationen des L. Licinius Lucullus procos. Ciliciae (et Asiae) 73-66/63 (Strab. geogr.
12,2,1 [535]; App. Mithr. 80,357.359; Sall. hist. frg. 4,69,15 Maurenbrecher=4,67 McGushin;
4,59=4,60; Memn., FGrH 434 F 38,2). Erhielt im Rahmen der Verfügungen des Cn.
Pompeius Magnus procos. 66-62/61 Gebietserweiterungen um Sophene und Gordyene sowie
in Kilikien (App. Mithr. 105,495f.). Dankte a. 63/62 im Beisein und möglicherweise auf
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
104
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Druck des Pompeius zugunsten seines Sohnes Ariobarzanes II. Philopator ab (Val. Max. 5,7
ext. 2; ferner App. Mithr. 105,496; vgl. Mastrocinque 1999, 102).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Niese: Ariobarzanes [5] I. Philorhomaios, RE 2,1, 1895, 833f.
Schottky, Martin: Ariobarzanes [3] Philorhomaios, DNP 1, 1996, 1082f.
Dmitriev, Sviatoslav: Cappadocian Dynastic Rearrangements on the Eve of the First Mithridatic War, Historia
55, 2006, 289-297.
Hoben, Wolfgang: Untersuchungen zur Stellung kleinasiatischer Dynasten in den Machtkämpfen der
ausgehenden römischen Republik, Diss. Mainz 1969, 144-154.
Mastrocinque, Attilio: Studi sulle guerre mitridatiche, Stuttgart 1999, 29-40; 99-102.
Simonetta, Bono: The Coins of the Cappadocian Kings, Freiburg/Ü. 1977, 39-42.
Stein-Kramer, Michaela: Die Klientelkönigreiche Kleinasiens in der Außenpolitik der späten Republik und des
Augustus, Berlin 1988, 138-45.
Sullivan, Richard D.: The Dynasty of Cappadocia, ANRW II 7,2, 1980, 1128-36.
Sullivan, Richard D.: Near Eastern Royalty and Rome, 100-30 B.C., Toronto 1990, 54-58; 174f.
van Dam, Raymond: Kingdom of Snow. Roman Rule and Greek Culture in Cappadocia, Philadelphia 2002, 1719.
MT/20.12.06–r/30.06.07
Ariobarzanes II. Philopator, König von Kappadokien
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemmata Ariarathiden / Ariobarzaniden
Sohn des Ariobarzanes I. Philorhomaios, Vater des Ariobarzanes III. Eusebes Philorhomaios;
starb a. 52/51.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Wurde im Beisein des Cn. Pompeius Magnus procos. 66-62/61 als König eingesetzt (Val.
Max. 5,7 ext. 2; ferner App. Mithr. 105,496). Fiel a. 52/51 einem Mordkomplott zum Opfer
(Cic. fam. 15,2,5=105 ShB).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Niese: Ariobarzanes [6] II. Philopator, RE 2,1, 1895, 834.
Schottky, Martin: Ariobarzanes [4] II. Philopator, DNP 1, 1996, 1083.
Hoben, Wolfgang: Untersuchungen zur Stellung kleinasiatischer Dynasten in den Machtkämpfen der
ausgehenden römischen Republik, Diss. Mainz 1969, 152-59.
Simonetta, Bono: The Coins of the Cappadocian Kings, Freiburg/Ü. 1977, 43.
Stein-Kramer, Michaela: Die Klientelkönigreiche Kleinasiens in der Außenpolitik der späten Republik und des
Augustus, Berlin 1988, 145-48.
Sullivan, Richard D.: The Dynasty of Cappadocia, ANRW II 7,2, 1980, 1136-39.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
105
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Sullivan, Richard D.: Near Eastern Royalty and Rome, 100-30 B.C., Toronto 1990, 175-77.
MT/20.12.06–r/30.06.07
Ariobarzanes III. Eusebes Philorhomaios, König von Kappadokien
0. Onomastisches
Belege für die Beinamen in OGIS I 356; Simonetta 1977, 44.
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemmata Ariarathiden / Ariobarzaniden
Sohn des Ariobarzanes II. Philopator; Bruder des Ariarathes X. Eusebes; a. 42 getötet.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
M. Tullius Cicero procos. Ciliciae 51/50 brachte ihm die Anerkennung des Senats (Cic. fam.
15,2,4=105 ShB; 2,17,7=117). Überstand a. 51 mit Unterstützung Ciceros eine Verschwörung
(Cic. fam. 15,4,6=110 ShB; Att. 5,20,6=113 ShB). Hoch verschuldet gegenüber Cn.
Pompeius Magnus und M. Iunius Brutus (Cic. Att. 5,18,4=112 ShB; 6,1,3=115; 6,2,7=116;
6,3,5=117). Stand auf der Seite des Pompeius im Bürgerkrieg gegen C. Iulius Caesar (Caes.
civ. 3,4,3; Flor. 2,13,5), behielt aber im Anschluß seine Herrschaft mit einer
Gebietserweiterung in Kleinarmenien (Cass. Dio 41,63,3; 42,48,3) und unterstützte Cn.
Domitius Calvinus procos. Asiae 48/47 gegen Pharnakes (II.) (Cass. Dio 42,46,2; bell. Alex.
34,4). A. 42 von C. Cassius Longinus procos. Orientis 43-42 beseitigt (App. civ. 4,63,272;
Cass. Dio 47,33,4).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Niese: Ariobarzanes [6] III., RE 2,1, 1895, 834f.
Schottky, Martin: Ariobarzanes [5] III. Eusebes Philorhomaios, DNP 1, 1996, 1083.
Hoben, Wolfgang: Untersuchungen zur Stellung kleinasiatischer Dynasten in den Machtkämpfen der
ausgehenden römischen Republik, Diss. Mainz 1969, 159-176.
Simonetta, Bono: The Coins of the Cappadocian Kings, Freiburg/Ü. 1977, 43f.
Stein-Kramer, Michaela: Die Klientelkönigreiche Kleinasiens in der Außenpolitik der späten Republik und des
Augustus, Berlin 1988.
Sullivan, Richard D.: The Dynasty of Cappadocia, ANRW II 7,2, 1980, 1139-46.
Sullivan, Richard D.: Near Eastern Royalty and Rome, 100-30 B.C., Toronto 1990, 177-80.
MT/20.12.06–r/30.06.07
Aristarchos, Dynast von Kolchis
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
106
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Als Dynast von Kolchis in den späten 60er Jahren bezeugt.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Von Cn. Pompeius Magnus procos. 67-62/61 a. 64/62 bei der Neuordnung des Ostens als
Dynast von Kolchis eingesetzt. Sein genauer Titel ist unbekannt; vgl. App. Mithr. 114,560;
Eutr. 6,14,1. Seine Münzen tragen die Legende Aristarchu tu epi Kolchidos (Head HN2 S.
496; Hoben 1969, 70 Anm. 80). Eine Unterstellung unter den galatischen König Deiotaros (I.)
Philorhomaios, der die angrenzenden Gebiete von Ost-Pontos und Kleinarmenien übertragen
bekommen hatte, ist gut möglich, aber nicht beweisbar; vgl. einerseits Coskun 2007, Teil B.II,
andererseits Hoben 1969, 70. Vermutlich mobilisierte Aristarchos die kolchische Flotte für
Pompeius während des Bürgerkrieges a. 49/48 (Cic. Att. 9,9,2=176 ShB; vgl. die Andeutung
in App. civ. 2,211).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Wilcken, U.: Aristarchus [20], RE 2,1, 1895, 861.
DNP –.
Coskun, Altay: Von der ‘Geißel Asiens’ zu ‘kaiserfrommen’ Reichsbewohnern. Studien zur politischen und
gesellschaftlichen Entwicklung der Galater unter besonderer Berücksichtigung der amicitia populi Romani
und der göttlichen Verehrung des Augustus (3. Jh. v.–2. Jh. n.Chr.), unveröff. Habil. Trier 2007, Teil B.II.
Hoben, Wolfgang: Untersuchungen zur Stellung kleinasiatischer Dynasten in den Machtkämpfen der
ausgehenden römischen Republik, Diss. Mainz 1969, 70 Anm. 80.
Magie, David: Roman Rule in Asia Minor to the End of the Third Century after Christ, Princeton/N.J. 1950, II
1238 Anm. 41.
Sullivan, Richard D.: Near Eastern Royalty and Rome, 100-30 B.C., Toronto 1990, 156; 164.
AC/03.07.07
Aristobulos, König von Kleinarmenien bzw. von Chalkis (ad Belum?) = Iulius
Aristobulus
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemmata Herodianer
Aristobulos wurde wohl zu Beginn der 30er Jahre n.Chr. als Sohn des Herodes Philoklaudios
von Chalkis und der Mariamme (PIR2 M 274) geboren (Ios. bell. Iud. 2,221; ant. Iud. 18,134;
20,104). Um 49 heiratete er Salome (Ios. ant. Iud. 18,137). Ihre Identifizierung mit der
Tochter der Herodias, die Flavius Josephus vornimmt, ist aber kaum glaubwürdig (Kokkinos
1986, v.a. 35; 43-45; 1998, 310f.; Josephus folgen dagegen u.a. Wilcken 1895, 910;
Bringmann 1996, 1105). Wahrscheinlicher handelt es sich um ein anderes, ansonsten
unbekanntes Mitglied der herodianischen Familie. Aus der Ehe gingen die drei Söhne
Herodes (eventuell erwähnt in Ios. c. Ap. 1,51) (PIR2 H 158), Agrippa (PIR2 A 461) und
Aristobulos (PIR2 A 1053) hervor (Ios. ant. Iud. 18,137).
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
107
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
2. Verhältnis zu Rom / Römern und Karriereverlauf
44 n.Chr. setzte sich Aristobulos gemeinsam mit seinem Vater Herodes Philoklaudios und
seinem Cousin Agrippa II. bei Claudius für eine priesterliche Gesandtschaft ein, die um die
Kontrolle über die Gewänder des Hohepriesters bat. Claudius nennt ihn und seinen Vater in
dem entsprechenden Schreiben als ihm in tiefer Freundschaft verbunden (Ios. ant. Iud. 20,13).
54/55 wurde Aristobulos von Nero zum König über Armenia Minor ernannt (Ios. bell. Iud.
2,252; ant. Iud. 20,158; Tac. ann. 13,7). Im Zuge der Armenienkrise wurde ihm im Jahr 60
zudem die Kontrolle über einige weitere angrenzende Gebiete in Großarmenien übertragen
(Tac. ann. 14,26). Nach der Annexion Kleinarmeniens (a. 72) wurde Aristobulos von
Vespasian zum König von Chalkis ernannt (Ios. bell. Iud. 7,226), das wahrscheinlich mit
Chalcis ad Belum im nördlichen Libanon zu identifizieren ist (Schmitt 1982, 113); Kokkinos
1998, 312f. geht dagegen von Chalkis ad Libanum aus. Die Niederschlagung des Aufstandes
in Kommagene unterstützte er mit Truppen (Ios. bell. Iud. 7,226). Im Jahr 92 wurde Chalkis
wahrscheinlich annektiert, eventuell ist auf diesen Zeitpunkt auch sein Todesjahr zu datieren
(BMCGC Syria, S. 147, Nr. 6 mit dem Kommentar S. liv).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Wilcken, Ulrich: Aristobulos [10], RE 2,1, 1895, 910.
Bringmann, Klaus: Aristobulos [6], DNP 1, 1996, 1105f.
PIR2 A 1052.
Cumont, Franz: Monnaie d’Aristobule, RN 4, 1900, 484f.
Kokkinos, Nikos: The Herodian Dynasty. Origins, Role in Society and Eclipse, Sheffield 1998.
Kokkinos, Nikos: Which Salome Did Aristobulos Marry?, PalEQ 118, 1986, 33-50.
Schmitt, Götz: Zum Königreich Chalkis, ZPalV 98, 1982, 110-124.
Schürer, Emil: Geschichte des jüdischen Volkes im Zeitalter Jesu Christi, Bd. 1, Leipzig 1901.
Wilker, Julia, Für Rom und Jerusalem. Die herodianische Dynastie im 1. Jahrhundert n.Chr., Frankfurt/M. 2007.
JW/25.02.10 – r/02.03.10
Aristobulos II., König von Judäa
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemmata Herodianer
Sohn des Alexandros Iannaios und der Alexandra Salome, Bruder des Hyrkanos II., Vater von
Alexandros und Matthatias Antigonos. Erhob sich 69 v.Chr. gegen seine Mutter und den von
ihr zum Nachfolger bestimmten Hyrkanos. Hohepriester und König a. 67-63. (Belege unter
2.)
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
108
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Hyrkanos versuchte auf Betreiben des Antipatros, die von Aristobulos usurpierte Herrschaft
zurückzuerobern und belagerte ihn in Jerusalem. Dieser sicherte sich durch Bestechung die
Gunst des M. Aemilius Scaurus quaest. bzw. proquaest. (des Cn. Pompeius Magnus) 6561, der ihn aus der Belagerung befreite (Ios. ant. Iud. 14,30-32). Auch Pompeius schickte er
als Geschenk einen goldenen Weinstock (?) nach Syrien (Strab., FGrH 91 F 14). In den
folgenden Verhandlungen vor Pompeius (Diod. 40,2) beugte er sich jedoch nicht dessen
Entscheidung zugunsten des Hyrkanos (Ios. bell. Iud. 1,131-41; ant. Iud. 14,37-57). A. 63
eroberte Pompeius Jerusalem, Aristobulos und dessen Kinder wurden nach Rom gebracht
(Diod. 40,4; Strab. geogr. 16,2,40 [763]; Ios. bell. Iud. 1,157f.; ant. Iud. 14,79; Plut. Pomp.
39,3; 45,1.5. App. Mithr. 106,498; 117,573.578 [mit dem Fehler einer angeblich folgenden
Hinrichtung des Aristobulos]; Syr. 50,252; Cass. Dio 37,15,3-16,4; Eutr. 6,14,2).
A. 56 gelang Aristobulos die Flucht (Ios. bell. Iud. 1,171; ant. Iud. 14,92); er wurde bei neuen
Aufstandsversuchen in Judäa von A. Gabinius cos. 58, procos. Syr. 57-54 gefangengesetzt
und wiederum nach Rom gebracht (Ios. bell. Iud. 1,171-73; ant. Iud. 14,92-97; Plut. Ant.
3,2f.; Cass. Dio 39,56,6). A. 49 entließ C. Iulius Caesar ihn aus der Haft und sandte ihn mit
zwei Legionen gegen die Pompeianer nach Syrien und Judäa zurück (Ios. bell. Iud. 1,183. ant.
Iud. 14,123. Cass. Dio 41,18,1). Anhänger des Pompeius vergifteten ihn im selben Jahr,
Caesarianer bestatten ihn vorläufig (Ios. bell. Iud. 1,184; ant. Iud. 14,124). M. Antonius
verfügte später seine Beisetzung in den jüdischen Königsgräbern (Ios. bell. Iud. 1,184; ant.
Iud. 14,124).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Wilcken, Ulrich: Aristobulos [6], RE 2,1, 1895, 907-9.
Bringmann, Klaus: Aristobulos [2], DNP 1, 1996, 1104f.
Baltrusch, Ernst: Die Juden und das Römische Reich. Geschichte einer konfliktreichen Beziehung, Darmstadt
2002, 128-56.
Baumann, Uwe: Rom und die Juden. Die römisch-jüdischen Beziehungen von Pompeius bis zum Tode des
Herodes (63 v.Chr.-4 v.Chr.), Frankfurt/M. 1983, 1-88.
Schalit, Abraham: König Herodes. Der Mann und sein Werk. Mit einem Vorwort von Daniel R. Schwartz, Berlin
2
2001, 4-36.
Schürer, Emil: The History of the Jewish People in the Age of Jesus Christ (175 B.C.-A.D. 135). A New English
Version Revised and Edited by Geza Vermes and Fergus Millar, Bd. 1, Edinburgh 1973, 233-70.
JW/23.11.2006–r/03.07.07
Aristobulos (IV.), Bruder Agrippas I. = Iulius Aristobulus
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemmata Herodianer
Sohn des Aristobulos und der älteren Berenike (Ios. bell. Iud. 1,553; ant. Iud. 18,133) sowie
Bruder Agrippas I. von Judäa und des Herodes Philoklaudios von Chalkis. Verheiratet mit
Jotape (PIR2 J 45), einer Tochter des Sampsigeramus II. von Emesa, mit der er eine Tochter
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
109
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
gleichen Namens bekam (PIR2 J 46; Ios. bell. Iud. 2,221; ant. Iud. 18,135). Er starb als
Privatmann wohl in den 40er Jahren n.Chr. (Ios. bell. Iud. 2,221).
2. Verhältnis zu Rom / Römern und Karriereverlauf
Zeitweilig hielt er sich wohl in den 20er oder 30er Jahren des 1. Jh. n.Chr. bei dem syrischen
Statthalter L. Pomponius Flaccus (cos. 17 n.Chr.) auf (Ios. ant. Iud. 18,151f.). Hier zerstritt
er sich mit seinem ebenfalls anwesenden älteren Bruder Agrippa I., den er bei Flaccus wegen
Bestechlichkeit anzeigte (Ios. ant. Iud. 18,152-154). Während der Krise wegen des Befehls
des Caligula, seine Statue im Jerusalemer Tempel aufzurichten, hielt er sich jedoch am Hof
des Agrippa I. in Tiberias auf und empfing dort in Abwesenheit seines Bruders den syrischen
Legaten P. Petronius (cos. suff. 19 n.Chr.). Diesen bat er gemeinsam mit anderen
Würdenträgern, auf den Princeps einzuwirken (Ios. ant. Iud. 18,273.276).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Wilcken, Ulrich: Aristobulos [9], RE 2,1, 1895, 910.
Bringmann, Klaus, Aristobulos [5], DNP 1, 1996, 1105.
2
PIR A 1051.
Kokkinos, Nikos, The Herodian Dynasty. Origins, Role in Society and Eclipse, Sheffield 1998.
Schürer, Emil, Geschichte des jüdischen Volkes im Zeitalter Jesu Christi. Band 1, Leipzig 1901.
Wilker, Julia, Für Rom und Jerusalem. Die herodianische Dynastie im 1. Jahrhundert n.Chr., Frankfurt (M)
2007.
JW/25.02.10 – r/02.03.10
Aristos von Askalon
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
Philosoph, Bruder und Schüler des Antiochos von Askalon. Sein Geburtsjahr ist nicht
bekannt, aber er war jünger als sein Bruder (130/120 - 68/7 v. Chr.), dessen Nachfolger er als
Leiter der Akademie in Athen wurde (Philodemus, Index Academicorum 35). Aristos war als
Philosoph und Redner weniger begabt als Antiochus (Plut. Brut. 2,3), und seine Anhänger
Ariston von Alexandria und Kratippos von Pergamon verließen ihn (Philodemus, Index
Academicorum 35). Er starb zwischen 50 und 44 v. Chr. Um 44 v. Chr. wurde Theomnestos
von Naukratis sein Nachfolger. Zu dieser Zeit hielt sich auch Brutus in Athen auf (Plut. Brut.
44).
2. Verhältnis zu Rom und Römern und Verlauf seiner Karriere
Cicero beschreibt Aristos als hospes et familiaris (Cic. Brut. 332). Er hörte ihn um 51/50 v.
Chr. in Athen (Cic. Att. 5,10,11; Tusc. 5,22). Auch Brutus hielt ihn für einen Freund (Plut.
Brut. 2,3: φίλος καὶ συμβιωτή ς) und hörte seine Vorlesungen in Athen (Cic. fin. 5,8).
Aristos war im Jahre 87 v. Chr. auch mit Antiochos und L. Licinius Lucullus in Alexandria
(Cic. Luc. 12).
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
110
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
3. Auswahlbibliographie
von Arnim, H.: Aristos [9], RE 1.2, 1010.
Barnes, Jonathan: Antiochus of Ascalon, in: M. Griffin/J. Barnes (eds.): Philosophia Togata: Essays on
Philosophy and Roman Society, Oxford 1989, 51–96.
Dillon, John M.: The Middle Platonists. 80 B.C. to A.D. 220, Cornell 1996, 61.
Glucker, John: Antiochus and the Late Academy (=Hypomnemata 56), Göttingen 1978.
Karamanolis, George E.: Plato and Aristotle in Agreement: Platonists on Aristotle from Antiochus to Porphyry,
Oxford 2006, 81.
Shackleton Bailey, D. R.: Cicero's Letters to Atticus. Vol. III (Books V-VII.9), Cambridge 1968, 206.
AF/6.12.11 – r/6.12.11
Artavasdes I., König von Armenien
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemmata Artaxiaden
Um 160 v.Chr wird der Sohn Artaxias’ I. dessen Nachfolger als König von Großarmenien.
Herrschte bis ca. a. 120.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Über sein Verhältnis zu Rom ist nichts bekannt. Das einzige durch Quellen belegte Ereignis,
das in seine Regierungszeit fällt, ist eine Niederlage gegen die Parther unter Mithradates II.
um a. 120. Infolgedessen mußten den Parthern Geiseln gestellt werden, darunter auch der
spätere König Tigranes I. (Iust. 38,3,1; Strab. geogr. 11,14,15 [532]).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
RE –.
Schottky, M.: Artavasdes [1], DNP 2, 1997, 46.
Asdourian, Pascal: Die politischen Beziehungen zwischen Armenien und Rom von 190 v.Chr. bis 428 n.Chr. Ein
Abriß der armenischen Geschichte in dieser Periode, Diss. Freiburg (CH), Venedig 1911.
Schottky, Martin: Media Atropatene und Groß-Armenien in hellenistischer Zeit, Diss. Erlangen-Nürnberg 1988,
Bonn 1989.
Sullivan, Richard D.: Near Eastern Royalty and Rome, 100-30 B.C., Toronto 1990, 281f.; 307.
HP/31.07.08–r/31.07.08
Artavasdes II., König von Armenien
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemmata Artaxiaden
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
111
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Ab 55/54 v.Chr. Nachfolger seines Vaters Tigranes’ I. Verheiratete eine Schwester mit dem
parthischen Königssohn Pakoros und eine seiner Töchter mit einem Sohn des Galaterkönigs
Deiotaros I. Vater von Artaxias II. und Tigranes II. von Armenien. Geriet 34 v.Chr. in
römische Gefangenschaft und wurde 31 v.Chr. auf Veranlassung Kleopatras VII. enthauptet.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Nach den Regelungen des Friedensvertrages zwischen Pompeius und Tigranes I. 66 v.Chr.
bedurfte Artavasdes der Zustimmung Roms zu seiner Herrschaft (Flor. 2,32), die
möglicherweise schon Pompeius nach der Entmachtung des jüngeren Tigranes gegeben hatte.
Bei den Kriegsvorbereitungen des Crassus gegen die Parther ab a. 54 spielte er eine zentrale
Rolle. Bei einem Zusammentreffen sicherte der armenische König umfangreiche Hilfstruppen
zu, sicherlich die größten Verbände aller östlichen Verbündeten Roms (Plut. Crass. 19,1). Den
Vorschlag des Artavasdes, nicht von Syrien, sondern von Armenien aus die Offensive gegen
die Parther zu beginnen, schlug Crassus aus (Plut. Crass. 19,2). Der Armenier reiste daraufhin
zurück in sein Land, um später mit den versprochenen Truppen zu Crassus zu stoßen, wurde
aber bald schon vom parthischen König Orodes angegriffen. Er schickte einen Boten zu den
in Mesopotamien stehenden Römern, erklärte, daß er keine Hilfe senden könne und bat statt
dessen selbst um Unterstützung (Plut. Crass. 22,2). Crassus deutete dies als Verrat.
Tatsächlich suchte Artavasdes bald einen Ausgleich mit den überlegenen Parthern und
verheiratete seine Schwester mit Pakoros, dem Sohn des Orodes (Plut. Crass. 33,1). Durch
den frühen Friedensschluß bewahrte sich Armenien einerseits seine Unabhängigkeit, geriet
aber andererseits bei den Römern in Verdacht, die Seiten gewechselt zu haben.
Nach der desaströsen Niederlage des Crassus bei Carrhae a. 53 befürchtete Cicero als
Proconsul der römischen Provinz Kilikien einen Einfall des Artavasdes in sein Gebiet oder
das des mit Rom befreundeten Kappadokien und traf entsprechende Sicherheitsmaßnahmen
(Cic. fam. 15,2,2 und 15,3,1 = 105 und 103 SB; Cic. Att. 5,20,2 = 113 SB). Ein solcher
Überfall fand aber nicht statt. Generell scheint Artavasdes sich nicht weiter an den
Kampfhandlungen zwischen Römern und Parthern beteiligt zu haben und eine neutrale
Stellung gesucht zu haben.
Mit dem Zurückdrängen der Parther durch Ventidius Bassus und dem Auftreten des Marcus
Antonius im Osten rückte Armenien in den Fokus römischer Außenpolitik. Der Triumvir
sandte seinen Feldherren Canidius Crassus, um sowohl Armenien wieder unter römische
Oberherrschaft als auch die nördlich gelegenen Kaukasusgebiete der Iberer und Albaner zu
unterwerfen (Cass. Dio 49,24,1; Strab. geogr. 11,3,5 [500f.]; Plut. Ant. 34,10). Plutarch
spricht im Gegensatz zu den beiden anderen Quellen in diesem Zusammenhang von einem
Sieg des Canidius Crassus nicht nur über die Iberer und Albaner, sondern auch über die
Armenier. Ob es aber wirklich zu Kampfhandlungen kam, bleibt unklar. Jedenfalls zählte
Armenien erneut zu den amici et socii populi Romani.
Bei den nun beginnenden Vorbereitungen des Antonius für einen erneuten Partherfeldzug
spielte Artavasdes wiederum eine zentrale Rolle, er wird als wichtigster Verbündeter der
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
112
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Römer genannt (Plut. Ant. 37,3). Dem Armenier gelang es angeblich, den römischen
Triumvirn dazu zu bewegen, den Krieg von Armenien ausgehend zu beginnen. In den –
oftmals durch augusteische Propaganda verzerrten – Quellen wird Artavasdes darüber hinaus
ein enormer Einfluß auf die Kriegsvorbereitung angedichtet (Cass. Dio 49,25,1; Plut. Ant.
39,1; Strab. geogr. 11,13,4 [523f.]). Tatsächlich zeichnete dafür allein Antonius
verantwortlich, der wohl auch von Beginn an Armenien als Operationsbasis auserkoren hatte,
wozu der Feldzug des Canidius Crassus die Grundlage geschaffen hatte.
Den Feldzug des Jahres 36 verlor Antonius, als die Parther seinen Troß mit den
Belagerungsmaschinen in der Media Atropatene überfielen und erbeuteten. Anscheinend
befand sich Artavasdes in der Nähe des Trosses oder hatte gar die Aufgabe, diesen zu
verteidigen (Plut. Ant. 50,2; Cass. Dio 49,25,5). Gegen die überlegenen Kräfte der Parther
mied er den Kampf, gab den Feldzug als verloren auf und zog sich nach Armenien zurück
(Plut. Ant. 50,3; Strab. geogr. 11,14,15 [532]; Cass. Dio 49,31,2). Dort empfing er aber
Antonius nach dessen verlustreichen Rückzug aus Medien freundschaftlich und versorgte die
angeschlagenen Truppen (Cass. Dio 49,31,2f.; Plut. Ant. 50,3f.). Antonius machte nach
seinem Abzug aus Armenien Artavasdes dennoch verantwortlich für das Scheitern seines
Feldzuges und versuchte zunächst auf diplomatischem Wege, den armenischen König zu sich
zu locken und gefangenzusetzen (Cass. Dio 49,33,2f.; 49,39,2). Schließlich marschierte der
Triumvir in Armenien ein und zwang Artavasdes zu einem Treffen. Der König und die
meisten Mitglieder seiner Familie wurden gefangengenommen, in silberne Ketten gelegt und
nach Alexandria gebracht, wo sie später in einem Triumphzug Kleopatra VII. zugeführt
wurden (Cass. Dio 49,40,3f.). Artaxias (II.), ein Sohn des Artavasdes geriet nicht in
Gefangenschaft und versuchte Widerstand zu leisten. Seine Truppen wurden aber geschlagen
und er mußte zu den Parthern fliehen (Cass. Dio 49,39,3-40,2).
Armenien blieb bis zur Schlacht von Actium in der Hand des Antonius, sein Feldherr
Canidius Crassus sicherte dort mit zahlreichen Truppen die Grenze zu den Parthern (Plut. Ant.
56,1). Artavasdes und seine Familie blieben in Gefangenschaft bis zur Niederlage des
Antonius gegen Octavian. Auf Betreiben der Kleopatra wurde der armenische König bald
darauf ermordet (Cass. Dio 51,5,5; Strab. geogr. 11,14,15 [532]; Tac. ann. 2,3; Plut. Ant. 5).
Seine Söhne fielen in Octavians Hände, der diese als potentielle Thronprätendenten nach Rom
brachte (Cass. Dio 51,16,2).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Baumgartner, A.: Artavasdes [1], RE 2, 1896, 1308f.
Pressler, F./ Schottky, M.: Artavasdes [2], DNP 2, 1997, 46.
Asdourian, Pascal: Die politischen Beziehungen zwischen Armenien und Rom von 190 v.Chr. bis 428 n.Chr. Ein
Abriß der armenischen Geschichte in dieser Periode, Diss. Freiburg (CH), Venedig 1911.
Bengtson, Hermann: Zum Partherfeldzug des Antonius, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften,
Philosophisch-Historische Klasse, Sitzungsberichte Jahrgang 1974, Heft 1, 3-48.
Ders.: Marcus Antonius. Triumvir und Herrscher des Orients, München 1977.
Buchheim, Hans: Die Orientpolitik des Triumvirn M. Antonius. Ihre Voraussetzungen, Entwicklung und
Zusammenhang mit den politischen Ereignissen in Italien, Heidelberg 1960.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
113
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Kerouzian, Yessai Ohannes: Armênia e Roma. Relações políticas nos anos de 190-A.C.–387-D.C. (Universidade
de São Paulo, Fac. de Filosofia, Letras e Ciências Humanas, N.S 8; Departamento de Linguística e Línguas
Orientais, 1; Curso de Armenio, 1), São Paulo 1977.
Prantl, Henrik: Artavasdes II. – Freund oder Feind der Römer? In: Altay Coskun (Hg.): Freundschaft und
Gefolgschaft in den auswärtigen Beziehungen der Römer (2. Jh. v.Chr.–1. Jh. n.Chr.), Frankfurt/M. 2008,
91-108.
Schottky, Martin: Media Atropatene und Groß-Armenien in hellenistischer Zeit, Diss. Erlangen-Nürnberg 1988,
Bonn 1989.
Sherwin-White, Adrian N.: Roman Foreign Policy in the East 168 B.C. to A.D. 1, London 1984.
Sullivan, Richard D.: Near Eastern Royalty and Rome, 100-30 B.C., Toronto 1990, 281f.; 307.
HP/31.07.08–r/31.07.08
Artavasdes III., König von Armenien
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemmata Artaxiaden
Sicherlich ein Artaxiade, möglicherweise ein weiterer Sohn Artavasdes’ II. Um 6 v.Chr. von
Augustus in Armenien als König eingesetzt, von Tigranes III. aus dem Land gejagt.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Über Artavasdes III. ist wenig bekannt. Er gehörte wahrscheinlich zum Kreis der Familie
Artavasdes’ II., die Antonius 34 v.Chr. hatte gefangennehmen lassen und in seinem
alexandrinischen Triumphzug mitführte (Cass. Dio 49,39,3-40,3). Somit befand er sich
wahrscheinlich bis a. 6 in Rom. Später wurde er von Augustus als Gegenkönig des den
Parthern zuneigenden Tigranes III. nach Armenien geschickt. Dieser vertrieb den römischen
Thronprätendenten jedoch mit parthischer Unterstützung wieder (Tac. ann. 2,4). Mehr ist über
das Schicksal Artavasdes’ III. nicht bekannt.
3. Auswahlbibliographie
RE –.
Streck, M.: Artavasdes [3], DNP 2, 1997, 46.
Asdourian, Pascal: Die politischen Beziehungen zwischen Armenien und Rom von 190 v.Chr. bis 428 n.Chr. Ein
Abriß der armenischen Geschichte in dieser Periode, Diss. Freiburg (CH), Venedig 1911.
Kerouzian, Yessai Ohannes: Armênia e Roma. Relações políticas nos anos de 190-A.C.–387-D.C. (Universidade
de São Paulo, Fac. de Filosofia, Letras e Ciências Humanas, N.S 8; Departamento de Linguística e Línguas
Orientais, 1; Curso de Armenio, 1), São Paulo 1977.
Schottky, Martin: Media Atropatene und Groß-Armenien in hellenistischer Zeit, Diss. Erlangen-Nürnberg 1988,
Bonn 1989.
Sherwin-White, Adrian N.: Roman Foreign Policy in the East 168 B.C. to A.D. 1, London 1984.
Sullivan, Richard D.: Near Eastern Royalty and Rome, 100-30 B.C., Toronto 1990, 281f.; 307.
HP/31.07.08–r/31.07.08
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
114
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Artavasdes (II.), König von Media Atropatene und später von Kleinarmenien
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemmata Artaxiaden
Sohn Ariobarzanes’ I. von Media Atropatene. Verheiratete seine Tochter Iotape mit
Alexander Helios, dem Sohn des Antonius. Bestieg zu einem unbekannten Zeitpunkt den
Thron. 31 v.Chr. wurde er von den Parthern aus seinem Land vertrieben. Bald darauf wurde er
König von Kleinarmenien. Starb ca. 20 v.Chr.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Über seine frühen Jahre ist nichts bekannt. Im Krieg der Parther mit den Römern unter
Antonius unterstützte er erstere erfolgreich. So fielen ihm wohl die Feldzeichen des Oppius
Statianus zu, der den Troß des Antonius befehligte (Cass. Dio 49,44,2). Die Belagerung
seiner Hauptstadt Phraata konnte er beenden. Nach dem Krieg geriet er wegen Differenzen
bei der Beuteverteilung mit dem parthischen König Phraates IV. in Streit und verbündete sich
bald mit Antonius gegen die Parther. Seine Tochter Iotape wurde mit Alexander Helios, dem
Sohn des Antonius und der Kleopatra VII. vermählt (Cass. Dio 49,40,2; Plut. Ant. 53,6).
Zudem erhielt er einige Gebietserweiterungen auf Kosten der Armenier (Cass. Dio 49,44,2).
Nach dem Abzug des Großteils der römischen Truppen aus Armenien konnte er nach der
Niederlage des Antonius bei Actium den Parthern keinen wirksamen Widerstand mehr
entgegensetzen und wurde von diesen aus seinem Land vertrieben (Cass. Dio 51,16,2). Trotz
seines Bündnisses mit Antonius gab ihm Octavian seine Tochter Iotape zurück und setzte ihn
als König von Kleinarmenien ein (Cass. Dio 54,9; Aug. RG. 33). Dort herrschte er bis ca. 20
v.Chr. als amicus et socius populi Romani.
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Wilcken, U.: Artavasdes [2], RE 2, 1896, 1309-1311.
Streck, M.: Artavasdes [6], DNP 2, 1997, 49.
Asdourian, Pascal: Die politischen Beziehungen zwischen Armenien und Rom von 190 v.Chr. bis 428 n.Chr. Ein
Abriß der armenischen Geschichte in dieser Periode, Diss. Freiburg (CH), Venedig 1911.
Schottky, Martin: Media Atropatene und Groß-Armenien in hellenistischer Zeit, Diss. Erlangen-Nürnberg 1988,
Bonn 1989.
Sherwin-White, Adrian N.: Roman Foreign Policy in the East 168 B.C. to A.D. 1, London 1984.
Sullivan, Richard D.: Near Eastern Royalty and Rome, 100-30 B.C., Toronto 1990, 281f.; 307.
HP/31.07.08–r/31.07.08
Artaxias I., König von Armenien
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
115
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
 Stemmata Artaxiaden
Vor 190 v.Chr. Satrap in Großarmenien; nach der Niederlage Antiochos III. gegen die Römer
ernannte er sich dort zum König. Begründete die Dynastie der Artaxiaden, deren Vertreter
etwa 200 Jahre in Großarmenien herrschten und gründete die armenische Residenzstadt
Artaxata. Vater Artavasdes’ I. Starb wohl um a. 160.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Seine Anerkennung als König erlangte er durch Rom, nachdem die Republik zuvor in der
Schlacht von Magnesia die Seleukiden geschlagen hatte. Die Schwächung des
Diadochenstaates nutzte Artaxias, um die Unabhängigkeit zu erlangen. Schnell konnte er sein
Reich vor allem auf Kosten der Media Atropatene ausdehnen (Strab. geogr. 11,14,15 [531f.]).
Möglicherweise führte der Aufenthalt des Karthagers Hannibal in Armenien (Plut. Luc.
31,3f.; Strab. geogr. 11,14,6 [528f.]: Hannibal wird als Gründer von Artaxiasata = Artaxata
genannt) zu Spannungen mit Rom. Im Jahr 179 trat Artaxias als Friedensvermittler zwischen
Pergamon, Kappadokien und Bithynien auf der einen und Pontos sowie Kleinarmenien auf
der anderen Seite auf (Polyb. 25,2,11f.). 165/4 geriet Armenien erneut unter seleukidische
Oberherrschaft, Artaxias durfte aber als Vasall seinen Thron behalten (App. Syr. 66,349) und
herrschte noch bis ca. a. 160. Zuvor hatte er sich ca. a. 161 mit Timarchos, dem Satrapen von
Medien, gegen Demetrios I., dem Mörder Antiochos’ IV., verbündet (Diod. 31,27a).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Baumgartner, A.: Artaxias [1], RE 2, 1896, 1326.
Streck, M.: Artaxias [1], DNP 2, 1997, 49.
Asdourian, Pascal: Die politischen Beziehungen zwischen Armenien und Rom von 190 v.Chr. bis 428 n.Chr. Ein
Abriß der armenischen Geschichte in dieser Periode, Diss. Freiburg (CH), Venedig 1911.
Kerouzian, Yessai Ohannes: Armênia e Roma. Relações políticas nos anos de 190-A.C.–387-D.C. (Universidade
de São Paulo, Fac. de Filosofia, Letras e Ciências Humanas, N.S 8; Departamento de Linguística e Línguas
Orientais, 1; Curso de Armenio, 1), São Paulo 1977.
Schottky, Martin: Media Atropatene und Groß-Armenien in hellenistischer Zeit, Diss. Erlangen-Nürnberg 1988,
Bonn 1989.
HP/08.07.08–r/01.08.08
Artaxias II., König von Armenien
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemmata Artaxiaden
Sohn Artavasdes’ II., Bruder Tigranes’ II. Ab ca. 31 v.Chr. König von Armenien. Im Jahr
20/19 ermordet.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
116
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Nach der Gefangennahme seines Vaters durch Antonius a. 34 erhoben ihn die Armenier zum
König. Er unterlag jedoch den Römern militärisch und mußte zu den Parthern fliehen (Cass.
Dio 49,39,6-40,1). Dort wartete er bis a. 31 auf eine Möglichkeit zur Rückkehr. Diese ergab
sich nach der Niederlage des Antonius gegen Octavian bei Actium. Mit parthischer Hilfe
gelang es ihm, sein Land zurückzuerobern und auch Artavasdes von Media Atropatene, den
Bundesgenossen des Antonius, aus dessen Land zu vertreiben. Alle Römer, die er in
Armenien vorfand, ließ er töten (Cass. Dio 51,16,2). Von Octavian forderte er die Rückgabe
seiner in Rom gefangengehaltenen Brüder, die dieser aber verweigerte (Cass. Dio 51,16,2).
Erst a. 20 entschied sich Augustus dazu, in Armenien wieder einen prorömischen Herrscher
einzusetzen. Er entschied sich für Tigranes (II.), den Bruder des Artaxias. Schon bevor
Tiberius in Armenien einrückte, wurde Artaxias ermordet, so daß Tiberius ohne größere
Widerstände Tigranes II. zum König krönen konnte (Tac. ann. 2,3; Ios. ant. Iud. 15,105; Cass.
Dio 54,9,4-5; Suet. Tib. 9, Aug. RG 27).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Baumgartner, A.: Artaxias [2], RE 2, 1896, 1326.
Streck, M.: Artaxias [2], DNP 2, 1997, 49.
Asdourian, Pascal: Die politischen Beziehungen zwischen Armenien und Rom von 190 v.Chr. bis 428 n.Chr. Ein
Abriß der armenischen Geschichte in dieser Periode, Diss. Freiburg (CH), Venedig 1911.
Chaumont, Marie-Louise: L’Arménie entre Rome et l’Iran, I: De l’avènement d’Auguste a l’avènement de
Dioclétien, in: ANRW II 9,1, Berlin 1976, 71-194.
Kerouzian, Yessai Ohannes: Armênia e Roma. Relações políticas nos anos de 190-A.C.–387-D.C. (Universidade
de São Paulo, Fac. de Filosofia, Letras e Ciências Humanas, N.S 8; Departamento de Linguística e Línguas
Orientais, 1; Curso de Armenio, 1), São Paulo 1977.
Sherwin-White, Adrian N.: Roman Foreign Policy in the East 168 B.C. to A.D. 1, London 1984.
Sullivan, Richard D.: Near Eastern Royalty and Rome, 100-30 B.C., Toronto 1990, 281f.; 307.
HP/31.07.08–r/31.07.08
Asandros, King of the Bosporos [Var. Asandrochos?]
0. Onomasctic Issues
His name could be related to Greek inhabitants of the Bosporan region. It is controversial
whether to identify Asandros with Asandrochos, who is attested as the father of Aspurgos, king
of the Bosporos (CIRB 40; Kuznecov 2006, 156ff.; Saprykin/Fedoseev 2009). Some scholars
hold that Asandrochos was a barbarian adaptation of the Greek name Asandros (BongardLevine et al. 2006, 270f.); meanwhile other specialists have expressed doubts on this
identification (for discussion, see Heinen 2006, 36 n. 42; cf. Rostovtzeff 1919, 103 n. 27).
Gajducevič 1971, 324 thought that Asandros was of Sarmatian origin, but there is no evidence to
support this hypothesis.
1. Central Biographical Dates and Family Relations
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
117
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
 Stemmata of the Bosporani
Born ca. 110, died ca. 21/20 (Lucian. macr. 17; Frolova et al. 1993). He first bore the titles
ethnarch and archōn, the latter following the traditions of the Bosporan rulers. King of the
Bosporos ca. 47-21/20. It has even been proposed that he had been ruling over a Bosporan region
since ca. 51/50 (Luther 2002, 271). Around 42/41 BC, he adopted the title of king, and thereafter
Basileus Basileōn Megas (Hoben 1969, 30f.). Husband of Glykareia (CIRB 913) and thereafter
of Dynamis, queen of the Bosporos. Father of Aspurgos, king of the Bosporos (CIRB 40;
Kuznecov 2006, 156ff.) only if identified with Asandros. Committed suicide after his failure
against the revolt led by Scribonius (Cass. Dio 54,24,4; Lucian. macr. 17; Hoben 1969, 31;
Braund 2005, 254).
2. Relations with Rome / Romans and Career
Bore the epithets Philokaisar kai Philorhomaios (CIRB 30, 40; cf. Heinen 2008, 191-201). Led a
rebellion in the Bosporos around a. 47 while Pharnakes (II) was in Anatolia, and defeated this
king when the latter came back after Caesar’s victory at Zela. Asandros’ aim was to receive the
sovereignty over the Bosporos from the Romans (Cass. Dio 42.46.4). Strab. geogr. 13.4.3 (625)
states that Asandros killed Pharnakes, although this allegation is not supported by other evidence.
Thereafter, Asandros beat Mithradates (VII) of Pergamum, who had been appointed by Caesar
as the new king of the Bosporos (Strab. geogr. 13.4.3 [625]; Bell. Alex. 78.2; Cass. Dio 42.4648; App. Mithr. 120-121.954-956; Hoben 1969, 26ff.; Sullivan 1990, 158ff.; Heinen 1994).
Saprykin 2004, 168f. has deduced an anti-Caesarian position during the Civil War from his
coins. But Asandros pursued a policy of good relationship with Rome (Hoben 1969, 32; Sullivan
1990, 159). However, it has been suggested that since the voyage of Augustus and Agrippa to
the East, Rome began to limit Asandros’ power, if not seeking to remove him from the throne
(Saprykin 2004, 169).
3. Select Bibliography
Bongard-Levine, Grigori/ Kochelenko, Gennadi/ Kouznetsov, Vladimir: Fouilles de Phanagorie: noveaux
documents archéologiques et épigraphiques du Bosphore, CRAI 2006.1, 255-292.
Braund, David C.: Rome and the Friendly King. The Character of the Client Kingship, London 1984.
Braund, David C.: Greek Geography and Roman Empire: the Transformation of Tradition in Strabo’s Euxine, in D.
Dueck/ H. Lindsay/ S. Pothecary (eds.): Strabo’s Cultural Geography. The Making of a Kolossourgia, Cambridge
2005, 216-234.
Braund, David (C.): Polemo, Pythodoris and Strabo. Friends of Rome in the Black Sea Region, in: Altay Coskun
(ed.): Roms auswärtige Freunde in der späten Republik und im frühen Prinzipat, Göttingen 2005, 253-270.
Frolova, Nina/ Karyškovskij, P.O./ Delfs, Martina: Zur Chronologie der Herrrschaft Asanders im Bosporus, Chriron
23, 1993, 63-81.
Gajducevič, Victor F.: Das Bosporanische Reich, Berlin-Amsterdam 19712.
Heinen, Heinz: Mithradates von Pergamon und Caesars bosporanische Pläne. Zur Interpretation von Bellum
Alexandrinum 78, in: R. Günther/ S. Rebenich (eds.): E fontibus haurire. Beiträge zur römischen Geschichte und
zu ihren Hilfwissenschaften, Paderborn 1994, 63-79.
Heinen, Heinz: Rome et le Bosphore: notes épigraphiques, CCG 7, 1996, 81-101.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
118
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Heinen, Heinz: Die Mithradatische Tradition der bosporanischen Könige – ein mißverstandener Befund, in: K. Geus/
K. Zimmermann (eds.): Punica-Libyca-Ptolemaica. Festschrift für Werner Huß zum 65. Geburtstag, Leuven
2001, 355-370.
Heinen, Heinz: Antike am Rande der Steppe. Der nördliche Schwarzmeerraum als Forschungsaufgabe, Stuttgart
2006.
Heinen, Heinz: Romfreunde und Kaiserpriester am Kimmerischen Bosporos. Zu neuen Inschriften aus
Phanagoreia. In: Altay Coskun (ed.): Freundschaft und Gefolgschaft in den auswärtigen Beziehungen der
Römer (2. Jh. v.Chr. – 1. Jh. n.Chr.), Frankfurt a.M. 2008, 179-198.
Hoben, Wolfgang: Untersuchungen zur Stellung kleinasiatischer Dynasten in den Machtkämpfen der ausgehenden
römischen Republik, Diss. Mainz 1969.
Kuznecov, Vladimir D.: New Inscriptions from Phanagoreia (Russian, with English summary), VDI 2006.1, 155172.
Luther, Andreas: Nachrichten über das Bosporanische Reich bei Horaz, in: M. Huol/ U. Hartmann (eds.):
Grenzüberschreitungen. Formen des Kontakts zwischen Orient und Occident im Altertum, Stuttgart 2002,
259-277.
Parfenov, Vladimir N.: Dynamis, Agrippa und der Friedensaltar. Zur militarischen und politischen Geschichte des
Bosporanischen Reiches nach Asandros, Historia 45, 1996, 95-103.
Podossinov, Alexander V.: Am Rande der griechischen Oikumene, in: J. Fornasier/ B. Böttger (eds.): Das
Bosporanische Reich, Mainz 2002, 21-38.
Rostovtzeff, Mijail: Queen Dynamis of Bosporus, JHS 39, 1919, 87-109.
Rostovtzeff, Mijail: Iranians and Greeks in Southern Russia, Oxford 1922.
Saprykin, Sergey Yu.: Thrace and the Bosporus under the Early Roman Emperors, in: D. Braund (ed.): Scythians
and Greeks: Cultural Interaction in Scythia, Athens and the Early Roman Empire (Sixth Century BC – First
Century AD), Exeter 2004, 167-175.
Saprykin, Sergey Yu./Fedoseev, Nikolai F.: Epigraphica Pontica II. New Inscription of Pythodoris from
Panticapaeum, VDI 2009.3, 138-147.
Sullivan, Richard D.: Near Eastern Royalty and Rome, 100-30 B.C., Toronto 1990.
LBP/10.09.08/14.03.10–r/11.09.08/14.03.10
Asklepiades of Klazomenai
1. Central Biographical Dates and Family Relations
Asklepiades of Klazomenai is mentioned in the so-called senatus consultum de Asclepiade
sociisque (Sherk, RDGE 22 = RGEDA 66), a bilingual bronze tablet found in Rome and
known since the XVI century, as one of the three Greek naval captains (nauarchs) who
supported Rome during a bellum Italicum (l. 7 of the Greek version, namely the Social War,
or the fight of Sulla against the Marian faction and some Italian people on his return to Rome
from the East in 83/82 BC). Asklepiades was son of Philinos (l. 9 [Greek]). The other two
captains named in the inscription are Meniskos of Miletos and Polystratos of Karystos. The
senatus consultum was issued in 78 BC. Asklepiades was thus militarily active in the 80s;
however, being unknown from other sources, it is not clear how old he was at the time.
2. Relations with Rome / Romans and Career
In the late Republic, several Greek cities supported Roman warfare, often following the
provision of a treaty. Asklepiades, probably officially sent by his own city Klazomenai, joined
the Roman side during the troubled years which followed the Social War, and most possibly
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
119
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
operated in the Sullan navy in the 80s. He and the two fellow Greeks may have been at Rome
when the decree of the senate was issued (78 BC), for they had their name added at the
bottom of the document (ll. 32-33 [Greek]) on the bronze tablet.
On account of his support to the Roman cause, Asklepiades was officially inscribed in the list
(formula) of the ‘friends of the Roman people’ (amici populi Romani) (l. 17 [Latin] = ll. 2425 [Greek]), and duly rewarded with significant fiscal, juridical and honorary privileges
enlisted in the senatus consultum. The decree is unique in that it is the only surviving
document to attest the granting of the status of amicus populi Romani to individual
provincials.
The three Greeks probably were notables of their own cities, who had either volunteered or
had been chosen in order to bring support to Rome in a dramatic situation. It is uncertain
whether they owned the ship they operated with or whether they only commanded its crew.
Upon his return to his hometown, Asklepiades surely endeavoured to publish the decree of the
senate containing the privileges, in order to exploit them in his own city and in the province of
Asia. There is no positive evidence to prove that he held any city magistracy or lent support to
Rome in any of the crises that would follow soon.
3. Select Bibliography
RE –. DNP –.
Bowman A.: The Formula Sociorum in the Second and First Centuries B.C., CJ 85, 1989-1990, 330-336.
Gallet, L.: Essai sur le sénatus-consulte De Asclepiade sociisque, RD ser. 4, 16, 1937, 242-293; 387-425.
Marshall, A.J.: Friends of the Roman People, AJPh 89, 1968, 39-55.
Raggi, A.: Amici populi Romani, MediterrAnt 11, 2008 [2009], 97-113.
Raggi, A.: Senatus consultum de Asclepiade Clazomenio sociisque, ZPE 135, 2001, 73-116.
Rosenberger, V.: Bella et expeditiones. Die antike Terminologie der Kriege Roms, Stuttgart 1992, 35-41 on
bellum Italicum.
Sherk, R.K.: Roman Documents from the Greek East: Senatus Consulta and Epistulae to the Age of Augustus,
Baltimore 1969, 124-132 no. 22. (RDGE)
Sherk, R.K.: Roman and the Greek East to the Death of Augustus (Translated Documents of Greece and Rome,
4), Cambridge 1984, 81-83 no. 66. (RGEDA)
Wolff, H.: Die Entwicklung der Veteranenprivilegien vom Beginn des 1. Jahrhunderts v. Chr. bis auf Konstantin
d. Gr., in W. Eck / H. Wolff (Hgg.): Heer und Integrationspolitik. Die römischen Militärdiplome als
historische Quelle, Köln-Wien 1986, 44-115, esp. 56-67.
AR/28.12.11 – r/20.02.12
Ateporix, Dynast der Karanitis [Var. Teporix]
0. Onomastisches
Teporix nach Strab. geogr. 12,3,37 (560), Ateporix nach der Ankyraner Inschrift (s. 2). Das
Pferdemotiv seines Namens scheint seine Zugehörigkeit zur Dynastie der Tosioper zu
bestätigen. S. auch zu Eporedorix.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
120
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemma Galater / Tosioper
Strab. geogr. 12,3,37 (560) bezeugt ihn für die augusteische Zeit als Abkömmling aus einem
galatischen Tetrarchengeschlecht und Dynast in der Karanitis, einem Teil der Zelitis im
pontisch-galatischen Grenzgebiet. Wohl der jüngste Sohn des Adiatorix und Bruder des
Dyteutos (vgl. Coskun 2007, Teil E.III). Vater des vierten bzw. siebten Ankyraner SebastosPriesters Albiorix (1 v./n.Chr. bzw. 3/4 n.Chr.) und über diesen Großvater des fünfzehnten
Sebastos-Priesters Aristokles (11/12 n.Chr.) (OGIS II 533=Bosch, QGA 51, mit der
Chronologie von Coskun 2007, Teil G). Die Eingliederung der Karanitis in die Provinz
Galatia a. 3/2 gilt als Terminus ad quem für seinen Tod.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Nach der bisherigen Forschung gilt Ateporix bereits als Günstling des M. Antonius, der vom
jungen Caesar nach Aktion in seiner Herrschaft belassen worden sei. Jedoch scheint
Dyteutos an der von Strabon bezeugten Dreiteilung der Zelitis beteiligt gewesen zu sein. Ein
Terminus a quo von 29 v.Chr. wird zudem durch die Genealogie gestützt (vgl. Coskun 2007,
Teil E.III).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Niese, Benedictus: Ateporix, RE Suppl. 1, 1903, 158.
DNP –.
Coskun, Altay: Von der ‘Geißel Asiens’ zu ‘kaiserfrommen’ Reichsbewohnern. Studien zur politischen und
gesellschaftlichen Entwicklung der Galater unter besonderer Berücksichtigung der amicitia populi Romani
und der göttlichen Verehrung des Augustus (3. Jh. v.–2. Jh. n.Chr.), unveröff. Habil. Trier 2007, Teil
E.III/V.
Hoben, Wolfgang: Untersuchungen zur Stellung kleinasiatischer Dynasten in den Machtkämpfen der
ausgehenden römischen Republik, Diss. Mainz 1969, 36f.; 43.
Leschhorn, Wolfgang: Die Anfänge der Provinz Galatia, Chiron 22, 1992, 315-36, hier 331f.
Magie, David: Roman Rule in Asia Minor to the End of the Third Century after Christ, Princeton/N.J. 1950, I
435; II 1285f. (der die Ära aber zwischen 2/1 v. und 1/2 n.Chr. beginnen läßt)
Mitchell, Stephen: Anatolia. Land, Men, and Gods in Asia Minor, Oxford 1993, I 39.91-94;107-9; II 153.
Stähelin, Felix: Geschichte der kleinasiatischen Galater, 21907, Nd. Osnabrück 1973, 100; 111.
Syme, Ronald: Anatolica. Studies in Strabo, hg. von Anthony Birley, Oxford 1995, 293.
AC/03.07.07/06.03.10
Athambelos aus Spasinu Charax (AL)
0. Onomastisches
Bei Cass. Dio 68,28,4 Athámbēlos. Der Name ist seit dem 1. Jh. v. Chr. häufig bei Königen
von Charakene-Mesene bezeugt (auf Münzen seit Athambelos I.: ATTAMBHΛOY); er ist
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
121
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
semitischen Ursprungs und bedeutet wohl „Bel hat gegeben“, aus *ntn-bl (nach Waddington
1866, 316f.; vgl. Schuol 2000, 312); dagegen schlägt Weissbach 1931, 1095 eine Herleitung
aus dem Babylonischen: „attam bel ‚du bist fürwahr Herr‘“ vor.
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
Belegt 116 n. Chr. (Cass. Dio 68,28,4) als König von Charakene-Mesene, einem Königreich
im Mündungsgebiet von Euphrat und Tigris in den Persischen Golf. Da er keine Münzen
geprägt hat (Le Rider 1959, 252f.), die in der Charakene-Mesene üblicherweise ein Datum
tragen, ist eine Bestimmung der Herrschaftsdauer unsicher. Schuol 2000, 231f. setzt den
Regierungbeginn 113/4 an. Das Ende seiner Herrschaft hängt möglicherweise mit dem Abzug
römischer Truppen 116/7 zusammen, doch ist dies unsicher, da sein Nachfolger
Meeredates/Meredat erst 131 bezeugt ist (PAT Nr. 1374). Gezählt wird er als Attambelos IV.
(Waddington 1866, 333), Athambelos V. (Nodelman 1960, 109f.) oder Athambelos VII.
(Schuol 2000, 344–348). Zum Problem der numismatischen Zeugnisse: Potts 1988, 143.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Im Anschluß an den Einmarsch der Truppen Trajans in Zentralmesopotamien 116 unterwarf
sich auch Athambelos von Charakene-Mesene. Als Trajan durch einen Sturm und durch die
Fluten des Tigris in Bedrängnis geriet, blieb Athambelos den Römern gegenüber loyal,
obwohl ihm ein Tribut auferlegt worden war (Cass. Dio 68,28,4). Umstritten ist in der
modernen Forschung, ob die Charakene-Mesene nach dem Abzug der römischen Truppen
romfreundlich und von den Parthern unabhängig blieb, wie Potter 1991, 281; Schuol 2000,
459 u.a. vermuten. Dagegen spricht sich Hauser 2005, 198 mit Anm. 123 aus. Unentschieden
bleibt Gebhardt 2002, 280–283.
3. Auswahlbibliographie
RE –. DNP –.
Vgl. Weissbach, F.H.: Art. Mesene, in: RE XV,1, 1931, 1082–1095.
Gebhardt, A.: Imperiale Politik und provinziale Entwicklung (Klio Beihefte N.F. 4), Berlin 2002.
Hauser, S.: Die ewigen Nomaden? Bemerkungen zu Herkunft, Militär, Staatsaufbau und nomadischen
Traditionen der Arsakiden, in: Meissner, B. u.a. (Hgg.): Krieg – Gesellschaft – Institutionen. Berlin 2005,
163–208,
Le Rider, G.: Monnaies de Characène, Syria 36, 1959, 229–253.
Nodelman, Sh.A.: A Preliminary History of Characene, Berytus 13, 1960, 83–123.
PAT = Hillers, D.R./Cussini, E. (Eds.): Palmyrene Aramaic Texts, Baltimore 1996.
Potter, D.S.: The inscriptions on the bronze Herakles from Mesene: Vologases IV’s war with Rome and the date
of Tacitus’ Annales, ZPE 88, 1991, 277–290.
Potts, D.T.: Araby the blest: Studies in Arabian Archaeology, Copenhagen 1988, 137–167.
Schuol, M.: Die Charakene. Ein mesopotamisches Königreich in hellenistisch-parthischer Zeit (Oriens et
Occidens 1). Stuttgart 2000, 231–232, 344–348.
Waddington, W.H.: Chronologie des Rois de la Characène, Revue Numismatique N.S. 11, 1866, 303–333.
AL/15.03.11 – r/30.04.12
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
122
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Athenodoros (Kananites / Calvus) von Tarsos
0. Onomastisches
Unter den Philosophen des 1. Jhs. v.Chr. tragen mehrere den Namen Athenodoros, darunter
zwei Stoiker aus Tarsos: Athenodoros, der Sohn Sandons (genannt Kananites [‘aus Kana’]
oder Calvus [‘Glatzkopf’]), und der etwa eine Generation ältere homonyme Athenodoros
(genannt Kordylion). Bereits antike Autoren unterscheiden nicht genau zwischen den
Werken, Aussprüchen und Taten dieser beiden tarsischen Philosophen. Die überlieferten biodoxographischen Informationen sind zu lückenhaft und undeutlich, um einen präzisen Abriß
ihrer
jeweiligen
philosophischen
Positionen
geben
zu
können.
Ältere
Rekonstruktionsversuche von Grimal, Cichorius und Philippson sind in ihren Vermutungen
zu den Lebensläufen und Lehren der beiden Athenodoroi zu spekulativ. Vgl. von Arnim 1896,
2045; Cichorius 1922, 279-282; Philippson 1931, 47-55; Grimal 1945, 261-273 und ders.
1946, 62-79 = 1986, 1147-1176; aus jüngerer Zeit zusammenfassend Goulet 1994, 655–657,
zuletzt Hülser 1997, 203 und Engels 2008. Jacoby hat bereits die wenigen verläßlichen
Zeugnisse über Leben und Werke des Athenodoros, Sohn des Sandon, in seinen Fragmenten
der griechischen Historiker III C gesammelt (FGrH 746). Das ausführlichste Zeugnis über
Athenodoros ist eine Notiz Strabons zu Tarsos (geogr. 14,5,14 C674f. = F 1). Die Zuweisung
aller bei Jacoby gesammelten Fragmente F 1–6c an Athenodoros, den Sohn des Sandon, ist
allerdings keineswegs gesichert. Auch andere homonyme Athenodoroi sind für bestimmte
Fragmente vorgeschlagen worden.
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
Athenodoros, Sohn des Sandon, stammte aus einem Dorf Kana bei Tarsos und wird daher bei
Strabon Kananites genannt, bei lateinischen Autoren auch Calvus. Er wurde ca. 95 (Grimal) –
85 (Philippson) v.Chr. geboren. Bei seiner Rückkehr in die Heimatstadt Tarsos nach 31/30
stand Athenodoros bereits in hohem Alter. Noch während der Regierung des Augustus ist er
in seiner kilikischen Heimat verstorben. Lukian (macr. 21) gibt ihm ein Alter von 82 Jahren.
Die Chronik des Eusebios-Hieronymos (FGrH 746 F 2 = Euseb. chron. ol. 196,4) datiert die
akme (insignes habentur) des Athenodoros und des lateinischen Grammatikers M. Verrius
Flaccus wohl zu spät auf 8-9 n.Chr. Hülser 1997, 203, vermutete (ohne eindeutige
Argumente) ein Todesdatum im Jahre 13 oder 3 v.Chr. Postum wurden Athenodoros in Tarsos
heroische Ehren (als euergetes oder neuem ktistes der Stadt?) mit jährlich wiederkehrenden
Opfern zuerkannt (Luk. macr. 21; Dion Chrys. or. 33,48). Über die Familienverhältnisse des
Athenodoros Kananites ist nichts bekannt.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Athenodoros Kananites war als stoischer Philosoph, vielseitiger Schriftsteller, Berater
führender Römer und leitender Politiker seiner Heimatstadt Tarsos bekannt. Außer
Athenodoros erwähnt Strabon noch eine große Anzahl weiterer andres endoxoi aus Tarsos,
das als damals führendes Zentrum des Stoizismus in Kleinasien gelobt wird. Athenodoros
Kananites selbst galt später in Rom als philosophischer Nachfolger des Poseidonios. Alle
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
123
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
andres endoxoi aus Tarsos tragen griechische Namen. Ethnisch waren sie aber teilweise auch
hellenisierte Indigene, wie Athenodoros, der Sohn des Sandon.
Athenodoros wanderte wie viele seiner gelehrten Mitbürger aus Tarsos aus und wirkte später
lange Jahre in Rom. In den 40er Jahren unterrichtete Athenodoros in Rom den jungen
Octavian, vielleicht ab 44 v.Chr. (so Kaplan 1990, 1-3 und Bowersock 1965, 32; vgl. zur
Erziehung der jungen Prinzen im Kaiserhaus Parker 1946, 29-50.) Im Jahre 44 erbat Cicero
bei seiner Arbeit an De officiis von Athenodoros ein hypomnema über die Pflichtenlehre des
Poseidonios (Poseidonios F 41 a/b Edelstein/Kidd). Athenodoros behielt auch nach Ende
seiner Tätigkeit als Lehrer des jungen Octavian im Umfeld des späteren Prinzeps weiterhin
Einfluß als ‘Hofphilosoph’ (Cichorius). Mehrere, teils anekdotische Notizen deuten auf eine
persönliche Vertrauensstellung als Berater hin (Plut. Quaestiones convivales 2,1,13 = mor.
634 E = FGrH 746 F 5; Plut. mor. 207c = Apophth. Caes. Aug. 7, Cass. Dio 52,36,4 und
56,43,2).
Cichorius vermutete, daß Athenodoros bereits vor Actium in römischen Diensten auf Sizilien
tätig gewesen sein könnte. Aber in der einzigen Quelle, die er als Beleg für diese Annahme
heranzieht (Plut. mor. 207b = Apophth. Caes. Aug. 5), muß der Name des Athenodoros
zunächst aus dem im Text überlieferten Namen Theodoros aus Tarsos emendiert werden.
Daher bleibt die Vermutung unbeweisbar. Eine Notiz Strabons (geogr. 16,4,21 C779 = FGrH
746 F 5) über Petra stützt sich mit großer Wahrscheinlichkeit auf Athenodoros, den Sohn des
Sandon. Diese Stelle berichtet von einer diplomatischen Mission des Athenodoros, die ca. 3025 v.Chr. im Auftrage des Augustus nach Petra zu den Nabatäern führte, möglicherweise als
Teil der Vorbereitungen des Arabienfeldzuges des Gallus. Athenodoros könnte sich hierdurch
für die Aufgabe empfohlen haben, in seiner Heimatstadt Tarsos politisch wieder im Sinne des
Augustus ‘Ordnung’ zu schaffen.
Eine exakte Datierung der Umbrüche im Stadtregiment von Tarsos zwischen 42 v.Chr. und
dem Tode des Augustus 14 n.Chr. ist mangels eindeutiger Quellen unmöglich; aber die
Abfolge dreier Phasen ist gesichert: unter Boethos, unter Athenodoros und schließlich unter
Nestor. Boethos war zwischen 42 und 31 v.Chr. von Marcus Antonius als ‘Vorsteher’ der
Regierung der Polis eingesetzt worden. Augustus hat Boethos nicht unmittelbar nach seinem
Sieg von 31 abgesetzt, sondern erst einige Jahre später. Dies geht daraus hervor, daß sich
Athenodoros, der Nachfolger des Boethos, nach 31/30 noch in Rom am Kaiserhof aufgehalten
hat (Franco 2006, 324). Als Athenodoros in den 20er Jahren nach Tarsos kam und dort mit
Vollmachten ausgestattet (hypo tou Kaisaros exousias) die Regierung des Boethos und seiner
„aufrührerischen Anhänger“ (systasiotas) beenden wollte, regte sich Widerstand gegen diese
Maßnahmen, bevor Athenodoros sich durchsetzte. Dies gesteht sogar Strabon ein, unsere
einzige Quelle über diese Ereignisse (geogr. 14,5,14 C674f.).
Unsicher bleibt, was genau Strabon unter der Formulierung proestē tēs politeias verstand, mit
der er die Stellung des Athenodoros und seines Nachfolgers Nestor als Vorsteher der
Regierung in Tarsos in einer untechnischen, literarischen Ausdrucksweise umschrieb.
Vielleicht war diese prostasia nur eine informelle Position aufgrund der engen amicitaBeziehung zu Augustus. Aber man hat auch ein spezielles imperium oder kaiserliches
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
124
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
mandatum für Athenodoros zur Absetzung des Boethos und zum Eingriff in die Verfassung
der civitas libera Tarsos angenommen. Möglicherweise übernahm Athenodoros als
Philosophenherrscher von Augustus’ Gnaden zeitweise auch selbst führende Ämter der Polis
als Demarchos oder Prytanis. Kurze Notizen über Tarsos bei Lukian (macr. 21) und vor allem
Dion Chrysostomos (or. 33,48) helfen nicht entscheidend weiter. Allerdings hat Crosby den
Text bei Dion Chrysostomos durch die Konjektur prytanin verbessert. U.a. Goulet nahm
deswegen an, daß Athenodoros die Vertreibung des Boethos und die Neuordnung der Polis
formal von der tarsischen Prytanie aus betrieb. Falls Athenodoros mit einem homonymen
tarsischen Magistraten des späten 1. Jhs. v.Chr. identisch sein sollte (vgl. zu diesem
Athenodoro(s) Levante 1993 = SNG France 2, Cilicie, Nr. 1345 mit Tafel 67 und in diesem
Sinne Franco 2006, 327), der für die lokale Münzprägung zuständig war, war dieses Amt
gewiß nicht die institutionelle Basis für seine weitgehenden Eingriffe in die Polis.
Athenodoros wirkte auch als philosophischer, historischer und naturkundlicher Autor: Die
Anzahl, die Titel und der Inhalt seiner Werke sind aufgrund der fragmentarischen
Überlieferungslage jedoch nicht sicher zu bestimmen: Er verfaßte eine Konsolationsschrift an
Octavia Pros Oktavian (FGrH 746 F 2 = Plut. Poplic. 17). Athenodoros F 3 (= Athen.
Deipnos. 519b) stammt aus einem Traktat Peri spoudēs kai paidias. F 4 handelt von einer
Diskussion über ein Götterbild (agalma) des Sarapis, in die Athenodoros eingriff. F 6a–c
beziehen sich auf einen Autor namens Athenodoros, der dreimal von Strabon zusammen mit
dem Stoiker Poseidonios genannt wird. Wenngleich eine Identifikation mit dem Sohn
Sandons oft einfach vorausgesetzt wird, läßt sie sich nicht sicher beweisen. F 6a–c würden
Athenodoros auch als eine Autorität in der Naturphilosophie und Ozeanlehre erweisen.
Vermutlich ist der Sohn Sandons auch noch der Verfasser eines Traktates Gegen die
Kategorien-Schrift des Aristoteles. Nach Jacobys überzeugender Vermutung verfaßte
Athenodoros Kananites auch eine lediglich bei Stephanos von Byzanz in den Ethnika einmal
erwähnte Lokalgeschichte von Tarsos (Peri tes Patridos: FGrH 746 F 1 = Steph. Byz. Eth.
s.v. Anchiale A 53 Billerbeck).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Hülser, K.-H.: Athenodoros [2-3], DNP 2, 1997, 203.
Philippson, R.: Athenodoros [19], RE Suppl. V, 1931, 47-55.
von Arnim, J.: Athenodoros [19], RE I 2, 1896, 2045.
Bowersock, G.W.: Augustus and the Greek World, Oxford 1965.
Cichorius, C.: Römische Studien. Historisches, Epigraphisches, Literaturgeschichtliches aus vier Jahrhunderten
Roms, Leipzig/Berlin 1922.
Engels, J.: Athenodoros, Boethos und Nestor: ‘Vorsteher der Regierung’ in Tarsos und Freunde führender
Römer, in: A. Coskun (Hg.): Freundschaft und Gefolgschaft in den auswärtigen Beziehungen der Römer (2.
Jh. v.Chr. – 1. Jh. n.Chr.), Frankfurt a.M. 2008, 109-132.
Follet, S.: Athénodore de Tarse dit Cordylion RE 18, in: R.Goulet (Hg.): Dictionnaire des philosophes antiques,
Bd. I: Abam(m)on à Axiothéa, Paris 1994, 658f.
Franco, C.: Tarso tra Antonio e Ottaviano (Strabone 14,5,14), Rudiae 18, 2006, 311-339.
Goulet, R.: Athénodore de Tarse dit Calvus (497), in: R.Goulet (Hg.): Dictionnaire des philosophes antiques, Bd.
I: Abam(m)on à Axiothéa, Paris 1994, 655–657.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
125
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Grimal, P.: Auguste et Athénodore. Teile I-II, REA 47, 1945, 261-273 und 48, 1946, 62-79 (= ND in: Grimal, P.:
Rome, la littérature et l’histoire, Bd. II, Rom 1986, 1147-1176).
Kaplan, M.: Greeks and the Imperial Court, from Tiberius to Nero, Diss. Harvard 1977, New York/London
1990.
Levante, E.: Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum France 2: Cabinet de Médailles, Cilicie, Paris 1993.
Parker, E.R.: The Education of Heirs in the Julio-Claudian Family, AJPh 67, 1946, 29-50.
JE/15.08.08-r/25.08.08
Athenodoros (Kordylion) von Tarsos
0. Onomastisches
Unter den Philosophen des 1. Jhs. v.Chr. tragen mehrere den Namen Athenodoros, darunter
zwei Stoiker aus Tarsos: Athenodoros, der Sohn Sandons (genannt Kananites oder
Calvus), und Athenodoros, genannt Kordylion (‘der Buckelige’). Letzterer war etwa eine
Generation älter als der Sohn des Sandon, und wurde als Hausphilosoph und Berater des M.
Porcius Cato Uticensis bekannt (vgl. Follet 1994, 658f.; Hülser 1997, 203). Bereits antike
Autoren unterscheiden nicht mehr genau zwischen den Werken, Aussprüchen und Taten der
beiden tarsischen Philosophen. Die überlieferten bio-doxographischen Informationen sind zu
knapp und lückenhaft, um einen präzisen Abriß ihrer jeweiligen philosophischen Positionen
geben zu können (vgl. zuletzt Engels 2008). Insbesondere die älteren
Rekonstruktionsversuche von Grimal (Grimal 1945, bes. 264-266 über Kordylion = 1986,
1148-1152) sind in ihren Vermutungen zu den Lebensläufen und Lehren der beiden
Athenodoroi zu spekulativ.
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
Über die Familienverhältnisse des Athenodoros Kordylion ist nichts bekannt. Wie viele seiner
gelehrten Mitbürger verließ auch er die Heimatpolis Tarsos. Er übernahm darauf die Leitung
der Bibliothek von Pergamon (Diog. Laert. 7,34; Plut. Cato minor 10,1-3). Von ca. 66 bis 49
v.Chr. lebte er im Haus Catos des Jüngeren in Rom. Mit Ausbruch des Bürgerkrieges
verlieren sich seine Spuren.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Athenodoros Kordylion zählt in der stoischen Schulgeschichte zu den bedeutendsten
Philosophen des 1. Jhs. v.Chr. Mehrere philosophische Schriften werden entweder ihm oder
einem homonymen Athenodoros, dem Sohn Sandons, zugeschrieben (s.o. 1.). Dies betrifft vor
allem Werke und Lehrpositionen, die von dem stoischen Philosophen Seneca zitiert wurden.
Als gelehrter Bibliothekar von Pergamon fiel er durch übertriebene Kritik an den Werken und
Lehrmeinungen älterer Stoiker und eigenmächtige Athetesen im Text stoischer Traktate
unangenehm auf (Diog. Laert. 7,34 nach Isidor von Pergamon).
Als M. Porcius Cato (Uticensis) als Militärtribun des Statthalters Rubrius 68/67 oder 67/66
(vgl. Fündling 2001, 1146) in der Provinz Makedonien diente, suchte er Athenodoros
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
126
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Kordylion in Pergamon auf, um ihn als Philosophen zu hören. Der damals bereits hoch
angesehene und ältere Philosoph nahm Catos Einladung an, ihm nach Makedonien und
danach nach Rom zu folgen, und lebte danach in einem engen amicitia-Verhältnis zu Cato in
dessen Haus in Rom als Hausphilosoph und Berater (vgl. Strab. geogr. 14,5,14 C674
synebiose Marko Katoni / „teilte sein Leben mit Marcus Cato“; ähnlich Plut. Cat. min. 16,1).
Damals gehörte er zu den einflußreichen östlichen Intellektuellen in der Hauptstadt. Plutarch
(mor. 777a: Maxime cum principibus philosopho esse disserendum) erwähnt das Verhältnis
zwischen Athenodoros Kordylion und Cato Uticensis als ein Vorbild für eine ideale
Beziehung zwischen einem Philosophen und einem Staatsmann.
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Hülser, K.-H.: Athenodoros Nr. 2, DNP 2, 1997, 203.
Engels, J.: Athenodoros, Boethos und Nestor: ‘Vorsteher der Regierung’ in Tarsos und Freunde führender
Römer, in: A. Coskun (Hg.): Freundschaft und Gefolgschaft in den auswärtigen Beziehungen der Römer (2.
Jh. v.Chr. – 1. Jh. n.Chr.), Frankfurt a.M. 2008, 109-132.
Follet, S.: Athénodore de Tarse dit Cordylion RE 18, in: R.Goulet (Hg.): Dictionnaire des philosophes antiques,
Bd. I: Abam(m)on à Axiothéa, Paris 1994, 658f.
Fündling. J.: Rubrius (I 2), DNP 10, 2001, 1146.
Grimal, P.: Auguste et Athénodore. Teile I-II, REA 47, 1945, 261-273 und 48, 1946, 62-79 (= Nd. in: P. Grimal:
Rome, la littérature et l’histoire, Bd. II, Rom 1986, 1147–1176).
JE/15.08.08-r/25.08.08
Attalos III. Philometor Euergetes, König von Pergamon
1. Zentrale Daten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemmata Attaliden
Letzter König des Pergamenischen Reiches. Herrscherjahre: 138-133 v.Chr. Geburtsjahr
umstritten, sicher nach 172, sehr wahrscheinlich nach 168, vor 159. Er starb 133. Galt als
Sohn der kappadokischen Prinzessin Stratonike (Tochter des Ariarathes IV., Schwester des
Ariarathes V.) und des Eumenes II.Soter und somit als Neffe Attalos’ II.
Diese Version ist in allen inschriftlichen Zeugnissen (z.B. IPerg. 246 = OGIS 332; IPerg. 248
= OGIS 331 = Welles, RC 65-67; OGIS 329; IMagn. 87 = OGIS 319; IK 12,2,200) sowie bei
Strab. geogr. 13,4,2 (624) (vgl. Liv. per. 58; Flor. epit. 1,35,2) dokumentiert und bildet die
offizielle Version des pergamenischen Hofes. Sie ist aber wegen einer mysteriösen
Andeutung bei Polyb. 30,2,4-6 erstmals von Koepp 1883, IX in Zweifel gezogen worden.
Denn einerseits wurde dem Bruder des damals regierenden Eumenes II., dem späteren König
Attalos II. Philadelphos, bei seinem Rombesuch a. 168/67 durch Stratios, den Leibarzt des
Königs, versichert, dass Eumenes II. keinem anderen die Herrschaft hinterlassen könne, da er
bei schlechter Gesundheit und zudem kinderlos sei. In einem Nachtrag heißt es dann aber
erläuternd: „denn derjenige, der später in der Herrschaft nachgefolgt ist, war damals noch
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
127
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
nicht als sein leiblicher Sohn offiziell anerkannt worden“ (§ 6 oudepō gar anadedeigmenos
etynchanen kata physin hyios ōn autō ho meta tauta diadexamenos tēn archēn). Vgl. auch die
Liviusversion (45,19): necdum enim agnoverat eum, qui postea regnavit. Das Problem wird
dadurch verkompliziert, dass „Attalos, der Sohn des Eumenes“, im Jahr 152 nach Polyb.
33,18,1f. „erst ein Knabe“ war. Beim Tod des Eumenes 159 war er jedenfalls noch viel zu
jung, um selbst die Herrschaft zu übernehmen, wie Strab. geogr. 13,4,2 (624) feststellt.
Während ein Teil der Forschung der offiziellen Version folgt (z.B. Cardinali 1906/68, 129138; Welles, RC 65, zu Z. 14; Hansen 21971, Appendix I, 471-474; Allen 1983, Appendix I,
189-194; Habicht 1989, 373; Mehl 1997 mit Vorbehalt), haben sich daneben drei alternative
Varianten herausgebildet:
a) Attalos III. sei der Sohn der Stratonike, aber nicht des Eumenes II. (so Vatin 1970, 108111; Hopp 1977, 23-26; vgl. dazu Herrmann-Otto 1994, 89 Anm. 21).
b) Attalos III. sei der Sohn des Eumenes II., aber nicht der Stratonike (so Niese 1903, 204ff.
Anm. 4; Breccia 1903/1966, 50-57; Koperberg 1926, 195-205; Magie 1950 II 772-774 Anm.
76; Walbank 1979, III 417f.; Schmitt/Nollé 2005, 172; 176).
c) Attalos III. sei die Frucht einer kurzen Verbindung zwischen Attalos II. und Stratonike (so
Koepp 1893, 154-157; Wilcken 1896; Geyer 1931). Vgl. hierzu auch die Überlieferung, dass
Attalos II. im Jahr 172 auf die irrige Nachricht vom Tod seines Bruders die vermeintliche
Witwe Stratonike vorübergehend zur Frau genommen habe: Diod. 29,34,2; Liv. 42,15f., bes.
16,9; Plut. mor. 184b. Von einer Zeugung ist aber in diesem Kontext nicht die Rede. Vgl.
ferner Iust. 36,4,1, wo Eumenes als patruus des jungen Attalos bezeichnet wird.
Tatsächlich bereiten diese drei Varianten nicht weniger Schwierigkeiten als die offizielle
Version. Vgl. die ausführlichen Forschungsberichte und Diskussionen (auch des
Geburtsjahres) bei Koperberg 1926; Hopp 1977, 16ff.; Hansen 21971, Appendix I, 471-474;
Allen 1983, Appendix I, 189-194. Eine überzeugende Erklärung des Gesamtbefundes steht
noch aus.
[Nachtrag: Zu einer Bekräftigung der offiziellen Version vgl. jetzt A. Coşkun, Historia 60.1,
2011, wo dargelegt wird, dass der „natürliche Sohn“ in Polyb. 30,2,6 mit Aristonikos zu
identifizieren ist.]
[AC 07.12.10]
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Attalos III. wurde beim Tod des Eumenes II. a. 159 unter die Vormundschaft des Attalos II.
gestellt, der gleichzeitig zum Reichsverweser eingesetzt wurde. Doch nahm dieser die
Königswürde an und hatte sie bis zu seinem Lebensende a. 138 inne, wonach ihm Attalos III.
auf den Thron folgte; vgl. Strab. geogr. 13,4,2 (624). Jedoch ist unklar, ob Eumenes II. nicht
doch vorgesehen hatte, dass zuerst sein Bruder und dann sein Sohn König werden sollte.
Attalos wurde mit besonderer Sorgfalt erzogen und ausgebildet, wie aus einem Brief des
Attalos II. an den Rat und das Volk der Ephesier zu erschließen ist (IΚ 12,2,202). Auch vor
seinem Herrschaftssantritt ist Attalos’ III. öffentliche Präsenz inschriftlich belegt: Welles, RC
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
128
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
65,14; 66,12,14; IDidyma 488,40; IMagn. 87 = OGIS 319,16ff.; AM 29, 1904, 14; OGIS 329,
Z. 39; Denkmäler aus Lykaonien 75.
Bereits a. 152 begab sich Attalos III. nach Rom, um dort dem Senat vorgestellt zu werden und
das Freundschaftsverhältnis, welches das pergamenische Königshaus mit vornehmen Römern
verband, zu erneuern. Vgl. Polyb. 33,18,1f.: charin tou tē te synklētō systathēnai kai tas
patrikas ananeōsasthai philias kai xenias. Vielleicht hielt er sich damals auch im Haus der
Sempronier auf, da Ti. Sempronius Gracchus (cos. I 177, cos. II 163, cens. 169) bei einer
Inspektionsreise in den Osten (166/5 und 161, Belege in den Einträgen zu Ariarathes IV. und
Ariarathes V.) enge Freundschaftsbande mit dem damals herrschenden Eumenes II. geknüpft
hatte. Nach seinem Romaufenthalt besuchte Attalos verschiedene Städte Griechenlands und
wurde dort mit großer Begeisterung empfangen (Polyb. 33,18,4).
Für die kurze Herrschaftszeit Attalos’ III. liegen nur wenige Belege vor. Die Aussagen der
inschriftlichen Dokumente bezeugen vorwiegend sein Interesse für kultische Einrichtungen;
IPerg. 248 = OGIS 331 = Welles, RC 65-67 enthält Regelungen für die Kulte des Dionysos
Kathegemon und des Zeus Sabazios. Der letztgenannte Kult war von der Königin-Mutter
Stratonike aus Kappadokien nach Pergamon gebracht worden. Die Priestertümer beider Kulte
lagen in der Hand eines Mitgliedes des königlichen Hauses. Überschwängliche Ehrungen
wurden ihm nach einem großen militärischen Sieg zuteil (IPerg. 246 = OGIS 332).
Kurz vor seinem Tod schickte er Hilfstruppen und Geschenke zu P. Cornelius Scipio
Aemilianus Africanus minor (cos. I 147, cos. II 134) nach Numantia (Cic. Deiot. 19). Die
Hilfe erreichte das römische Lager im Frühjahr 133 während der Belagerung der Stadt. Hopp
1977, 116 vermutet, dass Scipio, als er sich ca. a. 139 in Pergamon aufhielt (Lukian. macrob.
12), den damaligen Thronfolger tief beindruckt habe. Zu Scipios Inspektionsreise in den
Osten vgl. auch MRR I 480f.; Astin 1967, 138; 177; Kallet-Marx 1995, 97.
Ansonsten ist das Bild des Attalos von der einseitig negativen literarischen Überlieferung
geprägt. So wird er als ein exzentrischer Despot bezeichnet. Mommsen 91903, 53 spricht etwa
von einem „asiatische[n] Sultanregiment“. Er habe kein Interesse an der Politik gezeigt und
sich stattdessen ganz dem Studium der Giftpflanzen, dem Gartenbau und der
Metallverarbeitung gewidmet (Iust. 36,4). Für eine positivere Einschätzung dieser Aktivitäten
s. jedoch Habicht 1989, 377; Rigsby 1988, 123-127; Engster 2004 (auch zur Rezeption seiner
Forschung und seines Werkes bei antiken Schriftstellern).
Die Vernachlässigung der öffentlichen Aufgaben wird von Pompeius Trogus (bei Iust. 36,4,14), wahrscheinlich arbiträr, als Folge seiner übermäßigen Trauer über den Tod der
leidenschaftlich geliebten Mutter und seiner Verlobten Berenike dargestellt. Er schildert
Attalos’ heftige Reaktion und Wut gegen alle, die er dafür für verantwortlich hielt, sowie die
daraus resultierenden Hinrichtungen hoch stehender Personen am königlichen Hof. Diodor
34,3 berichtet ebenfalls von Liquidierungen königlicher Freunde und Funktionäre sowie ihrer
Familien, da sie vom König eines Komplotts verdächtigt wurden. Beide Aussagen beziehen
sich wahrscheinlich auf dasselbe Ereignis im letzten Regierungsabschnitt Attalos’ III. und
sollen seinen Nachruf in der Überlieferung entscheidend beeinflusst haben. Wohl in diesen
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
129
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
letzten Teil seiner Regierungszeit gehört auch die Kreuzigung des grammatikos Daphidas
(Strab. geogr. 14,1,39 [647c]). Dieser wurde wegen eines Spottepigramms auf die
Attalidische Dynastie zum Tode verurteilt (s. Hopp 1977, 119f. mit weiteren Belegen).
Diese negative Darstellung Attalos’ III. als eines misstrauischen und verstörten (Iust. 36,4,2:
non aliquod signum sani hominis habere … videretur), bei seinem Volk verhassten und sein
Volk hassenden Monarchen, hat auch die Perspektive bestimmt, aus der ein Teil der
Forschung seine letzte und meistdiskutierte Tat betrachtet: die Abfassung eines Testaments, in
dem er das römische Volk als Erben einsetzte. Bekannt wurde dies erst nach seinem
unerwarteten Tod a. 133. Hopp 1977, 116f. vermutet, das Attalosbild sei absichtlich so dunkel
gefärbt worden, um eine plausible Erklärung für das Testament anzubieten. Habicht 1989, 377
erkennt zudem in der Entstellung der Persönlichkeit des Attalos eine Art Legitimierung der
römischen Machtübernahme. Vgl. Diod. 34,3: dia de tēn ōmotēta misētheis ou monon hypo
tōn archomenōn alla kai tōn plesiochōrōn pantas tous hypotetagmenous epoiēse meteōrous
pros kainotomian.
Die Existenz dieses schwerwiegenden Vermächtnisses, historisch vielleicht des Wichtigsten
in einer Gruppe ähnlicher königlicher Testamente zugunsten des populus Romanus, ist
literarisch reichlich belegt: Flor. 1,35; Liv. per. 59; Val. Max. 5,2,ext.3; App. civ. 5,4; vgl.
Cardinali 1910, 275ff. Hinzu kommen zeitgenössische Dokumente: IPerg. 249 = OGIS 338;
jetzt auch IK 63, 1 A, Z. 13-19. Als Vorbild wird das erste derartige Vermächtnis, das
Testament des Ptolemaios VIII. Euergetes II. a. 155, gedient haben: In dynastischen
Zwistigkeiten mit dem Bruder Ptolemaios VI. Philometor verwickelt, vermachte er zur
Abwehr weiterer Attentatsversuche den Römern im Fall seines kinderlosen Ablebens Kyrene
(SEG IX 7). Die Einsetzung der Römer als Erben gilt als Euergetes’ eigene
„Rechtsschöpfung“ (Herrmann-Otto 1994, 93ff.). Allerdings ist Attalos’ III. politisches
Testament zugunsten der Römer das erste, das tatsächlich umgesetzt wurde. Jedoch enthalten
die Quellen keine näheren Auskünfte über die Motive oder die einzelnen Verfügungen des
Testaments. Wie allgemein in der Forschung angenommen wird, soll Attalos III. das
Pergamenische Reich, oder vielmehr den königlichen Besitz, den Römern hinterlassen haben.
Ausgenommen waren indes Pergamon selbst und vermutlich auch andere griechische Städte,
für die er das Privileg der Freiheit verfügte.
Nach dem Tod des Königs wurde das Testament vom Pergamener Eudemos nach Rom zur
Bestätigung gebracht. Bezeichnenderweise wandte sich der Gesandte zuerst an den
amtierenden Volkstribunen Ti. Sempronius Gracchus den Jüngeren, da zwischen dem
Attalidischen Königshaus und seiner Familie bereits Freundschaftsbeziehungen bestanden
(Plut. Tib. Gracch. 14). Als das Testament eröffnet wurde, stritt Tiberius schon über seine
Agrarreform mit dem Senat. So ließ er die Volksversammlung über die Verwendung des
königlichen Schatzes für die Finanzierung seines Agrarprogramms sowie über den Status der
griechischen Städte im ehemaligen Attalidenreich entscheiden. Nach seiner bald darauf
erfolgten Ermordung übernahm der Senat die politische Initiative, hielt aber an der
Ausnutzung des Attalos-Schatzes zur Verwirklichung des Ansiedlungsprogramms fest.
Zudem wurden noch im selben Sommer alle griechischen Städte des Attalidenreichs für frei
erklärt, wie Dreyer 2005, 63-64; 71-73, gestützt auch auf IK 63,1, gezeigt hat. Der
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
130
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Senatsbeschluss wurde in Asien durch die Fünfergesandtschaft bekannt gemacht (Strab.
geogr. 14,1,38 [646]), und hatte vermutlich das Ziel, die Städte gegen die antirömischen
Aktionen des Usurpators Aristonikos zu mobilisieren.
Aristonikos beanspruchte, ein Sohn des Eumenes II. oder jedenfalls eines Königs zu sein, und
nahm bezeichnenderweise den Namen Eumenes III. an; vgl. Liv. per. 58f.; Eutrop. 4,20; Iust.
36,4,6; Vell. Pat. 2,4,1; Flor. 1,35,20; Oros. 5,10,1; dazu Hopp 1977, 121ff. Deswegen wird
oft angenommen, dass das Testament des Attalos vor allem bezweckte, Aristonikos von der
Thronfolge auszuschließen; vgl. dazu Gruen 1984, 594f.; auch Engels 1999, 293f. Dabei ist es
irrelevant, ob sich Aristonikos schon vor dem Tod Attalos’ III., wie Hopp 1977, 121f.
behauptet, oder erst nach der Testamenteröffnung erhob.
Unter den diskutierten Faktoren begegnen ferner sein irrationaler Hass gegen seine
Untertanen (Mommsen 1903, 53), seine finstere Persönlichkeit und ernsten
Regierungsprobleme (Allen 1983, 84), sein Wunsch, Rom als Beschützerin der Griechen
Kleinasiens zu etablieren (McShane 1964, 194), ein in Zusammenarbeit mit Rom aufgestellter
Plan (Vogt 1975, 96), sein Wille, Westkleinasien vor möglicher Anarchie und politischer
Destabilisierung nach seinem Tod zu schützen (Magie 1950, I 31f.; Vavrinek 1957, 20), sein
gespanntes Verhältnis zur Reichselite und die Angst vor einem Attentat (Braund 1983, 22;
1984, 132; vgl. auch Sherwin-White 1984, 81), der Einfluss der pergamenischen
Führungsschicht, die mit Hilfe Roms ihre politischen und sozialen Privilegien vor einem in
Zukunft drohendem sozialen Aufruhr bewahren wollte (Carrata Thomes 1968, 30f.; vgl. dazu
Rostovtzeff 1955-56, HW II, 805-808; III, 1521-22, Anm. 75-77).
Von besonderer Bedeutung ist aber schließlich die realistische Einschätzung der
geopolitischen Verhältnisse, die nach 168 von der Supermacht Rom bestimmt wurden; vgl.
Mommsen 1903, 53; Cardinali 1910, 278-280; Hansen 1971, 148f. Diese Einsicht dürfte –
wohl in Verbindung mit dem Argwohn Attalos’ III. gegen seinen Halbbruder – die Einsetzung
der Römer als seine Erben wesentlich bestimmt haben. Vgl. auch Herrmann-Otto 1994, 92,
das Testament sei „in der Art der pergamenischen Politik seiner Vorgänger, vor allem seines
Onkels, Vormundes und politischen Lehrmeisters Attalos II. zu sehen“. Die Attaliden hatten
seit den Tagen Attalos’ I. konsequent an ihrer prorömischen Politik festgehalten, auch wenn
der Senat Eumenes II. nach Pydna wiederholt die kalte Schulter gezeigt hatte. Jedoch gelang
es Attalos II., die Balance zwischen selbständigen Entscheidungen und dem Einholen der
Zustimmung Roms zu halten. Unter seiner Vormundschaft und seinem Einfluss erneuerte der
noch junge Attalos III. die traditionelle amicitia mit Rom.
Schließlich ist aber noch zu berücksichtigen, dass die Römer durch Testamente dieser Art in
der Regel nur für den Fall der Kinderlosigkeit als Erben eingesetzt wurden. Die Übernahme
der direkten Herrschaft durch Rom hatte Attalos III. also nicht voraussehen können.
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Wilcken, U.: Attalos [11], RE 2,2, 1896, 2175-2177.
Mehl, A.: Attalos [6], DNP 2, 1997, 230-231.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
131
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Schmitt, H.H./Nollé, J.: Attaliden, Attalidenreich, in: LH 2005, 169-176.
Allen, R.E.: The Attalid Kingdom. A Constitutional History, Oxford 1983, 83-85; 189-194.
Astin, A.E.: Scipio Aemilianus, Oxford 1967, 138; 177.
Braund, D.: Royal Wills and Rome, PBSR 51, 1983, 16-57.
Braund, D.: Rome and the Friendly King. The Character of the Client Kingship, London 1984, 130-131, 150151.
Breccia, E.: Il diritto dinastico nelle monarchie dei successori d’Alessandro Magno, Rom 1903, Nd. 1966, 50-57.
Cardinali, G.: Il regno di Pergamo, Rom 1906, Nd. 1968, 129-138.
Cardinali, G.: La morte di Attalo III e la rivolta di Aristonico, in: Saggi di Storia Antica e di Archeologia offerti
a G. Beloch, Rom 1910, 269-320.
Carrata Thomes, F.: La rivolta di Aristonico e le origini della provincia romana d’Asia, Turin 1968, 30f.
Dreyer, B.: Rom und die griechischen Polisstaaten an der westkleinasiatischen Küste in der zweiten Hälfte des
zweiten Jahrhunderts v.Chr. – Hegemoniale Herrschaft und lokale Eliten im Zeitalter der Gracchen, in: A.
Coşkun (Hg.): Roms auswärtige Freunde in der späten Republik und im frühen Prinzipat (in
Zusammenarbeit mit H. Heinen und M. Tröster), Göttingen 2005, 62-64; 71-73.
Engels, J.: Augusteische Oikumenegeographie und Universalhistorie im Werk Strabons von Amaseia, Stuttgart
1999, 291-297.
Engster, D.: Attalos III. Philometor – ein ‚Sonderling‘ auf dem Thron?, Klio 86.1, 2004, 66-82.
Geyer, F.: Stratonike [11], RE IV A1, 1931, 321.
Gruen, E.: The Hellenistic World and the Coming of Rome, Berkely 1984, II 592-609.
Habicht, Chr.: The Last Attalids and the Origin of Roman Asia, in: CAH VIII2, Cambridge 1989, 373-380.
Hansen, E.: The Attalids of Pergamon, Ithaka-London 19712, 142-163; Appendix I, 471-474.
Herrmann-Otto, E.: Die Bedeutung politischer Testamente in der späten römischen Republik, in: R. Günther/St.
Rebenich (Hgg.): E fontibus haurire. Beiträge zur römischen Geschichte und zu ihren Hilfswissenschaften
(FS Heinrich Chantraine), Paderborn 1994, 81-94.
Hopp, J.: Untersuchungen zur Geschichte der letzten Attaliden, München 1977, 16-26; 107-120; s. auch 121149.
Kallet-Marx, R.: Hegemony to Empire. The Development of the Roman Imperium in the East from 148 to 62
B.C., Berkeley 1995, 97-108.
Koepp, F.: De gigantomachiae in poeseos artisque monumentis usu, Diss. Bonn 1883.
Koepp, F.: De Attali III patre, RhM 48, 1893, 154-157.
Koperberg, S.: De origini Attali III, Mnemosene 54, 1926, 195-205.
Magie, D.: Roman Rule in Asia Minor to the End of the Third Century after Christ, Princeton 1950, I 30-33; II
772-774 n. 76; 778-781 nn. 86-94.
McShane, R.B.: The Foreign Policy of the Attalids of Pergamon, Urbana Ill. 1964, 192-202.
Mommsen, Th.: Römische Geschichte, II, Berlin 91903, 53.
Niese, B.: Geschichte der griechischen und makedonischen Staaten seit der Schlacht bei Chaeronea, Bd. III,
Gotha 1903, 204ff.
Rigsby, K.J.: Provincia Asia, TAPA 118, 1988, 123-127.
Rostovtzeff, M.I.: Die Hellenistische Welt. Gesellschaft und Wirtschaft, 3 Bde., 1955-1956. (HW)
Sherwin-White, A.N.: Roman Foreign Policy in the East (168B.C. to A.D.1), London 1984, 80-84.
Vatin, C.: Recherches sur le mariage et la condition de la femme mariée à l’époque hellénistique, Paris 1970,
108-111.
Vavrinek, V.: La révolte d’Aristonicos, Prag 1957, 20.
Vogt, J.: Ancient Slavery and the Ideal of Man, Cambridge, Mass., 1975, 96.
Walbank, F.W.: Historical Commentary to Polybios, vol. III, Oxford 1979, 417f.
Welles, C. Bradford: Royal Correspondence in the Hellenistic World. A Study in Greek Epigraphy, London
1934.
WKK/27.03.10-r/17.04.10
Attalos, Dynast von Paphlagonien
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
132
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
Stammte aus der Familie der Pylaimeniden (zu diesen vgl. Strab. geogr. 12,3,1.8 [541; 543];
Magie II 1950, 1234f. Anm. 37); Bruder des Pylaimenes von Paphlagonien (Eutr. 6,14,1).
Starb ca. a. 41/40 (Cass. Dio 48,33,5).
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Bei der Neuordnung des Ostens a. 64/62 durch Cn. Pompeius Magnus procos. 67-62/61
wurde seine paphlagonische Dynastie nach App. Mithr. 114,560 neu eingerichtet. Gemäß
Strab. geogr. 12,3,1 (541) gab Pompeius „einigen Nachkommen des Pylaimenes das
Binnenland der Paphlagoner zum Beherrschen (basileuesthai), so wie die Galater Männern
aus Tetrarchengeschlecht“. Die Gewährung des Königstitels sollte hieraus entgegen Sullivan
1990, 168f. nicht gefolgert werden.
Eutr. 6,14,1 nennt neben Attalos auch einen nicht weiter bekannten, aber offenbar aus
demselben Geschlecht stammenden Pylaimenes. Vermutlich beerbte Attalos den vor ihm
gestorbenen Pylaimenes, da nach seinem Tod a.41/40 das nicht zur Provinz Pontus-Bithynia
gehörige Paphlagonien an Kastor (III.) überging (Cass. Dio 48,33,5). App. civ. 2,294 bezeugt
für die Schlacht von Pharsalos pauschal die Unterstützung des Pompeius auch durch die
Paphlagoner.
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Wilcken, U.: Attalos [12], RE II,2, 1896, 2177.
DNP –.
Hoben, Wolfgang: Untersuchungen zur Stellung kleinasiatischer Dynasten in den Machtkämpfen der
ausgehenden römischen Republik, Diss. Mainz 1969, 119f.
Magie, David: Roman Rule in Asia Minor to the End of the Third Century after Christ, Princeton/N.J. 1950, II
1234f. Anm. 37.
Mitchell, Stephen: Anatolia. Land, Men, and Gods in Asia Minor, Bd. 1: The Celts in Anatolia and the Impact of
Roman Rule, Oxford 1993, 33; 37.
Sullivan, Richard D.: Near Eastern Royalty and Rome, 100-30 B.C., Toronto 1990, 156; 160; 168f.
AC/03.07.07
A. Baebius aus Hasta
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
A. 45 als römischer Ritter belegt.
Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
133
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Kämpfte zunächst auf der Seite des jungen Cn. Pompeius Magnus in Hispanien, ging dann
aber a. 45 zusammen mit C. Flavius und A. Trebellius zu C. Iulius Caesar über (Bell. Hisp.
26,2).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Klebs: A. Baebius, RE 2,2, 1896, 2729.
DNP –.
Caballos Rufino, Antonio: Los senadores de origen hispano durante la república romana, in: Julián González
(Hg.): Estudios sobre Urso Colonia Iulia Genetiva, Sevilla 1989, 233-79, bes. 266.
Castillo García, Carmen: Städte und Personen der Baetica, ANRW II 3, 1975, 601-53, bes. 636.
Wiegels, Rainer: Die römischen Senatoren und Ritter aus den hispanischen Provinzen bis Diokletian, Diss.
Solingen 1971, Nr. 224.
Zeidler, Jürgen: Onomastic Studies on Some Roman Amici in Hispania, in: Altay Coskun (Hg.): Roms
auswärtige Freunde in der späten Republik und im frühen Prinzipat, Göttingen 2005, 175-200, 177.
JL/29.09.04–r/28.06.07/17.04.10
Balbus (I.) aus Gades = L. Cornelius Balbus
0. Onomastisches
S. Balbus (II.) aus Gades.
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
A. 72 als Vater des L. Cornelius L. f. Balbus (II.) und des P. Cornelius L. f. Balbus (III.)
sowie Großvater des L. Cornelius P. f. Balbus (IV.) belegt.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Erhält a. 72 zusammen mit seinen beiden Söhnen und seinem Enkel von Cn. Pompeius
Magnus das römische Bürgerrecht (Plin. nat. 5,36).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
RE –; DNP –.
Lamberty, John: Amicus Caesaris. Der Aufstieg des L. Cornelius Balbus aus Gades, in: Altay Coskun (Hg.):
Roms auswärtige Freunde in der späten Republik und im frühen Prinzipat, Göttingen 2005, 155-73.
Rubio, Lisardo: Los Balbos y el Imperio romano, in: Anales de Historia Antigua y Medieval, Buenos Aires
1949, 93.
Wiegels, Rainer: Die römischen Senatoren und Ritter aus den hispanischen Provinzen bis Diokletian, Diss.
Solingen 1971, Nr. 35.
Zeidler, Jürgen: Onomastic Studies on Some Roman Amici in Hispania, in: Altay Coskun (Hg.): Roms
auswärtige Freunde in der späten Republik und im frühen Prinzipat, Göttingen 2005, 175-200, 178-80.
JL/29.09.04–r/28.06.07/17.04.10
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
134
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Balbus (II.) aus Gades = L. Cornelius L. f. Balbus cos. suff. 40
0. Onomastisches
Praenomen und Gentilnomen beziehen sich wahrscheinlich auf L. Cornelius Lentulus Crus
cos. 49 (oder eines Verwandten), der sich vermutlich für die Bürgerrechtsverleihung an die
Balbi eingesetzt hatte. Das Cognomen Balbus verweist möglicherweise auf die punische
Herkunft der Familie und lehnt sich an den in Gades beheimateten Baal-Kult an. Zur
Etymologie vgl. jetzt Zeidler 2005, 178-80.
Die Variante Balbus Cornelius Theophanes (SHA Max. Balb. 27,3) ist ihrerseits wohl auf die
Adoption des Balbus durch Theophanes von Mytilene a. 59 zurückzuführen (siehe unter 2.).
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
Ca. 96/95-nach 32. Sohn des L. Cornelius Balbus (I.); Bruder des P. Cornelius L. f. Balbus
(III.); Onkel des L. Cornelius L. f. Balbus (IV.). Ab a. 72 römisches Bürgerrecht; a. 40
Ernennung zum consul suffectus; Patron von Gades und Capua.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom/ Römern und Karrierverlauf
Militärische Beteiligung am Sertorius-Krieg, ab a. 77 unter Q. Caecilius Metellus Pius und
ab 75 unter C. Memmius im Heer des Cn. Pompeius Magnus. Erhielt von letzterem a. 72
das römische Bürgerrecht auf der Grundlage der lex Gellia Cornelia. In der Folgezeit
Aufstieg in die Tribus Clustumina und Erhebung in den Ritterstand.
Mögliche Kontaktaufnahme zu C. Iulius Caesar quaest. Hisp. Ult. 68. Diente Caesar procos.
Hisp. Ult. 61-60 als praefectus fabrum im Feldzug gegen die Lusitaner und Callaecer.
Begleitet Caesar a. 60 nach Rom. Durch seine guten Beziehungen zu Pompeius und wohl
auch zu M. Licinius Crassus an der Bildung des sog. “Ersten Triumvirats” beteiligt.
Adoption durch Theophanes von Mytilene, der seinerseits ein enger Vertrauter des Pompeius
war. Nebenkläger im Prozeß gegen L. Valerius Heptachordus, ebenfalls a. 59. Teilnahme als
praefectus fabrum an Caesars Gallischem Krieg a. 58, aus dem er jedoch noch im gleichen
Jahr nach Rom zurückkehrte, um dort Caesars Interessen zu vertreten.
Angeklagt wegen Anmaßung des römischen Bürgerrechts und Freispruch dank der
Verteidigung durch Pompeius, Crassus und vor allem M. Tullius Cicero a. 56.
Während des Bürgerkrieges Vertretung Caesars in Rom zusammen mit C. Oppius. Dort
versuchte er a. 49–47 mehrmals, Cicero für Caesars Politik zu gewinnen. In dieser Zeit war er
insbesondere für die Verwaltung der Staatsfinanzen zuständig, ab a. 45 möglicherweise im
Amt eines praefectus urbi. Erhebung in den Senatorenstand.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
135
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Nach Caesars Ermordung schloß er sich Balbus C. Iulius Caesar (Octavian) an. Erreichte a.
40 als erster Nichtitaliker das Consulat. Patron der Stadt Capua. Hinterließ bei seinem Tod
nach a. 32 jedem römischen Bürger 100 Sesterzen.
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Münzer, Friedrich: L. Cornelius Balbus [69], RE 4,1, 1900, 1260-1268.
Elvers, Karl-Ludwig: L. Cornelius Balbus [I 6], DNP 3, 1997, 169.
Caballos Rufino, Antonio: Los senadores de origen hispano durante la república romana, in: Julián González
(Hg.): Estudios sobre Urso Colonia Iulia Genetiva, Sevilla 1989, 233-79, bes. 252-54.
Castillo, Carmen: Los senadores béticos. Relaciones familiares y sociales, in: Epigrafia e ordine senatorio, Atti
del colloquio internazionale AIEGL (Tituli 5), Bd. 2, Rom 1982, 465-519, bes. 497f.
Des Boscs-Plateaux, Françoise: L. Cornelius Balbus de Gadès: la carrière méconnue d’un espagnol à l’époque
des guerres civiles, MCV 30, 1994, 7-35.
Lamberty, John: Amicus Caesaris. Der Aufstieg des L. Cornelius Balbus aus Gades, in: Altay Coskun (Hg.):
Roms auswärtige Freunde in der späten Republik und im frühen Prinzipat, Göttingen 2005, 155-73.
Masciantonio, Rudolph: Balbus the Unique, CW 61, 1967, 134-38.
Rodríguez-Neila, Juan Francisco: Los Balbos de Cádiz. Dos españoles en la Roma de César y Augusto, Sevilla
1973.
Rubio, Lisardo: Los Balbos y el Imperio romano, in: Anales de Historia Antigua y Medieval, Buenos Aires
1949, 67-119 und 1950, 142-99.
Weinrib, Joseph E.: The Spaniards in Rome. From Marius to Domitian, New York 1990, 61-76.
Welch, Kathryn E.: The Praefectura Urbis of 45 B.C. and the Ambitions of L. Cornelius Balbus, Antichthon 24,
1990, 53-69.
Wiegels, Rainer: Die römischen Senatoren und Ritter aus den hispanischen Provinzen bis Diokletian, Diss.
Solingen 1971, Nr. 35.
Zeidler, Jürgen: Onomastic Studies on Some Roman Amici in Hispania, in: Altay Coskun (Hg.): Roms
auswärtige Freunde in der späten Republik und im frühen Prinzipat, Göttingen 2005, 175-200, 178-80.
JL/29.09.04-r/29.09.04/28.06.07/17.04.10
Balbus (III.) aus Gades = P. Cornelius L. f. Balbus
0. Onomastisches
S. Balbus (II.) aus Gades.
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
Belegt a. 72. Sohn des L. Cornelius Balbus (II.); Bruder des L. Cornelius L. f. Balbus (III.);
Vater des L. Cornelius P. f. Balbus (IV.).
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Erhielt a. 72 zusammen mit seinem Vater, seinem Bruder und seinem Sohn von Cn.
Pompeius Magnus das römische Bürgerrecht (Plin. nat. 5,36).
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
136
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
3. Auswahlbibliographie
RE –; DNP –.
Lamberty, John: Amicus Caesaris. Der Aufstieg des L. Cornelius Balbus aus Gades, in: Altay Coskun (Hg.):
Roms auswärtige Freunde in der späten Republik und im frühen Prinzipat, Göttingen 2005, 155-73.
Rubio, Lisardo: Los Balbos y el Imperio romano, in: Anales de Historia Antigua y Medieval, Buenos Aires
1949, 93.
Wiegels, Rainer: Die römischen Senatoren und Ritter aus den hispanischen Provinzen bis Diokletian, Diss.
Solingen 1971, Nr. 35.
Zeidler, Jürgen: Onomastic Studies on Some Roman Amici in Hispania, in: Altay Coskun (Hg.): Roms
auswärtige Freunde in der späten Republik und im frühen Prinzipat, Göttingen 2005, 175-200, 178-80.
JL/29.09.04–r/28.06.07/17.04.10
Balbus (IV.) aus Gades = L. Cornelius P. f. Balbus cos. suff. 32
0. Onomastisches
S. Balbus (II.) aus Gades.
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
Belegt zwischen a. 72 v.Chr. und 13 n.Chr.; Sohn des P. Cornelius L. f. Balbus (III.); Neffe
des L. Cornelius L. f. Balbus (II.); Enkel des L. Cornelius Balbus (I.) mit denen er a. 72 das
römische Bürgerrecht erhielt. Vater der Cornelia, Gattin des C. Norbanus Flaccus cos. 24
(CIL VI 16357); Großvater des C. Norbanus Flaccus cos. a. 15 n.Chr und L. Norbanus
Balbus cos. a. 19 n.Chr.; consul suffectus a. 32; pontifex.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Erhielt a. 72 zusammen mit seinem Vater, seinem Großvater und seinem Onkel von Cn.
Pompeius Magnus das römische Bürgerrecht (Plin. nat. 5,36). Im Bürgerkrieg schloß er sich,
nicht zuletzt wegen der politischen Stellung seines Onkels, C. Iulius Caesar an. Beteiligung
an den Feldzügen in Illyrien, Ägypten und Hispanien (Caes. civ. 3,19,7; Vell. 2,51,3; Cic. Att.
11,12,1=223 ShB). Von a. 49-48 mehrere Missionen zu L. Cornelius Lentulus Crus cos. 49
(Vell. 2,51,3; Cic. Att. 8,9a,2=160 ShB), zu dem die Balbi gute Beziehungen pflegten (Cic.
Att. 8,15a=165A ShB).
Lokalmagistrat in seiner Heimatstadt Gades und quaest. Hisp. Ult. 43 unter C. Asinius Pollio.
Laut Pollio war er in der Provinz wegen seiner Grausamkeit und Selbstherrlichkeit verhaßt.
Dort soll er zudem Gelder unterschlagen und sich daraufhin zu Bogud, König von
Mauretanien, abgesetzt haben (Pollio bei Cic. fam. 10,32,1-5=415 ShB). Sorgte in Gades für
den Aufbau neuer Stadtteile und eines neuen Hafens (Strab. geogr. 12,5,1 [566]). Pontifex
wohl noch vor a. 41 (Rubio 1950, 192, Anm.105). Propraet. zwischen a. 41 und 38,
wahrscheinlich ebenfalls in der Hispania Ulterior (MRR II 381; Rubio 1950, 188).
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
137
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Cos. suff. 32 (CIL I2 160). Procos. Afr. 21; feierte nach seinem Sieg über die Garamanten als
erster Nichtitaliker einen Triumph (CIL I2 50 bzw. 181). Errichtung des sog. Theatrum Balbi
in Rom a. 13 n.Chr (Suet. Aug. 29; Cass. Dio 66,24,2). Patron von Norba Caesarina (Hispania
Antiqua Epigraphica, Nr. 1852).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Groag, E.: L. Cornelius Balbus der Jüngere [70], RE 4,1, 1900, 1268-1271.
Elvers, Karl-Ludwig: L. Cornelius Balbus [I 7], DNP 3, 1997, 169.
Caballos Rufino, Antonio: Los senadores de origen hispano durante la república romana, in: Julián González
(Hg.): Estudios sobre Urso Colonia Iulia Genetiva, Sevilla 1989, 233-79, bes. 254-56.
Castillo, Carmen: Los senadores béticos. Relaciones familiares y sociales, in: Epigrafia e ordine senatorio, Atti
del colloquio internazionale AIEGL (Tituli 5), Bd. 2, Rom 1982, 465-519, bes. 498f.
Curchin, Leonard A.: The Magistrates of Roman Spain, Toronto 1990, 146f.
Lamberty, John: Amicus Caesaris. Der Aufstieg des L. Cornelius Balbus aus Gades, in: Altay Coskun (Hg.):
Roms auswärtige Freunde in der späten Republik und im frühen Prinzipat, Göttingen 2005, 155-73.
Rodríguez Neila, Juan Francisco: Los Balbos de Cádiz. Dos españoles en la Roma de César y Augusto, Sevilla
1973.
Rubio, Lisardo: Los Balbos y el Imperio romano, in: Anales de Historia Antigua y Medieval, Buenos Aires
1949, 67-119 und 1950, 142-99.
Weinrib, Joseph E.: The Spaniards in Rome. From Marius to Domitian, New York 1990, 61-76.
Wiegels, Rainer: Die römischen Senatoren und Ritter aus den hispanischen Provinzen bis Diokletian, Diss.
Solingen 1971, Nr. 36.
Zeidler, Jürgen: Onomastic Studies on Some Roman Amici in Hispania, in: Altay Coskun (Hg.): Roms
auswärtige Freunde in der späten Republik und im frühen Prinzipat, Göttingen 2005, 175-200, 178-80.
JL/29.09.04–r/28.06.07/17.04.10
Berenike IV. Thea, Königin von Ägypten
0. Onomastisches
Ein weiterer Kult- bzw. Herrscherbeiname lautet Epiphanes.
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemmata Ptolemäer
Ca. 78/75-55. Älteste und einzig legitime Tochter von Ptolemaios XII. und dessen
Schwestergattin Kleopatra V. Tryphaina; a. 58-55 Königin von Ägypten. Auf Befehl ihres
Vaters ermordet.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Nach Vertreibung ihres Vaters aus Ägypten übernahm sie a. 58 zunächst zusammen mit ihrer
Mutter die Regierungsgeschäfte in Alexandreia (Cass. Dio 39,57,1). Die Alexandriner
tolerierten wohl keine weibliche Alleinherrschaft. Nach dem Tod der Mutter a. 57 Heirat mit
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
138
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Seleukos Kybiosaktes, dem Bruder des Antiochos XIII. Philadelphos (Asiatikos), der nach
wenigen Tagen auf Befehl Berenikes ermordet wurde (Strab. geogr. 17,1,11 [796]; Cass. Dio
39,57,2). Zweite Ehe mit Archelaos, Priester von Komana Pontike, der a. 56 zum König der
Ägypter gekrönt wurde (Liv. per. 105; Strab. geogr. 17,1,11 [796]); Im Kampf gegen das
Heer des A. Gabinius getötet. Berenike wurde nach der Restauration ihres Vaters a. 55 auf
dessen Befehl hingerichtet (Strab. geogr. 17,1,11 [796]; Cass. Dio 39,58,3).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Wilcken, Ulrich: Berenike [14], RE 3,1, 1897, 286f.
Ameling, Walter: Berenike [7], DNP 2, 1997, 568.
Bennet, Chris: The Ptolemaic Dynasty, Tyndale House, Cambridge 2001-2009.
URL: http://www.tyndalehouse.com/Egypt/ptolemies/ptolemies.htm [20.02.10].
Bloedow, Edmund: Beiträge zur Geschichte Ptolemaios’ XII., Diss. Würzburg 1964, 68-71;75.
Hölbl, Günther: Geschichte des Ptolemäerreiches, Darmstadt 1994, 201-3.
Huß, Werner: Ägypten in hellenistischer Zeit, 332-30 v.Chr., München 2001, 692-95.
Olshausen, Eckart: Rom und Ägypten von 116 bis 51 v.Chr., Diss. Erlangen 1963, 58-62.
Siani-Davies, Mary: Ptolemy XII Auletes and the Romans, Historia 46, 1997, 306-40.
Sullivan, Richard D.: Near Eastern Royalty and Rome, 100-30 B.C., Toronto 1990, 239-43.
KC/30.09.04–r/30.09.04/20.02.10
Berenike die Ältere, Ehefrau des judäischen Prinzen Aristobulos = Iulia Berenike
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemmata Herodianer
Tochter des Kostobar und der Salome, verheiratet mit dem Prinzen Aristobulos (III.), dem
Sohn Herodes’ I. von Judäa, mit dem sie die Söhne Agrippa (I.), Herodes (Philoklaudios) und
Aristobulos (IV.) sowie die Töchter Herodias und Mariamme (PIR2 M 277) bekam (Ios. bell.
Iud. 1,552; ant. Iud. 17,12). In den familieninternen Intrigen unter der Herrschaft Herodes’ I.
verriet sie nach Ios. ant. Iud. 16,201-205 Lästereien des Aristobulos gegen seinen Vater an
ihre Mutter Salome. Nach der Hinrichtung des Aristobulos 7 v.Chr. wurde sie von Herodes I.
dem Bruder seiner Ehefrau Doris verheiratet (Ios. bell. Iud. 1,553.566, wahrscheinlich
Theudion, Ios. ant. Iud. 17,70). Sie starb wohl in den 20er Jahren des 1. Jh. n.Chr. (Ios. ant.
Iud. 18,145).
2. Verhältnis zu Rom / Römern und Karriereverlauf
Nach Ios. ant. Iud. 18,143.165 verband sie eine enge Freundschaft mit Antonia minor.
Gemäß Strab. 16,2,46 (765) bedachte Augustus sie bei der Verteilung des Nachlasses des
Herodes I. Nach ihrem Tod ging ihr Freigelassener Protos testamentarisch in den Dienst der
Antonia über (Ios. ant. Iud. 18,156).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
139
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Stähelin, Felix: Berenike [20], RE Suppl. 3, 1918, 203.
DNP –
2
PIR B 108.
Kokkinos, Nikos: The Herodian Dynasty. Origins, Role in Society and Eclipse, Sheffield 1998.
Schürer, Emil: Geschichte des jüdischen Volkes im Zeitalter Jesu Christi, Bd. 1, Leipzig 1901.
JW/25.02.10 – r/02.03.10
Berenike die Jüngere von Judäa, Tochter Agrippas I. = Iulia Berenike
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemmata Herodianer
Berenike wurde 28/29 n.Chr. als Tochter Agrippas I. und der Kypros geboren (Ios. bell. Iud.
2,220; ant. Iud. 19,354). Mit 12 bzw. 13 Jahren wurde sie mit dem jüdischen Geschäftsmann
Marcus Iulius Alexander (PIR2 J 138) aus Alexandria verheiratet (Ios. ant. Iud. 19,276f.), der
jedoch kurz darauf verstarb. Berenike heiratete danach ihren Onkel Herodes (Philoklaudios),
den neuen König von Chalkis (Ios. bell. Iud. 2,217.221; ant. Iud. 19,277.354). Mit diesem
bekam sie die zwei Söhne Hyrkanus (PIR2 H 246) und Berenikianos (PIR2 B 109) (Ios. bell.
Iud. 2,221; ant. Iud. 20,104). Nach dem Tod des Herodes a. 48 lebte Berenike bei ihrem
Bruder Agrippa II.; Gerüchte über eine inzestuöse Beziehung der beiden verbreiteten sich
(Ios. ant. Iud. 20,145; Iuv. sat. 6,158). Um a. 63 heiratete sie Polemon II. von Pontus, doch
hielt die Ehe nicht lange an, und Berenike kehrte nach der Scheidung zu Agrippa II. zurück
(Ios. ant. Iud. 20,145f.).
2. Verhältnis zu Rom / Römern und Karriereverlauf
Während ihrer Zeit bei ihrem Bruder Agrippa II. trat sie offenbar als dessen Mitregentin auf
(vgl. Ios. bell. Iud. 2,344.402 405.426.595; vita 48-50; 126; 180f.; Apg 25,13.23; AE 1928,
Nr. 82). So besuchte sie gemeinsam mit ihm den neuen Statthalter Porcius Festus in Caesarea
Maritim (Apg 25,13f.) und war beim Verhör des Apostel Paulus zugegen (Apg 25,23; 26,30).
Beim Ausbruch der Unruhen in Judäa a. 66 hielt sich Berenike wegen eines religiösen
Gelübdes in Jerusalem auf und versuchte vergeblich, den Procurator Gessius Florus zur
Deeskalation zu bewegen (Ios. bell. Iud. 2,309-314). Sie beklagte sich daraufhin schriftlich
über Florus beim syrischen Legaten C. Cestius Gallus (cos. suff. 42 n.Chr.) (Ios. bell. Iud.
2,333) und trat bei der Rede Agrippas, mit der er die Jerusalemer Bevölkerung vom Aufstand
abbringen wollte, gemeinsam mit ihm auf (Ios. bell. Iud. 2,344.402).
Wohl während des Jüdischen Krieges begann Berenike eine Liebesbeziehung zum Caesar
Titus (vgl. Tac. hist. 2,81). Im Jahr 75 reiste sie gemeinsam mit Agrippa II. nach Rom und
wohnte bei Titus auf dem Palatin, musste jedoch aufgrund der massiven Opposition gegen
ihre Anwesenheit abreisen (Suet. Tit. 7,1f.; Cass. Dio 65,15,4f.; Ps. Aur. Vict. epit. Caes.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
140
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
10,4-7). Wahrscheinlich ist dem ausführlicheren Bericht des Cassius Dio zu folgen, nach dem
Berenike nach der Erhebung des Titus zum Princeps noch einmal nach Rom reiste, dieser sie
wegen der öffentlichen Proteste aber erneut fortschicken musste (Cass. Dio 65,18,1).
Quintilian berichtet, er habe einst Königin Berenike in einem Prozess vertreten, dem sie in
eigener Sache selbst vorsaß (fuerunt etiam quidam suarum rerum iudices. (...) et ego pro
regina Berenice apud ipsam eam dixi), ohne dass die näheren Umstände bekannt wären
(Quint. inst. 4,1,18f.). Die Inschrift AE 1928, Nr. 82 aus Berytus nennt sie gemeinsam mit
ihrem Bruder Agrippa II.; in Athen wurde für sie eine Ehrenstatue errichtet, deren Inschrift
erhalten ist (OGIS 428 = IG III 556 = CIG 361). Ob sie den sowohl in epigraphischen als
auch literarischen Quellen belegten Titel basilissa / regina durch ihren Vater Agrippa I. oder
ihre Ehemänner Herodes II. bzw. Polemon II. erhalten hat oder ob es sich allein um eine
Ehrung aufgrund ihrer Abkunft handelt, ist nicht endgültig zu entscheiden.
3. Auswahbibliographie
Wilcken, Ulrich: Berenike [15], RE 3,1, 1897, 287-289.
Strothmann, Mereth: Iulia Berenike [7b], DNP online.
URL: http://www.brillonline.nl/subscriber/entry?entry=dnp_e12220270 [25.02.10]
PIR2 J 651.
Braund, David: Berenice in Rome, Historia 33, 1984, 120-123.
Crook, John A.: Titus and Berenice, AJPh 72, 1951, 162-175.
Haensch, Rudolf: Die deplazierte Königin. Zur Inschrift AE 1928, 82 aus Berytus, Chiron 36, 2006, 141-149.
Keaveney, Arthur: Berenice at Rome, MH 60, 2003, 39-43.
Kokkinos, Nikos: The Herodian Dynasty. Origins, Role in Society and Eclipse, Sheffield 1998.
Krieger, Klaus-Stefan: Berenike, die Schwester König Agrippas II., bei Flavius Josephus, JSJ 28, 1997, 1-11.
Macurdy, Grace H.: Julia Berenice, AJPh 56, 1935, 246-253.
Rogers, Perry M.: Titus, Berenice and Mucianus, Historia 29, 1980, 86-95.
Schürer, Emil, Geschichte des jüdischen Volkes im Zeitalter Jesu Christi, Bd. 1, Leipzig 1901.
Wilker, Julia, Für Rom und Jerusalem. Die herodianische Dynastie im 1. Jahrhundert n.Chr., Frankfurt/M. 2007.
Wilker, Julia: Principes et reges. Das persönliche Nahverhältnis zwischen Princeps und Klientelherrschern und
seine Auswirkungen im frühen Prinzipat, in: Altay Coskun (Hg.): Freundschaft und Gefolgschaft in den
auswärtigen Beziehungen der Römer (2. Jahrhundert v.Chr. - 1. Jahrhundert n.Chr.), Frankfurt/M. 2008,
165-188.
Young-Widmaier, Michael R.: Quintilian’s Legal Representation of Julia Berenice, Historia 51, 2002, 124-129.
JW/04.03.10 – r/06.03.10
Blesamios, Vertrauter des Deiotaros (I.) Philorhomaios
0. Onomastisches
Holder 1, 1896, 451f. erinnert an die keltische Göttin Belisama und verweist auf norditalische
Belege für Blesamus. Ein nichttheophores, keltisches Motiv der 'Stärke' postuliert dagegen
Coskun 2007, Teil A Anm. 50.
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
141
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Vermutlich galatischer Aristokrat; belegt a. 45; s. 2.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Gesandter des Deiotaros (I.) Philorhomaios zu C. Iulius Caesar in Tarraco a. 45; Bittgesuch
um die Rückerstattung der Trokmertetrarchie an seinen König (Cic. Deiot. 38). In seinem
Gefolge befand sich Antiogonos. Begleitete den Diktator nach Rom. Verbürgte sich dort im
Nov. 45 für seinen König, der Attentats- und Verratsklagen ausgesetzt wurde (Cic. Deiot. 41).
Vermutlich Gast des Cn. Domitius Calvinus cos. 54, procos. Asiae 48-46 (Cic. Deiot. 32).
Erstattete aus Rom brieflich Bericht an Deiotaros (Cic. Deiot. 33; 42). M. Tullius Cicero,
Caesar und anderen in Kleinasien tätig gewesenen Beamten schon von früher gut bekannt
(Cic. Deiot. 41): corpora sua pro salute regum suorum hi legati tibi regii tradunt, Hieras et
Blesamius et Antigonus, tibi nobisque omnibus iam diu noti. Verkehrte auch vertraulich mit
Cicero (Cic. Att. 16,3,6=413 ShB a. 44).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Klebs, Elimar: Blesamios, RE 3,1, 1897, 569.
DNP –.
Holder, Alfred: Alt-celtischer Sprachschatz, Bd. 1, Leipzig 1896.
Stähelin, Felix: Geschichte der kleinasiatischen Galater, 21907, Nd. Osnabrück 1973, 94 Anm. 2.
Hoben, Wolfgang: Untersuchungen zur Stellung kleinasiatischer Dynasten in den Machtkämpfen der
ausgehenden römischen Republik, Diss. Mainz 1969, 109.
Coskun, Altay: Amicitiae und politische Ambitionen im Kontext der causa Deiotariana, in: ders. (Hg.): Roms
auswärtige Freunde in der späten Republik und im frühen Prinzipat, Göttingen 2005, 127-54, bes. 129; 138.
Coskun, Altay: Von der ‘Geißel Asiens’ zu ‘kaiserfrommen’ Reichsbewohnern. Studien zur politischen und
gesellschaftlichen Entwicklung der Galater unter besonderer Berücksichtigung der amicitia populi Romani
und der göttlichen Verehrung des Augustus (3. Jh. v.–2. Jh. n.Chr.), unveröff. Habil. Trier 2007, Teil A und
C.
AC/14.09.04–r/23.06.07
Boethos von Tarsos
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
Sowohl das genaue Geburts- und Todesjahr des Boethos (sicher nach 31 v.Chr.) als auch sein
Geburts- und Todesort (s.u.) sind unbekannt. Zwischen 42 und 31 v.Chr. war er bereits ein
erwachsener Mann, ein Vertrauter (philos) des Triumvirn Marcus Antonius und über Jahre in
dessen Auftrag der entscheidende Mann in der Regierung der Polis Tarsos. Die Namen der
Eltern, oder möglicherweise von Ehefrau(en) und Kind(ern) des Boethos sind ebenfalls nicht
bekannt.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
142
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Durch Kontributionen und Einquartierungen in den Wirren der römischen Bürgerkriege nach
Caesars Ermordung zwischen 44 und der Schlacht von Philippi 42 zunächst schwer belastet,
wurde Tarsos von M. Antonius reichlich entschädigt. Appian (civ. 5,7; Cass. Dio 47,31,1–4)
berichtet, daß Tarsos damals eine civitas libera et immunis wurde. Antonius setzte dort
zwischen 42 und 31 Boethos als einen seiner ‘Freunde’ (philoi) als Stadtherrscher ein. (Strab.
geogr. 14,5,14 C674f.; vgl. Reitzenstein 1897, 61, Franco 2006, 322-324, sowie Engels 2008).
Der Geograph und Historiker Strabon, unsere einzige aussagekräftige Quelle über Boethos’
Karriere, ist gegenüber den meisten Günstlingen des Antonius feindselig eingestellt. Dies
beeinflußt auch sein Urteil über Boethos, den er – im absichtsvollen Kontrast zu dem
überschwenglichen Lob für den Stoiker Athenodoros und den Akademiker Nestor – als einen
kakos poiētēs und kakos politēs beschimpft (geogr. 14,5,14 C674). Die literarischen
Qualitäten des Boethos können heute nicht mehr sicher beurteilt werden, da sich von seinem
enkomiastischen Epos mit dem (erschlossenen) Titel Eis tēn en Philippois nikēn (FGrH 194 F
1) keine Überreste erhalten haben. Jede Identifikation des Boethos mit homonymen antiken
Dichtern bleibt rein spekulativ. Immerhin gesteht aber selbst Strabon dem Boethos eine „bei
den Tarsiern verbreitete Geschicklichkeit, ohne zu stocken sofort zu jedem gegebenen Thema
zu improvisieren“ zu.
Welche Ämter Boethos in Tarsos übernommen hat und auf welche institutionelle Grundlage
neben seinem Einfluß in der Volksversammlung sich seine Macht in der Stadt stützte, bleibt
unklar. Strabon erwähnt als einziges Amt die (Vize-) Gymnasiarchie. Die Handschriften der
Geographika Strabons überliefern an dieser Stelle antigymnasiarchon in einem Wort. Dies
hat auch Radt Bd. 4, 2005, 112, in seinen Text übernommen. Allerdings hatte z.B. bereits
Kramer 1852, 163, die minimale, aber inhaltlich folgenreiche Änderung anti gymnasiarchou
bevorzugt. Danach hätte dann Antonius den Boethos in irgendeiner anderen offiziellen
Funktion anstelle eines Gymnasiarchen eingesetzt. Entscheidend dürfte ohnehin der
informelle Einfluß durch das persönliche Freundschaftsverhältnis zu Antonius gewesen sein.
Strabon erzählt noch von einer Unterschlagung, in die Boethos verwickelt gewesen sei,
jedoch von Antonius freigesprochen wurde und dann weiterhin „die Stadt bis zum Sturz des
Antonius ausgeplündert“ habe.
Augustus hat den Boethos als Leiter der Politik von Tarsos nicht unmittelbar nach dem Sieg
von Actium ausgewechselt. Denn der Nachfolger in der Stadtregierung von Tarsos,
Athenodoros, war bis nach 31/30 noch in Rom am Kaiserhof (vgl. Franco 2006, 324). Als
Athenodoros nach Tarsos kam, nutzte er ihm von Augustus erteilte Sondervollmachten und
vertrieb Boethos (geogr. 14,5,14 C674). Boethos starb nach 31/30 v.Chr. und möglicherweise
im Exil in Lykien, sofern sich eine Grabinschrift aus Telmessos auf ihn beziehen sollte (TAM
II 49), in der ein Boethos (ohne Vatersnamen oder Heimatangabe) als anēr musorrytos gelobt
wird.
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Reitzenstein, R.: Boethos [3], RE III 1, 1897, 601.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
143
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Engels, J.: Athenodoros, Boethos und Nestor: ‘Vorsteher der Regierung’ in Tarsos und Freunde führender
Römer, in: A. Coskun (Hg.): Freundschaft und Gefolgschaft in den auswärtigen Beziehungen der Römer (2.
Jh. v.Chr. – 1. Jh. n.Chr.), Frankfurt a.M. 2008, 109-132.
Franco, C.: Tarso tra Antonio e Ottaviano (Strabone 14,5,14), Rudiae 18, 2006, 311-339.
Kramer, G.: Strabonis Geographica, Bd. III, Berlin 1852.
Radt, S.: Strabons Geographika, 4 Bde., Göttingen 2002-2005.
Ruge, W.: Tarsos Nr. 3, RE IV A 2, 1932, 2413-2439.
JE/14.08.08-r/25.08.08
Bogodiataros, trokmischer Dynast von Mithridation (?)
0. Onomastisches
Strab. geogr. 12,5,2 nennt den von Pompeius mit der Festung Mithridation belohnten Trokmer
Bogodiataros. Dies wird mit Blick auf die früheren und späteren Zeugnisse für den
Tetrarchen der Trokmer Brogitaros regelmäßig und vielleicht auch zu Recht als
Verschreibung gewertet. Dennoch ist festzuhalten, dass sich auch die überlieferte Form
keltisch etymologisieren lässt: bogo- (Freeman, GL 20 bogi- ‘battle’; Delamarre, DLG2 82
boios ‘frappeur’); di- (Delamarre, DLG2 143 ‘de, ex’), oder vielleicht eher dia- als Nebenform
zu dio-, divo-, devo- ‚Gott‘, vgl. Dia-coxie (Dat. fem., Noricum CIL III 4857) ‚Deren Fuß
göttlich ist‘ (Hinweis von JZ); taro- ‚qui traverse‘ (Delamarre, DLG2 291) oder tarvos ‚Stier‘
(Freeman, GL 22 taro-; Delamarre, DLG2 291f.). -dia-taros wäre dann eine Variante zu Deiotaros, während das erste Element im weiblichen Leitnamen der Dynastie (s. Adobogiona [I.])
bezeugt ist.
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stammbaum
Sollte Bogodiataros also existiert haben, dürfte es sich um einen nahen Verwandten des
Brogitaros (vielleicht um seinen Sohn?), des Sohnes und Schwiegersohnes je eines Deiotaros
sowie Bruders und Ehemanns je einer Adobogiona handeln. Er wäre zur Zeit der Neuordnung
des Ostens durch Pompeius 65/63 v.Chr. erwachsen gewesen.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Es ist anzunehmen, dass Pompeius mit der Überlassung der Festung Mithridation treue
Dienste des Bogodiataros (oder doch des Brogitaros?) belohnte.
3. Auswahlbibliographie
RE –. DNP –.
Coskun, Altay: Art. Brogitaros, in APR 03, 2010.
Delamarre, Xavier: Dictionnaire de la langue gauloise, Paris 2001, 22003. (DLG2)
Freeman, Philip: The Galatian Language. A Comprehensive Survey of the Language of the Ancient Celts in
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
144
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Greco-Roman Asia Minor, Lewiston/NY 2001.
AC/07.07.10
Brigatos, König von Galatien
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemma Galater / Deiotaros
Bezeugt als Vater des galatischen Tetrarchen Amyntas (II.) unter den Ahnen des G. Iulios
Severos cos. suff. 138 (OGIS II 544=Bosch, QGA 105f. a. 114/138 nC) sowie als Vater des
Kastor (IV.), des ersten Ankyraner Sebastos-Priesters a. 4/3 (OGIS II 533=Bosch, QGA 51,
mit der Chronologie von Coskun 2007, Teil G.III). Durch genealogische Kombination erweist
er sich als Sohn des Deiotaros (II.) Philopator und Bruder Kastors (III.), des Königs von
Paphlagonien, der entgegen Cass. Dio 48,33,5 vielleicht gar nicht über Galatien geherrscht
hat. Wahrscheinlich war vielmehr Brigatos König von Galatien a. 41/40-37/36; vgl. Coskun
2007, Teil E.IV. Abweichend schreibt Mitchell I 1993, 93; 107f. Brigatos die Herrschaft über
Amaseia zu; vgl. Strab. geogr. 12,3,39 [561] zur vorübergehenden Unterstellung der Stadt
unter „Könige“.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Aus der Chronologie ergibt sich, daß M. Antonius beim Tod von Brigatos’ Großvater
Deiotaros (I.) Philorhomaios das Erbrecht der Enkel anerkannte. Er teilte das Deiotaros-Reich
nach einem Tausch von Ostpontos, das an Dareios fiel, mit Paphlagonien, das durch das etwa
gleichzeitige Ableben des Dynasten Attalos vakant wurde. Womöglich kamen schon damals
weitere Gebiete hinzu, die erst unter der Herrschaft des Amyntas (I.) bezeugt sind; vgl.
Coskun 2007, Teil H.
3. Auswahlbibliographie
RE –. DNP –.
Coskun, Altay: Von der ‘Geißel Asiens’ zu ‘kaiserfrommen’ Reichsbewohnern. Studien zur politischen und
gesellschaftlichen Entwicklung der Galater unter besonderer Berücksichtigung der amicitia populi Romani
und der göttlichen Verehrung des Augustus (3. Jh. v.–2. Jh. n.Chr.), unveröff. Habil. Trier 2007, Teil E.IV.
Mitchell, Stephen: Anatolia. Land, Men, and Gods in Asia Minor, Bd. 1: The Celts in Anatolia and the Impact of
Roman Rule, Oxford 1993, 93; 107f.
Settipani, Christian: Continuité gentilice et continuité familiale dans les familles sénatoriales romaines à
l’époque impériale. Mythe et réalité, Oxford 2000, 463-67.
Stähelin, Felix: Geschichte der kleinasiatischen Galater, 21907, Nd. Osnabrück 1973, 112.
AC/03.07.07
Brithagoras of Heraclea Pontica
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
145
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
0. Onomastic Issues
The name is attested only in Memnon (FGrH 434 F 1.35,40). The feminine Brithagorē is
attested epigraphically at Sinope (IK Sinope 71) and Apollonia in Thrace (IGBulg I2 413 =
SEG LII 676).
1. Central Biographical Dates and Family Relations
Brithagoras is mentioned as one of the leading citizens in 1st-century-BC Heraclea by the
local historian Memnon (FGrH 434 F 1), who is our only source for his life and career.
Brithagoras features in Memnon’s narrative on three occasions: when he tried to persuade
Konnakorex, the commander of the Mithridatic garrison quartered at Heraclea, not to betray
the city to C. Valerius Triarius and M. Aurelius Cotta, in 74/73 (35), when he returned to
Heraclea in the Sixties after several years spent in Rome (40), and when he approached Julius
Caesar on behalf of the city in the Fifties and Forties (40).
Memnon also mentions Brithagoras’ son Propylos (40), who joined him on his mission to
Caesar. Memnon states that Brithagoras died in old age, presumably in 47 (or 45?) BC.
2. Relations with Rome / Romans and Career
It is not known what city magistracies Brithagoras held, although it is virtually certain that he
did hold some. He was certainly in Rome around 67 BC, when Thrasymedes gave a speech on
the conduct of M. Aurelius Cotta (cos. 74) in the sack of Heraclea and caused his expulsion
from the Senate. In fact, Memnon’s text suggests that Brithagoras was among the Heraclean
prisoners that were freed when Cotta fell into disgrace. He stayed in Rome with Thrasymedes
and Propylos for some time after the end of the negotiations (40).
Upon his return to his hometown, he endeavoured to restore its freedom and autonomy.
Instead of leading another mission to the Senate, he chose to approach Julius Caesar, the
man who appeared to be the most influential in Rome at the time. It is unnecessary to assume,
though, that he went on his mission to Caesar in an official capacity. If Memnon’s chronology
is correct, the likeliest date for the mission is 59 BC, the year of Caesar’s first consulship; but
this squares badly with Memnon’s comment that by that time the government of Rome was in
the hands of a sole individual. It is possible that this passage is marred by an anachronism,
and Memnon’s knowledge of the political and constitutional history of the late Republic is at
any rate far from impeccable.
Memnon states that Brithagoras first became an “acquaintance” of Caesar (gnōstheis), and
later “managed to enter more closely into friendship” with him (diapraxamenos engyterō tē
filia proselthein). Caesar set off on campaign shortly after Brithagoras’ visit, and Brithagoras
joined him, accompanied by his son Propylos. Caesar’s decision to allow them to stay in his
retinue was seen as a sign of his intention to grant freedom to Heraclea in due course. Just as
Caesar was planning to return to Rome (presumably in 47, or possibly even in 45, after
Munda) and the award of the freedom grant seemed a real possibility, Brithagoras died. The
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
146
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
narrative of these events coincided with the end of the sixteenth book of Memnon (and of the
second octad of his work); Photius did not have access to the following section of the work,
which may have shed light on the development of the juridical status of the city.
3. Select Bibliography
RE –. DNP –.
Desideri, Paolo: I Romani visti dall’Asia: riflessioni sulla sezione romana della Storia di Eraclea di Memnone, in
G. Urso (ed.): Tra Oriente e Occidente. Indigeni, Greci e Romani in Asia Minore, Pisa 2007, 45-59, esp.
57f.
Dueck, Daniela: Memnon of Herakleia on Rome and the Romans, in J.M. Højte (ed.): Mithridates VI and the
Pontic Kingdom, Aarhus 2009, 43-61, esp. 55.
Janke, Manfred: Historische Untersuchungen zu Memnon von Herakleia. Kap. 18-40, FgrHist Nr. 434, Diss.
Würzburg 1963, 128.
Malitz, Jürgen: Die Kanzlei Caesars: Herrschaftsorganisation zwischen Republik und Prinzipat, Historia 36,
1987, 51-72, esp. 63, n. 82.
Millar, Fergus: The Emperor in the Roman World, London 1977, 31.
Quass, Friedemann: Die Honoratiorenschicht in den Städten des griechischen Ostens, Stuttgart 1993, 144f., n.
347.
Santangelo, Federico: Memnone di Eraclea e il dominio romano in Asia Minore, Simblos 4, 2004, 247-261, esp.
260f.
Santangelo, Federico: With or Without You: Some Late Hellenistic Narratives of Contemporary History, Scripta
Classica Israelica 28, 2009, 57-78, esp. 71.
FS 16.03.10–r/17.03.10
Brogitaros Philorhomaios, Tetrarch und König der galatischen Trokmer [Var.
Bogodiataros (?)]
0. Onomastisches
Brogitaros (bei Cicero, s. unten 2.) ist ein keltischer Kompositionsname. Er bestehend aus den
Elementen brogi- ‚Distrikt‘, ‚Territorium‘ (vgl. Freeman, GL 20f.; Delamarre, DLG2, 91: „est
plus sûrement un ‘Traverseur-de-Frontière, marche-frontière’ … qu’un ‘Taureau-deFrontière’“) und taro- ‚qui traverse‘ (Delamarre, DLG2 291) oder tarvos ‚Stier‘ (Freeman, GL
22 taro-; Delamarre, DLG2 291f.). Letzteres Element findet sich unter anderem auch im
Namen seines Vaters (bzw. seines gleichnamigen Schwiegervaters) Deiotaros.
Strab. geogr. 12,5,2 nennt den von Pompeius mit der Festung Mithridation belohnten Trokmer
indes Bogodiataros. Dies wird mit Blick auf die früheren und späteren Zeugnisse für
Brogitaros als Tetrarchen der Trokmer regelmäßig und vielleicht auch zu Recht als
Verschreibung gewertet. Dennoch ist festzuhalten, dass sich auch diese Form keltisch
etymologisieren lässt: bogo- (Freeman 2001, 20 bogi- ‘battle’; Delamarre 2003, 82 boios
‘frappeur’); di- (Delamarre 2003, 143 ‘de, ex’), oder vielleicht eher dia- als Nebenform zu
dio-, divo-, devo- ‚Gott‘, vgl. Dia-coxie (Dat. fem., Noricum CIL III 4857) ‚Deren Fuß
göttlich ist‘ (Hinweis von JZ); -dia-taros wäre dann eine Variante zu Deio-taros, während das
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
147
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
erste Element im weiblichen Leitnamen der Dynastie (s. Adobogiona [I.]) bezeugt ist.
Womöglich ist Bogodiataros also ein naher Verwandter, vielleicht ein Sohn des Brogitaros.
Der Herrscherbeiname Philorhōmaios ist allein durch die Legende (Basileōs Brogitaru
Philorhōmaiu) der einzigen von ihm erhaltenen Münze bezeugt: Mionnet IV S. 405 Nr. 12. Er
dürfte auf die Verleihung der Königswürde durch die römische Volksversammlung 58 v.Chr.
zurückgehen, s. unter 2.
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stammbaum
Sohn eines nicht weiter bekannten Deiotaros, der nicht mit Brogitaros’ Schwiegervater
Deiotaros I. zu verwechseln ist. Brogitaros dürfte zwischen 115 und 100 v.Chr. geboren
worden sein, denn als er und seine Schwester Adobogiōna (I.) um a. 90 als Stifter dreier
Phialen in Didyma hervortraten, scheinen beide noch unverheiratet gewesen zu sein. Vgl.
IvDidyma 475 ed. Rehm/Harder S. 277f. = Bringmann/von Steuben I 1995, 329-331 Nr. 276,
bes. Z. 35-41: „Brogitaros, Sohn des Deiotaros, Tetrarch der galatischen Trokmer, und seine
Schwester Abadogiona (sic) (haben mich) dem Apoll von Didyma, dem schon ihr Vater
verbunden gewesen war (Apollōni Didymei patrōiōi), als Dankesgeschenk (gestiftet).“ Zur
Datierung vgl. neben Rehm (um 100, vor 89) auch Coskun 2007, Teil B.
Die enge Bindung der Dynastie an Pergamon zeigt sich nicht nur durch die Heirat seiner
Schwester mit dem Priester Menodotos, sondern auch durch das dortige Auftreten seiner
späteren Gattin Adobogiona (II.) als Euergetin (Ippel 1912, 294 Nr. 20).
Auf die Bestätigung der Tetrarchenwürde ca. 66/64 v.Chr. folgte 58 die Ernennung zum
König. Sein letztes Lebenszeichen fällt ins Jahr 53, s. im folgenden.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Dass Brogitaros und seine Schwester Anfang der 80er Jahre in der Lage waren, als Euergeten
in griechischen Poleis aufzutreten (s.o. 1 sowie unter Adobogiona [I.]; zudem OGIS I 349:
Pitanen am Hermos), könnte daran liegen, dass sie besondere Förderung seitens des
Mithradates VI. Eupator von Pontos erfuhren. Damals verbrachte Adobogiona I. eine gewisse
Zeit als Mätresse am Hof jenes Königs. Ihren wenig später geborenen Sohn nannte sie
ebenfalls Mithradates (VII.) (von Pergamon). Entgegen der traditionellen Sicht, welche die
trokmische Landnahme ins 3. Jh. v.Chr. datiert, könnten die Trokmer erst unter Mithradates
das Land östlich des Halys und um Tavion in Besitz genommen haben; jedenfalls sind sie vor
dessen Herrschaftszeit dort nicht nachgewiesen (vgl. bes. Liv. 38,16ff.; Plin. nat. 5,146;
Coskun 2007). Des Weiteren ist unsicher, ob bereits der Vater des Brogitaros den
Tetrarchentitel geführt bzw. über die Trokmer geherrscht hat oder Brogitaros seinen Aufstieg
vielleicht erst Mithradates verdankte.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
148
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Unklar ist, welche Rolle Brogitaros im Verlauf des Ersten Mithradatischen Krieges spielte. Es
ist nicht ausdrücklich bezeugt, dass er sich im Jahr 86 unter den zunächst als Gäste, dann als
Geiseln gehaltenen galatischen Aristokraten am Hof des Königs in Pergamon aufhielt. Ebenso
wenig begegnet sein Name im Zusammenhang mit der Verschwörung des Eporedorix, des
Tetrarchen der Tosioper, dem darauf folgenden Massaker an der galatischen Führungsschicht
oder der sodann einsetzenden von Deiotaros I. geführten Rebellion (Plut. mor. 259a-d; App.
Mithr. 46,178). Es ist zwar denkbar, dass Brogitaros nach Sullas Erfolgen in Griechenland
zugleich mit den beiden genannten Tetrarchen auf die prorömische Seite hinüber trat.
Wahrscheinlicher ist aber, dass er oder seine Schwester die galatische Verschwörung
verrieten und dem König auch über 86 hinaus die Treue hielten. Denn Adobogiona blieb – als
Gattin des Menodotos – in Pergamon (oder kehrte bald dorthin zurück) und nutzte auch die
Benennung ihres o.g. Sohnes als Ausdruck der Verbundenheit zur pontischen Dynastie.
Überdies spricht Appian davon, dass nur drei der 60 Geiseln das Massaker überlebten, obwohl
es damals vier Tetrarchien gegeben haben dürfte: Tolistobogier, Tektosagen, Trokmer und
Tosioper (mit Coskun 2007, wiederum gegen die traditionelle Sicht, welche von einer
Reduktion von zwölf auf drei Tetrarchen ausgeht). Mit der Dreizahl könnte Appian oder seine
Quelle an die Führer der drei galatischen Stämme gedacht haben, die Mithradates Widerstand
leisteten (ähnlich Strobel 1999, 398). Brogitaros könnte dagegen womöglich ein galatisches
Kontingent im pontischen Heer des Archelaos angeführt haben. Bleibt dies zwar Spekulation,
so würde es doch erklären, warum sein Name in den Quellen zur Verschwörung von
Pergamon fehlt. Zudem wäre es bestens damit vereinbar, dass sich Mithradates noch zu
Beginn des Krieges gebrüstet hatte, Galater in seinem Heer zu haben (Iust. 38,3,11, dazu
37,4,6 und 38,3,6).
Es muss also offen bleiben, wann Brogitaros den Seitenwechsel vollzog. Möglicherweise
geschah dies nicht vor Ausbruch des Dritten Mithradatischen Krieges. Die (nicht genau
datierbare) Heirat mit einer Tochter des Deiotaros I. legt nahe, dass dieser vermittelnd
aufgetreten sein könnte. Spätestens seit dem Frieden von Dardanos war der Tolistobogier das
stärkste Gegengewicht zum König von Pontos in Kleinasien.
Brogitaros ist nicht namentlich als Unterstützer des L. Licinius Lucullus (cos. 74), dem
römischen Oberbefehlshaber gegen Mithradates von 73 bis 66 v.Chr., genannt, aber nach den
militärischen Rückschlägen der Römer hielt sich Lucullus 67/66 mit Posdala in Brogitaros’
Territorium auf (Strab. geogr. 12,5,2). Grund hierfür war freilich nicht zuletzt die Grenzlage
der Trokmer. Bald darauf belohnte Pompeius, der den Krieg von 66 bis 63/62 führte, die
Unterstützung des Brogitaros mit der Erweiterung seines Territoriums gen Osten um die
Festung Mithridation (Strab. geogr. 12,5,2), es sei denn, dass es sich bei dem von Strabon
genannten Bogodiataros um einen anderen als den Tetrarchen der Trokmer handelt (s.o. 0).
Wenig später verschlechterte sich jedoch das Verhältnis zu Deiotaros und Pompeius durch
Brogitaros’ Hinwendung zu P. Clodius Pulcher. Dieser hatte bereits 69-66 als Legat im
Osten Kleinasiens gewirkt (Plut. Luc. 34; Cass. Dio 36,17,2-3). Im Jahr 59 reiste er im
Auftrag des Senats nach Armenien (Cic. Att. 2,4,2; 2,7,2-3 [24; 27 SB]). Demgegenüber
folgert Rawson 1973/91, 118-22 aus dem für Clodius bezeugten Unmut, dass er die Mission
nicht angetreten habe. Jedenfalls gehören die Absprachen mit Brogitaros in diese Zeit. Denn
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
149
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
als tr. pl. 59/58 verschaffte Clodius ihm durch einen Volksbeschluss nicht nur den
Königstitel, welchen Pompeius als einzigem Galater Deiotaros I. zuerkannt hatte; zudem
übertrug er Brogitaros auch das lukrative Recht, den Oberpriester von Pessinus einzusetzen
und damit wohl auch eine Art Oberaufsicht zu führen.
Bekannt ist die ganze Angelegenheit vor allem durch die polemischen Bemerkungen aus den
Reden, die Cicero nach der Rückkehr aus seinem Exil in Rom gehalten hat: harusp. resp. 29
(a. 56): quod cum Deiotarus religione sua castissime tueretur, quem unum habemus in orbe
terrarum fidelissimum huic imperio atque amantissimum nostri nominis, Brogitaro, ut ante
dixi, addictum pecunia tradidisti. atque hunc tamen Deiotarum saepe a senatu regali nomine
dignum existimatum, clarissimorum imperatorum testimoniis ornatum, tu etiam regem
appellari cum Brogitaro iubes. sed alter est rex iudicio senatus per nos, pecunia Brogitarus
per te appellatus . . . alterum putabo regem, si habuerit, unde tibi solvat, quod ei per
syngrapham credidisti. nam, cum multa regia sunt in Deiotaro, tum illa maxime, quod tibi
nummum nullum dedit, quod eam partem legis tuae, quae congruebat cum iudicio senatus, ut
ipse rex esset, non repudiavit, quod Pessinuntem per scelus a te violatum et sacerdote
sacrisque spoliatum reciperavit, ut in pristina religione servaret, quod caerimonias ab omni
vetustate acceptas a Brogitaro pollui non sinit, mavultque generum suum munere tuo quam
illud fanum antiquitate religionis carere. Sowie Sest. 56 (a. 56): lege tribunicia Matris
Magnae Pessinuntius ille sacerdos expulsus et spoliatus sacerdotio est, fanumque
sanctissimarum atque antiquissimarum religionum venditum pecunia grandi Brogitaro,
impuro homini atque indigno illa religione, praesertim cum eam sibi ille non colendi, sed
violandi causa adpetisset; appellati reges a populo, qui id numquam ne a senatu quidem
postulassent. Daneben auch die Anspielungen in dom. 60 (a. 57): cum post meum discessum
omnium locupletium fortunas, omnium provinciarum fructus, tetrarcharum ac regum bona
spe atque avaritia devorasses; 129: si tuus scriptor in illo incendio civitatis non syngraphas
cum Byzantiis exsulibus et cum legatis Brogitari faceret; Mil. 76 (a. 52) omitto socios exteras
nationes reges tetrarchas.
Angesichts dieser Parteilichkeit ist nicht mehr zu erkennen, ob die Pessinus betreffende
Entscheidung – über eine angebliche hohe Geldzahlung durch Brogitaros hinaus – nicht doch
auch sachlich gerechtfertigt gewesen sein könnte. Ohnehin ist unklar, von wem die Initiative
ausgegangen war: Setzte sich Brogitaros gegen zunehmende Hegemonialbestrebungen seines
Schwiegervaters und vielleicht auch gegen dessen Usurpation der Kontrolle von Pessinus zur
Wehr, handelte er aus eigenen Ambitionen heraus, oder hatte Clodius die Zwietracht gesät
(vgl. Syme 1995, 132), um so einen auswärtigen Bündner und damit auch zahlungskräftigen
Unterstützer seines Kampfes um die Macht in Rom zu gewinnen? Jedenfalls stellte Cicero im
Jahr 56 mit Genugtuung fest, dass der Tolistobogier den Schützling des Brogitaros verjagt
und seinen eigenen Kandidaten wieder eingesetzt habe. Wenn sich Deiotaros hierfür auch
nicht auf einen Senats- oder Volksbeschluss stützen konnte, so legt doch das Datum nahe,
dass er nach der Konferenz von Luca mit Zustimmung mindestens des Pompeius handelte.
Irrig ist die Auffassung, Brogitaros selbst habe das Hohepriestertum angetreten (so indes
Klebs 1897, 887; Rawson 1973/91, 121). Ebenso wenig tragfähig sind die Ansichten, die
Aufsichtsbefugnis habe sich jeweils aus dem Königstitel ergeben (so Devreker 1984, 17f.).
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
150
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Nicht zutreffend ist Strobel 1999, 399, dem zufolge der Senat Brogitaros den Königstitel
verlieh. Zu Recht weist Rawson auf das große Engagement der Claudier im Osten hin. Indes
ist es fraglich, dass deren Anteil an der Einführung des pergamenischen Kybele-Kultes in
Rom während des Hannibalkrieges Clodius’ Interesse an Pessinus bestimmt habe (so Rawson
1973/91, 114; 121 und 1977/91, 240). Andererseits ist es durchaus vorstellbar, dass der
Volkstribun auf diese Verbindung hinwies.
Im Jahr 55 war Clodius um eine libera legatio nach Byzanz und zu Brogitaros bemüht. Cic.
Q.fr. 2,8,2 (13 SB) kommentiert: plena res nummorum, was regelmäßig mit der Absicht
erklärt wird, der ehemalige Volkstribun habe einen Rest der versprochenen Summe eintreiben
wollen; vgl. z.B. Hoben 1969, 77; Shackleton Bailey, Cic.Q.fr. S. 189. Da Brogitaros den
einträglichen Tempelstaat aber verloren hatte, könnte es sich auch um neue Pläne gehandelt
haben (s. auch im folgenden).
Die letzten Lebensjahre des Trokmers liegen im Dunkeln. Deswegen kommt der oben (unter
0.) erwähnten Münze eine besondere Bedeutung zu, da sie im sechsten Jahr seiner
Königsherrschaft geschlagen wurde. Damit ist nicht etwa auf 52/51 verwiesen (so z.B. Syme
1995, 133), sondern auf 54/53 oder 53/52, je nachdem, ob der Zählung jeweils der Beginn
eines neuen (seleukidischen) Kalenderjahrs oder der Tag des Herrschaftsantritt zu Grunde lag.
Von Gewicht ist überdies, dass Brogitaros weder in den Briefen des Proconsul Ciliciae
Cicero betreffs der Abwehr der Parther 52-50 noch etwa in Caesars Aufstellung der
Heeresgefolgschaften vor Pharsalos 48 (civ. 3,4,5) Erwähnung findet. Deshalb ist kaum ein
Überleben des Tetrarchen bis zu demjenigen Jahr anzunehmen, in dem Deiotaros I. im
effektiven Besitz des Trokmerlandes nachgewiesen ist (47 v.Chr.) (so aber Sullivan 1990,
165: „his power must have been much eroded“).
Die Mehrheit der Forscher datiert den Tod dagegen auf eine frühere Phase des Bürgerkriegs
und beschuldigt Deiotaros, sich – womöglich mit Duldung des Pompeius – seines Rivalen
entledigt zu haben. Vgl. Niese 1901, 2402 (48/47 v.Chr.); Hoben 1969, 77f.; Spickermann
1997. Begründet wird diese Unterstellung auch mit dem Hinweis auf die Gewalttat von
Gorbeous, obwohl die Ermordung des Kastor (I.) Tarkondarios in eine andere Zeit fällt und
wenig hilfreich ist, Licht auf das Schicksal des Brogitaros zu werfen. Vgl. aber dennoch z.B.
Ramsay 1941, 44f.: „Deiotarus made himself king and killed all tetrarchs whom he could get
hold of“; Hahland 1953, 153f.; Stein-Kramer 1986, 178; Syme 1995, 128; 133: „the sagacity
of the veteran statesman suggested the right season for crime with impunity“; 138. Die
Verdächtigungen haben aber wenig für sich, da weder Caesar im Jahr 47 ([Caes.] Alex., bes.
67f.) noch der junge Kastor (II.) (Cic. Deiot.) den Vorwurf erhob, Deiotaros habe einen rex
amicus populi Romani ermordet und sein Territorium annektiert.
Einen viel plausibleren Kontext bietet dagegen der Partherzug des Proconsul Crassus 54-53
v.Chr. Sein Weg führte ihn bekanntlich durch Galatien, wie aus einer von Plutarch
überlieferten Begegnung mit Deiotaros I. hervorgeht (Crass. 17,2). Doch während der
Tolistobogier sich nicht an dem Angriffskrieg beteiligte, ist die Annahme plausibel, dass
Brogitaros auf das Werben des Crassus einging, der nach Plutarch (Crass. 17,9) Geld und
Truppen von orientalischen Städten und Dynasten einforderte. Der Trokmer mag in dem
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
151
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Feldzug zudem die Möglichkeit gesehen haben, sich ein nennenswertes außergalatisches
Territorium hinzu zu gewinnen. Außerdem könnte ihn seine Verbindung zu Clodius, der
seinerseits Crassus nahestand, zu einem Engagement bewogen haben. Zur wiederholten
Finanzierung des Clodius druch Crassus vgl. Gruen 1974, 68 und Shatzman 1975, 325-27 ad
a. 61-56. Ferner scheint sich Crassus cos. II 55 für die von Clodius gewünschte Mission in
den Osten eingesetzt zu haben (Cic. Q.fr. 2,8,2 = 13 SB). Es ist deswegen naheliegend, dass
Crassus auf seinem Feldzug auch auf die große östliche Klientel der Claudii zurückgriff. Es
wäre also sehr gut möglich – und ist jedenfalls wahrscheinlicher als die bisherigen Theorien –,
dass Brogitaros Crassus auf seinem fatalen Feldzug begleitete und ebenfalls um den 9. Juni 53
sein Leben ließ (vgl. Broughton, MRR II 224.230; Sherwin-White 1984, 279-90). Ein
weiteres Indiz für diese Rekonstruktion ist die oben erwähnte zeitnahe Silberprägung, die
überhaupt die einzige jemals für Brogitaros bezeugte Münzemission blieb. Hier liegt der
Verdacht nahe, dass entweder die Kriegskasse des Crassus direkt unterstützt oder aber das
Geld zur Finanzierung der eigenen Kriegskosten, vor allem zur Entlohnung von Söldnern,
aufgebracht werden sollte.
Deiotaros dürfte also im Jahr 53 nichts anderes getan haben, als auf die Nachricht vom
katastrophalen Ausgang des Partherfeldzugs die verwaiste Tetrarchie seines Schwiegersohnes,
für den übrigens keine direkten Nachkommen bezeugt sind (vgl. auch Hoben 1969, 78), selbst
in Besitz zu nehmen. Damit leistete er, zumal nachdem sie von einem erheblichen Teil ihrer
Kämpfer entblößt worden war, einen aktiven Beitrag zur Stabilisierung Kleinasiens. In Rom
musste dies angesichts der Umstände durchweg positiv bewertet werden. Die spätere
Sukzession des Mithradates von Pergamon, des Neffen des Brogitaros, war effektiv durch
dessen Verdienste um Caesar und nicht durch dessen besseres Erbrecht begründet.
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Klebs, Elimar: Brogitarus, RE 3,1, 1897, 887.
Kroll, W.: Brogitarus, RE Suppl. 7, 1940, 82f.
Spickermann, Wolfgang: Brogitarus, DNP 2, 1997, 789.
Bringmann, Klaus/ von Steuben, Hans (Hgg.): Schenkungen hellenistischer Herrscher an griechische Städte und
Heiligtümer, T. 1, Berlin 1995.
Broughton, T. Robert S.: The Magistrates of the Roman Republic, 3 Bde., Atlanta 1951/52/86. (MRR)
Coskun, Altay: Von der ‘Geißel Asiens’ zu ‘kaiserfrommen’ Reichsbewohnern. Studien zur politischen und
gesellschaftlichen Entwicklung der Galater unter besonderer Berücksichtigung der amicitia populi Romani
und der göttlichen Verehrung des Augustus (3. Jh. v.–2. Jh. n.Chr.), unveröff. unveröff. Habil. Trier 2007.
Delamarre, Xavier: Dictionnaire de la langue gauloise, Paris 2001, 22003. (DLG2)
Devreker, John: L’histoire de Pessinonte, in: ders./ Waelkens (Hgg.): Les Fouilles de la Rijksuniversiteit te Gent
a Pessinonte, 1967-1973. Hommage à Pieter Lambrechts, Brügge 1984, I 13-37.
Freeman, Philip: The Galatian Language. A Comprehensive Survey of the Language of the Ancient Celts in
Greco-Roman Asia Minor, Lewiston/NY 2001.
Gruen, Erich Stephen: The Last Generation of the Roman Republic, Berkeley/Cal. 1974.
Hahland, Walter: Bildnis der Keltenfürstin Adobogiona, in: FS für Rudolf Egger. Beiträge zur älteren
europäischen Kulturgeschichte, Bd. 2, Klagenfurt 1953, 137-57.
Hoben, Wolfgang: Untersuchungen zur Stellung kleinasiatischer Dynasten in den Machtkämpfen der
ausgehenden römischen Republik, Diss. Mainz 1969.
Ippel, A.: Die Arbeiten zu Pergamon 1910–1911, Kap. II, MDAI (A) 37, 1912, 277-303.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
152
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Magie, David: Roman Rule in Asia Minor to the End of the Third Century after Christ, vols. I-II, Princeton/N.J.
1950.
Mionnet, T.E.: Description de médailles antiques, grecques et romaines, Bd. IV, Paris 1806, Nd. Graz 1972.
Mitchell, Stephen: Anatolia. Land, Men, and Gods in Asia Minor, Bd. 1: The Celts in Anatolia and the Impact of
Roman Rule, Oxford 1993.
Niese, Benedictus: Deiotarus [2-3], RE 4,2, 1901, 2401-4.
Ramsay, William M.: The Social Basis of Roman Power in Asia Minor. Prepared for the Press by J.G.C.
Anderson, Aberdeen 1941.
Rawson, Elisabeth: The Eastern Clientelae of Clodius and the Claudii (Historia 22, 1973, 219-39); More on the
Clientelae of the Patrician Claudii (Historia 26, 1977, 340-57), in: dies.: Roman Culture and Society, Oxford
1991, 102-24; 227-44.
Rehm, Albert: Die Inschriften von Didyma, posthum hg. von Richard Harder, Berlin 1958 (= Teil II zu Theodor
Wiegand: Didyma, hg. vom DAI).
Shackleton Bailey, D.R.: Cicero: Epistulae ad Quintum fratrem et M. Brutum, Cambridge 1980.
Shatzman, Israel: Senatorial Wealth and Roman Politics, Brüssel 1975.
Sherwin-White, Adrian N.: Roman Foreign Policy in the East (168 B.C. to A.D. 1), London 1984.
Stähelin, Felix: Geschichte der kleinasiatischen Galater, 21907, Nd. Osnabrück 1973, 112f.
Stein-Kramer, Michaela: Die Klientelkönigreiche Kleinasiens in der Außenpolitik der späten Republik und des
Augustus, Berlin 1988.
Strobel, Karl: Kelten [III.]: Kelten im Osten, DNP 6, 1999, 393-400.
Sullivan, Richard D.: Near Eastern Royalty and Rome, 100-30 B.C., Toronto 1990, 164-171; 331 mit Anm.
Syme, Ronald: Anatolica. Studies in Strabo, hg. von Anthony Birley, Oxford 1995.
AC/08.03.10
Burebista, König der Geten [Var. Boirebistas, Buruista, Byrabeista, Byrebistas]
0. Onomastisches
Byrebistas (Strab. geogr. 7,3,5 [298]; IGB I2 13 = Syll3 762 = IGRR I 662, Z. 22; IGB I2 323
= IGRR I 1502); Byrabeista (IGB I2 13, Z. 33f.); Boirebistas (Strab. geogr. 7,3,11 [303] und
C304); Buruista (Iord. Get. 11). Vgl. zu den Namensformen Detschew 1957, 96.
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
Zeitpunkt der Machtübernahme umstritten: um a. 82 v.Chr. (Iord. Get. 11) oder erheblich
später, um/nach a. 60. Ursprünglicher Herrschaftsbereich sehr umstritten: Südwesten
Siebenbürgens oder die rumänische Tiefebene. Mit Unterstützung des Priesters Dekaineos
(Strab. geogr. 7,3,5 [298]; Iord. Get. 11) unternahm er umfassende Reformen, deren genaue
Natur uns entgeht, und schuf durch Eroberungen ein großes Reich. Dieses erstreckte sich von
der mittleren Donau und den Waldkarpaten bis an das Schwarze Meer und die Ebene südlich
der Donau. Laut Strab. geogr. 7,3,13 (305) war er in der Lage, 200.000 Krieger aufzustellen.
Das Zentrum seines Reiches bildete die in Südwestsiebenbürgen gelegene Hauptstadt
Sarmizegetusa Regia/to basileion, die durch ein System von Befestigungen geschützt wurde.
Er unternahm Feldzüge nach Westen gegen Boier und Taurisker, Plünderungszüge nach
Thrakien, Makedonien und Illyrien (Strab. geogr. 7,3,11 [303f.]), Feldzüge nach Osten gegen
Bastarner und Sarmaten (Crişan 1978, 131-134), Feldzüge gegen die westpontischen
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
153
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Griechenstädte von Olbia bis Apollonia (Dion Chrys. or. 36,4; IGB I2 323), von denen er die
meisten eroberte und zerstörte. Die Reihenfolge seiner Feldzüge ist umstritten. Allgemein
datiert man die keltischen Feldzüge um a. 60, wobei unklar ist, ob die westpontischen Städte
vorher oder nachher erobert wurden. Infolge eines Komplotts ermordert, wohl kurz nach
Caesars Tod, genauer Zeitpunkt ungewiss. Sein Reich zerfiel in vier, später fünf Teile (Strab.
geogr. 7,3,11 [304]).
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Im Jahre 48 sandte er Akornion aus Dionysopolis in das Lager des Pompeius nach Herakleia
am Lykos (IGB I2 13), der das Wohlwollen der Römer für den König gewann. Es wird
allgemein angenommen, dass er Pompeius Militärhilfe für den kommenden Kampf gegen
Caesar anbot. Falls es aber so war, erreichten die getischen Streitkräfte Pompeius nicht mehr
vor Pharsalos. Vielleicht ist die von der Inschrift erwähnte eunoia als Verleihung des Titels
eines rex socius et amicus zu deuten.
Kurz vor seiner Ermordung plante Caesar einen Feldzug gegen Burebista (Strab. geogr. 7,3,5
[298]; App. civ. 2,110,459; 3,25,93-96; Ill. 13; Suet. Caes. 44,3; Aug. 8,2; Vell. 2,59).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Brandis, K.: Burebista, RE 3.2, 1899, 2903f.
Brandis, K.: Dacia, RE 4.2, 1901, 1958-1960.
Brandis, K.: Burebista, RE Suppl. 1, 1903, 261-264.
Mócsy, A.: Pannonia, RE Suppl. 9, 1962, 530-532.
Meier, M.: Burebista, DNP 2, 1997, 855.
Detschew, D.: Die thrakischen Sprachreste, Wien 1957.
Daicoviciu, H.: Dacia de la Burebista la cucerirea romană, Cluj 1972, 30-91.
Preda, C.: Monedele geto-dacilor, Bukarest 1976.
Vulpe, R.: Studia Thracologica, Bukarest 1976, 39-61; 125-127.
Crişan, I.H.: Burebista şi epoca sa, Bukarest 21977 = Burebista and His Time, Bukarest 1978.
Daicoviciu, C.: Dakien und Rom in der Prinzipatszeit, ANRW II 6, 1977, 902-908.
McDermott, W.C.: Caesar’s Projected Dacian-Parthian Expedition, AncSoc 13-14, 1982-1983, 223-231.
Suceveanu, Al.: Burebista et la Dobroudja, Thraco-Dacica 4, 1983, 45-58.
Glodariu, I.: Arhitectura dacilor. Civilă şi militară (sec. II î. e. n.- I e. n.), Cluj 1983.
Pippidi, D.M.: Gètes et Grecs à l’époque de Byrebistas, in: Parerga. Écrits de philologie, d’épigraphie et
d’histoire ancienne, Bucarest – Paris 1984, 118-134.
Vinogradov, J.G.: Političeskaja istorija Olbijskovo polisa, VII.- I. vv. do n. e. Istoriko-epigrafičeskoje
issledovanje, Moskva 1989, 263-272.
Daicoviciu, H./ Ferenczi, Şt./ Glodariu, I.: Cetăţi şi aşezări dacice în sud-vestul Transilvaniei, Bukarest 1989.
Freber, P.-S.G.: Der hellenistische Osten und das Illyricum unter Caesar, Stuttgart 1993, 157-176.
Dobesch, G.: Zur Datierung des Dakerkönigs Burebista, in: R. Göbl: Die Hexadrachmenprägung der GroßBoier. Ablauf, Chronologie und historische Relevanz für Noricum und Nachbargebiete, Wien 1994, 51-68.
Suceveanu, Al.: Prōtos kai megistos (basileus) tōn epi Thrakēs basileōn. IGB I2 13, Z. 22-23, Tyche 13, 1998,
229-247.
Sullivan, Richard D.: Near Eastern Royalty and Rome, 100-30 B.C., Toronto 1990, 147f.
Syme, R.: Caesar’s Designs on Dacia and Parthia, in: A. Birley (Hg.): The Provincial at Rome. And: Rome and
the Balkans 80 BC – AD 14, Exeter 1999, 174-192.
Lica, V.: The Coming of Rome in the Dacian World, Konstanz 2000.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
154
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Ştefan, Al.S.: Les guerres daciques de Domitien et de Trajan. Architecture militaire, topographie, images et
histoire, Rom 2005.
LR/15.02.2006–r/29.07.08
Charops the Elder of Epeiros
1. Central Biographical Dates and Family Relations
Charops was a prominent figure of the Epeirotes (Livy 32.11.1 calls him princeps
Epirotarum). According to Plut. Flam. 4.5, he was the son of Machatas, which was also his
son’s name; on his grandson of the same name Charops, see below. Charops was sent by his
people as chief-ambassador to King Antiochos III in winter 192/191 BC (Polyb. 20.3.1; on the
episode, cf. also Livy 36.5.1). For a stemma of the family of Charops, cf. Habicht 1973-1974,
317.
2. Relations with Rome / Romans and Career
Charops is referred to in Polyb. 27.15.2 as philos Rhōmaiōn. In 199 BC he was in touch with
the consul P. Villius (Livy 32.6.1). In 198 BC, Charops helped Flamininus by producing a
shepherd as a guide through unexpected paths across the Aous pass, in order to dislodge
Philip V from his position and, in consequence, from Epirus, cf. Livy 32.11.1-12; 32.14.5;
Polyb. 27.15.2; Diod. Sic. 30.5; for other evidence: Ennius, ann. fr. 334ff.; Plut. Flam. 4.2-6;
App. Mac. 6; Zon. 9.16.1; Aur. Vict. vir. ill. 51; see Walbank 1940, 152-153; Hammond
1966, 52-53. Therefore, the Romans may well have enrolled Charops in the formula
amicorum, but we have no decisive proof for this. However, his grandson Charops, son of
Machatas, thanks to the grandfather’s friendship with the Romans (dia tēn tou pappou pros
Rhōmaiōn philian) “was educated in Rome and formed ties of hospitality with many
prominent men” (Diod. Sic. 30.5, transl. Loeb; cf. Polyb. 27.15.3-5). Charops the younger
was the pro-Roman demagogue of the years following 170 BC (cf. Scullard 1945, 58-64).
3. Select Bibliography
Büttner Wobst Th.: Charops [11], RE Suppl. 1, 1903, 284-285.
Habicht, Chr.: Ein thesprotischer Adliger im Dienste Ptolemaios’ V, ArchClass 25-26, 1973-74 (= Mél.
Guarducci), 313-318.
Hammond, N.G.L.: The Opening Campaigns and the Battle of the Aoi Stena in the Second Macedonian War,
JRS, 56, 1966, 39-54
Marshall, A.J.: Friends of the Roman People, AJPh 89, 1968, 39-55.
Raggi, A.: Amici populi Romani, MeditAnt 11, 2008 [2009], 97-113.
Scullard, H.H.: Charops and Roman Policy in Epirus, JRS, 35, 1945, 58-64.
Walbank, F.W.: Philip V of Macedon, Cambridge 1940.
Walbank, F.W.: A Historical Commentary on Polybius III, Oxford 1979, 313-314.
AR 10.02.12 – r/14.02.12
Cotiso, König der Daker
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
155
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
König der Daker, Herrscher über eines der Teilreiche, in die der Herrschaftsbereich des
Burebista nach dessen Tode zerfiel. Er ist vielleicht mit dem König Coson zu identifizieren,
von dem aus Siebenbürgen zahlreiche Goldmünzen (Nachahmungen von Typen
spätrepublikanischer Denare) erhalten sind; die Identifizierung ist aber kontrovers.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Unternahm in der Zeit der Bürgerkriege zwischen Octavian und Antonius Einfälle über die
Donau (Flor. 2,28), erlitt aber um a. 29 eine Niederlage (Hor. carm. 3,8,18). Antonius brachte
eine Geschichte in Umlauf, laut der Octavian beabsichtigt hätte, seine Tochter Iulia, die dem
jungen M. Antonius versprochen war, dem Cotiso zur Frau zu geben, während Octavian die
Tochter des Cotiso zu heiraten gedacht hätte (Suet. Aug. 63,2).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Stein, A.: Cotiso, RE 4.2, 1901, 1676.
Kienast, D.: Cotiso, DNP 3, 1997, 214.
Daicoviciu, H.: Coson sau Cotiso?, Acta Musei Napocensis 2, 1965, 107-110.
Mócsy, A.: Der vertuschte Dakerkrieg des M. Licinius Crassus, Historia 15, 1966, 511-514.
Daicoviciu, H.: Dacia de la Burebista la cucerirea romană, Cluj 1972, 105-114.
Preda, C.: Monedele geto-dacilor, Bukarest 1973, 353-361.
Daicoviciu, C.: Dakien und Rom in der Prinzipatszeit, ANRW II 6, 1977, 909.
Braund, D.: Rome and the Friendly King. The Character of the Client Kingship, London 1984, 125; 175.
Preda, C.: Istoria monedei în Dacia preromană, Bukarest 1998, 226-233.
LR/15.02.2006–r/29.07.08
Dapyx, getischer König
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
König eines Getenstammes, wohl in der mittleren Dobrudscha. Für das Jahr 28 bezeugt.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Griff Rholes an, der von M. Licinius Crassus cos. 30 nach dessen Siege über die Bastarner
und Thraker Hilfe forderte. Crassus fügte dem Dapyx eine gewaltige Niederlage zu und
belagerte ihn in einer Festung, die durch Verrat eingenommen wurde; Dapyx selbst fiel im
Kampfe (Cass. Dio 51,26,1f.).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Brandis, K.: Dapyx, RE 4.2, 1901, 2149f.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
156
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Weiss, J.: Getae, RE 7.1, 1910, 1334.
Groag, E.: Licinius Crassus (58), RE 13.1, 1926, 279f.
Daicoviciu, C.: Dakien und Rom in der Prinzipatszeit, ANRW II6, 1977, 910.
Ştefan, Al. S.: Les guerres daciques de Domitien et de Trajan. Architecture militaire, topographie, images et
histoire, Rom 2005, 388f.
Suceveanu, Al.; Barnea, Al.: La Dobroudja romaine, Bukarest 1991, 25f.
LR/15.02.2006–r/29.07.08
Decidius Saxa: s. Saxa
Deiotaros (I.) Philorhomaios, König von Galatien, Pontos und Kleinarmenien
Für eine vollständige Dokumentation vgl. demnächst Coskun ca. 2012.
0. Onomastisches
Am ehesten ist der Name mit Birkhan 1997, 590 als ‘Himmelsstier’ zu übersetzen; vgl. jetzt
ausführlich Coskun 2007, Teil A.V Anm. 50. Vgl. ebenda Teil D.II.5 zum hellenistischen
Einfluß auf die dynastische Wiederholung des Leitnamens Deiotaros sowie zum Kontext des
Herrscherbeinamens Philorhomaios.
Für eine Sammlung der Belege vgl. auch Freeman, GL 40-50; mit Ergänzungen bei Falilejev
2007, 83f.
[Nachtrag AC 07.03.10]
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemma Galater / Deiotaros
Ca. a. 120-41/40. Sohn des tolistobogischen Dynasten Sinorix, dem er ca. a. 107/2 in der
Herrschaft der galatischen Tolistobogier nachfolgte. Gatte der Berronike (Var. Berenike),
Vater Deiotaros’ (II.) Philopators, der Adobogiona (II.), der Gattin des Brogitaros, und
mindestens einer weiteren Tochter, die mit Kastor (I.) Tarkondarios verheiratet war. Seit a. 64
auch Herrscher über ostpontische Gebiete, Kleinarmenien (bis a. 48/47) und die halbe
Gazelonitits; a. 60 Bestätigung des Königstitels durch den Senat; a. 53-48 und erneut seit a.
44 auch Tetrarch der Trokmer; a. 42/41 auch Tetrarch der Tektosagen.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Wahrscheinlich unterstützte er L. Cornelius Sulla procos. Ciliciae 94 gegen Tigranes I. von
Armenien und Ariarathes IX. von Kappadokien; damals schloß er auch Gastfreundschaft mit
dessen Legaten M. Porcius Cato, dem Vater des Uticensis. Er überlebte das von Mithridates
VI. Eupator Dionysos verübte Massaker an der galatischen Elite a. 86 und führte den
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
157
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
tolistobogischen Widerstand gegen dessen Statthalter Eumachos. Kämpfte aufseiten Sullas im
Ersten (a. 89-85) und des L. Licinius Murena im Zweiten Mithradatischen Krieg (a. 83-80).
Erhielt Freiheitsgarantie für die Galater im Vertrag von Dardanos; eine förmliche amicitia
populi Romani ist spätestens bei Sullas Rückkehr nach Rom anzunehmen, könnte aber schon
um 92 erfolgt sein.
Unterstützte P. Servilius Vatia (Isauricus) procos. Ciliciae 78-74 im Krieg gegen die
Seeräuber und Isaurier. Schloß Gastfreundschaft mit dem jungen C. Iulius Caesar a. 80/78
(frühere Kontakte mit dessen gleichnamigem Vater a. 100/90 oder Schwiegervater C. Marius
a. 99/98 sind erwägenswert, aber nicht belegt). Wiederaufnahme der Gastfreundschaft mit M.
Porcius Cato (Uticensis), dem Sohn des o.g. Legaten, a. 66.
Verbündeter des L. Licinius Lucullus procos. Ciliciae (et Asiae) 73-66/63 und des Cn.
Pompeius Magnus procos. 66-62/61 im Dritten Mithradatischen Krieg. Ca. a. 64 Belohnung
mit der Königsherrschaft über den westlichen Teil der zwischen dem Halys und Amisos
gelegenen Gazelonitis sowie über Teile ehemals pontischer Territorien (an der
Schwarzmeerküste ca. von der Iris- bis zur Akampsismündung, im Südwesten in etwa bis zum
Lykostal) sowie im Südosten über Kleinarmenien. Während der Senat ihn a. 60 lediglich als
rex Armeniae minoris anerkannte, setzte C. Iulius Caesar als cos. 59 die weiteren acta
Pompeii durch Volksbeschluß in Kraft.
Verlor die Aufsicht über den Tempelstaat Pessinus durch Plebiszit des P. Clodius Pulcher tr.
pl. 58 an seinen Schwiegersohn Brogitaros, den Tetrarchen der Trokmer. Seine Vormacht
über Pessinus stellte er a. 56 gewaltsam wieder her; ein Zusammenhang mit dem
Wiedererstarken des Pompeius nach der Konferenz von Luca ist anzunehmen. Begegnete M.
Licinius Crassus Dives auf dessen Weg nach Syrien a. 54, scheint denselben aber nicht
unterstützt zu haben. Annektierte die Trokmertetrarchie nach Brogitaros’ Tod a. 53 und
stabilisierte dadurch Kleinasien vor der Parthergefahr. Bis Anfang a. 51 verlobte er seinen
Sohn Deiotaros (II.) Philopator mit der Tochter des Königs Artavasdes von Armenien. Als
besondere Auszeichnung für beide Deiotaroi erkannte der römische Senat den Sohn 52/51 als
seinen designierten Nachfolger im Rang eines rex amicus populi Romani an.
Er schloß Freundschaft und unterhielt Geschäftsbeziehungen mit M. Iunius (Q. Servilius
Caepio) Brutus quaest. Ciliciae 53. Ca. a. 51/50 zahlte er Subsidien an einen P.(?) Valerius.
Knüpfte Freundschaft mit den Tullii Cicerones, sei es ab dem proconsulatus Asiae 61-58 des
Quintus, sei es erst über Marcus’ Freundschaft zu Lucullus und Pompeius. M. Cicero
belobigte ihn wiederholt in Reden seit a. 56. Deiotaros unterstützte C. Cassius Longinus
proquaest. Syriae a. 52, M. Cicero procos. Ciliciae 51/50 und M. Calpurnius Bibulus cos.
59, procos. Syriae 51/50 gegen die Parther, gegen die er aber auch allein erfolgreich vorging.
Deiotaros verfügte damals über 30 nach römischer Art bewaffnete cohortes (aus diesen
Einheiten sollte in der Kaiserzeit die legio XXII Deiotariana hervorgehen). Sommer und
Herbst 51 verbrachten die Söhne des M. und Q. Tullius Cicero am Hof der Deiotaroi. Auch
mit P. Sestius procos. Ciliciae 49-47 schloß er Freundschaft.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
158
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Er nahm persönlich an der Schlacht von Pharsalos 9.8.48 auf der Seite des Pompeius teil,
begleitete ihn anschließend auf seiner Flucht bis Lesbos. Gab das Versprechen neuer
Aushebungen gegen Caesar, doch hielt er es wegen dessen unerwartet schneller Besetzung
Westkleinasiens, der Invasion des Pharnakes (II.) von Nordosten her und des Todes des
Pompeius nicht ein. Tributzahlungen an Caesar in drei Raten (ca. a. 48/47/46). Zog mit Cn.
Domitius Calvinus procos. Asiae gegen Pharnakes und erlitt eine Niederlage bei Nikopolis
Anfang Dez. 48; verlor mindestens eine Legion. Vollführte eine Demutsgeste vor Caesar im
Juni 47. Dieser bestätigte ihm seines und seines Sohnes Königtums, aber entzog ihnen
Kleinarmenien. Danach hatte er einen Anteil an Caesars Blitzsieg bei Zela am 2.8.47. Bald
darauf bewirtete und beschenkte er Caesar in Blukion/Galatien. Wenig später entschied
Caesar in Nikaia, ihm auch die Trokmertetrarchie zu Gunsten des Mithradates von Pergamon
zu entziehen. Die Fürsprache römischer Freunde, bes. des Brutus, schützte ihn vor weiteren
Verlusten.
Nach dem Tod des Mithridates schickte er Blesamios und Antigonos zu Caesar nach Tarraco,
der seine Bitte um die Rückerstattung der Trokmertetrarchie Anfang 45 freundlich aufnahm,
die Entscheidung aber aufschob. In Rom erwarteten den Diktator die weiteren Gesandten
Hieras und Dorylaos, vielleicht mit der Vollmacht, nötigenfalls auch Bestechungsgelder zu
zahlen. Zugleich denunzierte ihn sein Enkel Kastor (II.), der ihm einen Mordversuch an
Caesar a. 47 sowie Konspiration mit dem Rebellen Caecilius Bassus a. 46/45 unterstellte. Bei
der Anhörung vor Caesar im Nov. 45 übernahm Cicero die Verteidigung; als weitere
Entlastungszeugen traten Calvinus, Serv. Sulpicius Rufus cos. 51, procos. Macedoniae 4846 und T. Torquatus auf. Der Redner stilisiert den Fall zum Prüfstein für Caesars Politik der
clementia und des Bestandes des römischen Rechtssystems während der Diktatur. Caesar wird
der durchschaubaren Klage kaum gefolgt sein, aber schob territoriale Änderungen bis zu
seiner Ankunft während des geplanten Partherzugs zurück. Kurz vor seinem Aufbruch wurde
er jedoch am 15.3.44 ermordet.
Hieras bestach M. Antonius cos. 44 (laut Cic. Att. 14,12,1=366 ShB vom 22.4.44 über dessen
Gattin Fulvia) zur Fälschung der acta Caesaris, um so die Annexion des Trokmergebietes zu
autorisieren. Bald darauf unterstützte er den Caesarmörder L. Tillius Cimber procos. Ponti et
Bithyniae 44-43 gegen P. Cornelius Dolabella cos. suff. 44, procos. Syriae 43. Dem Cassius
verweigerte er indes seine Hilfe gegen Caecilius Bassus. Brutus zog ihn erneut ins Lager der
Republikaner. Sein Feldherr Amyntas vertrat ihn vor Philippoi a. 42, vermutlich nachdem sein
Sohn Deiotaros (II.) in der ersten Schlacht umgekommen war. Amyntas wechselte vor der
zweiten Schlacht zu den Triumvirn, mit denen er siegte.
Deiotaros erhielt nun freie Hand gegen die Tektosagen, vernichtete Kastor (I.) Tarkondarios
samt seiner eigenen Tochter in Gorbeous. Die Söhne des Deiotaros (II.) Philopator, Brigatos
und Kastor (III.), designierte er wohl noch zu seinen Nachfolgern, bevor er 41/40 starb.
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Niese, Benedictus: Deiotarus [2], RE 4,2, 1901, 2401-3.
Rosenberg: Deiotaros [zu Nr. 2], RE Suppl. 3, 1918, 328.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
159
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Spickermann, Wolfgang: Deiotaros, DNP 3, 1997, 376f.
Coskun, Altay: Amicitiae und politische Ambitionen im Kontext der causa Deiotariana, in: Altay Coskun (Hg.):
Roms auswärtige Freunde in der späten Republik und im frühen Prinzipat, Göttingen 2005, 127-54.
Coskun, Altay: Von der ‘Geißel Asiens’ zu ‘kaiserfrommen’ Reichsbewohnern. Studien zur politischen und
gesellschaftlichen Entwicklung der Galater unter besonderer Berücksichtigung der amicitia populi Romani
und der göttlichen Verehrung des Augustus (3. Jh. v.–2. Jh. n.Chr.), unveröff. unveröff. Habil. Trier 2007.
Coskun, Altay: Das Ende der ‚romfreundlichen‘ Herrschaft in Galatien und das Beispiel einer ,sanften‘
Provinzialisierung in Zentralanatolien, in: A.C. (Hg.): Freundschaft und Gefolgschaft in den auswärtigen
Beziehungen der Römer (2. Jh. v.Chr. – 1. Jh. n.Chr.), Frankfurt/M. 2008, 133-164 (mit Karten 3-4).
Coskun, Altay: Von der ‘Geißel Asiens’ zur ‘römerfreundlichen Ordnungsmacht’. Die politische Geschichte der
Galater von ihrer Landnahme in Zentralanatolien bis zur Königsherrschaft des Deiotaros Philorhomaios und
Amyntas, 3.–1. Jh. v.Chr., in Vorbereitung.
Falileyev, Alexander: Celtic Dacia. Personal Names, Place-Names and Ethnic Names of Celtic Origin in Dacia
and Scythia Minor, Aberystwyth/Wales 2007.
Freber, Philipp-Stephan Graham: Der hellenistische Osten und das Illyricum unter Caesar, Stuttgart 1993.
Freeman, Philip: The Galatian Language. A Comprehensive Survey of the Language of the Ancient Celts in
Greco-Roman Asia Minor, Lewiston/NY 2001. (GL)
Hoben, Wolfgang: Untersuchungen zur Stellung kleinasiatischer Dynasten in den Machtkämpfen der
ausgehenden römischen Republik, Diss. Mainz 1969, 64-126; 169-73.
Magie, David: Roman Rule in Asia Minor to the End of the Third Century after Christ, I, Princeton/N.J. 1950,
294; 329; 373f.; 389; 396; 402-14; 421-26.
Magie, David: Roman Rule in Asia Minor to the End of the Third Century after Christ, II, Princeton/N.J. 1950,
1235-38; 1275f.
Mitchell, Stephen: Anatolia. Land, Men, and Gods in Asia Minor, Bd. 1: The Celts in Anatolia and the Impact of
Roman Rule, Oxford 1993, 27-41.
Münzer, Friedrich: Cn. Domitius Calvinus [43], RE 5,1, 1903, 1419-24.
Saddington, D.B.: Preparing to become Roman in the “Romanisation” of Deiotarus in Cicero, in: U. VogelWeidmann (Hg.): Charistion C.P.T. Naudé, Pretoria 1993, 87-96.
Stähelin, Felix: Geschichte der kleinasiatischen Galater, 21907, Nd. Osnabrück 1973, 87-97; 113.
Stein-Kramer, Michaela: Die Klientelkönigreiche Kleinasiens in der Außenpolitik der späten Republik und des
Augustus, Berlin 1988.
Sullivan, Richard D.: Near Eastern Royalty and Rome, 100-30 B.C., Toronto 1990, 50f.; 164-71.
Syme, Ronald: Anatolica. Studies in Strabo, hg. von Anthony Birley, Oxford 1995, bes. 127-43.
AC/24.09.04–r/31.07.08/20.02.10
Deiotaros II. Philopator (I.), König von Galatien, Pontos und Kleinarmenien
0. Onomastisches
Zum Namen s. unter Deiotaros I. Philorhomaios. Der nur in seinem Epitaph bezeugte
Herrscherbeiname Philopator (Mitchell, RECAM II 188 = French 2003, Nr. 1) betont die
Intention, die Dynastie und Politik des Vaters fortzuführen.
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemma Galater / Deiotaros
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
160
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Ca. 85/70 v.Chr. als Sohn des Tolistobogiers Deiotaros I. (Philorhomaios) und der Berronike
geboren (RECAM II 188 = French 2003, Nr. 1). Anfang 50 als Verlobter einer Tochter des
Artavasdes, des Königs von Armenien, bezeugt (Cic. Att. 5,21,2 = 114 SB). Während ihm in
der bisherigen Forschung keine Nachfahren zugeschrieben worden sind, schlägt Coskun 2007,
Teil E aufgrund genealogischer Überlegungen folgende Verbindungen vor: Gatte der von
Plut. mor. 258d genannten Stratonike (vor a. 50) sowie Vater des Brigatos, des Königs der
Galater, und Kastors (III.), des Königs der Paphlagoner. Zur Samtherrschaft mit seinem Vater
im Königsrang von a. 52 bis zu seinem Todesjahr 42 s.u.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Infolge der neuerlichen Verdienste seines schon betagten Vaters um die Stabilisierung
Kleinasiens während des Partherkrieges, vielleicht aber auch des Sohnes selbst, gestattete der
Senat schon zu Lebzeiten eine dynastische Sukzessionsregelung in Galatien, die erstmals 51
v.Chr. bezeugt ist (s. folgenden Abschnitt). Damit trat der jüngere Deiotaros auch formal in
eine Samtherrschaft über die Tetrarchien der Tolistobogier und Trokmer sowie über das
ostpontische Reich, Kleinarmenien und eines Teils der Gazelonitis an, wenn auch die
Souveränität beim weiterhin aktiven Vater gelegen haben wird. Letzteres ist vor allem aus
Cic. Deiot. 8-14 (zur Politik der Jahre 48-45) zu schließen. Der genaue Anteil Deiotaros’ II.
an den militärischen und politischen Kooperationen mit römischen Statthaltern der 50er und
40er Jahre, die unter Deiotaros I. aufgezählt sind, läßt sich nicht immer genau bestimmen.
Nahverhältnis zu den Tullii Cicerones, wobei dies möglicherweise schon auf den
proconsulatus Asiae 61-58 des Quintus zurückgehen könnte. Denn Deiotaros II. machte M.
Cicero procos. Cil. 51-50 gleich bei seiner Ankunft in Laodikeia seine Aufwartung und nahm
Ciceros Sohn Marcus und Neffen Quintus für den Rest des Sommers als Gäste „mit sich in
das Königreich“ (Cic. Att. 5,17,3 = 110 SB vom 15. Aug. 51 v.Chr.): Cicerones nostros
Deiotarus filius, qui rex a senatu appellatus est, secum in regnum; dum in aestivis nos
essemus, illum pueris locum esse bellissimum duximus. Die klimatische Andeutung könnte auf
die pontischen oder kleinarmenischen Territorien verweisen. Die erwartete Rückkehr nach
Laodikeia wurde bis zum 19. Dez. 51 v.Chr. brieflich angekündigt (Cic. Att. 5,20,9 = 113
SB). Für den Fall der Eskalation des Partherkrieges war abgesprochen, daß die
Heranwachsenden nach Rhodos gebracht werden sollten, vermutlich auf dem Seeweg rund
um den anatolischen Subkontinent (Cic. Att. 5,18,4 = 111 SB vom 20. Sept. 51 v.Chr.).
Wenn der über 70jährige Deiotaros I. persönlich an der Schlacht von Pharsalos am 9.8.48 auf
der Seite des Pompeius teilnahm, von seinem Sohn aber in den Quellen nicht die Rede ist
(Cic. Deiot. bes. 8-13; 28), so könnte man hierin nicht nur eine Loyalitätbezeugung, sondern
auch eine Absicherung der dynastischen Herrschaft erkennen. Womöglich galt diese
Aufgabenteilung auch während des Krieges gegen Pharnakes (II.) a. 48 an der Seite des Cn.
Domitius Calvinus (Bell. Alex. 34-40; Cic. Deiot. 14) und a. 47 an der Seite Caesars, der
anschließend Galatien durchreiste (Bell. Alex. 67-78; Cic. Deiot. 14; 15-22): Wiederum
begegnet als Akteur allein der Vater (zum Jahr 47 s. aber unten). Selbst während der
diplomatischen Missionen nach Rom trat Deiotaros II. nicht in Erscheinung (s. Blesamios,
Antigonos, Hieras, Dorylaos). Jedoch belegt Cic. Deiot. 36 (omnia tu Deiotaro, Caesar,
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
161
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
tribuisti, cum et ipsi et filio nomen regium concessisti; auch § 41; ohne Nennung des Sohnes:
§§ 8; 10; 15) eindeutig, daß Caesar trotz des Einzugs Kleinarmeniens und der
Trokmertetrarchie sowie der Auferlegung von Tributen a. 48/47 das Königtum der beiden
Deiotaroi (sowie mindestens für den Älteren auch die Freundschaft zu ihm selbst) restituierte.
Schließlich liegt nahe, daß Deiotaros II. das galatische Aufgebot während der ersten Schlacht
vor Philippoi anführte und dabei fiel. Der Sektretär (und spätere König) Amyntas trat
jedenfalls erst vor der zweiten Schlacht beim Wechsel auf die Seite des jungen Caesar in
Erscheinung (s. zu Amyntas). Zu dieser Datierung paßt jedenfalls auch, daß Deiotaros II. in
seinem Epitaph noch nicht auch Tetrarch der Tektosagen genannt wird; denn es scheint, daß
sein Vater dieses Territorium erst nach Aktion, vermutlich erst nach Rücksprache mit M.
Antonius Anfang 41 erobert hat (s. zu Kastor [I.] Tarcondarius).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Niese, Benedictus: Deiotarus [3], RE 4,2, 1901, 2403f.
Coskun, Altay: Von der ‘Geißel Asiens’ zu ‘kaiserfrommen’ Reichsbewohnern. Studien zur politischen und
gesellschaftlichen Entwicklung der Galater unter besonderer Berücksichtigung der amicitia populi Romani
und der göttlichen Verehrung des Augustus (3. Jh. v.–2. Jh. n.Chr.), unveröff. Habil. Trier 2007.
French, David: Roman, Late Roman and Byzantine Inscriptions of Ankara, Ankara 2003, Nr. 1.
Hoben, Wolfgang: Untersuchungen zur Stellung kleinasiatischer Dynasten in den Machtkämpfen der
ausgehenden römischen Republik, Diss. Mainz 1969, 67; 107-112; 117; 219.
Mitchell, Stephen: Anatolia. Land, Men, and Gods in Asia Minor, Bd. 1: The Celts in Anatolia and the Impact of
Roman Rule, Oxford 1993, 28; 35; 57.
Stähelin, Felix: Geschichte der kleinasiatischen Galater, 21907, Nd. Osnabrück 1973, 92; 97; 114 (Deiotaros
III.).
Sullivan, Richard D.: Near Eastern Royalty and Rome, 100-30 B.C., Toronto 1990, 167-169.
Zu weiterer Lit. s. unter Deiotaros I. Philorhomaios.
AC/29.07.08–r/01.08.08
Deiotaros (III.) Philadelphos, König von Paphlagonien
0. Onomastisches
Zum Namen s. unter Deiotaros I. Philorhomaios. Im Fall des Herrscherbeinamens
Philadelphos ist umstritten, ob er das Verhältnis zu Deiotaros IV. Philopator (sei es als
seinem älteren oder jüngeren Bruder) oder aber zu Adobogiona III. (als seiner
Schwestergattin) zum Ausdruck bringen soll. Letzteres ist wahrscheinlicher; s.u. 1.
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemma Galater / Deiotaros
Nach Strab. geogr. 12,3,41 (562) war Deiotaros Philadelphos der Sohn eines Kastor und
zugleich der letzte König Paphlagoniens. Traditionell gilt er als Sohn Kastors (II.). Jedoch ist
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
162
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
nicht plausibel, daß M. Antonius, der seit der Schlacht von Philippoi einvernehmlich mit
Deiotaros I., Deiotaros II. und Amyntas (I.) gehandelt hatte sowie der Ermordung Kastors (I.)
Tarkondarios und der Annexion des Tektosagenlandes durch Deiotaros I. zugestimmt haben
muß, die Söhne Deiotaros’ II. zugunsten eben desjenigen Kastors (II.) übergangen hätte, der
seinem Großvater Deiotaros I. 45 v.Chr. nach dem Leben getrachtet hatte. Zudem legen auch
genealogische Indizien die Abfolge Kastor (I.) –> Stratonike oo Deiotaros II. –> Kastor (III.),
König von Paphlagonien, –> Deiotaros (III.) nahe (Coskun 2007, Teil E).
Dabei gilt Adobogiona (III.) meist als seine Mutter, die vorübergehend die Vormundschaft
über ihn ausgeübt habe, und Deiotaros (IV.) Philopator als sein Bruder (z.B. Stähelin 1907,
114; Hoben 1969, 118; Sullivan 1990, st. 3; Mitchell 1993, I 28; Settipani 2000, 467).
Deiotaros Philadelphos wäre demnach seinem Bruder auf dem Thron gefolgt, sei es mit oder
ohne vorherige Koregentschaft. Jedoch ist Philadelphos sicher a. 31, ein weiteres Mal
gemeinsam mit Philopator wahrscheinlich ca. a. 14/06 und zuletzt wieder allein ca. a. 6 v.Chr.
bezeugt. Zudem erweist ihn auch die Gestaltung einer paphlagonischen Münzserie als den
Älteren (s.u. 2. zu den Quellen). Dafür, daß er der Vater Philopators (so z.B. auch Rosenberg
1918, 328) und nicht sein Bruder war, spricht nicht zuletzt auch die unter den Galatern
übliche Einnamigkeit, wonach zwei lebende Brüder kaum denselben Namen trugen.
Demgegenüber zeigt sich schon in den vorangehenden Generationen die Neigung zur
unveränderten Übertragung des dynastischen Leitnamens an den ältesten Sohn durch
hellenistischen Einfluß.
Mithin darf auch die Wahl des Beinamens Philadelphos nicht auf ein gutes Einvernehmen mit
Philopator bezogen werden. Eher impliziert sie die Ehe mit seiner Schwester Adobogiona
(III.) (so auch Stähelin 1907, 97f.; 109; Coskun 2007, Teil E mit einem Referat weiterer
Varianten) oder zumindest eine signifikante Begünstigung derselben durch ihn oder auch
seiner selbst durch sie (s. unter Adobogiona [III.]).
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Trifft die genealogische Rekonstruktion zu, dann folgte Deiotaros (III.) seinem Vater Kastor
(III.) nach a. 40 und bis a. 31 in der Herrschaft über das binnenländische Paphlagonien.
Erstmals bezeugt ist er vor der Schlacht von Aktion: Plut. Ant. 61,2 (Philadelphos von
Paphlagonien) und Cass. Dio 50,13,5 nennen ihn noch auf der Seite des M. Antonius. Dabei
wechselte er gemeinsam mit Amyntas’ (I.) auf die Seite des jungen Caesar (Plut. Ant. 63,5:
Deiotaros).
Über die Zeit nach a. 31 informieren im wesentlichen nur zwei äußerst seltene Münztypen.
Der erste zeigt auf der Vorderseite gleichermaßen das Portrait des Königs mit der Umschrift
Basileōs Philadelphu und der Beischrift ZKV. Auf die Rückseite ist das Bildnis einer Königin
mit der Legende Basilissēs Prusiados Adobogiōnas geprägt (RPC I S. 537 Nr. 3508). Der
zweite Typ bildet wiederum denselben König ab, der nun aber mit Basileōs Dēiotaru
Philadelphu bezeichnet ist, während auf dem Verso zwei Dioskurenkappen ein unlesbares
Monogramm umgeben. Die dortige Umschrift lautet Basileōs Dēiotaru Philadelphu (RPC I S.
537 Nr. 3509).
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
163
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Mit Kahrstedt 1910, 284 ist V als Ärenzeichen sowie ZK als 27 zu lesen. Beim Ansatz einer
pompejanischen Ära (Beginn a. 62) führt ihn das ins Jahr 36; ähnlich Burnett, RPC I S. 537
(a. 37); überzeugender wäre freilich ein Beginn a. 64 (a. 38). Da aber der Ansatz einer
pompejanischen Ära nach dem Dynastiewechsel a. 41/40 (vgl. Cass. Dio 48,33,5; s. Attalos
von Paphlagonien) wenig plausibel ist, sollte man die Zählung entweder mit dem
Herrschaftsantritt Kastors III. oder Deiotaros’ (III.) selbst beginnen lassen. Unter diesen –
freilich hypothetischen – Bedingungen fiele die Prägung in die Jahre 14/06 v.Chr.
Abzulehnen ist jedenfalls die Interpretation von V als Zahlenwert (so aber Reinach 1902,
163f.: Ärenjahr 427); aporetisch bleibt Leschhorn 1993, 176f.
Offenbar erwirkte Deiotaros bei Augustus noch zu seinen Lebzeiten die Zustimmung zur
Sukzession seines Sohnes Deiotaros (IV.) Philopator, der aber vor ihm selbst gestorben sein
muß. Denn das Lebensende des Deiotaros (III.) Philadelphos bedeutete nach Strab. geogr.
12,3,41 (562) zugleich das Erlöschen seiner Dynastie. Anhand der kaiserzeitlichen Ären
paphlagonischer Städte muß er im Jahr 6 v.Chr. (oder unmittelbar davor) gestorben sein; vgl.
Leschhorn 1993, 481-484.
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Niese, Benedictus: Deiotarus [4], RE 4,2, 1901, 2404.
Rosenberg: Deiotaros [zu Nr. 4], RE Suppl. 3, 1918, 328.
Coskun, Altay: Von der ‘Geißel Asiens’ zu ‘kaiserfrommen’ Reichsbewohnern. Studien zur politischen und
gesellschaftlichen Entwicklung der Galater unter besonderer Berücksichtigung der amicitia populi Romani
und der göttlichen Verehrung des Augustus (3. Jh. v.–2. Jh. n.Chr.), unveröff. Habil. Trier 2007.
Hoben, Wolfgang: Untersuchungen zur Stellung kleinasiatischer Dynasten in den Machtkämpfen der
ausgehenden römischen Republik, Diss. Mainz 1969, 120.
Kahrstedt, Ulrich: Frauen auf antiken Münzen, Klio 10, 1910, 261-314, bes. 284.
Leschhorn, Wolfgang: Antike Ären. Zeitrechnung, Politik und Geschichte im Schwarzmeerraum und in
Kleinasien nördlich des Tauros, Stuttgart 1993.
Mitchell, Stephen: Anatolia. Land, Men, and Gods in Asia Minor, 2 Bde., Oxford 1993.
Reinach 1925: Waddington, William Henry/ Babelon, Ernest: Recueil général des monnaies grecques d’Asie
Mineure, Teil I, 4 Bde., Paris 11904/08/10/12; 2. Aufl. des 1. Teilbandes von Théodore Reinach 1925; Nd.
Hildesheim 1976.
RPC I: Burnett, Andrew M./ Amandry, Michel/ Ripollès, Pere Pau: Roman Provincial Coinage, Vol. I (Part I-II),
London 1992.
Settipani, Christian: Continuité gentilice et continuité familiale dans les familles sénatoriales romaines à
l’époque impériale. Mythe et réalité, Oxford 2000, bes. 467.
Stähelin, Felix: Geschichte der kleinasiatischen Galater, 21907, Nd. Osnabrück 1973, 97f.; 114 („Deiotaros
IV.“).
Sullivan, Richard D.: Near Eastern Royalty and Rome, 100-30 B.C., Toronto 1990, 169f.; 173; 269; 277; 392
und Stemma 3.
AC/29.07.08–r/01.08.08
Deiotaros (IV.) Philopator (II.), König von Paphlagonien
0. Onomastisches
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
164
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Zu Namen und Beinamen s. unter Deiotaros (III.) Philadelphos.
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemma Galater / Deiotaros
Einziger Beleg für seine Existenz und seine Namen bietet eine paphlagonische Münze von
14/06 v.Chr. (RPC I S. 537 Nr. 3509). Die Kombination mit weiteren genealogischen Indizien
erweist ihn also Sohn Königs Deiotaros (III.) Philadelphos, s. ebda. Er dürfte bis ca. a. 35/30
geboren und noch vor seinem Vater, also spätestens a. 6 gestorben sein.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Aus derselben Quelle ist zu erschließen, daß Augustus ihn noch zu Lebzeiten seines Vaters
zu dessen Koregenten im Königsrang erhoben hat.
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Rosenberg: Deiotaros [5], RE Suppl. 3, 1918, 328.
S.o. zu Deiotaros (III.) Philadelphos.
AC/29.07.08–r/31.07.08
Demetrios I. Soter, König des Seleukidenreichs
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemmata Seleukiden
Sohn Seleukos’ IV. Philopator, Vater von Demetrios II. Theos Philadelphos Nikator und
Antiochos VII. Sidetes. Um 186 v.Chr. geboren, regierte Demetrios I. nach der Ermordung
seines Cousins und Vorgängers Antiochos’ V. Eupators ab 162 das Seleukidenreich und starb
150 im Krieg gegen den Usurpator Alexandros I. Balas.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom/ Römern und Karriereverlauf
Demetrios I. wurde 175 von seinem Vater Seleukos IV. im Austausch gegen Seleukos’ Bruder
Antiochos IV. als Geisel nach Rom geschickt (Polyb. 31,12,1; App. Syr. 45). Hier genoß er
wohl recht große Freiheit, konnte etwa auf die Jagd gehen und pflegte regen Umgang mit
Römern und Griechen (Polyb. 31,11-15; Diod. 18). Schon als der Tod Antiochos’ IV. 164
bekannt wurde und der minderjährige Antiochos V. zum König ausgerufen worden war, hatte
Demetrios als Sohn Seleukos’ IV. seine Ansprüche laut gemacht und seine Loyalität zu Rom
beschworen, dessen Senatoren für ihn wie Väter seien. Nichtsdestoweniger war diese Bitte
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
165
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
vom Senat nicht berücksichtigt worden (Polyb. 31,2,5; App. Syr. 46), da eine
Vormundschaftsregierung willkommene Gelegenheit bot, das unter Antiochos IV. gefährlich
erstarkte und außenpolitisch aktive Seleukidenreich besser zu kontrollieren (Polyb. 31,2,10).
Allerdings mag Demetrios in seiner Rede den Bruch des Vertrags von Apameia besonders
hervorgehoben haben und dadurch erst die unglückliche Gesandtschaft des Cn. Octavius
(cos. 165) im Jahr 162 bewirkt haben (Ehling 2008, 120). Demgegenüber sieht Will 1972, 624
die Gesandtschaft von vorne herein gegen ein zu großes Machtpotential des als
unausweichlichen späteren Herrscher betrachteten Demetrios gerichtet.
Nach der Ermordung des Octavius durch einen gewissen Leptines bat Demetrios ein zweites
Mal um seine Entlassung, die aber erneut abgelehnt wurde (Polyb. 31,11,10-12). Laut
Polybios war der Grund, daß der Senat einen allzu tatkräftigen und begabten Herrscher auf
dem Seleukidenthron fürchtete (Polyb. 31,2,7), vielleicht aber auch, weil die Herrschaft des
Antiochos V. gerade gefestigt schien und eine erneute Destabilisierung der Region nicht
wünschenswert war (Gruen 1976, 81). Als Demetrios dann durch seinen nach Rom gereisten
Ziehvater Diodor von seiner Beliebtheit bei der Bevölkerung erfuhr (Polyb. 31,12,3),
organisierte er seine Flucht. Dabei fand er im Historiker Polybios und dem ptolemaischen
Botschafter Menyllos von Alabanda hochrangige Förderer (Polyb. 31,11-15; App. Syr. 47;
Diod. 18), die sicherlich ihre Hilfe im Einklang mit einigen Senatoren wußten. Nachdem die
Flucht bekannt geworden war, entschied der Senat zwar, eine Gesandtschaft an den Hof
Antiochos’ V. zu senden, die die Lage überwachen sollte. Sie bestand aus Tib. Sempronius
Gracchus (cos. 177 und 163), L. Cornelius Lentulus Lupus (cos. 156) und Servilius
Glaucia (letzterer sonst nur bekannt als Vater des C. Servilius Glaucia, praet. 100). Da die
Gesandten aber zunächst Missionen in Griechenland und Kleinasien ausführen sollten (Polyb.
31,15,9-12), ist zu vermuten, daß der Usurpation des Demetrios eine Chance gegeben werden
sollte (Bouché-Leclercq 1913, 313f.; Will 1972, 624).
Noch auf der Fahrt nach Syrien erklärte Demetrios dem Senat brieflich, er ziehe nicht gegen
Antiochos, sondern gegen dessen Vormund Lysias, um Octavius zu rächen. Auch der
syrischen Bevölkerung gegenüber wurde zunächst die Flucht aus Rom verheimlicht, um die
Usurpation durch eine angebliche römische Unterstützung zu legitimieren (Zon. 9,25).
Demetrios gelang es rasch, viele Anhänger zu finden und sowohl Lysias als auch seinen
Cousin Antiochos V. gefangenzunehmen und hinzurichten (OGIS I 252; 1 Makk 6f.; 2 Makk
14; Ios. ant. Iud. 12,389f.; Liv. per. 46; Iust. 34,3,6-9; App. Syr. 47).
Doch zeigte sich schon jetzt, daß Roms unverbindliche Politik keine echte Unterstützung des
Demetrios bedeutet hatte, sondern auf eine Schwächung und Destabilisierung des
Seleukidenreichs zielte. Denn fast zeitgleich mit seinem Herrschaftsantritt unterstützten die
Römer mit Timarchos einen neuen Usurpator. Dieser wirkte seit Antiochos IV. als Satrap
Mediens und/oder Babyloniens (Diod. 31,2a; App. Syr. 45) und als Statthalter der Oberen
Satrapien (Bengtson II 1964, 88). Die Machtübernahme des Demetrios hatte er nicht
akzeptiert. Er reiste 162/161 nach Rom und erwirkte (auch durch Bestechung) die Erlaubnis,
den Königstitel führen zu dürfen (Diod. 31,27a), wurde also zum offenen Abfall ermuntert
(dagegen Gruen 1976, 85, der diese Haltung als „ambiguous and non committal“ bezeichnet).
Dies war sicherlich mit dem amicus-Titel verbunden. Als rex Medorum (Pomp. Trog. prol.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
166
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
34) bzw. als Großkönig (Bellinger) verbündete er sich mit Artaxias I. von Armenien (Trogus
schwebte wohl irrtümlich ein Bündnis mit Ariarathes V. vor). und zog bis nach Zeugma,
wurde aber im Winter 161/160 von Demetrios geschlagen und hingerichtet. Letzterer erhielt
daraufhin in Babylonien den Kultnamen Soter (Diod. 31,27a; App. Syr. 47).
Um 160 setzte sich Demetrios dann in Kontakt mit dem 162 aufgebrochenen Gesandten Tib.
Sempronius Gracchus, der sich erst in Kleinasien befand, erklärte ihm seine völlige
Unterwerfung unter das Verdikt Roms und erreichte so dessen Fürsprache für eine offizielle
Anerkennung der Königswürde in Rom. Hierfür bedankte Demetrios sich gegenüber dem
Senat mit der Entsendung einer goldnen Krone im Wert von 10.000 Goldstücken und der
Auslieferung des Leptines (Polyb. 31,33 und 32,2-3; App. Syr. 47). Die Römer nahmen
allerdings nur das Gold, nicht aber den Mörder an, da sie die Syrer allgemein für den Tod des
Octavius verantwortlich machten und, laut Polybios, für spätere Zeiten ein Druckmittel bereit
halten wollten (Polyb. 32,3,11; Diod. 31,25; App. Syr. 47). Trotzdem ist kaum zu bezweifeln,
daß die unter Antiochos IV. herrschende amicitia formal wiederhergestellt wurde, da der
Senat erklärte, er werde dem Demetrios seine philanthropia bewahren, wenn dieser sich als
verläßlicher Herrscher erweise (Polyb. 32,3,13), was wohl eine explizite Anerkennung seines
Königtums bedeutete (Gruen 1976, 84; vgl. aber skeptischer Ehling 2008, 140).
Ähnlich beweist auch die Tatsache, daß Demetrios den makedonischen Thronprätendenten
Andriskos, der sich als Sohn des 168 getöteten Perseus ausgegeben hatte, nach dessen Flucht
an den Seleukidenhof den Römern auslieferte, seine Treue zu Rom, umso mehr, als das
syrische Volk auf die Unterstützung des Andriskos drang (Diod. 31,40a).
Trotzdem wurde bereits in den Auseinandersetzungen in Palästina die Einflußnahme Roms
auf die inneren seleukidischen Angelegenheiten wieder spürbar. Demetrios kämpfte dort seit
162 mit wechselndem Erfolg gegen die aufständischen Juden unter Iudas Makkabaios
(Niederlage des Strategen Nikanor: 1 Makk 7,33f.; 2 Makk 14,12f.; Ios. ant. Iud. 12,402; Sieg
des Strategen Bakchides und Tod des Judas: 1 Makk 9,1-29; Ios. ant. Iud. 12,420). Judas war
es 161 gelungen, einen Freundschaftsvertrag mit Rom zu schließen (1 Makk 8,17-32; Iust.
36,3,9; Ios. ant. Iud. 12,414-419). Hiermit verbunden war eine angebliche Aufforderung
Roms an Demetrios, den Krieg gegen Judäa einzustellen (1 Makk 8,31f.), auf die der König
aber nicht reagierte. Nach Judas erzielte auch sein Bruder Ionathan die Freundschaft mit Rom
(1 Makk 12,1 und 3-4). Trotzdem glückte es Demetrios im Jahre 157, vorübergehend Frieden
in dieser Region zu erzielen (1 Makk 7f.; 2 Makk 14f.; Diod. 31,27a; Ios. ant. Iud. 12,391f.
und 13,1f.). Dieser sollte allerdings nur von kurzer Dauer sein.
158 griff Demetrios in die Nachfolge des kappadokischen Königreichs ein und unterstützte
mit einem Heer (App. Syr. 47) Orophernes gegen den von Pergamon geförderten Ariarathes
V., welcher die Hand von Demetrios’ Schwester Laodike, der Witwe des Perseus, abgelehnt
hatte (Polyb. 32,10; Diod. 31,28 und 32; Iust. 35,1-5). Hiermit bedrohte Demetrios I.
pergamenische Belange. In der Folge suchte Eumenes II. deswegen seinerseits Demetrios’
Stellung zu gefährden, indem er Alexandros I. Balas, einen angeblichen Sohn Antiochos’ IV.,
unterstützte und ihm half, sich im Taurusgebirge festzusetzen (Diod. 31,32a). Zwar entschied
der Senat 157 angesichts einer Gesandtschaft von Orophernes und Ariarathes, das Königreich
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
167
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
aufzuteilen (Polyb. 32,10; App. Syr. 47); doch konnte sich Rom angesichts der Einsetzung
eines seleukidischen Vasalls in Kappadokien und der Verletzung der im Vertrag von Apameia
gesetzten Nordwestgrenze nur provoziert fühlen. Als es dem Nachfolger des Eumenes,
Attalos II. Philadelphos, gelang, Orophernes zu stürzen (Polyb. 3,5,2; Diod. 31,34; Iust.
35,1,2), wurde Demetrios’ Position in Rom zunehmend geschwächt.
Als daher 153 der Bruder des Timarchos, Herakleides, als pergamenischer Gesandter dem
römischen Senat Alexandros als legitimen Nachfolger des Antiochos IV. präsentierte und an
die Stellung des letzteren als amicus et socius erinnerte, erhielt der Usurpator ein positives
senatus consultum (Polyb. 33,18,6-14), welches sicherlich auch eine amicus-Klausel enthielt.
Dies war umso bedenklicher, als Demetrios seinen eigenen Sohn nach Rom geschickt hatte,
wohl um dem Senat als Geisel für den guten Willen seines Vaters zu bürgen – so jedenfalls
die Vermutung von Willrich, 1901, 2797. Allerdings wurde dieser vom Senat wieder
zurückgeschickt (Polyb. 33,16,5). Alexandros I. wurde neben Rom und Pergamon auch von
den folgenden Mächten unterstützt: Ariarathes V. von Kappadokien, Ptolemaios VI. von
Ägypten, dessen Sympathie Demetrios sich durch sein Verlangen nach Zypern verscherzt
hatte (Polyb. 33,5), und sogar von den Makkabäern, deren Führer Jonathan von Alexandros
152 zum Hohepriester ernannt worden war (1 Makk 10,15-21). Nach mehreren Niederlagen
seit 153 gegen Alexandros kam Demetrios, der sich zudem in Antiocheia unbeliebt gemacht
hatte (Ios. ant. Iud. 13,35; Iust. 35,1,8), im Winter 151/150 in einer Schlacht bei Antiocheia
ums Leben (Polyb. 33,19; Diod. 31,32a; Ios. ant. Iud. 13,35f.; 58f.; Iust. 35,1,6f.).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Willrich, Hugo: Demetrios [40] I. Soter, RE 4,2, 1901, 2795-2798.
Mehl, Andreas: Demetrios [7] I. Soter, DNP 3, 1997, 431f.
Schmitt, Hatto H.: Seleukidenreich II 7 (Demetrios I.), in: LH 2005, 974-977.
Bellinger, Alfred R.: The Bronze Coins of Timarchus 162-0 B.C., ANSMN 1, 1945, 37-44.
Bengtson, Herman: Die Strategie in der hellenistischen Zeit. Ein Beitrag zum antiken Staatsrecht, Band 2,
München 21964.
Bevan, Edwyn R.: The House of Seleucus, London 1902, 188-211.
Bouché-Leclercq, Auguste: Histoire des Séleucides (323-64 avant J.-C.), Bd. 1, Paris 1913, 316-337.
Braund, David: Rome and the Friendly King. The Character of Client Kingship, London 1984, bes. 13f.
Ehling, Kay, Untersuchungen zur Geschichte der späten Seleukiden (164-63 v.Chr.), Stuttgart 2008, 122-153.
Grainger, John D.: A Seleukid Prosopography and Gazetteer, Leiden/New York/Köln 1997, 39-42.
Gruen, Erich S.: Rome and the Seleucids in the Aftermath of Pydna, Chiron 6, 1976, 73-95.
Kneppe, Alfred: Timarchos von Milet – ein Usurpator im Seleukidenreich, in: Hans-Joachim Drexhage/Julia
Sünskes (Hgg.): Migratio et Commutatio. Th. Pekáry zum 60. Geburtstag, St. Katharinen 1989, 37-49.
Volkmann, Hans: Demetrios I. und Alexander I. von Syrien, Klio 19, 1925, 373-412.
Will, Édouard: Rome et les Séleucides, ANRW I 1, 1972, 590-632.
DaE/30.07.08/08.11.09–r/01.08.08/23.02.10
Demetrios II. Theos Philadelphos Nikator, König des Seleukidenreichs
0. Onomastisches
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
168
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Nikator bezieht sich entweder auf den Sieg gegen Alexandros I. Balas 146 v.Chr. (vgl. App.
Syr. 67) oder aber auf mögliche Erfolge im Osten (McDowell 1935, 43). Vgl. im allgemeinen
auch LeRider 1995.
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemmata Seleukiden
Älterer Sohn Demetrios’ I. Soter, Bruder des Antiochos VII. Megas Soter Euergetes
Kallinikos. Um 161 v.Chr. geboren, erhob sich Demetrios II. gegen Alexandros I. Balas im
Jahre 147 und beherrschte nach dessen Tod 146 bis 125 das Seleukidenreich. Freilich wurde
er im Lauf seiner langen Regierung mit mehreren Erhebungen konfrontiert (Antiochos VI.
Epiphanes Dionysios; Diodotos Tryphon; vielleicht Antiochos VII.; Alexandros II. [Zabinas])
und verbrachte die Jahre 140 bis 129 in parthischer Gefangenschaft war. 125 wurde er von
Alexandros II. vom Thron verdrängt und getötet; seine direkten Nachfolger waren seine
Söhne Seleukos V. und Antiochos VIII. Epiphanes Philometor Kallinikos (Grypos).
2. Verhältnis zu den Römern und Karriereverlauf
Über die Jugend Demetrios’ II., der wohl um oder nach 161 zur Welt kam (Grainger1997, 42)
ist wenig bekannt. Ausgenommen ist freilich die Tatsache, daß sein Vater ihn 153 nach Rom
schickte, um dem pergamenischen Gesandtschaft Herakleides entgegenzuwirken, welcher hier
Alexandros I. Balas als legitimen Nachfolger des Antiochos IV. Epiphanes präsentieren sollte.
Herakleides erinnerte laut Polybios an die Stellung des Antiochos IV. als amicus et socius und
erlangte ein positives senatus consultum (Polyb. 33,18,6-14), welches sicherlich auch eine
amicus-Klausel enthielt. Demetrios hingegen, der damals noch ein Kind war und dem Senat
wohl als Geisel für den guten Willen seines Vaters bürgen sollte (Vermutung bei Willrich,
1901a, 2797), wurde vom Senat wieder zurückgeschickt (Polyb. 33,16,5). Demetrios’ I. ließ
seinen Sohn Demetrios II. zusammen mit dessen Bruder Antiochos VII., als seine Lage im
Kampf gegen Alexandros I. gefährlich wurde, nach Kleinasien in Sicherheit bringen (Iust.
35,2,1).
Anfang 147 erhob sich Demetrios II. mit Unterstützung des kretischen Söldnerführers
Lasthenes gegen Alexandros I. und landete in Kilikien (Ios. ant. Iud. 13,86-90). Schnell
erklärte sich Apollonios, der Statthalter Koilesyriens, für Demetrios, wurde aber von Ionathan
geschlagen, der weiterhin zu Alexandros I. hielt (1 Makk 10,67-89; Ios. ant. Iud. 13,88-102).
Auch Ptolemaios VI. Philometor, der als Schwiegervater des Alexandros I. die syrische Küste
gegen Demetrios sicherte (1 Makk 11,1-8; Ios. ant. Iud. 13,104), schloß sich diesem an, da
Alexandros angeblich einen Anschlag auf ihn geplant hatte (Ios. ant. Iud. 13,106-108; laut
Volkmann 1925, 410f. nur eine später vorgeschobene Ausrede). Ptolemaios VI. versprach
Demetrios II. die Hand seiner noch mit Alexandros verheirateten Tochter Kleopatra Thea und
schloß ein Bündnis mit seinem neuen Schwiegersohn (1 Makk 11,9; Ios. ant. Iud. 13,109f.;
Diod. 32,9c). Bei den Antiochenern scheint Demetrios zunächst keinen Rückhalt gefunden zu
haben, da sie nach der Vertreibung des Alexandros nur Ptolemaios VI. aufnehmen wollten,
der sich zunächst zum König Asiens krönen ließ, aus Rücksicht auf die Römer die Herrschaft
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
169
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
aber dem Demetrios überließ (Ios. ant. Iud. 13,113f.), vielleicht im Austausch für Koilesyrien
(Diod. 32,9c).
Alexandros, von den Römern nicht weiter gefördert, wurde 146 von Demetrios II. in einer
Schlacht am Oinoparas vernichtend geschlagen, wobei damals auch Ptolmaios VI. tödlich
verwundet wurde (Iust. 35,2,3f.; Strab. 16,2,8 [751C]; App. Syr. 67; Ios. ant. Iud. 13,112116). Nach der Ermordung des Alexandros durch den arabischen Fürsten Zabdiel/Diokles (1
Makk 11; Diod. 32,27,9d/10,1; Ios. ant. Iud. 13,117f.; vgl. auch Liv. per. 52) wurde
Demetrios II., der die Epitheta Theos Philadelphos Nikator angenommen hatte, zum
alleinigen Herrscher des Seleukidenreichs.
Im Süden mit dem Makkabäeraufstand und im Osten mit der parthischen Expansion
konfrontiert, gewährte Demetrios den Juden gegen Einstellung der Feindseligkeiten
weitgehende Zugeständnisse und beließ Jonathan im Amt (1 Makk 11,20-37). Nach der
Entlassung des Heeres, womit wohl die Staatskasse saniert werden sollte, kam es vor allem in
Antiocheia zu gefährlichen Aufständen. Deren blutige Niederschlagung durch jüdische
Truppen kostete Demetrios II. die Sympathie vieler Untertanen (1 Makk 11,38-50; Diod. 33,4
und 9; Ios. ant. Iud. 13,129-141). Schon 145 hatte der König daher mit einer ersten
organisierten Erhebung zu rechnen, als der ehemalige Stratege Alexandros’ I. Balas, Diodotos
Tryphon, dessen Sohn Antiochos VI. zum Herrscher ausrief und gegen Demetrios II. zu Felde
zog (Diod. 33,4a). Diodotos besetzte Südsyrien und Antiocheia, womit er Demetrios II. auf
Nordsyrien (mit Stützpunkt Seleukeia: Liv. per. 52), Phoinizien, Kilikien, Mesopotamien und
Medien (Ios. ant. Iud. 13,145) reduzierte. Seinen Erfolg verdankte Diodotos nicht zuletzt
seiner Allianz mit dem Makkabäer Jonathan (1 Makk 11,57f.; Ios. ant. Iud. 13,145f.). Dieser
nutzte freilich seine Machtposition, um nach Möglichkeit eine Autonomie Judäas zu
erreichen. Durch eine Gesandtschaft nach Rom im Jahr 144 (1 Makk 12,16) vermochte er das
foedus des Jahres 161 zu erneuern (1 Makk 12,1; 3; 16; Ios. ant. Iud. 13,163-166; Timpe
1974).
Die verräterische Gefangennahme und Ermordung des Jonathan (1 Makk 12,48; Ios. ant. Iud.
13,192) machte Diodotos jedoch in den Augen der Juden zum Feind, so daß Demetrios II.
Frieden mit Jonathans Nachfolger Simon schließen konnte. Diesem gewährte er gegen
militärische Unterstützung Amnestie, Steuerfreiheit und den Besitz der Festungen, also
faktische Unabhängigkeit (1 Makk 13,35-49; Diod. 33,4a; App. Syr. 68; Iust. 36,1,10 und
3,9). Demetrios scheint es gelungen zu sein, Diodotos aus Antiocheia zu vertreiben und bis
nach Ptolemais zurückziehen zu lassen (Ehling 2008, 178f.). Ob die Usurpation der
Königsherrschaft durch Diodotos nach der Ermordung Antiochos’ VI. nun aber in das Jahr
139/8 oder bereits 142/1 stattfand, ist schwierig zu klären (s. unter Antiochos VI.).
In diesem Kontext ist auch die Senatsgesandtschaft (vgl. Cavaignac 1951) des P. Cornelius
Scipio Aemilianus (cos. I 147, cos. II 134), L. Caecilius Metellus Calvus (cos. 142), Sp.
Mummius (leg. 146) sowie des Philosophen Panaitios von Rhodos vom Jahr 139 zu sehen
(Diod. 33,28b; Athen. 12,549d–e = Poseidonios, FGrH 87 F 6 (= F 126 Theiler = p. 249
Malitz); Iust. 38,8,8-11). Justin bezeichnet ihre Aufgabe ad inspicienda sociorum regna
(38,8,8), ohne indes ihren syrischen Gesprächspartner namentlich zu nennen. Diesen mag man
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
170
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
mit Demetrios II. identifizieren (Ehling 2008, 182), falls er 139 noch in Syrien weilte.
Allerdings kommen auch Diodotos (vgl. Cavaignac 1951) oder gar schon mit Antiochos VII.
(Bilz 1935, 46) in Frage.
Als 141/0 die Parther das Zweistromland besetzten, glaubte sich Demetrios II. stark genug,
139 gegen sie in den Krieg zu ziehen (Ios. ant. Iud. 13,184ff.). Dabei hoffte er vielleicht auch,
durch die beabsichtigte Gebietserweiterung neue Truppen für den Kampf gegen Diodotos
rekrutieren zu können (Grainger 1997, 43). Er geriet aber nach ersten Erfolgen im Frühjahr
138 in Gefangenschaft (1 Makk 14,1ff.; Ios. ant. Iud. 13,219; App. Syr. 67; Iust. 38,9; zum
Datum Ehling 2008, 184-188 und Sachs/Hunger 1996, III S. 167 Nr. 137 Z. 10). Zwei
Fluchtversuche verliefen unglücklich, so daß er insgesamt 11 Jahre dort verbrachte (Dabrowa,
1992). Der Partherkönig Phraates II. hielt ihn in ehrenvoller Haft, um ihn als außenpolitisches
Druckmittel sowohl gegen Diodotos benutzen zu können, der spätestens zu diesem Zeitpunkt
die Königswürde und den Thronnamen Tryphon übernommen hatte, als auch notfalls gegen
Demetrios’ eigenen Bruder, Antiochos VII., ausspielen zu können. Dieser hatte sich
möglicherweise bereits von Side aus als Prätendent zu erkennen gegeben und, vielleicht, nicht
nur gegen Diodotos, sondern auch gegen Demetrios II. gewandt. Dies könnte vielleicht
erklären, wieso Demetrios auf der Münzprägung seines Partherkriegs den bisher geführten
Beinamen Philadelphos ablegte (Ehling 2008, 184). Jedenfalls richtete er sich im Frühjahr
138 spätestens seit der Gefangennahme des Demetrios gegen Diodotos und trieb diesen 136/5
in den Selbstmord.
Demetrios II. wurde bald nach seiner Gefangennahme mit der parthischen Prinzessin
Rhodogune, der Tochter Mithridates’ I. und Schwester Phraates’ II., verheiratet. Mit ihr hatte
er zwei Kinder (1 Makk. 14,1-3; Ios. ant. Iud. 13,219; App. Syr. 67; Iust. 38,9). Zwei
Fluchtversuche scheiterten (Iust. 38,9). Erst 129, als Antiochos VII. den Parthern gefährlich
wurde, führten diese Demetrios II. wieder ins Seleukidenreich zurück, entweder mit dem Ziel,
Antiochos gegenüber Entgegenkommen zu zeigen, hatte dieser doch die Freilassung des
Bruders zur Friedensbedingung gemacht (Diod. 34,15), oder aber mit der Absicht, einen
Bruderstreit zu provozieren (Iust. 38,10,7). Nachdem Antiochos VII. allerdings gefallen war
und ein seleukidischer Sieg dadurch zunichte wurde, versuchte Phraates II., Demetrios II.
wieder einzufangen, doch entkam dieser seinen Häschern und gelangte wohlbehalten nach
Syrien zurück (Iust. 38,10,11).
Demetrios II. wurde zusehends unbeliebt, was auf seine Übernahme parthischer Sitten
zurückgeführt wurde (Iust. 39,1,3). Der König entschied sich wohl auch für die parthische
Barttracht, wie die Münzen zeigen (Ehling 2008, 206f.). Dennoch gelang es ihm, sich wieder
in den Besitz des Reichs zu setzen, das allerdings ganz auf Syrien und Kilikien reduziert war.
Angesichts der schwierigen Situation seiner Schwiegermutter Kleopatra II. unternahm
Demetrios in der Hoffnung, den ägyptischen Thron besteigen zu können (Iust. 39,1,2), einen
Zug gegen Ptolemaios VIII. Euergetes II., mußte aber aus Furcht vor einer Meuterei
umkehren (Euseb. chron. 1,257f. Schoene = FGrH 260 F 32,21). Der Ptolemaierkönig
förderte daraufhin 128 die Usurpation des Alexandros II. (Zabinas), der laut Justin als
Adoptivsohn Antiochos’ VII. ausgegeben wurde (Iust. 39,1,4f.), laut Porphyrios aber als Sohn
Alexanders I. galt (Euseb. chron. 1,258 = FGrH 260 F 32,21). Rasch schlossen sich ihm große
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
171
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Teile Syriens an (Antiocheia bereits 128: Iust. 39,1,3). Alexandros II. vermochte Demetrios
II. 125 bei Damaskos zu schlagen (Euseb. chron. 1,257f. = FGrH 260 F 32,21). Von seiner
Frau Kleopatra nicht oder jedenfalls nicht dauerhaft in Ptolemais aufgenommen (Ios. ant. Iud.
13,268), wurde er daraufhin Mitte 125 vom Kommandanten der Stadt Tyros, die ebenfalls von
ihm abfiel, getötet (Liv. per. 60; App. Syr. 68; Iust. 39,1).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Willrich, Hugo: Demetrios [40] I. Soter, RE 4,2, 1901a, 2795-2798.
Willrich, Hugo: Demetrios [41] II. Nikator, RE 4,2, 1901b, 2798-2801.
Mehl, Andreas: Demetrios [8] II. Theos Nikator Philadelphos, DNP 3, 1997, 432.
Schmitt, Hatto H.: Art. Seleukidenreich II 13 (Demetrios II.), in: LH 2005, 978-979.
Bevan, Edwyn R.: The House of Seleucus, London 1902, 217–234; 247–250.
Bouché-Leclercq, Auguste: Histoire des Séleucides (323-64 avant J.-C.), Bd. 2, Paris 1913, 343–370; 384–394.
Cavaignac, Eugène: À propos des monnaies de Tryphon, L’ambassade de Scipio Émilien, Rev Num 13, 1951,
131–138.
Colledge, Malcolm A.R.: The Parthians, London 1967.
Ehling, Kay: Untersuchungen zur Geschichte der späten Seleukiden (164-63 v.Chr.), Stuttgart 2008, 159–212.
Dabrowa, Edward: Könige Syriens in der Gefangenschaft der Parther, in: Tyche 7, 1992, 45-54.
Grainger, John D.: A Seleukid Prosopography and Gazetteer, Leiden/New York/Köln 1997, 42-44.
Houghton, Arthur.: The Second Reign of Demetrios II of Syria art Tarsus, ANSMN 24, 1979, 111-116.
LeRider, Georges: La politique monétaire des Séleucides en Coele Syrie et en Phénicie après 200, BCH 119,
1995, 391-404.
McDowell, Robert H.: Coins from Seleucia on the Tigris, Ann Arbor 1935.
Sachs, Abraham J./Hunger, Hermann: Astronomical Diaries and Related Texts from Babylonia, vol. III: Diaries
from 164 B.C. to 61 B.C., Wien 1996.
Timpe, Dieter: Der römische Vertrag mit den Juden von 161 v.Chr., Chiron 4, 1974, 133–152.
Volkmann, Hans: Demetrios I. und Alexander I. von Syrien, Klio 19, 1925, 373-412.
DaE/08.11.09–r/21.02.10
Demetrios, Sohn Philipps V. von Makedonien
0. Onomastisches
Anders als bei Perseus handelt es sich beim Namen Demetrios um einen typischen
makedonischen Namen bzw. um den eines möglichen Thronfolgers.
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemmata Antigoniden
Wohl 207 v.Chr. als jüngerer Sohn Philipps V. und dessen zweiter Frau geboren (Liv.
39,53,2; 40,6,4; 41,23,10). Bruder des späteren Königs Perseus; 197-191 als Geisel in Rom
(Polyb. 18,39,5f.; Liv. 33,13,14f.). 184 Gesandter in Rom (Polyb. 23,1f.; Liv. 39,47). Wegen
enger Kontakte zu den Römern und angeblichen Verrats 181 oder 180 ermordet (Polyb. 23,7;
10; Liv. 40,7-16.20.23f.).
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
172
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
2. Verhältnis zu den Römern und Karriereverlauf
Er wurde für das Wohlverhalten Philipps V. nach dem Zweiten Makedonischen Krieg 197 als
Geisel nach Rom entsandt (Polyb. 18,39,5; Liv. 33,1,14; App. Mac. 9,2; Plut. Arat. 54; Flam.
9,4f.; Cass. Dio 18,60; Zon. 9,16) und wurde auch im Triumphzug des T. Quinctius
Flamininus vorgeführt (Liv. 34,52,9). Seine Rückkehr wurde Philipp V. bereits 194 in
Aussicht gestellt (Liv. 35,31,5; Diod. 28,15,1) und erfolgte 191 (Liv. 36,35,13; App. Mac.
9,5; App. Syr. 20).
Demetrios hatte in Rom offensichtlich gute Kontakte geknüpft. Als es zu erneuten Konflikten
zwischen Makedonien und Rom kam, wurde er daher 184 zusammen mit Philipps Vertrauten
Apelles und Philokles entsandt, um die Rechtfertigung seines Vaters zu überbringen (Polyb.
23,1,3-6; Liv. 39,35,2f.; 39,47; App. Mac. 9,6; Iust. 32,2,3). Sein Auftreten vor dem Senat
war eher unsicher (Polyb. 23,2,1-5; Liv. 39,47,1ff.), doch wurden ihm vom Senat Wohlwollen
entgegengebracht. Es wurde ihm erlassen, auf die Vorwürfe der anwesenden griechischen
Gesandte im Detail zu antworten (Polyb. 22,2,1-5; Liv. 39,47,3-7; Iust. 32,2,4; App. Mac. 9,6)
und ein Großteil der von ihm verlesenen Argumente Philipps – mit ausdrücklichem Verweis
auf die Sympathien für Demetrios, eines amicus populi Romani, – akzeptiert (Polyb. 23,2,10;
Liv. 39,47,8-11; Iust. 32,2,4; App. Mac. 9,6f. – auch zur Verärgerung Philipps).
Demetrios überschätzte in der Folge offenbar seine Rolle (Polyb. 13,3,4ff.; Liv. 39,53,8ff.).
Unter anderem war dies darauf zurückzuführen, dass ihm Flamininus in einer vertraulichen
Unterredung nahe legte, dass er der von Rom favorisierte Thronfolger für Makedonien sei
(Polyb. 23,3,7f.; Liv. 39,48,1; 39,53,4; 40,12-17). Flamininus soll soweit gegangen sein, in
einem Schreiben Philipp V. zu einer möglichst baldigen erneuten Entsendung des Demetrios
nach Rom aufzufordern (Polyb. 23,3,8; Liv. 40,11,1).
Nach seiner Rückkehr konnte er in Makedonien offenbar einen Kreis von Personen um sich
sammeln, die ebenfalls eher einen Ausgleich mit Rom anstrebten (Polyb. 23,7,1-7; Liv.
39,53,1-11). Demetrios entwickelte, gestützt auf diese Gruppierung, eigene Thronambitionen,
zumal offenbar Gerüchte aufkamen, dass Perseus illegitimer Herkunft und damit Demetrios
der rechtmäßige Nachfolger Philipps war (Polyb. 23,7,6; Liv. 39,53,3; 40,9,2; 41,23,10; Plut.
Arat. 54; Plut. Aem. Paull. 8; Ael. V.H. 12,43).
Auch knüpfte er Kontakte zur römischen Gesandtschaft unter Q. Marcius Philippus (Liv.
39,53,10-11). Nach Darstellung der Quellen wurde von den Römern als der geeignetere
Thronfolger gesehen und protegiert. Es gelang ihm, auch am makedonischen Hof Anhänger
zu sammeln bzw. angeblich eine Art zweiten Hof zu bilden (Liv. 39,53,7). Möglicherweise ist
eine für die letzten Jahre Philipps V. bezeugte Verschwörung mit dieser Faktion zu verbinden,
die lieber Demetrios auf dem Thron sehen wollte (Polyb. 23,10,8ff.; Liv. 39,53,4-11; 40,3,7).
Die enge Verbindung nach Rom und die Ansätze zu einer eigenständigen Politik weckten
offenbar Misstrauen sowohl bei Philipp, als auch – in noch höherem Maße – bei Perseus, der
seinen Vater in dieser Hinsicht angeblich weiter anstachelte. (Polyb. 23,7,4ff.; 10,12-15; Liv.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
173
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
39,53,5ff.; 40,2ff.; Justin 32,2,6ff.). In der Folge wurde Demetrios von wichtigeren
Beratungen ausgeschlossen und marginalisiert. Zur Eskalation kam es 182 bei einem Fest zu
Ehren des Heros Xanthus. Bei einem Scheingefecht, das sich zu einer echten Schlacht
entwickelte, errang Demetrios, nicht Perseus, der Anführer der gegnerischen Partei den Sieg
(Polyb. 23,10,17; Liv. 40,6,1-7).
Livius schildert die darauf folgende Eskalation des Konflikts, in den vor allem auch die
Anhänger der beiden Seiten verwickelt waren (Liv. 40,7). Perseus beschuldigte seinen Bruder
später, einen Anschlag auf ihn geplant zu haben (Liv. 40,8,1-4). Der Streit wurde vor dem
König ausgetragen, der zwar noch keine Entscheidung in dieser Sache fällte, jedoch
Demetrios nun offenbar noch stärker in Verdacht hatte (Liv. 40,8-16; Polyb. 23,11). Dieser
brach offenbar seine Kontakte nach Rom ab (Liv. 40,20,5f.).
Als Philipp V. zusammen mit Perseus 181 zu einem Kriegszug nach Thrakien aufbrach,
begleitete ihn Demetrios zunächst, wurde dann aber nach Makedonien zurück geschickt (Liv.
40,21,4-7). Dem Statthalter Didas, der ihn begleitete, soll Demetrios sich anvertraut und ihn
in seine Pläne einer Flucht nach Rom eingeweiht haben (Liv. 40,21,9-11; 23,1-3). Didas
informierte Philipp V. in dieser Sache. Dieser hatte zudem zwei Vertraute Philipps, Apelles
und Philokles, nach Rom geschickt, die über Demetrios Erkundigungen einholen sollten (Liv.
40,20,3f.; 40,23,5ff.; Iust. 32,2,9). Sie überbrachten einen – möglicherweise gefälschten –
Brief des Flamininus, in dem dieser die Ambitionen des Demetrios bestätigte (Liv. 40,23,7ff.;
40,54,9ff.). Ein enger Freund des Demetrios, der bereits vorher inhaftiert worden war, wurde
nun gefoltert und hingerichtet, ohne dass sich jedoch der Verdacht gegen Demetrios
bestätigen ließ (Liv. 40,23,4). Dennoch wurde nunmehr der Tod des Demetrios beschlossen
(Polyb. 23,3,9; Liv. 40,24,1ff.; Zon. 9,22,2). Philipp schickte seinen Sohn 180 in Begleitung
von Didas nach Astraeum. Letzterer führte ihn dann – angeblich um eines Opfers willen –
nach Herakleia, wo er unter nicht mehr genau zu klärenden Umständen ums Leben kam
(Polyb. 23,10-11; Liv. 40,24,2-8; 41,23,11; App. Mac. 11,1; Diod. 29,25; Iust. 32,2,9f.; Plut.
Arat. 54; Plut. Aem. Paull. 8; Zon. 9,22). Angeblich wurde Philipp später von
Gewissensbissen geplagt und bereute sein Vorgehen (Liv. 40,54,1-56,9; Iust. 32,3,1ff.).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Kaerst, Julius: Demetrios [37], RE 4,2, 2794f.
Günther, Linda-Marie: Demetrios [5], DNP 3, 1997, 431.
Badian, Ernst: Foreign Clientelae 264-70 B.C., Oxford 1958.
Badian, Ernst: Titus Quinctius Flamininus. Philhellenism and Realpolitik, Cincinnati 1971.
Briscoe, John: Flamininus and Roman Politics, 200-189 B.C., Latomus 31, 1972, 22-53.
Dell, H.J.: The Quarrel between Demetrius and Perseus: A Note on Macedonian National Policy, in: Ancient
Macedonia III, Thessaloniki, 1983, 67-76.
Edson, Charles F.: Perseus and Demetrios, HSCP 46, 1935, 191-202.
Errington, R. Malcolm: Dawn of Empire: Rome’s Rise to World Power, London 1971.
Errington, R. Malcolm: Geschichte Makedoniens: Von den Anfängen bis zum Untergang des Königreiches,
München 1986.
Gruen, Erich: The Last Years of Philipp V., GRBS 15,2, 1974, 221-246.
Hammond, N.G.L.: A History of Macedonia, Bd. III: 336-167 B.C., Oxford 1998.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
174
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Meloni, P.: Perseo e la fine della monarchia Macedone. Annali delle Facolta di Lettere, Filosofia e di Magistero
dell’ Università de Cagliari, 20, Rom 1953.
Pfeilschifter, Rene: Titus Quinctius Flaminius: Untersuchungen zur römischen Griechenlandpolitik, Göttingen
2005.
Walbank, Frank W.: Philipp V. of Macedon, Cambridge 1967.
Walbank, Frank W.: ΦΙΛΙΠΠΟΣ ΤΡΑΓΩΙΔΟΥΜΕΝΟΣ, JHS 58, 1938, 55-68.
Welwei, Karl-Wilhelm: Könige und Königtum im Urteil des Polybios, Köln 1963.
DoE/23.03.10 – r/27.03.10
Dexandros, Sebastos-Priester von Apameia am Orontes
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
Bekannt ist Dexandros lediglich aus der Ehreninschrift (s. 2) seines Urenkels L. Iulius
Agrippa, der in der ersten Hälfte des 2. Jhs. n.Chr. ein Patron der wohl gemeinsamen
Heimatstadt Apameia am Orontes war. Dort ist u.a. eine Auszeichnung des Dexandros durch
Augustus bezeugt (27 v. / 14 n.Chr.).
Die Namen des Nachkommens legen eine irgendwie geartete Verwandtschaft mit den
jüdischen Königen Iulius Agrippa I. und II. nahe. Dagegen wendet Rey-Coquais (1973, 53f.,
gefolgt z.B. in SEG LII 1553 ad loc.) ein, dass die basilikai timai der Vorfahren des Agrippa
lediglich auf die Verleihung königlicher Insignien, nicht auf die Königswürde selbst bezogen
seien, da sonst mindestens ein Ahn im Königsrang angeführt worden wäre. Dies ist möglich,
aber ohne jegliche Parallele für eine solche Auszeichnung im 1. Jh. v. oder n.Chr. bleibt
unsicher, worin genau die Ehrung bestanden haben soll. In einem gewissen
Spannungsverhältnis zur eigenen Argumentation behauptet Rey-Coquais (1973, 53) zudem,
dass derartige basilikai timai ansonsten nur für die Herodianer bezeugt seien. Solche Beispiele
sind mir aber nicht bekannt, auch J. Wilker (Email vom 28.04.12; vgl. Wilker 2007) hält dies
für einen Irrtum. Am ehesten wird man wohl an Iulius Antiochos Epiphanes Philopappos
denken, den Enkel des letzten Königs von Kommagene (Antiochos IV.) und Suffektconsuls
des Jahres 109 n.Chr.: Dieser trug gelegentlich den Königstitel, ohne dass die genauen
Umstände bekannt wären (PIR2 I 155). Ein Verwandtschaftsverhältnis zu diesem ist aber nicht
belegbar, ein Abstammungsverhältnis ganz auszuschließen.
Die Argumentation Rey-Coquais’ erscheint auch insofern inkonsequent, als Tetrarchen unter
den Vorfahren sicher angenommen werden (1973, 50; 52f.), obwohl auch hierfür kein
Beispiel genannt wird – es sei denn, man betrachtet Dexandros als einen solchen
Würdenträger. Derselbe wird aber keineswegs als solcher bezeichnet, wenngleich eine
gewisse Ambivalenz von den Verfassern der Ehreninschrift wohl bewusst in Kauf genommen
wurde. Des Weiteren darf nicht übersehen werden, dass die Wahl des einzigen namentlich
genannten Vorfahren der über den Großraum Syrien verzweigten Dynastie (Rey-Coquais
1973, 51-55) eine herausragende Rolle in genau der Stadt gespielt hatte, deren Bürger
Agrippa später geehrt wurde.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
175
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Folglich muss eine Abstammung von König Agrippa I. als höchst wahrscheinlich gelten. Ob
antijüdische Ressentiments in der Zeit nach dem großen Jüdischen Krieg 65-73 n.Chr. bzw.
während neuer Unruhen gegen Ende der Herrschaft Trajans ein weiterer Grund dafür waren,
die Nachfahren des Königs Herodes zu übergehen, mag dahingestellt sein.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Unser ganzes Wissen über Dexandros beruht auf der oben erwähnten Inschrift des L. Iulius
Agrippa aus dem Jahr 116 oder 117 n.Chr. (Rey-Coquais 1973, 49). Die Passage betreffs der
Vorfahren lautet: (25) [πολλ]οὶ μὲ ν ἀ πὸ πατρὸ ς καὶ μητρὸ ς | [πρό γον]οι ἔ νδοξοι καὶ
φιλό τειμοι καὶ τε- | [τρά ρχαι] καὶ βασιλικῶν τειμῶν μετέ χοντες∙ | [μά λιστα δ]ὲ
Δέ ξανδρος ὁ πρῶτος τῆ ς ἐ παρ- | (30) [χεί ας ἱ ε]ρασά μενος πρό παππος αὐ τοῦ ὑ πὸ |
[θεοῦ Αὐ ]γού στου διὰ τὴ ν πρὸ ς τὸ ν Ῥ ωμαί ων | [δῆ μον] φιλί αν καὶ πί στιν
ἐ πικρί ματι | [φί λο]ς καὶ σύ μμαχος ἀ νεγρά φη χαλ- | [καῖ ς δ]έ λτοις ἐ ν τῷ
Καπετωλί ῳ, ... (Rey-Coquais 1973, 39-84 Nr. 2, Z. 25-36 = SEG LII 1553 Z. 24-35; vgl.
AE 1976, 678; Sartre 2005, 70f.). Vgl. die Übersetzung der editio princeps (Rey-Coquais
1973, Nr. 2 S. 46): „il a aussi, tant du côté de son père que celui de sa mère, des ancêtres
illustres et généreux, des tétrarques, des personnes qui avaient part aux honneurs royaux;
notamment Dexandros, le premier de la province à être grand-prêtre, son arrière-grand-père,
fut par le divin Auguste, à cause de son amitié et de sa fidélité envers le Peuple Romain,
inscrit par respect comme ami et allié sur des tables de bronze au Capitole; dans ces tables
étaient aussi publiquement attestés les autres honneurs exceptionnels qui lui furent donnés, à
lui et à sa famille“.
Auf dieser Grundlage schließt Rey-Coquais (1973, 50-55, gefolgt z.B. in SEG LII 1553 und
von Sartre 2005, 70f.), dass Dexandros der erste Sebastos-Priester des Koinons von Syrien
noch zu Lebzeiten des Augustus gewesen war (so auch Gebhardt 2002, 305). Zudem schreibt
er ihm den Tetrarchenrang zu, wobei er das dazugehörige Territorium südwestlich von
Apameia lokalisiert und mit der von Plinius erwähnten Tetrarchie der Nazariner (nat. 5,33,81)
identifiziert. Beide Erklärungen sind aber zumindest problematisch.
So liegen Zeugnisse für das Koinon der Syrer ansonsten erst seit der Zeit Domitians vor;
entsprechend hatten die frühesten Ansätze für dessen Gründung vor Auffindung der AgrippaInschrift in der Mitte des 1. Jhs. n.Chr. gelegen (Deininger 1965, 87f.; Rey-Coquais 1973, 52;
Gebhardt 2002, 305-310). Als Titel für ein solches Priestertum wäre außerdem archiereus zu
erwarten gewesen, was nicht im verlorenen Text gestanden haben kann (entkräftet wird dieser
Einwand indes durch einen hierasamenos tōn tessarōn eparchiōn des 2. Jhs. n.Chr.: Gebhardt
2002, 306). Zudem verstand man unter Eparchie ab der flavischen Zeit zunehmend eine
Untereinheit der Provinz, wenngleich Apameia weiterhin in der Eparchie Syria verblieb (vgl.
z.B. Gebhardt 2002, 306f.). Ferner sind auch die Kultgottheiten der früheren Kaiserzeit nicht
bestimmbar. Schließlich ist fraglich, ob die jährlich wechselnde Stellung eines Hohepriesters
eine derart hohe Auszeichnung gewesen sein soll, dass diese nach einem Jahrhundert erwähnt
wurde, höhere Ehren anderer Vorfahren des Agrippa hingegen ungenannt blieben (s. auch 1).
Neben der Möglichkeit, dass Dexandros wirklich der erste Jahrespriester eines Koinon-Kultes
für Thea Rhome und Theos Sebastos bis 14 n.Chr. oder auch unter Tiberius wurde, ist deshalb
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
176
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
auch in Erwägung zu ziehen, dass es sich um einen lokalen Kaiserkult seiner Heimatstadt und
vielleicht sogar um ein lebenslanges Priestertum gehandelt hat. Hier werden nur weitere
Inschriftenfunde Klarheit schaffen können.
Während die Textergänzung im Fall der Tetrarchen unter den Vorfahren des Agrippa auch
schon mit Blick auf die klimaktisch folgenden „königlichen Ehren“ so gut wie sicher ist (Z.
27f.), zwingt nichts zu der Annahme, dass auch Dexandros diesen Titel getragen hätte. Es
wäre jedenfalls überraschend, dass die Verfasser der Ehreninschrift den höchsten Rang
unerwähnt gelassen hätten. Dies deckt sich mit meiner andernorts gezogenen
Schlussfolgerung, dass die kleineren syrischen Tetrarchien (nördlich von Ituräa) wohl erst in
die nachaugusteische Zeit zurückgehen dürften (Coşkun ca. 2013 Kapitel III).
Es bleibt natürlich die Besonderheit, dass Dexandros als Polisbürger offiziell zum amicus
populi Romani erklärt und dies auf einer Bronzeinschrift am Kapitol (Z. 33f.) vermerkt
wurde. In derselben Inschrift sollen andere Privilegien für ihn und seine Familie enthalten
gewesen sein, die aber nicht einzeln ausgeführt werden (Z. 34-36). Man mag hier z.B. an die
Sonderrechte denken, welche Seleukos von Rhosos noch vor Actium verliehen worden waren,
wobei die Frage, ob Dexandros zugleich römischer Bürger wurde, offen bleiben muss. Eine
Abschrift jener Bronzeinschrift befand sich im Stadtarchiv von Apameia (Z. 36-38). Über den
Zeitpunkt dieser von Augustus persönlich beantragten (Z. 30f.) Auszeichnung des Dexandros
kann man nur spekulieren. Ein Zusammenhang mit dem Feldzug Octavians nach Ägypten 30
v.Chr. bzw. des Augustus gegen die Parther um 20 v.Chr. ist denkbar.
3. Auswahlbibliographie
RE –; DNP –.
SEG LII 1553 = AE 1976, 678
Coşkun, Altay: Die Tetrarchie als hellenistisch-römisches Herrschaftsinstrument. Mit einer Untersuchung der
Titulatur der Dynasten von Ituräa. Demnächst in den Beiträgen der Tagung: Client Kings between Centre and
Periphery (Exzellenzcluster TOPOI & Friedrich-Meinecke Institut, FU Berlin, 18.-19.2.2011), hg. von Ernst
Baltrusch und Julia Wilker, ca. 2013.
Deininger, Jürgen: Die Provinziallandtage der römischen Kaiserzeit von Augustus bis zum Ende des dritten
Jahrhunderts, München 1965.
Gebhardt, Axel: Imperiale Politik und provinziale Entwicklung. Untersuchungen zum Verhältnis von Kaiser,
Heer und Städten im Syrien der vorseverischen Zeit, Berlin 2002.
Rey-Coquais, Jean-Paul: Lucius Iulius Agrippa, Annales archéologiques arabes syriennes 23, 1973, 39-84.
Sartre, Maurice: The Middle East under Rome. Translated by Catherine Porter and Elizabeth Rawlings,
Cambridge MA 2005.
Wilker, Julia: Für Rom und Jerusalem. Die herodianische Dynastie im 1. Jahrhundert n.Chr., Frankfurt/M. 2007.
AC/21.04.12 – r/30.04.12
Dicomes, König der Geten
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
177
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
König der Geten, Herrscher über eines der Teilreiche, in die der Herrschaftsbereich des
Burebista nach dessen Tode zerfiel.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Vor Actium riet P. Canidius Crassus cos. suff. 40, der Befehlshaber des Landheeres, dem M.
Antonius, keine Seeschlacht zu wagen und den Rückzug nach Thrakien und Makedonien
anzutreten, denn Dicomes, der König der Geten, habe versprochen, mit einem großen Heere
zur Hilfe anzurücken (Plut. Ant. 63,4).
Cass. Dio 51,22,6-8 erwähnt Daker, die zuerst Gesandte zu Octavian geschickt, sich aber
später auf die Seite des Antonius geschlagen hatten; sie waren diesem jedoch wegen ihrer
ständigen Streitigkeiten von geringem Nutzen. Später waren einige Gefangene gezwungen, in
den Wettkämpfen anlässlich der Einweihung des Tempels des Divus Iulius gegen Sueben
anzutreten. Ob diese Daker zu den Untertanen des Dicomes oder zu einem anderen
Dakerstamm gehörten, ist nicht sicher zu entscheiden.
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Brandis, K.: Dicomes, RE 5.1, 1903, 358.
Daicoviciu, H.: Dacia de la Burebista la cucerirea romană, Cluj 1972, 110f.
Daicoviciu, C.: Dakien und Rom in der Prinzipatszeit, ANRW II 6, 1977, 909f.
Ştefan, Al. S.: Les guerres daciques de Domitien et de Trajan. Architecture militaire, topographie, images et
histoire, Rom 2005, 388.
Sullivan, Richard D.: Near Eastern Royalty and Rome, 100-30 B.C., Toronto 1990, 148.
LR/15.02.2006–r/29.07.08
Diodotos Tryphon, Usurpator im Seleukidenreich
0. Onomastisches
Der Herrscherbeiname Tryphon wurde erst nach der Usurpation des Königtums angenommen.
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
Diodotos erhob sich als Stratege Alexandros’ I. Balas 145 gegen Demetrios’ II. Theos
Philadelphos Nikator und setzte das Kleinkind Antiochos VI. Epiphanes Dionysios als
Herrscher ein. Nach dessen Tod (Ermordung?) 142/1 oder 139/8 riß er unter dem Namen
Diodotos Tryphon selbst die Herrschaft an sich. 137 wurde er von Antiochos VII. Megas
Soter Euergetes Kallinikos, dem Bruder Demetrios II., geschlagen und getötet.
2. Verhältnis zu den Römern und Karriereverlauf
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
178
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Diodotos entstammte dem Ort Kasiane bei Apameia (Strab. 16,2,10 [752C]) und somit einer
Gemeinde makedonischer Militärsiedler. Wohl falsch ist App. Syr. 68, wo Tryphon als Sklave
bezeichnet wird; vgl. schon Bevan 1902, 226 Anm. 2. Nach erster Diensttätigkeit unter
Demetrios I. Soter fiel er zu Alexandros I. Balas ab (Diod. 32,9c), gehörte zu dessen nächstem
Umfeld (Diod. 33,4a; Strab. 16,2,10 [752C]), war Kommandant Antiocheias (Diod. 33,3) und
bekleidete den Rang eines Strategen (1 Makk 11,39; Ios. ant. Iud. 13,131). Trotz der
Übergabe der Stadt an Ptolemaios VI. Philometor anläßlich des Aufstands Demetrios’ II.
(Diod. 32,9c) schien er in Ungnade gefallen zu sein und flüchtete ins östliche Syrien (Diod.
33,4a).
Diodotos nutzte die Empörung der von Demetrios II. entlassenen Truppen, um die Führung
der Aufständischen an sich zu reißen und Apameia zu besetzen (Diod. 33,4a; Strab. 16,2,10
[752C]). Auch brachte er den zweijährigen (Liv. per. 52) Sohn des Alexandros I. Balas,
Antiochos, der vom Araberfürsten Iamblichos (1 Makk 1,39; Diod. 33,4a) oder
Malchos/Malichos (Ios. ant. Iud. 13,131) aufgezogen worden war, in seine Gewalt und
proklamierte ihn als Antiochos VI. zum Herrscher (1 Makk 11,54; Diod. 33,4a; Ios. ant. Iud.
13,144).
Seine Truppen besetzten nach einer Niederlage Demetrios’ II. Südsyrien und Antiocheia (zur
Frage, ob die Krönung erst hier stattfand, vgl. Ehling 2008, 166). So reduzierte er Demetrios
II. auf Nordsyrien, Phoinizien, Kilikien und Mesopotamien. Die Kämpfe in Kilikien bzw. die
aktive Unterstützung von Dissidenten waren letztlich Auslöser für das Überhandnehmen des
Piratenunwesens (Strab. 14,5,2 [668]; hierzu Maroti 1962; Ormerod 1924). Diodotos’ Erfolge
waren vor allem einer Allianz mit dem Makkabäer Ionathan zu verdanken (1 Makk 11,57f.;
Ios. ant. Iud. 13,14ff.). Freilich nutzte dieser seine Machtposition, um eine Autonomie Judäas
zu erreichen. Durch eine Gesandtschaft nach Rom (1 Makk 12,16) vermochte er 144 das
foedus des Jahres 161 zu erneuern (1 Makk 12,1-3 und 16; Ios. ant. Iud. 13,163-166; Timpe
1974).
Nun fühlte Diodotos sich offenbar sicher genug, die allzu große Autonomie der Makkabäer
wieder zu beschneiden. So brachte er Jonathan in seine Gewalt, um dessen Bruder Simon –
vergeblich – zu Zugeständnissen zu zwingen (1 Makk 12,39-48; Ios. ant. Iud. 13,187-193).
Dieser schloß sich nun allerdings Demetrios II. an (1 Makk 13,1-11.34-40; Ios. ant. Iud.
13,194-217) und vertrieb die Besatzungen des Diodotos (Jerusalem im Jahr 141: 1 Makk
13,49-51; Ios. ant. Iud. 13,215). Als 141/0 die Parther das Zweistromland besetzten, zog
Demetrios II. 139 gegen sie, geriet aber nach ersten Erfolgen 138 in längere Gefangenschaft.
Vgl. 1 Makk 14,1ff.; Ios. ant. Iud. 13,219; App. Syr. 67; Iust. 38,9; zum Datum Ehling 2008,
184-8 und Sachs/Hunger 1996, III S. 167, Nr. 137, Z. 10). Ob der Tod des Antiochos VI.
bereits ins Jahr 142/1 zu datieren ist, oder erst ins Jahr 139/8, ist schwer zu eruieren (Näheres
unter dem Eintrag Antiochos VI.), ebenso die Frage, ob es sich tatsächlich um einen Mord
handelte, oder die Version des Diodotos, Antiochos sei an den Folgen eines ärztlichen
Eingriffs gestorben, der Wahrheit entspricht (Ehling 2008, 179).
Nach dem Tod seines Schützlings ließ Diodotos sich von den Truppen zum basileus
autokrator proklamieren (Liv. per. 55; Diod. 33,28; Ios. ant. Iud. 13,219; App. Syr. 68). Er
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
179
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
verzichtete in seiner Münzprägung (BMC Seleucid Kings of Syria 68f.) auf die Weiterführung
der seleukidischen Ära und nahm offiziell den Thronnamen Tryphon an (App. Syr. 68), der,
zusammen mit dem teils als makedonisch (etwa Grainger 1997, 69), teils als kretisch (Ehling
2008, 180f.) identifizierten Helm auch auf seinen Münzen erscheint.
Diodotos suchte seine Herrschaft auch durch die Römer legitimieren zu lassen. Überliefert ist
die Übersendung einer goldenen Nike-Statue im Wert von 10.000 Goldstücken an den Senat,
die ihm, wie er hoffte, aufgrund ihres symbolischen wie finanziellen Wertes die
Unterstützung der Tiberstadt gewährleisten sollte. Schließlich hatte auch Demetrios I. einen
Kranz im selben Wert nach Rom bringen lassen (Diod. 31,29). Inwieweit die Herstellung der
Statue noch zu Lebzeiten des Antiochos VI. geschah, ist nicht explizit überliefert; belegt ist
allerdings, daß die Antwort des Senats auf die angebliche Ermordung des Kindes verwies und
das Standbild inschriftlich nicht als Spende des Diodotos, sondern des Antiochos bezeichnen
ließ (Diod. 33,28a), was wohl eine gewisse Ablehnung der Usurpation impliziert (BouchéLeclerq 1913, 369).
Es ist unsicher, wer der Gesprächspartner der aus P. Cornelius Scipio Aemilianus (cos. I
147, cos. II 134), L. Caecilius Metellus Calvus (cos. 142), Sp. Mummius (leg. 146) sowie
dem Philosophen Panaitios von Rhodos zusammengesetzten Senatsgesandtschaft des Jahres
139 war (Diod. 33,28b; Athen. 12,549d–e = Poseidonios, FGrH 87 F 6 [= F 126 Theiler = p.
249 Malitz]; Iust. 38,8,8-11). Laut Justin bereisten sie den Osten ad inspicienda sociorum
regna (38,8,8). Denkbar sind Demetrios II. (Ehling 2008, 182), Diodotos (vgl. Cavaignac
1951) oder gar Antiochos VII. (Bilz 1935, 46). Letzterer konnte die Anhänger seines
gefangenen Bruders Demetrios II. für sich gewinnen und erklärte sich gegen Diodotos, falls er
nicht schon während dessen Partherfeldzug die Usurpation versuchte (vgl. Ehling 2008, 184).
Nach der Meuterei einiger Truppenteile (1 Makk 15,10; Ios. ant. Iud. 13,221f.) verlor
Diodotos allmählich Nordsyrien, dann Phoinikien, und wurde zunächst in Dora, südlich von
Ptolemais (1 Makk 15,11-14 und 25; Ios. ant. Iud. 13,223f.), dann schließlich in Apameia
eingeschlossen (Ios. 13,224). Dort gab er sich wohl noch 137 in auswegloser Situation den
Tod (1 Makk 15,39; Strab. 14,5,2 [668]; App. Syr. 68; Iust. 36,1,8).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Hoffmann, W.: Tryphon [1], RE 7A1, 1939, 715-722.
Mehl, Andreas: Tryphon [1], DNP 12,1, 2002, 883.
Schmitt, Hatto H.: Art. Seleukidenreich II 12 (Diodotos Tryphon), in: LH 2005, 977f.
Baldus, Hans R.: Der Helm des Tryphon und die seleukidische Chronologie der Jahre 146-138 v.Chr., in: JNG
20, 1970, 217-239.
Bevan, Edwyn R.: The House of Seleucus, London 1902, 226-238.
Bilz, Konrad: Die Politik des P. Cornelius Scipio Aemilianus, Stuttgart 1935.
Bouché-Leclercq, Auguste: Histoire des Séleucides (323-64 avant J.-C.), Bd. 2, Paris 1913, 353-370.
Cavaignac, Eugène: À propos des monnaies de Tryphon: L’ambassade de Scipio Émilien, RevNum 13, 1951,
131-138.
Ehling, Kay: Untersuchungen zur Geschichte der späten Seleukiden (164-63 v.Chr.), Stuttgart 2008, 165-191.
Fischer, Thomas: Zu Tryphon, in: Chiron 2, 1972, 201-213.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
180
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Grainger, John D.: A Seleukid Prosopography and Gazetteer, Leiden/New York/Köln 1997, 69-71.
Maróti, E.: Diodotos Tryphon et la piraterie, Acta Antiqua 10, 1962, 187-194.
Ormerod, Henry A.: Piracy in the Ancient World, London 1924.
Sachs, Abraham J./Hunger, Hermann: Astronomical Diaries and Related Texts from Babylonia, vol. III: Diaries
from 164 B.C. to 61 B.C., Wien 1996.
Timpe, Dieter: Der römische Vertrag mit den Juden von 161 v.Chr., Chiron 4, 1974, 133-152.
DaE/08.11.09–r/23.02.10
Dion von Alexandreia
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
Alexandrinischer Philosoph; ermordet a. 56 in Rom (Strab. geogr. 17,1,11 [796]; Cass. Dio
39,14; Cic. Cael. 23). Schüler und Freund des Antiochos von Askalon. Hörte später dessen
Bruder Aristos in Athen und ging dann zum Peripatos über. Als Verfasser von
Tischgesprächen bekannt.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Kontakt mit L. Licinius Lucullus proquaest. 87-80, cos. 74, procos. 73-66/63, als dieser a.
87/86 Ägypten besuchte (Cic. acad. 2,11). Kam Ende 57 als Leiter einer alexandrinischen
Gesandtschaft nach Rom, um die Klagen des a. 58 aus Ägypten vertriebenen Königs
Ptolemaios XII. zurückzuweisen. Ptolemaios ließ einen Teil der Gesandtschaft bei Ankunft in
Puteoli ermorden; Bestechung der anderen Gesandten. Dion wurde vom Senat vorgeladen, um
zu den Vorgängen Stellung zu nehmen. Eingeschüchtert oder ebenfalls bestochen, erschien er
jedoch nicht. Kurze Zeit später wurde er im Haus seines römischen Gastgebers L. Lucceius
ermordet (Cass. Dio 39,14,3).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Crusius: Dion [13] und [14], RE 5,1, 1903, 847.
Ameling, Walter: Dion, DNP 3, 1997, 621.
Bloedow, Edmund: Beiträge zur Geschichte Ptolemaios’ XII., Diss. Würzburg 1964, 59.
Christmann, Kathrin: Ptolemaios XII. von Ägypten, Freund des Pompeius, in: Altay Coskun (Hg.): Roms
auswärtige Freunde in der späten Republik und im frühen Prinzipat, Göttingen 2005, 113-26, 100; 115; 122.
Olshausen, Eckart: Rom und Ägypten von 116 bis 51 v.Chr., Diss. Erlangen 1963, 51f.
Siani-Davies, Mary: Ptolemy XII Auletes and the Romans, Historia 46, 1997, 306-340.
Sullivan, Richard D.: Near Eastern Royalty and Rome, 100-30 B.C., Toronto 1990, 238.
KC/30.09.04–r/30.09.04/29.06.07
Diviciacus, Druide der Häduer [Var. Divitiacus]
0. Onomastisches
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
181
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Sein Name ist ein keltisches Namenskompositum aus divic- „rächen“; vgl. Evans, Gaulic
Personal Names 81 f.; Schmidt 194; CIL XIII 2081 (Lyon). Daneben ist auch die
Schreibweise Divitiacus überliefert (z.B. Cic. div. 1,90).
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
Diviciacus kam aus einer vornehmen Familie des gallischen Stammes der Häduer, deren
Mitglieder führende Positionen innerhalb der Stammesgemeinde einnahmen. Seine Geburt ist
um 100 v.Chr. anzusetzen, offensichtlich hatte er Kinder (Caes. Gall. 1,31,8; Hofeneder 2008,
38). Vermutlich hatte er zeitweilig in seinem Stamm das höchste Amt des vergobretus inne,
ferner wird er auch als Druide bezeichnet (Cic. div. 1,90, s.u.). Er ist damit der einzige
namentlich bekannte Druide Galliens.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Die Häduer hatten in den Wirren des 2. Jahrhunderts v.Chr., die zur Provinzialisierung
Südgalliens führten, als erster Stamm im freien Gallien die Verbindung zu Rom gesucht und
waren vielleicht schon vor 121 v.Chr. vom Senat als fratres consaguineique des römischen
Volkes bezeichnet worden; vgl. Caes. Gall. 1,33,2; auch Strab. geogr. 4,3,2 [192]; Reichert
1999, 275; Kremer 1994, 229f. Diese singuläre Bezeichnung einer Blutsbruderschaft ist wohl
nicht im staatsrechtlichen Sinne zu verstehen, sondern eine keltische Eigenheit, die auf die
Beziehung zwischen Römern und Häduern übertragen wurde (Kremer 1994, 230 Anm. 1).
Abweichend hiervon glaubt Elwyn 1993, 278f. hellenistischen Einfluss zu erkennen, wobei
die Verwandtschaft konkret mit der gemeinsamen Abstammung von den Trojanern begründet
worden sei; wieder anders Dench 2005, 12; 22-25, die von einer mediterranen Universalie
ausgeht. Diese besondere Form des amicitia-Verhältnisses beinhaltete jedenfalls keine
gegenseitige Beistandsklausel.
Diviciacus war im Jahre 61 v.Chr. Mitglied einer Delegation der Häduer, die den römischen
Senat in Vertrauen auf dessen Freundschaft um Hilfe gegen den Nachbarstamm der Sequaner
und den mit diesen verbündeten Germanenkönig Ariovistus bat. Dieser hatte zusammen mit
den Sequanern die Häduer mehrfach geschlagen, zuletzt entscheidend bei Magetobriga (Caes.
Gall. 1,38; Cic. Att. 1,19,2). Ein großer Teil des häduischen Adels war offenbar gefallen; die
Überlebenden mussten den Sequanern und Ariovistus Geiseln stellen und Tribute zahlen
(Caes. Gall. 1,31,7; 35,3; 36,3). Der Senat beschloss, dass der jeweilige Statthalter der Gallia
Transpadana die Häduer und die übrigen Freunde des römischen Volkes verteidigen solle,
aber nur dann, wenn die Republik davon keinen Schaden nähme. Dieser Beschluss
verpflichtete die Römer im Grunde zu nichts.
Anlässlich seines Aufenthalt in Rom führte Diviciacus M. Tullius Cicero und seinen Bruder
Quintus als seine Gastfreunde in die keltische Wahrsagekunst ein. Vgl. Cic. div. 1,90: eaque
divinationum ratio ne in barbaris quidem gentibus neglecta est, siquidem et in Gallia Druidae
sunt, e quibus ipse Divitiacum Haeduum hospitem tuum laudatoremque cognovi, qui et
naturae rationem, quam physiologian Graeci appellant, notam esse profitebatur et partim
auguriis, partim coniectura, quae essent futura, dicebat, ... Auffällig ist, dass Cicero ihn
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
182
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
durchaus ehrenvoll beschreibt und den sonst zu findenden despektierlichen Unterton
gegenüber der keltischen Religiosität weglässt (vgl. Hofeneder 2008, 41).
Dieser Besuch des Diviciacus in Rom wird auch in einem anonymen Panegyricus für
Constantin aus dem Jahre 312 erwähnt (Paneg. Lat. 5,3,2). Demnach soll er auf seinen Schild
gestützt vor dem Senat gesprochen haben. Nicht sicher ist, ob diese Darstellung auf einer
lokalen Überlieferung beruht oder von dem aus Augustodunum (Autun) stammenden
Verfasser ausgeschmückt wurde (vgl. Hofeneder 2008, 38 Anm. 165).
Nach der ergebnislosen Mission nach Rom verlor Diviciacus sein Ansehen im Stamm
offenbar, und eine antirömische Parteiung unter seinem jüngeren Bruder Dumnorix, der
offenbar über eine private Reitertruppe verfügte, übernahm die Macht (1,16,5 und 18,8).
Mit der Übernahme der gallischen Statthalterschaft durch C. Iulius Caesar wendete sich das
Blatt. Diviciacus war dem Senat als Vertreter einer prorömischen Politik bekannt und bot sich
förmlich als Unterstützer der Politik Caesars in Gallien an. So wird er von diesem – anders als
die meisten keltischen Führer – außerordentlich positiv charakterisiert. Caesar bediente sich
seiner und nahm in der Folge mehrfach seine Hilfe gegen Ariovistus in Anspruch; zugleich
gewann Diviciacus als Führer der prorömischen Partei innerhalb des Stammes wieder an
Einfluss (Caes. Gall. 1,16,5; 18,1-8; 19,2-3; 20,1-6; 31;32,4; 41,4). Offenbar hatte er aber nur
mangelhafte Kenntnisse des Lateinischen und Griechischen, da sich Caesar bei seinen
Unterredungen mit ihm eines Dolmetschers bediente (Caes. Gall. 1,19,3).
Er nahm auch an einer Delegation gallischer Adliger teil, die Caesar nach seinem Sieg über
die Helvetier 58 v.Chr. aufsuchten, um ihm Glück zu wünschen und gleichzeitig ein
concilium totius Galliae vorzubereiten (Caes. Gall. 1,30). Auf dieser Versammlung, die
sicherlich nicht aus allen Stämmen Galliens bestand (Walser 1956, 11f.), lässt Caesar den
Diviciacus als Wortführer der Anklage gegen Ariovistus (Caes. Gall. 1,31f.) und Fürsprecher
für die Sequaner auftreten. Er konnte bei Caesar auch die Schonung seines Bruders
durchsetzen (Caes. Gall. 1,19,2-20,6) und wurde in der Folgezeit für Caesar die Schlüsselfigur
bei den Häduern. Während Caesar Dumnorix zu einem isolierten Einzelkämpfer stilisiert, der
mit zweifelhaften Mitteln die Königswürde bei den Häduern anstrebe, wird dies in direkten
Gegensatz zu der besonnenen, gerechten und romtreuen Haltung seines Bruders Diviciacus
gestellt. Dabei war dem Prokonsul durchaus bewusst, dass es im Stamm eine große
antirömische Partei gab und er gleichzeitig auf die Häduer als Bündnispartner angewiesen
war, so dass sich allzu harte Maßnahmen verboten.
57 v. Chr. unterstützte Diviciacus Caesar im Krieg gegen die Belger, wobei er mit seinen
Truppen das Gebiet der Bellovacer verwüsten sollte, konnte aber schließlich deren Schonung
bewirken (Caes. Gall. 2,5,2; 10,5; 14,1-15,2). Danach wird er bei Caesar nicht mehr erwähnt,
entweder ist er bald darauf gestorben oder mit seiner prorömischen Politik innerhalb des
Stammes gescheitert (vgl. dazu Hofeneder 2008, 38 mit Anm. 168).
Literatur:
Münzer, F.: Divitiacus [2], RE 5,1, 1903, 1239-1240.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
183
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Spickermann, W.: Diviciacus [2], DNP 3, 1997, 702.
Emma Dench: Romulus’ Asylum, Oxford 2005.
Dobesch, G.: Einige Beobachtungen zu Politik und Tod des Haeduers Diviciacus und seines Bruders Dumnorix,
Tyche 19, 2004, 19-74.
Elwyn, Sue: Interstate Kinship and Roman Foreign Policy, TAPA 123, 1993, 261-86.
Hofeneder, A.: Die Religion der Kelten in den antiken literarischen Zeugnissen. Sammlung, Übersetzung und
Kommentierung. Band I: Von den Anfängen bis Caesar. Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften,
Mitteilungen der Prähistorischen Kommission 59, Wien 2005, 167-169.
Hofeneder, A.: Die Religion der Kelten in den antiken literarischen Zeugnissen. Sammlung, Übersetzung und
Kommentierung. Band II: Von Cicero bis Florus, Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften,
Mitteilungen der Prähistorischen Kommission 66, Wien 2008, 37-41.
Kremer, B.: Das Bild der Kelten bis in augusteische Zeit. Studien zur Instrumentalisierung eines antiken
Feindbildes bei griechischen und römischen Autoren, Stuttgart 1994.
Perrin, F.: Diviciacos – ein Druide aus Bibracte. In: H.-U. Cain/ S. Rieckhoff (Hgg.): fromm – fremd –
barbarisch. Die Religion der Kelten, Mainz 2002, 119-121.
Reichert, H.: Haedui, RGA2 13, 1999, 274-277.
Walser; G.: Caesar und die Germanen. Studien zur Tendenz römischer Feldzugsberichte. Historia Einzelschriften
1, Wiesbaden 1956.
WS/26.06.08–r/07.08.08
Domnekleios, Tetrarch der Tosioper (?) [Var. Domnilaus]
0. Onomastisches
Domnekleios (Strab. geogr. 12,3,6) und Domnilaus (Caes. civ. 3,4,5) werden regelmäßig
miteinander identifiziert. Holder 1, 1896, 1303; 1370 führt einerseits wenig überzeugend auf
*Domni-los (sic) < Domnil-avo-s (sic) zurück, andererseits treffender auf *Dumno-clev-io-s
(„der tiefen rum besitzt“ [sic]). Das erste Etymon begegnet z.B. auch in Dumnorix (‘Herrscher
der Dunkelheit/ der Unterwelt’); für den zweiten Bestandteil verweist Holder auf den
Männernamen Clev-ius. Die Form Domnekleios könnte unter dem Einfluß von gr. kleios
(‘Ruhm’) stehen. Die von Caesar bezeugte Namenform könnte darauf hinweisen, daß sich der
Tetrarch im Verkehr mit Römern eines latinisierten Namens bediente; der erste Teil klingt an
dominus (‘Herr’) an, das gerade in seiner Schwundstufe domn- auch onymisch war; der
zweite ist eine Übersetzung der zugrunde liegenden Wurzel (laus = ‘Ruhm’). Vgl.
ausführlicher Coskun 2007, Teil E.V.
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemma Galater / Tosioper
Ca. a. 110/90-48. Gilt in der Forschung meist als Tetrarch oder Dynast der tektosagischen
Galater, teils auch als Bruder des Kastor (I.) Tarkondarios. Doch war er wahrscheinlich ein
Sohn oder Nachkomme des Eporedorix, des Tetrarchen der galatischen Tosioper. Vater des
Adiatorix. Fiel vermutlich bei Pharsalos a. 48. Verwandtschaft oder Klientelverhältnis mit
Deiotaros (I.) Philorhomaios ist gut möglich. Vgl. jetzt Coskun 2007, Teil B und E.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
184
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Vermutlich trat er bald nach 86 – vielleicht mit der Unterstützung des Deiotaros (I.)
Philorhomaios – die Nachfolge des Eporedorix bei den Tosiopern an. Von Cn. Pompeius
Magnus ca. a. 64 wohl als Tetrarch bestätigt, wenn auch nicht namentlich bezeugt (Strab.
geogr. 12,3,1 [541]; App. Mithr. 114,560). Führte auf dessen Seite gemeinsam mit Kastor (II.)
300 tektosagische Reiter in die Schlacht von Pharsalos (Caes. civ. 3,4,5), wo er
wahrscheinlich fiel. Geschäfte mit römischen Bankiers über seinen Sohn Adiatorix (Cic. fam.
2,12,2 [95 SB]) sind anzunehmen.
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Münzer, Friedrich: Domnilaus, RE 5,1, 1903, 1521.
Spickermann, Wolfgang: Domnilaus, DNP 3, 1997, 761f.
Coskun, Altay: Von der ‘Geißel Asiens’ zu ‘kaiserfrommen’ Reichsbewohnern. Studien zur politischen und
gesellschaftlichen Entwicklung der Galater unter besonderer Berücksichtigung der amicitia populi Romani
und der göttlichen Verehrung des Augustus (3. Jh. v.–2. Jh. n.Chr.), unveröff. Habil. Trier 2007, Teil B und
E.
Hoben, Wolfgang: Untersuchungen zur Stellung kleinasiatischer Dynasten in den Machtkämpfen der
ausgehenden römischen Republik, Diss. Mainz 1969, 78-83; 95; 117.
Holder, Alfred: Alt-celtischer Sprachschatz, Bd. 1, Leipzig 1896.
Mitchell, Stephen: Anatolia. Land, Men, and Gods in Asia Minor, Bd. 1: The Celts in Anatolia and the Impact of
Roman Rule, Oxford 1993, 36; 40.
Stähelin, Felix: Geschichte der kleinasiatischen Galater, 21907, Nd. Osnabrück 1973, 89-92; 100; 114.
Sullivan, Richard D.: Near Eastern Royalty and Rome, 100-30 B.C., Toronto 1990, 171.
AC/14.09.04–r/29.06.07
Dorylaos, Gesandter des Deiotaros (I.) Philorhomaios
0. Onomastisches
Entgegen der in APRRE_001 geäußerten Vermutung eines keltisch-griechischen Decknamens
(vgl. etwa Holder 1, 1896, 1512-21 zu Gaiso-/'Speer'-Namen, z.B. Gaezatorix) ist sicher von
einer Verwandtschaft mit den prominenten Vorfahren des Geographen Strabon aus
Amaseia/Pontos zu rechnen; zu diesen vgl. Strab. geogr. 10,4,10 (477f.); 12,3,33 (557);
Engels 1999, 18-21; zur Verwandtschaft mit dem Gesandten des Deiotaros vgl. Coskun 2007,
Teil G.III zu Nr. 8.
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
Pontischer Aristokrat, belegt a. 45; s. 2. Vielleicht identisch mit dem biologischen Vater des
Metrodoros, des Adoptivsohns des Menemachos und Ankyraner Sebastos-Priesters in Ankyra
(OGIS II 533,35).
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
185
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Im Sommer 45 im Auftrag des Deiotaros (I.) Philorhomaios im Gefolge des Hieras nach Rom
gesandt. Damals vermutlich Gast des Cn. Domitius Calvinus cos. 54, procos. Asiae 48-46
(Cic. Deiot. 32) oder des P. Sestius procos. Ciliciae 49-47 (Cic. Att. 16,3,6= 413 ShB vom
17.7.44). Er verbürgte sich im Nov. 45 vor dem Diktator für seinen König, der Attentats- und
Verratsklagen ausgesetzt war (Cic. Deiot. 41). Vielleicht blieb er bis a. 44 zusammen mit
Hieras in Rom und gelangte ebenfalls in Kontakt mit M. Antonius.
3. Auswahlbibliographie
RE –; DNP –.
Coskun, Altay: Amicitiae und politische Ambitionen im Kontext der causa Deiotariana, in: ders. (Hg.): Roms
auswärtige Freunde in der späten Republik und im frühen Prinzipat, Göttingen 2005, 127-54, 130.
Coskun, Altay: Von der ‘Geißel Asiens’ zu ‘kaiserfrommen’ Reichsbewohnern. Studien zur politischen und
gesellschaftlichen Entwicklung der Galater unter besonderer Berücksichtigung der amicitia populi Romani
und der göttlichen Verehrung des Augustus (3. Jh. v.–2. Jh. n.Chr.), unveröff. Habil. Trier 2007, Teil G.III.2
zu Nr. 8.
Engels, Johannes: Augusteische Oikumenegeographie und Universalhistorie im Werk Strabons von Amaseia,
Stuttgart 1999.
Holder, Alfred: Alt-celtischer Sprachschatz, Bd. 1, Leipzig 1896, 1512-21 (nur zu Gaiso-Namen).
Stähelin, Felix: Geschichte der kleinasiatischen Galater, 21907, Nd. Osnabrück 1973, 114; 118.
AC/14.09.04–r/29.06.07
Drusilla, Tochter des Königs Agrippa I. von Judäa = Iulia Drusilla
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemmata Herodianer
Drusilla wurde 38 n.Chr. als Tochter Agrippas I. von Judäa geboren (Ios. bell. Iud. 2,220; ant.
Iud. 18,132; 19,354). Sie wurde von ihrem Vater mit Antiochos Epiphanes, dem Kronprinzen
von Kommagene, verlobt. Die Verbindung wurde jedoch gelöst, als sich dieser seinem
früheren Versprechen zum Trotz weigerte, zum Judentum zu konvertieren (Ios. ant. Iud.
19,355; 20,139). Ihr Bruder Agrippa II. gab sie daraufhin Azizus von Emesa zur Frau (Ios.
ant. Iud. 20,139). Zu ihrem dritten Gatten Felix (PIR2 A 828) und ihrem Sohn Agrippa (PIR2
A 809) s. im folgenden.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom / Römern und Karriereverlauf
Mitte der 50er Jahre verließ sie ihren Ehemann Azizus und heiratete den Procurator der
Provinz Iudaea Felix. Sein vollständiger Name ist umstritten, vorgeschlagen wurden M.
Antonius Felix und (Tib.) Claudius Felix (Ios. ant. Iud. 20,141-143; Apg. 24,24; vgl. Suet.
Claud. 28). Mit ihm war sie bei einem Verhör des Apostels Paulus zugegen (Apg 24,24).
Nach der Amtszeit des Felix lebten sie wahrscheinlich in Italien. Ihr Sohn Agrippa kam mit
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
186
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
seiner Gattin beim Ausbruch des Vesuvs a. 79 ums Leben (Ios. ant. Iud. 20,144; Kokkinos
1998, 321).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Stein, Otto: Drusilla [1], RE 5,2, 1905, 1741.
Bringmann, Klaus: Drusilla, DNP 3, 1997, 824.
PIR2 D 195.
Kokkinos, Nikos: The Herodian Dynasty. Origins, Role in Society and Eclipse, Sheffield 1998.
Schürer, Emil: Geschichte des jüdischen Volkes im Zeitalter Jesu Christi, Bd. 1, Leipzig 1901.
Wilker, Julia: Für Rom und Jerusalem. Die herodianische Dynastie im 1. Jahrhundert n.Chr., Frankfurt/M. 2007.
JW/25.02.10 – r/02.03.10
Dynamis, Queen of Pontos and of the Bosporos
0. Onomastic Issues
It is a name without any known dynastic connection. Adopted the title basilissa (Hoben 1969,
32).
1. Central Biographical Dates and Family Relations
 Stemmata Bosporani
Queen of the Bosporos and Pontos, daughter of Pharnakes (II); granddaughter of Mithradates VI
Eupator Dionysos (Cass. Dio 54.4; CIRB 979). Minns 1913, 152 proposed that her mother may
have been a Maeotian or Sarmatian. Sister of Dareios and Arsakes, kings of Pontos. It is doubtful
whether she was the princess offered as wife to C. Iulius Caesar by Pharnakes in 47 (App. civ.
2.91; Rostovtzeff 1919, 98; Hoben 1969, 32; cf. Braund 1984, 178f. n. 79). Her date of birth is
unknown; Rostovtzeff 1919, 98 proposed ca. 59/60. Wife of Asandros, king of the Bosporos, and
thereafter of Scribonius, who had rebelled against Asandros and killed him ca. 17/16 BC. (Cass.
Dio 54.24.3f.; Lucian. macr. 17). After Scribonius’ death in ca. 13/12 BC, she married Polemon
(I), king of Pontos and the Bosporos, although without Augustus’ permission (Cass. Dio
54.24.4-6). With this king, Dynamis had a daughter, who was married to Rhoimetalkes (II), king
of Thrakia (Saprykin 1984). It is not clear whether Dynamis was the mother of Aspurgos, king of
the Bosporos (Saprykin 2004, 170; Braund 2005, 261). The date of her death has been discussed:
some scholars have defended ca. 12 BC (Saprykin 2004, 171; Braund 2005, 258), while others
propose a year after AD 7/8 (Rostovtzeff 1919, 99; Rose 1990, 458; Parfenov 1996; Podossinov
2002, 31; Kearsley 2005, 100).
2. Relations with Rome / Romans and Career
Bore the epithet Philorhomaios: CIRB 30, 31, 38, 978, 979, 1046.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
187
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
It has been proposed that Dynamis went to Rome with M. Vipsanius Agrippa cos. 37, 28, 27 in
13 BC, and she was represented in the Ara Pacis together with Aspurgos (Rose 1990, 457ff.;
Parfenov 1996, 101f.).
Erected statues in Pantikapaion, Phanagoreia and Hermonassa honouring Augustus (CIRB 38,
1046) and Livia (CIRB 978) as “saviours” and “benefactors”. This is clear evidence for
Dynamis’ amicitia with the domus Augusta (Heinen 1996, 86).
Cities of her kingdom changed their name, showing Dynamis’ adhesion to Rome: Pantikapaion
was renamed as Caesarea, and Phanagoreia as Agrippeia, just two of the places where Dynamis
had dedicated the abovementioned statues (Rostovtzeff 1919, 100; Heinen 1996, 86).
Two busts of Livia have been found in the Bosporan kingdom, probably connected with the
relationship of Dynamis or Pythodoris (I) with Augustus’ wife (Braund 2005, 258).
3. Select Bibliography
Stein: Dynamis, RE 5,2, 1905, 1879f.
von Bedow, Iris: Dynamis, DNP 3, 1997, 856.
Braund, David C.: Rome and the Friendly King. The Character of the Client Kingship, London 1984.
Braund, David C.: Polemo, Pythodoris and Strabo. Friends of Rome in the Black Sea Region, in: A. Coskun (ed.):
Roms auswärtige Freunde in der späten Republik und im frühen Prinzipat, Göttingen 2005, 253-270.
Gajducevic, Victor F.: Das Bosporanische Reich, Berlin-Amsterdam 19712.
Heinen, Heinz: Rome et le Bosphore: notes épigraphiques, CCG 7, 1996, 81-101.
Heinen, Heinz: Die Mithradatische Tradition der bosporanischen Könige – ein mißverstandener Befund, in: K. Geus/
K. Zimmermann (eds.): Punica–Libyca–Ptolemaica. Festschrift für Werner Huß zum 65. Geburtstag, Leuven
2001, 355-370.
Heinen, Heinz: Antike am Rande der Steppe. Der nördliche Schwarzmeerraum als Forschungsaufgabe, Stuttgart
2006.
Hoben, Wolfgang: Untersuchungen zur Stellung kleinasiatischer Dynasten in den Machtkämpfen der ausgehenden
römischen Republik, Diss. Mainz 1969.
Kearsley, R.A.: Women and Public Life in Imperial Asia Minor: Hellenistic Tradition and Augustan Ideology, AWE
4, 2005, 98-121.
Minns, Ellis H.: Scythians and Greeks, Cambridge 1913.
Parfenov, Vladimir N.: Dynamis, Agrippa und der Friedensaltar. Zur militärischen und politischen Geschichte des
Bosporanischen Reiches nach Asandros, Historia 45, 1996, 95-103.
Podossinov, Alexander V.: Am Rande der griechischen Oikumene, in: J. Fornasier/ B. Böttger (eds.): Das
Bosporanische Reich, Mainz 2002, 21-38.
Rose, Brian: Princes and “barbarians” on the Ara Pacis, AJA 94, 1990, 453-467.
Rostovtzeff, Mijail: Queen Dynamis of Bosporus, JHS 39, 1919, 87-109.
Rostovtzeff, Mijail: Iranians and Greeks in Southern Russia, Oxford 1922.
Saprykin, Sergey Yu.: Pythodoris, Queen of Thracia, VDI 168, 1984, 141-153.
Saprykin, Sergey Yu.: Thrace and the Bosporus under the Early Roman Emperors, in: D. Braund (ed.): Scythians
and Greeks: Cultural Interaction in Scythia, Athens and the Early Roman Empire (Sixth Century BC – First
Century AD), Exeter 2004, 167-175.
Sullivan, Richard D.: Near Eastern Royalty and Rome, 100-30 B.C., Toronto 1990.
LBP/16.04.2008–r/31.07.08+21.03.09
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
188
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Dyteutos, Hohepriester von Komana Pontike
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemma Galater / Tosioper
Ältester Sohn des Adiatorix und wohl Bruder des Ateporix; geboren in den 40er Jahren des 1.
Jhs.; Hohepriester von Komana Pontike seit oder bald nach a. 29. Der Ärenbeginn des Pontus
Galaticus von 34/35 n.Chr. bietet nur einen sehr vagen Terminus ante quem für seinen Tod.
Onomastisch-genealogische Indizien legen nahe, daß Deinarchis aus Vetissos seine Tochter
war (MAMA VII 314.335).
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Wegen des Massakers seines Vaters an den römischen Kolonisten von Herakleia hätte er als
ältester Sohn a. 29 mit diesem hingerichtet werden sollen; jedoch starb sein zweiter
(namentlich unbekannter) Bruder an seiner Stelle (Anth. Pal. 7,638 mit Bowersock 1964,
255f.). Der junge Caesar begnadigte Dyteutos mit seiner Mutter und seinem jüngsten Bruder
und gewährte ihm das Priestertum von Komana Pontike (Strab. geogr. 12,3,35 [558f.]) sowie
einen Teil der Zelitis (Strab. geogr. 12,3,37 [560]).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Willrich: Dyteutos, RE 5,2, 1905, 1892.
DNP –.
Bowersock, G.W.: Anth. Pal. VII 638 (Crinagoras), Hermes 92, 1964, 255f.
Coskun, Altay: Von der ‘Geißel Asiens’ zu ‘kaiserfrommen’ Reichsbewohnern. Studien zur politischen und
gesellschaftlichen Entwicklung der Galater unter besonderer Berücksichtigung der amicitia populi Romani
und der göttlichen Verehrung des Augustus (3. Jh. v.–2. Jh. n.Chr.), unveröff. Habil. Trier 2007, Teil E.III
und Stammbaum in Teil J.VI.2/3.
Magie, David: Roman Rule in Asia Minor to the End of the Third Century after Christ, I, Princeton/N.J. 1950,
444.
Magie, David: Roman Rule in Asia Minor to the End of the Third Century after Christ, II, Princeton/N.J. 1950,
1291f. Anm. 43f.
Mitchell, Stephen: Anatolia. Land, Men, and Gods in Asia Minor, Oxford 1993, I 40f.; II 152.
Stähelin, Felix: Geschichte der kleinasiatischen Galater, 21907, Nd. Osnabrück 1973, 100; 114.
Sullivan, Richard D.: Near Eastern Royalty and Rome, 100-30 B.C., Toronto 1990, 171.
AC/03.07.07
Epigonos Philopatris, Potentat von Eumeneia
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
Als Dynast von Eumeneia durch einen augusteischen Münztypen belegt (RPC I Nr. 3142).
Gewiß ein Angehöriger der Dynastie des Zmertorix, des Sohnes des Philonides (RPC I Nr.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
189
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
3139 ca. a. 41/40 v.Chr.) bzw. der Kastoris Sotira (RPC I S. 509 Nr. 3143 augusteische Zeit).
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
S. 1.
3. Auswahlbibliographie
RE –. DNP –.
RPC I S. 509 Nr. 3142.
AC/03.07.07
Eporedorix, Tetrarch der galatischen Tosioper [Var. Poredorax]
0. Onomastisches
Bezeugt ist er allein in der Form Porēdorax (Plut. mul. virt. 23 = mor. 259a), welche indes
regelmäßig korrigiert wird, nicht zuletzt wegen der unmittelbar vorangehenden
Überlieferungslücke. Vgl. Freeman 2001, 55; Delamarre, DLG2 163f. eporedo-, eporedia
‘cavalier, cavalerie’; epos ‘cheval’, mit gallischen Belegen wie Eporedorix (Caes. Gall. 7,38);
Eporedirix (CIL 13,2805). ‚Pferde-Reiter-König‘ bzw. ‚(Der) reich an Pferde-Reitern (ist)‘.
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemma Galater / Tosioper
Nach Plutarch leitete er 86 v.Chr. als Tetrarch der galatischen Tosioper die Verschwörung
gegen Mithradates VI. Eupator. Dieser hatte die galatische Aristokratie zunächst als Gäste an
seinen Hof nach Pergamon eingeladen, hielt sie dann aber als Geiseln. Jedoch wurde die
Verschwörung verraten, und Eporedorix fand mit den meisten seiner Landsleute den Tod.
Vgl. auch die Variante Appians, in der die Opfer aber namenlos bleiben (Mithr. 46,178; vgl.
auch 54,218; 58, 236).
Sowohl der Personen- als auch der Stammesname ist nur dieses eine Mal bezeugt. Es besteht
keine Veranlassung, eine Verschreibung von Tolistobogioi oder Tolistoagioi (Holder, ACS II
1872; 1893; Stähelin 1903, 44 Anm. 3) anzunehmen. Vorsichtiger sprechen indes Mitchell
1993, I 43 (Tosiopae) und Freeman, GL 72 (Tosiopoi) von einem ansonsten unbekannten
Stamm, scheinen freilich vorauszusetzen, dass es sich um einen von zwölf galatischen
Teilstämmen handelt. Crombet 1999/2010 wagt gar eine Zuordnung der Tosioper zu den
Tolistobogiern. Allerdings ist die Annahme vorzuziehen, dass damals vier galatische Stämme
von je einem Tetrarchen gelenkt wurden. Dabei könnte das ‚Pferd‘-Motiv des Namens auf
eine Verwandtschaft mit Eposognatos und Ateporix hinweisen (s. ebendort; auch Coskun
2007).
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
190
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Zu Beginn des Ersten Mithradatischen Krieges war Eporedorix – wie die übrigen nach
Pergamon geladenen Gäste – offenbar ein philos (Appian) des Königs von Pontos. Unklar ist,
ob die Verschwörung der Galater allein durch das Fehlverhalten des Mithradates
hervorgerufen wurde, oder ob dessen sich abzeichnende Niederlage im Krieg gegen Rom den
Ausschlag gab. Die von Plutarch berichteten Umstände – eine in Pergamon ansässige Geliebte
des Eporedorix habe sich um seine Bestattung gekümmert –, legt nahe, dass der Aufenthalt in
der Nähe des Königshofs eine gewisse Zeit gedauert hat. Mithradates dürfte also nicht von
Anfang an die Beseitigung der Galater geplant haben. Zudem ist denkbar, aber ebenfalls nicht
belegbar, dass Eporedorix mit Sulla (oder mit dem im Nordwesten Kleinasien kämpfenden
Valerius Flaccus) Kontakt aufgenommen hatte. Gemäß Appian befürchtete Mithradates
jedenfalls, dass die Galater zu Sulla überlaufen würden, sobald sich die erste Gelegenheit
bieten würde.
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Münzer, Friedrich: Eporedorix [1], RE 6,1, 1907, 250.
Vgl. Spickermann, Wolfgang: Eporedorix [0], DNP 4, 1998, 10.
Ballesteros Pastor, Luis: Mithrídates Eupátor, rey del Ponto, Granada 1996, 155.
Coskun, Altay: Von der ‘Geißel Asiens’ zu ‘kaiserfrommen’ Reichsbewohnern. Studien zur politischen und
gesellschaftlichen Entwicklung der Galater unter besonderer Berücksichtigung der amicitia populi Romani
und der göttlichen Verehrung des Augustus (3. Jh. v.–2. Jh. n.Chr.), unveröff. unveröff. Habil. Trier 2007.
Crombet, Pierre: Art. Eporedorix; Art. Tosiopes, in: Arbre Celtique – Encyclopédie, 1999-2010.
URL: http://www.arbre-celtique.com/encyclopedie/tosiopes-543.htm
et http://www.arbre-celtique.com/encyclopedie/eporedorix-3-2491.htm [07.03.2010]
Delamarre, Xavier: Dictionnaire de la langue gauloise, Paris 22003.
Freeman, Philip: The Galatian Language. A Comprehensive Survey of the Language of the Ancient Celts in
Greco-Roman Asia Minor, Lewiston/NY 2001.
Holder, Alfred: Alt-celtischer Sprachschatz, 3 Bde., Leipzig 1896/1904/1913.
Mitchell, Stephen: Anatolia. Land, Men, and Gods in Asia Minor, Bd. 1: The Celts in Anatolia and the Impact of
Roman Rule, Oxford 1993, I 27-31.
Stähelin, Felix: Geschichte der kleinasiatischen Galater, 21907, Nd. Osnabrück 1973, 44;103.
AC/08.03.10
Eposgognatos, galatischer regulus
0. Onomastisches
Delamarre, DLG2 163f. (epos ‘cheval’) übersetzt Epo-so-gnatos: ‘Qui-s’y-connaît-enchevaux’ oder ‘Né d’Eposos’. Zum Pferdemotiv vgl. auch Eporedorix und Ateporix, bei
denen es sich womöglich um Nachkommen des Eposognatos handelt.
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemma Galater / Tosioper
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
191
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Eposognatos ist als galatischer regulus der Jahre 190 und 189 bezeugt. S. im folgenden.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Nach Polybios, gefolgt von Livius, hatte sich Eposognatos als einziger galatischer
Stammesführer der Aufforderung des Antiochos III. Megas verweigert, gegen die Römer zu
kämpfen. Auf diese Weise erhielt er sich die Freundschaft des mit Rom verbündeten Königs
Eumenes II. von Pergamon. Als Cn. Manlius Vulso cos. 189 die zentralanatolischen Bündner
des Antiochos heimsuchte, ließ dieser bei seiner Ankunft in Galatien nach Eposognatos
schicken, um einen Frieden für die übrigen Galater zu vermitteln. Einige Tage später baten
dessen Gesandten, zunächst auf einen Angriff der Galater zu verzichten. Nach Ablauf einiger
weiterer Tage ließ Eposognatos den Römern ausrichten, dass die übrigen Galater nicht bereit
seien, auf die Forderungen Vulsos einzugehen. Vgl. Polyb. 21,7,1.8f. und 21,20 (Bericht
lückenhaft); Liv. 38,18,1 (Liv. 38,18,1 missisque ad Eposognatum legatis, qui unus ex regulis
et in Eumenis manserat amicitia et negaverat Antiocho adversus Romanos auxilia); 18.3.1015.
Im weiteren Bericht über den galatischen Krieg des Vulso und dem anschließenden
Friedensdiktat ist keine Rede mehr von Eposognatos. Aber es ist nicht anzunehmen, dass sein
Stamm in Kriegshandlungen verwickelt wurde. Denkbar ist indes, dass dieser bald nach
Abzug der Römer aus Kleinasien der Rache des Tolistobogiers Ortiagon zum Opfer fiel (s.
dort).
Der Exzerptor des Polybios (vgl. Walbank 1979, III 148) verzichtet ganz auf die Nennung
eines Titels des Eposognatos. Nach Livius handelt es sich bei ihm dagegen – ebenso wie bei
drei weiteren Führern um einen regulus. Vgl. auch Liv. 38,19,2: erant autem tunc trium
populorum reguli Or<t>iago et Combo<i>omarus et Gau<d>otus. Brandis 1910, 547 und
Schwahn 1934, 1093 gingen noch davon gingen, dass die vier namentlich genannten Galater
sämtlich tolistobogische Tetrarchen gewesen seien (so wohl auch Crombet 1999/2010).
Jedoch ist mit Stähelin 1937, 1675 zu betonen, dass es sich bei den letzten drei je um die
Anführer der Tolistobogier, Tektosagen und Trokmer gehandelt haben wird. Oder zumindest
war dies die Sicht des Livius (trium populorum reguli), der man sich angesichts der
Kriegsschilderungen schwerlich entziehen kann. So spricht Mitchell 1993, I 23 vorsichtiger
davon, dass zumindest Eposognatos ein „dissident Tolistobogian“ gewesen sei; ähnlich
Willrich 1907, 251; Spickermann 1998, 29 und Strobel 1999, 398, nach dem elf von zwölf
Tetrarchen in der Gefolgschaft des Antiochos gestanden hatten.
Im ganzen deutet der Befund jedoch vielmehr darauf hin, dass die von Strab. geogr. 12,5,1
beschriebene dreifach tetrarchische Ordnung Galatiens niemals Realität gewesen war, sondern
dass etwa ab dem 2. Jh. v.Chr. mit vier politischen Einheiten in Galatien zu rechnen ist. Der
Tetrarchentitel ist überhaupt erst seit der Zeit des Mithradates VI. Eupator von Pontos
bezeugt. Vermutlich war er es auch, der ihn in Galatien eingeführt hat (s. auch zu Brogitaros
Philorhomaios). In Verbindung mit onomastischen Indizien ist es denkbar, wenn auch nicht
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
192
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
beweisbar, dass Eposognatos wie Eporedorix Herrscher der Tosioper waren. Vgl. Coskun
2007 und ca. 2010 gegenüber Strobel 1999 und 2007, 391-396.
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Willrich: Eposognatus, RE 6,1, 1907, 251.
Spickermann, Wolfgang: Eposognatus, DNP 4, 1998, 29.
Brandis, C.G.: ἡ Γαλατί α (2), RE 7,1, 1910, 534-559.
Coskun, Altay: Von der ‘Geißel Asiens’ zu ‘kaiserfrommen’ Reichsbewohnern. Studien zur politischen und
gesellschaftlichen Entwicklung der Galater unter besonderer Berücksichtigung der amicitia populi Romani
und der göttlichen Verehrung des Augustus (3. Jh. v.–2. Jh. n.Chr.), unveröff. unveröff. Habil. Trier 2007.
Coskun, Altay: Galatians and Seleukids: a Century of Conflict and Cooperation, in: Gillian Clark/Kyle
Erickson/Christian E. Ghiţa (eds.): Seleukid Dissolution: Fragmentation and Transformation of Empire
(Exeter, July 2008), Stuttgart ca. 2010.
Crombet, Pierre: Art. Eposognatos, in: Arbre Celtique – Encyclopédie, 1999-2010.
URL: http://www.arbre-celtique.com/encyclopedie/eposognatos-2851.htm [06.03.2010]
Delamarre, Xavier: Dictionnaire de la langue gauloise, Paris 22003. (DLG2)
Mitchell, Stephen: Anatolia. Land, Men, and Gods in Asia Minor, Bd. 1: The Celts in Anatolia and the Impact of
Roman Rule, Oxford 1993, I 23.
Stähelin, Felix: Geschichte der kleinasiatischen Galater, 21907, Nd. Osnabrück 1973, 51-54; 115.
Strobel, Karl: Kelten [III.]: Kelten im Osten, DNP 6, 1999, 393-400.
Strobel, Karl: Die Galater und Galatien: Historische Identität und ethnische Tradition im Imperium Romanum,
Klio 89.2, 2007, 356-402.
Walbank, F.W.: A Historical Commentary on Polybius, Bd. III, Oxford 1979.
AC/08.03.10
L. Munatius Flaccus aus Italica
0. Onomastisches
Bei Frontin. strat. 3,14,1 als Maurus bezeichnet. Münzer 1933, 538 hält dies für eine falsche
Namensangabe. Es könnte sich jedoch auch um eine ethnische Zuschreibung handeln
('maurisch' oder auch 'punisch'; vgl. Georges 1988, 835).
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
Belegt a. 48-45.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Beteiligte sich a. 48 an der Verschwörung gegen den caesarischen Statthalter Q. Cassius
Longinus in Hispanien (Bell. Alex. 52,3).
Unterstützte a. 45 zunächst den jungen Cn. Pompeius Magnus in Hispanien. Während der
Belagerung von Ategua durch C. Iulius Caesar wurde er von Pompeius mittels einer List in
die Stadt geschleust, um der Bevölkerung bei der Verteidigung zu helfen. Laut Val. Max.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
193
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
9,4,2 ließ er in der Stadt alle umbringen, von denen er glaubte, daß sie mit Caesar
sympathisierten. Als die Einnahme der Stadt kurz bevorstand und die Bewohner schließlich
ihre Waffen niederlegten, bot Flaccus Caesar die Kapitulation gegen Zusicherung seines
Lebens an. Caesar lehnte das Gnadengesuch ab (Bell. Hisp. 19,4f.; Cass. Dio 43,33f.).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Münzer, Friedrich: L. Munatius Flaccus, RE 16,1, 1933, 538.
Frigo, Thomas: L. Munatius Flaccus, DNP 8, 2000, 465.
Georges, Karl Ernst: Ausführliches lateinisch-deutsches Handwörterbuch, Bd. 2, Nd. Darmstadt 1988, 835.
JL/29.09.04–r/29.06.07/17.04.10
C. Flavius aus Hasta/Hispania Ulterior
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
Belegt a. 45. Römischer Ritter.
Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Kämpfte zunächst auf der Seite des jungen Cn. Pompeius Magnus in Hispanien, ging dann
aber a. 45 zusammen mit A. Baebius und A. Trebellius zu C. Iulius Caesar über (Bell. Hisp.
26,2). Münzer 1909, 2526 vermutet zusätzlich eine Verbindung zu dem römischen Ritter C.
Flavius Pusio, der sich a. 91 mit anderen Standesgenossen der lex iudicaria des M. Livius
Drusus tr. pl. 91 widersetzte (Cic. Cluent. 153).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Münzer, Friedrich: C. Flavius, RE 6,2, 1909, 2526.
DNP –.
Caballos Rufino, Antonio: Los senadores de origen hispano durante la república romana, in: Julián González
(Hg.): Estudios sobre Urso Colonia Iulia Genetiva, Sevilla 1989, 233-79, bes. 266.
Wiegels, Rainer: Die römischen Senatoren und Ritter aus den hispanischen Provinzen bis Diokletian, Diss.
Solingen 1971, Nr. 264.
JL/29.09.04–r/28.06.07
Gordios, Cappadocian Nobleman
0. Onomastic Issues
The name Gordios is of Cappadocian origin. Robert 1963, 548f. proposed that it is a theophoric
name in honour of Zeus Gordios.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
194
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
1. Central Biographical Data and Family Relations
Our first notice about him is in 116 BC. He died after 83 BC. Gordios was a Cappadocian
nobleman. We have no information about his family. Portanova 1988, 268 believes that he was a
member of the Ariarathid house, because Justin (38.5.9) states that a part of the Cappadocian
populus requested this noble as king, but this argument is not conclusive.
He is mentioned as an amicus of Mithridates VI Eupator, King of Pontus, although this may just
have had a private meaning (Iust.38.5.9; cf. Portanova 1988, 269 for a discussion). In fact,
Gordios is only related with Cappadocian affairs, and he had no part in Mithridates’ campaigns
far from this kingdom. His participation in the Second Mithridatic War was in territories which
had formerly belonged to the Cappadocian kingdom (Ballesteros Pastor 2000, 149f.).
2. Relations with Rome/Romans and Career.
Ca. 116, he murdered Ariarathes VI Epiphanes Philopator, king of Cappadocia, following the
orders of Mithridates VI Eupator, King of Pontus (Iust.38.1.1; on the chronology: De Callataÿ
1999, 192ff.). He took refuge in the Pontic court, but when Mithridates wanted to make him go
back to Cappadocia, Ariarathes VII broke relations with his uncle Eupator (Iust.38.1.6-7). Since
the beginning of the first century BC., he seems to have acted as an agent of the Pontic interests,
as tutor of the young Ariarathes VIII Epiphanes Eusebes, king of Cappadocia, the son of
Mithridates Eupator who had been installed on the Cappadocian throne by the Pontic king (Iust.
38.1.10).
Ca. 99-98, he travelled to Rome together with this young ruler, to check the demands of Laodike,
the wife of Ariarathes VI who had been married to Nicomedes III Euergetes, king of Bithynia.
Following the misleading account of Justin, Gordios, tried to demonstrate the rights of the eightyear-old prince telling that he was a descendant of Ariarathes V. The Senate rejected this false
statement and declared Cappadocia free (Iust. 38.2.5-6).
Ca. 94, Gordios fought in Cappadocia against the armies of L. Cornelius Sulla, propraetor
Ciliciae 96/93, cos. 88 (Plut. Sull. 5.3).
In 82 BC, Gordios confronted L. Licinius Murena (propraetor Asiae 83-81), when the latter
invaded Pontus, until the arrival of Mithridates’ army (App. Mithr. 65). His further career is
unknown.
Justin (38.3.2) points out that Gordios was sent by Mithridates to the court of Tigranes I, king of
Armenia, in order to conclude a treaty between both rulers. However, this author records a
phrase from a speech delivered by Mithridates, in which the Pontic king regrets that the Romans
had wrongly attributed him all the actions of Gordios and Tigranes (38.5.8). Manaseryan (1985)
proposed that Gordios was not actually an agent of Mithridates, but he led a faction among the
Cappadocian nobility who wanted to remain independent from both Rome and Pontus.
3. Select Bibliography
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
195
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Swoboda, Heinrich: Gordios, RE 7.2, 1912, 1590-1591.
Ballesteros Pastor, Luis: Mitrídates Eupátor, rey del Ponto, Granada 1996.
Ballesteros Pastor, Luis: El Santuario de Comana Póntica. (Apuntes para su historia), Arys 3, 2000, 143-150.
Ballesteros Pastor, Luis: Cappadocia and Pontus, Client Kingdoms of the Roman Republic. From the Peace of
Apamea to the Beginning of the Mithridatic Wars (188-89 B.C.), in A. Coskun (ed.): Freundschaft und
Gefolgschaft in den auswärtigen Beziehungen der Römer (2. Jhr. v.Chr. – 1 Jhr. n. Chr.), Stuttgart 2008, 4563.
de Callataÿ, François: L’histoire des Guerres Mithridatiques vue par les monnaies, Louvain-la-Neuve 1997.
Henke, Michael: Kappadokien in hellenistischer Zeit, Diss. Münster 2005.
Manaseryan, Ruben L.: The Struggle of Tigranes II against Roman Expansion in Cappadocia, VDI 174, 1985, 109118. (Russian, with English summary).
McGing, Brian: The Foreign Policy of Mithridates VI Eupator, King of Pontus, Leiden 1987.
Michels, Christoph: Kulturtransfer und monarchischer “Philhellenismus”. Bithynien, Pontos und Kappadokien in
hellenistischer Zeit, Göttingen 2009.
Portanova, Joseph John: The Associates of Mithridates VI of Pontus. Diss. Columbia University, Ann Arbor
1988.
Robert, Louis: Noms indigènes dans l’Asie Mineure gréco-romaine, Paris 1963.
Sullivan, Richard D.: Near Eastern Royalty and Rome 100-30 BC, Toronto 1990.
LBP/03.07.10 – r/16.12.11
Herodes I., König von Judäa
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemmata Herodianer
Geboren um a. 73, Sohn des Antipatros und der Kypros, Bruder des Phasael, Pheroras, Joseph
sowie der Salome, verheiratet mit Doris (gemeinsamer Sohn: Antipatros), Mariamme (1)
(gemeinsame Kinder: Alexandros, Aristobulos, Salampsio, Kypros), Mariamme (2)
(gemeinsamer Sohn: Herodes), Malthake (gemeinsame Kinder: Archelaos, Antipas,
Olympias), Kleopatra (gemeinsame Söhne: Philippos, Herodes), Pallas (gemeinsamer Sohn:
Phasael), Phaidra (gemeinsame Tochter: Roxane), Elpis (gemeinsame Tochter: Salome),
unbekannt sind die Namen der mit ihm verheirateten Cousine und Nichte sowie deren
eventuelle Kinder. Ernennung zum strategos von Galiläa durch seinen Vater a. 47, zum
strategos von Koile-Syrien durch Sex. Iulius Caesar proquaest. pro praet. Syr. 47-46, zum
Tetrarchen von Galiläa durch M. Antonius a. 41, zum König (des noch in parthischer Hand
befindlichen) Judäa a. 40 durch den römischen Senat. A. 37 Sieg über seinen Rivalen
Matthatias Antigonos und Einnahme Jerusalems mit römischer Hilfe. Starb a. 4.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Als strategos von Galiläa ließ Herodes den Widerstandsführer Ezechias hinrichten und wurde
deswegen vom Synhedrion in Jerusalem angeklagt. Sex. Iulius Caesar übte zugunsten des
Herodes Druck auf Hyrkanos II. aus, so daß sich Herodes dem Verfahren entziehen konnte
und sich zunächst zu Sex. Caesar nach Damaskos begab (Ios. bell. Iud. 1,211f.; ant. Iud.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
196
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
14,177-184). Dieser ernannte ihn in der Folge zum strategos von Koile-Syrien und Samaria
(Ios. bell. Iud. 1,213, ohne Nennung von Samaria in ant. Iud., 14,180).
A. 45 kämpfte Herodes bei Apameia gegen Caecilius Bassus (Ios. bell. Iud. 1,216f.; ant. Iud.
14,268f.). A. 43 lieferte er als strategos von Galiläa dem Proconsul C. Cassius Longinus die
geforderten Kontributionen (Ios. bell. Iud. 1,220-22; ant. Iud. 14,272-76). Nach Ios. bell. Iud.
1,225; ant. Iud. 14,280 ernannte Cassius ihn zum epimelētēs von (Koile-) Syrien bzw.
bestätigte seine alte Stellung. Aller Wahrscheinlichkeit nach unhistorisch ist die Angabe,
Herodes sei von Cassius auch das judäische Königtum in Aussicht gestellt worden (Ios. bell.
Iud. 1,225). Cassius unterstützte Herodes auch bei der Ermordung des Malichos, des Mörders
seines Vaters Antipatros (Ios. bell. Iud. 1,230-35; ant. Iud. 14,288-93).
A. 41 wies M. Antonius in Bithynia Anklagen jüdischer Gesandtschaften gegen Herodes und
seinen Bruder Phasael ab, gegen die Herodes sich persönlich verteidigte (Ios. bell. Iud. 1,242;
ant. Iud. 14,301-3). Weitere Vorwürfe, die Vertreter der jüdischen Aristokratie gegen
denselben in Antiocheia erhoben, wies Antonius ebenfalls zurück. Herodes und Phasael
wurden hier von Messala (wahrscheinlich M. Valerius Messala Corvinus, dem ehemaligen
leg. des Cassius und späteren cos. 31) und Hyrkanos II. verteidigt. Antonius erhob
anschließend Herodes und Phasael zu Tetrarchen (Ios. bell. Iud. 1,243-45; ant. Iud. 14,32426). Eine nachfolgende jüdische Gesandtschaft ließ Antonius in Tyros gar nicht mehr vor,
sondern nach weiteren Protesten sogar töten (Ios. bell. Iud. 1,245-47; ant. Iud. 14,327-29).
Vor den Parthern und dem von ihnen unterstützten Antigonos floh Herodes über Ägypten und
Rhodos nach Rom und wandte sich (angeblich dort: Ios. ant. Iud. 14, 379) an Antonius (Ios.
bell. Iud. 1,281f.; ant. Iud. 14,370-82). Dieser und der junge Caesar betrieben seine
Ernennung zum König von Judäa. Im Senat wurde Herodes von Messala und Atratinus
(wahrscheinlich L. Sempronius Atratinus cos. suff. 34) vorgestellt. Seine Ernennung wurde
mit Opfern auf dem Capitol und einem von Antonius ausgerichteten Bankett gefeiert (Ios.
bell. Iud. 1,282-85; ant. Iud. 14,383-88. Strab. geogr. 16,2,46 [765]. Tac. hist 5,9,2; vgl. auch
App. civ. 5,75,319).
Im folgenden Kriegszug gegen Matthatias Antigonos wurde Herodes zunächst aber nur
halbherzig von den römischen Truppen unter dem Proconsul P. Ventidius Bassus (?) bzw.
seinen Legaten Pompaedius Silo und (später) Machaeras unterstützt (Ios. bell. Iud. 1,288302.317-20; ant. Iud. 15,392-412.434-38). Vermittelt hatte ihm die Waffenhilfe Q. Dellius,
ein Gesandter des Antonius (Ios. bell. Iud. 1,290; ant. Iud. 14,395). A. 38 half Herodes
Antonius bei Samosata in der militärischen Auseinandersetzung mit Antiochos I. von
Kommagene. Antonius schickte seinerseits C. Sosius procos. Syr. 38-37, cos. 32 mit 2
Legionen zur Unterstützung des Herodes gegen Antigonos (Ios. bell. Iud. 1,321f.; ant. Iud.
14,439-447). A. 37 gelang es, Jerusalem zu erobern. Herodes wurde als König installiert.
Alexandra, die Schwiegermutter des Herodes, versuchte, über Kleopatra VII. Antonius für
sich und ihren Sohn Aristobulos einzunehmen. Nach dem Tod des letzteren a. 35/34 wurde
Herodes nach Klagen Alexandras bei Kleopatra von Antonius nach Laodikeia vorgeladen.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
197
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Jedoch wurde er für nicht schuldig am Tod seines Schwagers befunden (Ios. ant. Iud. 15,6267.74-79).
Antonius betraute ihn vor der Schlacht von Aktion auf Betreiben der Kleopatra mit dem Krieg
gegen die Araber (Ios. bell. Iud. 1,364f.). Nach der Niederlage des Antonius fiel Herodes von
ihm ab. Den Q. Didius leg. (?) Syr. 31 unterstützte er in den Kämpfen gegen die Gladiatoren
des Antonius (Ios. bell. Iud. 1,392; ant. Iud. 15,195). Dem jungen Caesar versicherte er in
Rhodos seine Freundschaft und Loyalität; er behielt seine Königswürde; später wurde sein
Reich mehrfach vergrößert (Strab. geogr. 16,2,46 [765]; Ios. bell. Iud. 1,386-397; ant. Iud.
15,187-198; Tac. hist. 5,9,2).
A. 30 begrüßte Herodes den jungen Caesar in Ptolemais und begleitete ihn einen Teil seines
Weges nach Ägypten. Er erhielt die von Antonius der Kleopatra übergebenen Gebiete zurück
sowie zusätzlich Stratonsturm, Joppe, Anthedon, Samaria, Hippos, Gadara (Ios. bell. Iud.
1,396f.; ant. Iud. 15,199-201.215-17). Den jungen Caesar begleitete er auch auf dessen
Rückweg und blieb bis zur Ankunft in Antiocheia bei ihm (Ios. ant. Iud. 15,218). Dieser
setzte ihn zudem laut Ios. bell. Iud. 1,399 zum epitropos von Syria ein, dessen Kompetenzen
aber unklar sind.
A. 24 unterstützte er L. Aelius Gallus praef. Aeg. 25/24 bei seinen Feldzügen gegen Arabia
Felix (Ios. ant. Iud. 15,317; Strab. geogr. 16,4,23 [780]). Herodes bat P. Petronius praef. Aeg.
ca. 24-22/1 bei einer Hungersnot um Hilfe (Ios. ant. Iud. 15,306-07). Wahrscheinlich a. 23/22
besuchte er M. Vipsanius Agrippa cos. 37, 28, 27, der über ein imperium proconsulare im
Osten des Reiches verfügte in Mytilene (Ios. ant. Iud. 15,350).
Von Augustus erhielt Herodes das Privileg, seinen Nachfolger selbst zu benennen sowie
„Flüchtige“ auch außerhalb seiner Reichsgrenzen zu verfolgen (Ios. bell. Iud. 1,458; 1,474;
ant. Iud. 15,343; 16,92; 16,129). A. 23/22 wird das Reich des Herodes um die Trachonitis,
Batanaia und Auranitis vergrößert (Ios. bell. Iud. 1,398; ant. Iud. 15,344f.). A. 20 besuchte
Augustus Syria und übertrug Herodes auch die restlichen Gebiete der ituräischen Tetrarchie
des Zenodoros (Ios. ant. Iud. 15,354; Cass. Dio 54,9,3).
Seine Söhne Alexandros und Aristobulos wohnten während ihrer Erziehung in Rom bei einem
Pollio, dessen Identifizierung mit C. Asinius Pollio cos. 40 eher unwahrscheinlich ist (Ios.
ant. Iud. 342f.; vgl. bes. Feldman 1953 und 1985; Braund 1983). A. 18/17 reiste Herodes nach
Rom, um seine Söhne nach vollendeter Erziehung zurückzuholen (Ios. ant. Iud. 16,6). A. 14
wurde dann aber der Herodessohn Antipatros als designierter Thronerbe nach Rom gesandt
und Augustus von Agrippa vorgestellt (Ios. bell. Iud. 1,451; ant. Iud. 16,86). Letzteren hatte
Herodes a. 15 in seinem Reich empfangen (Ios. ant. Iud. 16,12-16; Phil. Legatio ad Gaium 37)
und im Folgejahr auf dessen Asienreise begleitet, wo er sich bei ihm für die dort ansässigen
Juden einsetzte (Ios. ant. Iud. 16,16-62).
Bei einer weiteren Reise nach Rom a. 12 traf Herodes Augustus in Aquileia und klagte seine
Söhne Alexandros und Aristobulos der Verschwörung an (Ios. ant. Iud. 16,90-129; Ios. bell.
Iud. 1,452-66 nennt nur Alexandros als Angeklagten und Rom als Verhandlungsort). Um a. 8
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
198
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
erhob Herodes vor Augustus neue Anklage gegen Aristobulos und Alexandros wegen
Hochverrates. Augustus gestand ihm das Recht zu, selbst über seine Söhne zu richten, schlug
ihm jedoch ein Gericht aus römischen Amtsträgern der Region sowie Familien- und
Hofangehörigen vor. Herodes kam diesem Vorschlag nach. Die römischen Vertreter in dem in
Berytos stattfinden Verfahren waren C. Centius Saturninus cos. 19, leg. Aug. pro praet.
Syriae 9-6 sowie seine Legaten, darunter Pedanius, und vielleicht auch drei seiner Söhne,
zudem der epitropos Volumnius (procurator Augusti Syriae) (Ios. bell. Iud. 1,534-551; ant.
Iud. 16,332-334; 16,356-372; Schuol 2007, 145-49).
Die Beziehung zu Augustus verschlechterte sich nach militärischen Auseinandersetzungen
mit den Nabatäern a. 9 (Ios. ant. Iud. 16,286-99), doch konnte Nikolaos von Damaskos die
Verstimmung wieder beheben (Ios. ant. Iud. 16,335-55).
A. 5 wurde die Verschwörung des Herodessohnes Antipatros aufgedeckt, über die Herodes
Augustus schriftlich informierte (Ios. bell. Iud. 1,640; ant. Iud. 17,133). Augustus genehmigte
die Hinrichtung des Antipatros (Ios. bell. Iud. 1,661; ant. Iud. 17,182).
Diverse Bauten und Städtegründungen erfolgten zu Ehren von Antonius, Agrippa und
Augustus (Japp 2000; Lichtenberger 1999; Netzer 1999; Wilker 2005). Iosephos beschreibt
für Herodes, Agrippa und Augustus eine besonders enge Freundschaft (Ios. bell. Iud. 1,400;
ant. Iud. 15,361). Wahrscheinlich ist Herodes die Inschrift OGIS I 414 aus Athen
zuzuschreiben, in der er Philorhomaios genannt wird. Eventuell beziehen sich auch OGIS I
427 und SEG 12, 1955, 150, gleichfalls aus Athen, auf ihn; hier wird er als Eusebēs kai
Philokaisar betitelt (so u.a. Richardson 1996, 208f.; Geiger 1997, 75; abweichend
Dittenberger ad locum, der mit einem Enkel Herodes’ I. identifiziert). Philokaisar heißt er
jedenfalls auch auf einem Marktgewicht aus Ashdod (Kushnir-Stein 1995). In den
Verhandlungen nach seinem Tod bezeichnet Nikolaos von Damaskos ihn vor Augustus als
philos kai symmachos (Ios. ant. Iud. 17,246).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Otto, Walter: Herodes [14], RE suppl. 2, 1913, 1-158.
Bringmann, Klaus: Herodes [1], DNP 5, 1998, 458-60.
Baumann, Uwe: Rom und die Juden. Die römisch-jüdischen Beziehungen von Pompeius bis zum Tode des
Herodes (63 v.Chr.-4 v.Chr.), Frankfurt/M. 1983, 108-237.
Braund, David: Four Notes on the Herods, CQ 33, 1983, 239-42.
Feldman, Louis H.: Asinius Pollio and His Jewish Interests, TAPhA 84, 1953, 73-80.
Feldman, Louis H.: Asinius Pollio and Herod’s Sons, CQ 35, 1985, 240-43.
Geiger, Joseph: Herodes Philorhomaios, AncSoc 28, 1997, 75-88.
Günther, Linda-Marie: Herodes der Große, Darmstadt 2005.
Japp, Sarah: Die Baupolitik Herodes’ des Großen. Die Bedeutung der Architektur für die Herrschaftslegitimation
eines römischen Klientelkönigs, Rahden 2000.
Kushnir-Stein, Alla: An Inscribed Lead Weight from Ashdod, ZPE 105, 1995, 81-84.
Lichtenberger, Achim: Die Baupolitik Herodes’ des Großen, Wiesbaden 1999.
Netzer, Ehud: Die Paläste der Hasmonäer und Herodes’ des Großen, Mainz 1999.
Richardson, Peter: Herod. King of the Jews and Friend of the Romans, Columbia/SC 1996.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
199
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Schalit, Abraham: König Herodes. Der Mann und sein Werk. Mit einem Vorwort von Daniel R. Schwartz, Berlin
2
2001.
Schürer, Emil: The History of the Jewish People in the Age of Jesus Christ (175 B.C.-A.D. 135). A New English
Version Revised and Edited by Geza Vermes and Fergus Millar, Bd. 1, Edinburgh 1973, 275-329.
Schuol, Monika: Augustus und die Juden. Rechtsstellung und Interessenpolitik der kleinasiatischen Diaspora,
Frankfurt/M 2007.
Vogel, Manuel: Herodes. König der Juden, Freund der Römer, Leipzig 2002.
Wilker, Julia: Herodes der Große. Herrschaftslegitimation zwischen jüdischer Identität und römischer
Freundschaft, in: Altay Coskun (Hg.): Roms auswärtige Freunde in der späten Republik und im frühen
Prinzipat, Göttingen 2005, 201-23.
JW/1.12.2006–r/03.07.07
Herodes Antipas, Tetrarch von Galiläa und Peräa = Iulius Antipas
0. Onomastisches
Den Herodes-Namen nimmt Antipas wahrscheinlich erst nach der Absetzung seines Bruders
Herodes Archealos durch Augustus 6 n.Chr. an. Für eine Annahme des Herodes-Namens
bereits bei seiner Ernennung zum Tetrarchen 4 v.Chr. und damit in Konkurrenz zu Herodes
Archelaos sprechen sich indes Otto 1913, 170f. und Hendin 2003-2006 aus.
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemmata Herodianer
Antipas wird um die Mitte der 20er Jahren v.Chr. als Sohn von Herodes I. und der
Samaritanerin Malthake geboren wurde (Ios. bell. Iud. 1,562). Er ist mit einer Tochter des
Nabatäerkönigs Aretas IV. verheiratet, verstößt diese jedoch, um stattdessen seine Nichte
Herodias, die bereits zuvor mit seinem Halbbruder Herodes verheiratet war, zu ehelichen (Mk
6,17f.; Mt 14,3f.; Lk 3,19; Ios. ant. Iud. 18,110-115.136).
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Antipas wird in Rom erzogen (Ios. ant. Iud. 17,20f.). Augustus ernennt ihn entsprechend dem
letzten Testament des Vaters zum Tetrarchen von Galiläa und Peräa (Ios. bell. Iud. 2,93-95;
ant. Iud. 17,318f.). Flavius Josephus berichtet über enge freundschaftliche Beziehungen
zwischen Antipas und Tiberius (Ios. ant. Iud. 18,36). In seiner Tetrarchie gründet Antipas als
neue Hauptstadt Tiberias am See Genezareth sowie an der Stelle bereits bestehender
Siedlungen gründet er die Städte Autokratoris Sepphoris und Betharamphta Julias (Ios. ant.
Iud. 18,27.36-38).
Nach dem Bericht des Cassius Dio befindet sich Herodes Antipas gemeinsam mit seinem
Halbbruder Philippos unter den Anklägern des Herodes Archelaos vor Augustus 6 n.Chr.
(Cass. Dio 55,27,6); Strabon nennt dagegen alle drei herodianischen Klientelherrscher
(Archelaos, Antipas und Philippos) als Angeklagte, auch wenn Antipas und Philippos
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
200
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
schließlich ihre Herrschaft retten konnten (Strab. geogr. 16,2,46 [765]). Wegen der Scheidung
von der Tochter des Aretas kommt es zu militärischen Auseinandersetzungen mit den
Nabatäern; Antipas ruft Tiberius um Hilfe an, der den syrischen Legaten L. Vitellius (cos. 34)
zu seiner Unterstützung schickt (Ios. ant. Iud. 18,113-115).
Unter der Statthalterschaft des Pontius Pilatus (PIR2 P 815) in Iudaea ist Antipas
wahrscheinlich an einer von den Juden bestimmten Delegation beteiligt, die bei dem
procurator gegen die Aufbewahrung vergoldeter Schilde in Jerusalem protestiert, deren
Inschriften gegen die religiösen Vorschriften der Juden verstoßen. Nach der Zurückweisung
der Proteste wenden sich die Vertreter schriftlich an Tiberius, der Pilatus den Befehl erteilt,
die Schilde umgehend aus Jerusalem zu entfernen (Phil. leg. 300).
Nachdem sein Neffe (und Schwager), Agrippa I., von Caligula 37 n.Chr. die ehemalige
Tetrarchie des Philipp als Königreich übereignet bekommen hatte, bittet auch Antipas den
Princeps um den Titel eines basileus. Agrippa jedoch interveniert und kann Caligula davon
überzeugen, dass Antipas heimlich mit den Parthern konspiriere. Antipas wird daraufhin nach
Lugdunum verbannt, sein Herrschaftsgebiet wurde dem Reich des Agrippa hinzugefügt (Ios.
bell. Iud. 2,181-183; ant. Iud. 18,240-256; Cass. Dio 55,27,6). Herodias, die ihn nach dem
Bericht des Josephus auch zu den Intrigen in Rom angestiftet hat, folgt ihm ins Exil.
3. Auswahlbibliographie:
Otto, W.: Herodes [24] Herodes Antipas, RE Suppl. 2, 1913, 168-191.
Bringmann, K.: Herodes [4] Antipas, DNP 5, 1998, 460
Bruce, F.F.: Herod Antipas, Tetrarch of Galilee and Peraea, Ann. Leeds Univ. Orient. Soc. 5, 1963-65, 6-23.
Hendin, D.: A New Coin Type of Herod Antipas, Israel Numismatic Journal 15, 2003-2006, 56-61.
Hoehner, H.W.: Herod Antipas, Cambridge 1972.
Jensen, M.H.: Herod Antipas in Galilee. The Literary and Archaeological Sources on the Reign of Herod
Antipas and Its Socio-Economic Impact on Galilee, Tübingen 2006.
Jones, A.H.M.: The Herods of Judea, Oxford 1938.
Kokkinos, N.: The Herodian Dynasty. Origins, Role in Society and Eclipse, Sheffield 1998.
Schürer, E.: Geschichte des jüdischen Volkes im Zeitalter Jesu Christi, Band I, Leipzig 31901 (ND Hildesheim
1964).
Wilker, J.: Für Rom und Jerusalem. Die herodianische Dynastie im 1. Jahrhundert n.Chr., Frankfurt/M. 2007.
JW/05.08.08–r/07.08.08
Herodes Archelaos, Ethnarch von Iudäa, Idumäa und Samaria = Iulius Archelaus
0. Onomastisches
Den Herodes-Namen nimmt Archelaos nach seiner Ernennung zum Ethnarchen a. 4 v.Chr. an.
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemmata Herodianer
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
201
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Archelaos wird um 27 v.Chr. als Sohn von Herodes I. und Malthake geboren (Ios. bell. Iud.
1,562; 2,39; ant. Iud. 17,250). Er heiratet wahrscheinlich zunächst seine Nichte Mariamme,
von der er sich jedoch zugunsten von Glaphyra, der Tochter Archelaos’ III. von Kappadokien
und Witwe seines Halbbruders Alexander, scheiden lässt (Ios. bell. Iud. 2,114f.; ant. Iud.
17,341.349f.).
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Archelaos wird in Rom erzogen (Ios. bell. Iud. 1,602f.; ant. Iud. 17,20f.; 80f.). Nach dem Tod
des Herodes 4 v.Chr. reist er nach Rom, um seinen Anspruch auf den Thron zu verteidigen
(Ios. bell. Iud. 2,1.14; ant. Iud. 17,219). Augustus ernennt ihn – dem letzten Testament des
Vaters weitgehend folgend – zum Ethnarchen über Iudäa, Idumäa und Samaria mit der
Aussicht, bei Bewährung als Herrscher auch den Königstitel zu erhalten (Ios. bell. Iud. 2,9394; ant. Iud. 17,317; Nikol. Damas. FGrH 90 F 136, 11).
6 n.Chr. bewirken die Anklagen seiner jüdischen und samaritanischen Untertanen in Rom
seine Absetzung durch Augustus. Sein Reich wird in die Provinz Iudaea umgewandelt,
Archelaos nach Vienna verbannt (Ios. bell. Iud. 2,111-113.117; ant. Iud. 17,342-344.355;
18,1f.; Strab. geogr. 16,2,46 [765]; Cass. Dio 55,27,6).
3. Auswahlbibliographie:
Otto, W.: Herodes [25] Herodes Archelaos, RE Suppl. II, 1913, 191–200.
Ego, B.: Herodes [3] Archelaos, DNP 1, 1996, 460.
Ciecielag, J.: The Reign of Archelaus, Polish Journal of Biblical Research 1, 2000, 117–124.
Jones, A.H.M.: The Herods of Judea, Oxford 1938.
Kokkinos, N.: The Herodian Dynasty. Origins, Role in Society and Eclipse, Sheffield 1998.
Schürer, E.: Geschichte des jüdischen Volkes im Zeitalter Jesu Christi, Band I, Leipzig 31901 (ND Hildesheim
1964).
Wilker, J.: Für Rom und Jerusalem. Die herodianische Dynastie im 1. Jahrhundert n.Chr., Frankfurt/M. 2007.
JW/05.08.08–r/07.08.08
Herodes Philoklaudios, König von Chalkis am Libanon
0. Onomastisches
Philoklaudios (Ancient Jewish Coinage 2, 280, Nr. 1-3).
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemmata Herodianer
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
202
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Geboren zwischen 15 und 11 v.Chr. (dagegen Kokkinos 1998, 304: 10/9 v.Chr.) als Sohn des
judäischen Prinzen Aristobulos (III.) und der älteren Berenike. Nach Ios. ant. Iud. 17,14
wurde er wahrscheinlich von seinem Großvater Herodes I. mit einer Tochter seines Sohnes
Antipatros verlobt. Die Verbindung wurde dann aber wohl nach der Hinrichtung des
Antipatros 4 v.Chr. aufgelöst. Herodes war in erster Ehe mit Mariamme, der Tochter der
Olympias und des Joseph, verheiratet, mit der er Aristobulos bekam (Ios. bell. Iud. 2,221; ant.
Iud. 18,134; 20,104.158). 43/44 n.Chr. heiratete er seine Nichte Berenike die Jüngere, welche
ihm die Söhne Hyrkanos (PIR2 H 246) und Berenikianos (PIR2 B 109) gebar (Ios. bell. Iud.
2,217.221; ant. Iud. 19,277.354; 20,104). Er starb im Jahr 48 (Ios. bell. Iud. 2,221; ant. Iud.
20,104.145).
2. Verhältnis zu Rom / Römern und Karriereverlauf
Im Jahr 41 erhielt er von Claudius die ornamenta praetoria und wurde zum König von
Chalkis (ad Libanum) erhoben (Ios. bell. Iud. 2,217; ant. Iud. 19,277; Cass. Dio 60,8,2).
Hintergrund war eventuell seine Unterstützung des Claudius in den Wirren nach der
Ermordung Caligulas.
Gemeinsam mit seinem Bruder Agrippa I. setzt er sich bei Claudius erfolgreich für die Rechte
der Diasporajuden ein (Ios. ant. Iud. 19,279.288). Als König von Chalkis nahm er an der von
Agrippa I. organisierten Versammlung östlicher Klientelkönige in Tiberias teil, die vom
syrischen Statthalter C. Vibius Marsus aufgelöst wurde (Ios. ant. Iud. 19,338-342). 44 n.Chr.
hielt er sich zu den Spielen zu Ehren des Claudius in Caesarea Maritima auf, als sein Bruder
Agrippa I. überraschend starb (Ios. ant. Iud. 19,353). Bevor sich die Nachricht vom Tod des
Königs verbreitete, ordnete er angeblich auf Befehl seines Bruders an, den inhaftierten
ehemaligen eparchos Silas hinrichten zu lassen (Ios. ant. Iud. 19,353).
Nach der Reprovinzialisierung Iudaeas a. 44 setzte er sich bei Claudius für eine priesterliche
Gesandtschaft ein, die die Kontrolle über die hohepriesterlichen Gewänder erbat. Er wurde
vom Princeps mit der Oberaufsicht über den Jerusalemer Tempel einschließlich des Rechtes,
den Hohepriester einzusetzen, betraut (Ios. ant. Iud. 20,13.15f.).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Otto, Walter: Herodes [18], RE Suppl 2, 1913, 163-166.
Bringmann, Klaus: Herodes [7], DNP 5, 1998, 461.
PIR2 H 156.
Kokkinos, Nikos: The Herodian Dynasty. Origins, Role in Society and Eclipse, Sheffield 1998.
Schürer, Emil: Geschichte des jüdischen Volkes im Zeitalter Jesu Christi, Bd. 1, Leipzig 1901.
Wilker, Julia: Für Rom und Jerusalem. Die herodianische Dynastie im 1. Jahrhundert n.Chr., Frankfurt/M. 2007.
JW/25.02.10 – r/02.03.10
Herodias von Judäa, Schwester Agrippas I. = Iulia Herodias
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
203
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemmata Herodianer
Die Tochter des Aristobulos und der älteren Berenike wurde eventuell um das Jahr 15 v.Chr.
geboren (Kokkinos 1998, S. 264) und 7/6 v.Chr. von Herodes I. mit dessen Sohn Herodes
(PIR2 H 155), verlobt (Ios. bell. Iud. 1,557; ant. Iud. 17,14), mit dem sie nach der Heirat eine
Tochter Salome bekam (Ios. ant. Iud. 18,136). Sie verließ ihren Ehemann jedoch und heiratete
dessen Halbbruder Herodes Antipas (Ios. bell. Iud. 2,182; ant. Iud. 18,110-112.136.240-256).
Nach Mk 6,17 und Mt 14,3 war Herodias zudem auch mit dem Tetrachen Philippos
verheiratet, doch ist dies kaum wahrscheinlich, sondern dürfte eher auf einen Fehler der
frühchristlichen Überlieferung zurückgehen, war Philippos doch mit Herodias’ Tochter
Salome (PIR2 S 110) verheiratet (contra Kokkinos 1998, 266-268). Auf Bitten der Kypros,
der Ehefrau Agrippas I., drängte sie den Herodes Antipas, seinen zu dieser Zeit verschuldeten
Bruder Agrippa I. zum agoranomos von Tiberias zu ernennen (Ios. ant. Iud. 18,119). Nach Mt
14,3-11 und Mk 6,17-28 war sie maßgeblich an der Hinrichtung Johannes’ des Täufers
beteiligt, der u.a. ihre zweite Ehe als gesetzeswidrig kritisiert hatte (vgl. Lk 3,19-20; ant. Iud.
18,116-119).
2. Verhältnis zu Rom / Römern und Karriereverlauf
Nach der Schilderung des Flavius Josephus drängte sie den Herodes Antipas nach der
Ernennung ihres Bruders Agrippa I. zum König, Caligula gleichfalls um den Königstitel zu
bitten (Ios. bell. Iud. 2,181-183; ant. Iud. 18,240-246). Durch Intervention des Agrippa I.
setzte Caligula Herodes Antipas jedoch ab und verbannte ihn. Herodias wurde von Caligula
ihr Schicksal freigestellt, doch entschied sie sich, ihrem Mann ins Exil zu folgen (Ios. bell.
Iud. 2,183; ant. Iud. 18,253f.).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Otto, Walter: Herodias, RE Suppl. 2, 202-205.
Palitzsch, Johannes: Herodias, DNP 5, 1998, 467f.
PIR2 H 161.
Gillman, Florence Morgan: Herodias. At Home in the Fox’s Den, Collegeville 2003.
Kokkinos, Nikos: The Herodian Dynasty. Origins, Role in Society and Eclipse, Sheffield 1998.
Schürer, Emil: Geschichte des jüdischen Volkes im Zeitalter Jesu Christi, Bd. 1, Leipzig 1901.
Wilker, Julia: Für Rom und Jerusalem. Die herodianische Dynastie im 1. Jahrhundert n.Chr., Frankfurt/M. 2007.
JW/25.02.10 – r/02.03.10
Hieras, Vertrauter des Deiotaros (I.) Philorhomaios
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
Vermutlich galatischer Aristokrat; belegt a. 47-44.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
204
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Begleitete und umsorgte C. Iulius Caesar im Sommer 47 auf seiner Durchreise durch
Galatien im Auftrag des Deiotaros (I.) Philorhomaios (Cic. Deiot. 42). Im Sommer 45 nach
Rom gesandt, um das von Blesamios und Antigonos vertretene Bittgesuch um die Rückgabe
der Trokmertetrarchie zu unterstützen; in seinem Gefolge befand sich Dorylaos. Verbürgte
sich vor dem Diktator für seinen König, der Attentats- und Verratsklagen ausgesetzt war (Cic.
Deiot. 41f.). M. Tullius Cicero, Caesar und anderen in Kleinasien tätig gewesenen Beamten
schon früher gut bekannt (Cic. Deiot. 41): corpora sua pro salute regum suorum hi legati tibi
regii tradunt, Hieras et Blesamius et Antigonus, tibi nobisque omnibus iam diu noti. Damals
vermutlich Gast des Cn. Domitius Calvinus cos. 54, procos. Asiae 48-46 (Cic. Deiot. 32)
oder des P. Sestius procos. Ciliciae 49-47 (s.u.).
Vermutlich hatte er den Auftrag, weitere Fürsprecher für die Sache des Königs zu gewinnen,
ggf. auch Bestechungsgelder einzusetzen. Hatte die Weisung, dem Rat des Sestius zu folgen.
Blieb über Caesars Tod (15.3.44) hinaus in Rom. Erkaufte bis Mitte April 44 vielleicht durch
die Vermittlung der Fulvia (Cic. Att. 14,12,1=366 ShB vom 22.4.44) die Übertragung der
Trokmertetrarchie an Deiotaros durch M. Antonius, vermutlich ohne zu wissen, daß dieser
sie auf die Nachricht von Caesars Tod schon eigenmächtig besetzt hatte; zog sich den Unmut
Ciceros zu (Cic. Att. 16,3,6= 413 ShB vom 17.7.44).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Münzer, Friedrich: Hieras, RE 7,2, 1913, 1407.
DNP –.
Coskun, Altay: Amicitiae und politische Ambitionen im Kontext der causa Deiotariana, in: ders. (Hg.): Roms
auswärtige Freunde in der späten Republik und im frühen Prinzipat, Göttingen 2005, 127-54, bes. 130; 142.
Coskun, Altay: Von der ‘Geißel Asiens’ zu ‘kaiserfrommen’ Reichsbewohnern. Studien zur politischen und
gesellschaftlichen Entwicklung der Galater unter besonderer Berücksichtigung der amicitia populi Romani
und der göttlichen Verehrung des Augustus (3. Jh. v.–2. Jh. n.Chr.), unveröff. Habil. Trier 2007, Teil C.
Hoben, Wolfgang: Untersuchungen zur Stellung kleinasiatischer Dynasten in den Machtkämpfen der
ausgehenden römischen Republik, Diss. Mainz 1969, 109.
Stähelin, Felix: Geschichte der kleinasiatischen Galater, 21907, Nd. Osnabrück 1973, 94 Anm. 2.
AC/14.09.04–r/29.06.07
Hispaniensis aus Hispanien = L. Fabius L. f. Hispaniensis
0. Onomastisches
Das Cognomen Hispaniensis deutet darauf hin, daß er nicht indigenen Ursprungs war, da
Einheimische normalerweise als Hispanus bezeichnet wurden (Vell. 2,51,3). Caballos Rufino
1989, 246 vermutet, daß er einer Familie römischer Bürger angehörte, die bereits seit
längerem in Hispanien ansässig war. Weinrib 1990, 15f. glaubt sogar, daß er das Cognomen
Hispaniensis ganz bewußt angenommen hat, um klarzustellen, daß er einer emigrierten
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
205
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Familie angehörte; somit habe er Gerüchte über eine mögliche barbarische Herkunft seiner
Familie zu verhindern gesucht.
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
Belegt a. 81-72. Quästor a. 81. Seine Herkunft muß offen bleiben.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Quästor unter C. Annius, procos. Hisp. 81, der von L. Cornelius Sulla zum Kampf gegen Q.
Sertorius nach Hispanien geschickt wurde und diesen nach Afrika vertrieb (Grueber 1910,
Bd. 2, 352-356). Während dieser Zeit ist Hispaniensis auf mehreren Münzen bezeugt
(Sydenham 1952, Nr.748-748g).
Die Bezeichnung als senator ex proscriptis a. 72 (Sall. hist. frg. 3,83 Maurenbrecher = 3,79
McGushin) impliziert, daß er sich dem erfolglosen Aufstand des M. Aemilius Lepidus a. 77
angeschloßen hatte und daraufhin mit M. Perperna und C. Tarquitius Priscus, seinerzeit
ebenfalls Quästor unter C. Annius, nach Hispanien zu Sertorius fliehen mußte. Es ist daher
anzunehmen, daß er dem Exil-Senat der Perperna-Gruppe angehörte.
Seine Teilnahme am Gastmahl, an dem Sertorius a. 72 von den Anhängern des M. Perperna
ermordet wurde, scheint zu beweisen, daß er diesem gegenüber feindlich gesinnt geblieben
war (Sall. hist. wie oben).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Münzer, Friedrich: L. Fabius Hispaniensis, L. f., RE 6,2, 1909, 1171f.
DNP –.
Caballos Rufino, Antonio: Los senadores de origen hispano durante la república romana, in: Julián González
(Hg.): Estudios sobre Urso Colonia Iulia Genetiva, Sevilla 1989, 233-79, bes. 246f.
Castillo García, Carmen: Städte und Personen der Baetica, ANRW 3,2, 1975, 601-53, bes. 641.
Grueber, H. A.: Coins of the Roman Republic in the British Museum, Bd. 2, London 1910, 352-356.
Sydenham, E. A.: The Coinage of the Roman Republic, London 1952, Nr. 748-748g.
Weinrib, Joseph E.: The Spaniards in Rome. From Marius to Domitian, New York 1990, 57f.
Wiseman, Timothy P.: New Men in the Roman Senate 139 B.C.-A.D. 14, Oxford 1971, 230.
JL/29.09.04–r/29.06.07
Hyrkanos II., Hohepriester und König bzw. Ethnarch von Judäa [Var. Iohannes
Hyrkanos]
0. Onomastisches /Namenvarianten
Zuweilen wird für ihn in Analogie zu seinem Großvater Iohannes Hyrkanos I. als Zweitname
Iohannes/ Yehochanan angenommen.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
206
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemmata Hasmonäer, Makkabäer
Sohn des Alexandros Iannaios und der Alexandra Salome, Bruder des Aristobulos II., Vater
der Alexandra. A. 76 Hohepriester, nach dem Tod seiner Mutter a. 67 König von Judäa. Trat
von beiden Ämtern zunächst auf Betreiben seines Bruders Aristobulos II. zurück, kämpfte
aber anschließend mit Unterstützung des Strategen Antipatros um die Herrschaft. A. 63 von
Cn. Pompeius Magnus als Herrscher und Hohepriester bestätigt. Ab a. 57 zunächst nur noch
Hohepriester, von C. Iulius Caesar a. 47 als Hohepriester, Ethnarch und symmachos kai
philos bestätigt. A. 40 von den Parthern und Aristobulos gefangengesetzt und verstümmelt.
Auf Vermittlung des Herodes I. a. 36 nach Judäa zurückgekehrt, der ihn jedoch a. 31/30
hinrichten ließ.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Im Kampf um die Herrschaft belagerte er seinen Bruder Aristobulos in Jerusalem und bot wie
dieser dem M. Aemilius Scaurus quaest. bzw. proquaest. Syr. (des Pompeius) 65-61 eine
Bestechungszahlung von 400 Talenten an. Jener entschied sich aber für seinen Rivalen (Ios.
ant. Iud. 14,29-33). Hyrkanos erhielt jedoch von Pompeius a. 63 erneut die Herrschaft über
Judäa und das Hohepriesteramt (Diod. 40,2; Ios. bell. Iud. 1,131-33; ant. Iud. 14,37-52; Flor.
1,40,30).
Unterstützte Scaurus bei seinem Feldzug gegen die Nabatäer durch Antipatros mit
Lebensmitteln (Ios. bell. Iud. 1,159; ant. Iud. 14,80). Im Zuge der Verwaltungsreform in
Judäa a. 57 unter A. Gabinius cos. 58, procos. Syriae 57-54 behielt er allein die
Hohepriesterwürde (Ios. bell. Iud. 1,169f.; ant. Iud. 14,90f.). Gemeinsam mit Antipatros
unterstützte Hyrkanos a. 55 Gabinius bei dessen Zug nach Ägypten mit Getreidelieferungen,
Geld, Waffen und Hilfstruppen (Ios. bell. Iud. 1,175; ant. Iud. 14,99).
Gemäß App. bell. civ. 2,71,294 unterstützte er im Bürgerkrieg Pompeius. Nach dessen Ende
schickte Hyrkanos wohl unter der Führung des Antipatros dem Mithradates von Pergamon
Truppen zur Unterstützung Caesars in Alexandreia (nach Strab., FGrH 91 F 16-17 nahm
Hyrkanos selbst an dem Feldzug teil). Auf seine Fürsprache hin unterstützten schließlich auch
die Juden Ägyptens Caesar (Ios. ant. Iud. 14,127.131f.192f.). Caesar bestätigte ihn deswegen
als Hohepriester, ernannte ihn zum Ethnarchen (mit der Garantie beider Ämter auch für seine
Nachkommen) und befreite ihn von der Einquartierung römischer Truppen in Judäa. Zudem
wurde er unter die symmachoi kai philoi Roms aufgenommen (Ios. bell. Iud. 1,194.199; ant.
Iud. 14,137.143.190-99).
Wahrscheinlich gleichfalls a. 47 erhielt Hyrkanos zuvor verlorene Gebiete, insbesondere
Joppa, zurück (Ios. ant. Iud. 14,202-9). Ihm und seinen Kindern wurde das Recht
zugesprochen, bei Circusspielen unter den Senatoren zu sitzen, sowie Zugang zum Senat
gewährt (Ios. ant. Iud. 14,210).
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
207
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Auf Druck des Sex. Iulius Caesar quaest. 48, proquaest. pro praet. Syr. 47-46 führte er den
Prozeß gegen Herodes vor dem Synhedrion in Jerusalem nicht zu Ende bzw. akzeptierte die
Flucht des Herodes (Ios. bell. Iud. 1,210f.; ant. Iud. 14,170).
Wohl von a. 44 stammt das Edikt Caesars, das den Wiederaufbau der Mauern Jerusalems und
eine Abgabenreduktion für Judäa vorsah (Ios. ant. Iud. 14,200f.). Ebenfalls a. 44 bestätigte
Caesar die freundschaftlichen Beziehungen zu Hyrkanos und Judäa (Ios. ant. Iud. 14,211f.).
Nach der Ermordung des Diktators präsentieren M. Antonius und P. Cornelius Dolabella
cos. suff. 44 im Senat Gesandte des Hyrkanos; die Verträge wurden bestätigt bzw. erneuert
(Ios. ant. Iud. 14,217-22).
Zu Dolabella als Statthalter in Asia sandte Hyrkanos einen Gesandten, der um Privilegien für
die dortigen Juden bat. Dolabella gewährte diese umgehend (Ios. ant. Iud. 14,223-29).
Namentlich genannt wird Hyrkanos wahrscheinlich auch in dem in Ios. ant. Iud. 14,241-43
zitierten Brief der Magistrate von Laodikeia and den Proconsul C. Rabirius bezüglich der
Privilegien der jüdischen Gemeinden.
Von Antonius erbat er a. 41 in Ephesos durch eine Gesandtschaft erfolgreich die Freilassung
der von C. Cassius Longinus procos. Orientis 43-42 verkauften Juden und die Rückgabe der
von Tyros okkupierten Gebiete (Ios. ant. Iud. 14,304-23). Ebenso lobte er vor Antonius in
Antiocheia Herodes und Phasael, die dieser daraufhin zu Tetrarchen erhob (Ios. bell. Iud.
1,244; ant. Iud. 14,325f.).
A. 40 von den Parthern und Matthatias Antigonos gefangengesetzt und verstümmelt (Ios. bell.
Iud. 1,255-260. 269-270. 273. ant. Iud. 14,342-8. 365f. 15,12. 14f.). Auf Vermittlung des
Herodes I. a. 36 nach Judäa zurückgekehrt, der ihn jedoch a. 31/30 hinrichten ließ (Ios. bell.
Iud. 1,433. ant. Iud. 15,11-13. 18-21. 173-178).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Obst, Erich: Johannes [1.b], RE suppl. 4, 1924, 788-91.
Bringmann, Klaus: Hyrkanos [3], DNP 5, 1998, 827.
Baltrusch, Ernst: Die Juden und das Römische Reich. Geschichte einer konfliktreichen Beziehung, Darmstadt
2002, 128-56.
Bammel, E.: Die Neuordnung des Pompeius und das römisch-jüdische Bündnis, ZPalV 75, 1959, 76-82.
Baumann, Uwe: Rom und die Juden. Die römisch-jüdischen Beziehungen von Pompeius bis zum Tode des
Herodes (63 v.Chr.-4 v.Chr.), Frankfurt/M. 1983, 1-141.
Günther, Linda-Marie: Herodes der Große, Darmstadt 2005, 37-61.
Pucci ben Zeev, Miriam: Marcus Antonius, Publius Dolabella and the Jews, Athenaeum 82, 1994, 31-40.
Pucci ben Zeev, Miriam: Jewish Rights in the Roman World. The Greek and Roman Documents Quoted by
Josephus Flavius, Tübingen 1998.
Schalit, Abraham: König Herodes. Der Mann und sein Werk. Mit einem Vorwort von Daniel R. Schwartz, Berlin
2
2001, 4-80; 103f.; 124-26.
Schürer, Emil: The History of the Jewish People in the Age of Jesus Christ (175 B.C.-A.D. 135). A New English
Version Revised and Edited by Geza Vermes and Fergus Millar, Bd. 1, Edinburgh 1973, 267-86.
JW/3.12.06/24.09.08–r/03.07.07/21.02.10
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
208
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Iamblichos I., Phylarch oder König von Emesa
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemmata Emesener
Sohn des Sampsigeramos I.; Bruder des Alexandros I.; a. 31 hingerichtet. Zum Titel vgl.
Sullivan 1990, 199.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Informierte M. Tullius Cicero procos. Ciliciae 51/50 über die Aktivitäten der Parther (Cic.
fam. 15,1,2=104 ShB). Unterstützte Mithradates von Pergamon und damit C. Iulius Caesar a.
48/47 im Alexandrinischen Krieg (Ios. bell. Iud. 1,188). Stand 46-43 auf der Seite des Q.
Caecilius Bassus (Strab. geogr. 16,2,10 [753]: Phylarch). Wurde 31 im Heer des M.
Antonius von seinem Bruder Alexandros I. des Verrats beschuldigt, verurteilt und
hingerichtet (Cass. Dio 50,13,7; 51,2,2).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Stein: Iamblichos [1], RE 9,1, 1914, 639f.
Gundel, Hans Georg: Iamblichos [1], DNP 5, 1998, 848.
Sullivan, Richard D.: The Dynasty of Emesa, ANRW II 8, 1977, 205-10.
Sullivan, Richard D.: Near Eastern Royalty and Rome, 100-30 B.C., Toronto 1990, 200-2.
MT/06.12.06–r/30.06.07/03.03.12
Iamblichos II., Phylarch oder König von Emesa
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemmata Emesener
Sohn des Iamblichos I.; Vater des Sampsigeramos II. Zum Titel vgl. Sullivan 1990, 199; 202.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Erhielt a. 20 von Augustus die Herrschaft über Emesa (Cass. Dio 54,9,2).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Vgl. Stein: Iamblichos [1], RE 9,1, 1914, 639f.
Vgl. Gundel, Hans Georg: Iamblichos [1], DNP 5, 1998, 848.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
209
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Sullivan, Richard D.: The Dynasty of Emesa, ANRW II 8, 1977, 211f.
Sullivan, Richard D.: Near Eastern Royalty and Rome, 100-30 B.C., Toronto 1990, 202.
MT/06.12.06–r/30.06.07
Indo, König einer iberischen civitas
0. Onomastisches
Der Name weist Ähnlichkeit mit Indibilis, dem Anführer der Ilergeten im Zweiten Punischen
Krieg auf. Die Ilergeten siedelten im Binnenland zwischen Ebro und Pyrenäen. Vgl. Münzer
1916, 1325-27; Zeidler 2005, 192f.
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
A. 45 als König einer iberischen civitas belegt.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Unterstützte C. Iulius Caesar mit Truppen während seines zweiten Feldzuges in Hispanien a.
45. Verfolgte die pompejanischen Legionen auf ihrem Weg nach Corduba mit einer
Kavallerie-Einheit und wurde bei dieser Aktion von der feindlichen Nachhut getötet (Bell.
Hisp. 10,1-3).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Münzer, Friedrich: Indo, RE 9,2, 1916, 1369.
Vgl. Münzer, Friedrich: Indibilis, RE 9,2, 1916, 1325-27.
DNP –.
Zeidler, Jürgen: Onomastic Studies on Some Roman Amici in Hispania, in: Altay Coskun (Hg.): Roms
auswärtige Freunde in der späten Republik und im frühen Prinzipat, Göttingen 2005, 175-200, 192f.; 195.
JL/29.09.04–r/01.07.07
Izates II., König von Adiabene
0. Onomastisches / Namenvarianten / Homonyme
Griech. Ἰ ζάτης (Ios. Ant. 20,17ff.; Varianten: *Aἰ ζάς, *Ἰ ζᾶ ς u.ä. Ios. Bell. [z.B. 4,567]).
Lat. *Izates (Tac., conj. Freinsheim, codd.: Iuliates; Ezates, Exates). Der Name geht auf iran.
[avest.] yazata („Gott“) zurück (Justi 1895, 145f. Frenschkowski 1990, 216f.
Gignoux/Jullien/Jullien 2009, 88f. Nr. 244). Im tannaitischen Traktat Bereschit Rabba 46,11
(ed. J. Theodor, Berlin 1912 p. 467f.) werden die Brüder Zoitos (
ZWYṬWS) und
Monobazos (MWNBZ) erwähnt, die wohl mit Izates II. und Monobazos II. zu identifizieren
sind (vgl. Schiffman 1987, 301).
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
210
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
Sohn des Königs Monobazos I. Bazaios von Adiabene und der Königin Helena, die selbst
eine Schwester des Königs war (Ios. Ant. 20,17f.); Enkel des Königs Izates I. (Ios. Bell.
5,147); jüngerer Bruder des späteren Königs Monobazos II., ebenfalls eines Sohnes der
Helena; Izates hatte weitere Geschwister/Halbgeschwister (Ios. Ant. 20,20f. Bell. 6,356).
Verheiratet mit Symacho, einer Tochter des Königs Abennerigos von Charakene-Mesene (Ios.
Ant. 20,22f.); er dürfte weitere Ehefrauen gehabt haben, denn nach Ios. Ant. 20,93 hatte er je
24 Söhne und Töchter, die ihn überlebten. Eine Verwandte (syngenēs) namens Grapte hatte
sich einen Palast in Jerusalem erbaut (Ios. Bell. 4,567). Söhne und Brüder des Izates kämpften
im Jüdischen Krieg gegen die Römer und ergaben sich dem Titus a. 70 kurz vor der
Eroberung Jerusalems (Ios. Bell. 6,356f.).
Die Regierungszeit läßt sich nur annähernd bestimmen. Izates’ Vater Monobazos I. regierte
um das Jahr 20/21 n. Chr. (eine datierte Münze: Klose 1992, 82 Nr. 151). Izates starb
zwischen 51 (dem Beginn der Regierung des Partherkönigs Vologeses I. [51–78 n.Chr.]) und
64 n. Chr., da in diesem Jahr sein Nachfolger Monobazos II. erstmalig bezeugt ist (Cass. Dio
62,20,2 Exc. UnG 38 p. 391), im 56. Lebensjahr und im 25. Regierungsjahr (Ios. Ant. 20,4,3).
Sein Regierungsantritt ist demnach in die Zeitspanne 26–39 n.Chr. zu setzen. Da es bei Ios.
Ant. 20,37 heißt, daß Izates bald nach seiner Thronbesteigung Geiseln an den Partherkönig
Artabanos (ca. 10–38 n. Chr.) sowie an den Kaiser Claudius schickte (41–54 n. Chr.), dürfte
der Herrschaftsbeginn in den 30er Jahren, aber vor a. 38 liegen. Nun weiß Ios. davon, daß
Vologeses durch einen Einfall der Daher und Saken davon abgehalten wurde, mit Izates Krieg
zu führen und Izates bald darauf starb (Ios. Ant. 20,4,2); naheliegend ist, daß diese Episode
auf den Abfall der Hyrkanier im Jahr 58 anspielt (Tac. Ann. 13,38. Vgl. Heil 1997, 86–89.
Schuol 2000, 334), zumal die Daher im Hinterland Hyrkaniens saßen. Es wäre daher denkbar,
daß Izates im Zeitraum 33/34–58 n. Chr. regierte (vgl. auch Rajak 1998, 319: 33–57 n. Chr.
S.a. Neusner 1965, 61f.: 36–60 n. Chr.; Schalit 2007: „c. 35–60 C.E.“; Kahrstedt 1950, 69
Anm. 46: „30–54, eventuell ein Jahr früher“); in diesem Fall wäre er um 2 n. Chr. geboren.
Izates wuchs am Hof des Königs Abennerigos von Charakene-Mesene auf (Ios. Ant. 20,22f.;
Abennerigos ist wohl zu identifizieren mit dem numismatisch für ca. 11–13/14 n. Chr.
bezeugten König Abinerglos, der wohl wiederum mit dem durch Münzen des Jahres TΛΓ =
22/23 n. Chr. bekannten König Adinerglos identisch ist; er regierte vielleicht bis in die 30er
Jahre, da der folgende König Attambelos (III.?) erst für 38/39 n. Chr. bezeugt ist: Le Rider
1959, 252; Nodelman 1960, 98; Schuol 2000, 320–326).
Ob die im Relief von Batas-Herir (Irakisch-Kurdistan, nordöstl. von Arbil) abgebildete Person
Izates II. darstellt, wie Boehmer/v. Gall 1973 vermuten (vgl. auch Boehmer 1975. Boehmer
1989), muß aufgrund der ungeklärten Zeitstellung des Reliefs offen bleiben (Mathiesen 1992,
23f. datiert es in das 1. Jh. v. Chr.). Unwahrscheinlich (aufgrund der Onomastik) ist auch eine
Identität des Izates mit dem in Hatra (Inschrift H21) bezeugten König Atalu (’TLW), wie dies
von Teixidor 1967–68 vorgeschlagen wurde.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom / Römern und Karriereverlauf
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
211
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Izates schickte bald nach seinem Regierungsantritt einige seiner Brüder als Geiseln zum röm.
Kaiser Claudius, andere zum Partherkönig Artabanos (Ios. Ant. 20,37). Im Konflikt mit
dessen Nachfolger Vardanes (um 44? So Neusner 1965, 62) sandte er fünf seiner Söhne auf
römisches Gebiet (Ios. Ant. 20,71). Als Claudius a. 49 n. Chr. den Arsakidenprinzen
Meherdates auf Bitten einer parthischen Adelsdelegation ins Partherreich sandte, unterstützte
Izates zunächst die Sache des Meherdates gegen den Partherkönig Gotarzes, zog jedoch seine
Truppen vor der Schlacht am Corma-Fluß ab und überließ Meherdates seinem Schicksal (Tac.
Ann. 12,13–14).
Während seines Aufenthalts in der Charakene-Mesene wurde Izates zum jüdischen Glauben
bekehrt. Nach Neusner 1964, 63ff. geschah dies nicht allein aus privaten religiösen Motiven,
sondern auch vor dem Hintergrund politischer Ambitionen, die auch auf eine Einflußnahme
auf die Juden im Römischen Reich zielten (vgl. Neusner 1965, 64. Schiffman 1987, 307.
Schwartz 2007, 235). Im Reich des Izates lebte eine nicht unbedeutende jüdische Minderheit;
ein wichtiges jüdisches Zentrum war die Stadt Nisibis, die Artabanos den Adiabenern
übereignet hatte (Ios. Ant. 20,67f.).
Nach seinem Tod wurden seine Gebeine (ebenso wie die seiner Mutter Helena) nach
Jerusalem verbracht und in einem Grabmal (den „Pyramiden“) drei Stadien vor der Stadt
beigesetzt (Ios. Ant. 20,95). Das Mausoleum der Helena war selbst dem Periegeten Pausanias
bekannt (Paus. 8,16,5). Zahlreiche Forscher vermuten, daß die Reste einer umfangreichen
Grabanlage ca. 800 m nördlich der Altstadt von Jerusalem (sog. „Tombs of the Kings“ /
„Qubūr as-Salāṭīn“) mit der Grabstätte der Adiabener zu identifizieren ist (vgl. Schürer 1909,
170ff. mit Anm. 65).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
PIR2 I 891
Weissbach, [F.]: Izates [2], RE X,2, 1919, 1391f.
Boehmer, R.M.: Art. Bāṭās, in: Encyclopædia Iranica 3 (1989), 859 http://www.iranica.com/articles/batas.
Boehmer, R.M.: Art. Herir, Reallexikon der Assyriologie und vorderasiatischen Archäologie 4, 1975, 331.
Boehmer, R.M./v. Gall, H.: Das Felsrelief bei Batas-Herir, Baghdader Mitteilungen 6, 1973, 65–77.
Frenschkowski, M.: Iranische Königslegende in der Adiabene. Zur Vorgeschichte von Josephus Antiquitates
XX, 17–33, ZDMG 140, 1990, 213–233.
Gignoux, Ph. / Jullien, Ch. / Jullien, F.: Noms propres syriaques d’origine iranienne (Iranisches
Personennamenbuch 7,5 = Österr. Akademie der Wissenschaften, Phil.-Hist. Klasse, Sitzungsberichte 789),
Wien 2009.
Heil, M.: Die orientalische Außenpolitik des Kaisers Nero (Quellen und Forschungen zur antiken Welt 26),
München 1997 .
Justi, F.: Iranisches Namenbuch, Marburg 1895.
Kahrstedt, U.: Artabanos III. und seine Erben, Bern 1950.
Klose, D.: Von Alexander zu Kleopatra. Herrscherporträts der Griechen und Barbaren. München 1992 .
Le Rider, G.: Monnaies de Characène, Syria 36, 1959, 229–253.
Mathiesen, H.E.: Sculpture in the Parthian Empire, 2 Bde. Aarhus 1992.
Neusner, J.: A History of the Jews in Babylonia, Bd 1: The Parthian Period (Studia Post-Biblica 9). Leiden 1965.
Neusner, J.: The Conversion of Adiabene to Judaism, JBL 83, 1964, 60–66.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
212
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Nodelman, Sh.A.: A Preliminary History of Characene, Berytus 13, 1960, 83–123.
Rajak, T.: The Parthians in Josephus, in: Wiesehöfer, J. (Hrsg.): Das Partherreich und seine Zeugnisse (HistoriaEinzelschrift 122), Stuttgart 1998, 309–324.
Schalit, A.: Art. Izates II, Encyclopaedia Judaica (2nd Ed.) 10, 2007, 823.
Schiffman, L.H.: The Conversion of the Royal House of Adiabene in Josephus and Rabbinic Sources, in:
Feldman, L.H./Hata, G. (Eds.): Josephus, Judaism and Christianity, Leiden 1987, 293–312.
Schottky, M.: Parther, Meder und Hyrkanier, AMI 24, 1991, 61–134 (passim).
Schuol, M.: Die Charakene. Ein mesopotamisches Königreich in hellenistisch-parthischer Zeit (Oriens et
Occidens 1), Stuttgart 2000.
Schürer, E.: Geschichte des jüdischen Volkes im Zeitalter Jesu Christi. Bd. 3. Leipzig 41909, 169–172.
Schwartz, S.: Conversion to Judaism in the Second Temple Period: A Functionalist Approach, in: Cohen,
Sh.J.D./Schwartz, J.J. (Eds.): Studies in Josephus and the Varieties of Ancient Judaism. Louis H. Feldman
Jubilee Volume. Leiden – Boston 2007, 223–236.
Sellwood, D.: Art. Adiabene, Encyclopædia Iranica 1, 1985, 456–459.
Teixidor, J.: The Kingdom of Adiabene and Hatra, Berytus 17, 1967–68, 1–11.
AL / 15.3.2011 – r/20.02.12
Q. Iunius aus Hispanien
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
Belegt a. 54. Möglicherweise römischer Ritter. Castillo García 1975, 644 vermutet aufgrund
der Häufigkeit des Namens Iunius seine Herkunft aus der Hispania Ulterior.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Unterstützte C. Iulius Caesar bei seinem Feldzug in Gallien. Wurde a. 54 mit einer Mission
zu Ambiorix, dem Anführer der Eburonen, geschickt: Q. Iunius ex Hispania quidam, qui iam
missu Caesaris ad Ambiorigem ventitare consueverat (Caes. Gall. 5,27,1).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Münzer, Friedrich: Q. Iunius, RE 10,1, 1918, 965.
DNP –.
Caballos Rufino, Antonio: Los senadores de origen hispano durante la república romana, in: Julián González
(Hg.): Estudios sobre Urso Colonia Iulia Genetiva, Sevilla 1989, 233-79, bes. 266.
Castillo García, Carmen: Städte und Personen der Baetica, ANRW II 3, 1975, 601-53, bes. 644.
Zeidler, Jürgen: Onomastic Studies on Some Roman Amici in Hispania, in: Altay Coskun (Hg.): Roms
auswärtige Freunde in der späten Republik und im frühen Prinzipat, Göttingen 2005, 175-200, 182f.
JL/29.09.04–r/28.06.07
Kallisthenes, Sohn des Dades aus Olbia
0. Onomastisches
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
213
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Der griechische PN Kallisthenes ist im nördlichen Schwarzmeerrau in der vorrömischen Zeit
nicht belegt (vgl. Cojocaru 2004, 123-380: Katalog und Analyse der Personennamen). In
römischer Zeit ist der Name dagegen oftmals bezeugt, besonders in den Städten des
Bosporanischen Reiches und in Olbia (vgl. LPGN IV 183f.). Der Vatersname Dades ist als
thrakischer PN (mit Varianten Dada und Dadas) bei Detschew 1976, 110 (mit epigraphischen
Belegen) diskutiert. Vgl. aber auch die Rekonstruktion als Dados in LGPN IV 84 Nr. 13.
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
Kallisthenes, Sohn des Dados, bezeugt als archōn epōnymos von Olbia zur Zeit des Septimius
Severus (193-211 n.Chr.): IOSPE I2 42,3; 43,6; 174,10. Er wird wohl ein Verwandter des
Kallisthenes, Sohn des Kallisthenes, sein: IOSPE I2 42,4f. Vgl. auch IOSPE I2 44,4; 174,9.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Die Inschrift IOSPE I2 43,6f. bezeichnet ihn als genus genomenos lampru kai sebastognōstu.
Der Rang des sebastognōstos, der nicht ihm, sondern einem oder mehreren seiner Vorfahren
zugeschrieben wird, erinnert – in Verbindung mit seinem Namen und seiner herausgehobenen
sozialen Stellung – an Ababos, den Vater des Orontas, der vermutlich unter Tiberius
nachweislich diesen Titel erhielt: vgl. die Ehrung des Orontas in Byzantion, CIG II 2060 =
IOSPE I2 79 = IK 58,3, Mitte des 1. Jhs. n.Chr.: mechri tas tōn Sebastōn gnōseōs
prokopsantos. Denn Ababos selbst war Sohn eines Kallisthenes und Erbauer einer Säulenhalle
zu Ehren des vergöttlichten Augustus, des lebenden Kaisers Tiberius und des römischen
Volkes in Olbia (IOSPE I2 181). Zum Titel s. zu Ababos.
Kallisthenes, Sohn des Dados, kann offenbar keinen direkten Kontakt zum Kaiserhaus
nachweisen, nicht einmal römisches Bürgerrecht hat er erlangt. Dennoch gehört er, wie sein
berühmter Vorfahre Ababos, zur Elite seiner Stadt. Es ist möglich, aber keinesfalls sicher,
dass ein weiterer Spross der Familie im Dienst des Kaisers gestanden oder als Gesandter an
dessen Hof gereist ist. Hierauf könnte (muss aber nicht zwingend) der Titel eines wohl
verwandten Kallisthenes, Sohn des Kallisthenes, verweisen (s. dort).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
RE –. DNP –. PIR2 K –.
LGPN IV: A Lexicon of Greek Personal Names, vol. IV: Macedonia, Thrace, Northern Regions of the Black Sea,
ed. by P.M. Fraser and E. Matthews, assist. ed. R.W.V. Catling, Oxford 2005, S. 184 Nr. 27.
Cojocaru, Victor: Populaţia zonei nordice şi nord-vestice a Pontului Euxin în secolele VI–I a. Chr. pe baza
izvoarelor epigrafice (Die Bevölkerung der nördlichen und nordwestlichen Schwarzmeerküste vom 6. bis 1. Jh.
v. Chr. auf Grundlage des Inschriftenmaterials), Iaşi 2004.
Cojocaru, Victor: Von Byzantion nach Olbia: Zur Proxenie und zu den Außenbeziehungen auf der Grundlage
einer Ehreninschrift, in: Arheologia Moldovei 32, Bukarest 2009 (im Druck, erwartet im Frühjahr 2010).
Detschew, Dimiter: Die thrakischen Sprachreste, Wien 21976.
IK 58: Die Inschriften von Byzantion (Inschriften griechischen Städte aus Kleinasien, Bd. 58). Teil I: Die
Inschriften, hg. von A. Łajtar, Bonn 2000.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
214
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
IOSPE I2: Inscriptiones orae septentrionalis Ponti Euxini Graecae et Latinae, Vol. I 2. Inscriptiones Tyrae, Olbiae,
Chersonesi Tauricae aliorum locorum a Danubio usque ad Regnum Bosporanum. Iterum edidit Basilius
Latyschev, St. Petersburg 1916.
AC & VC/14.03.10
Kallisthenes, Sohn des Kallisthenes aus Olbia
0. Onomastisches
S. zu Kallisthenes, Sohn des Dades.
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
Kallisthenes, Sohn des Kallisthenes, bezeugt als patros (tēs) poleōs von Olbia zur Zeit des
Septimius Severus (193-211 n.Chr.): IOSPE I2 42,4f. Vgl. auch IOSPE I2 42, Z. 4 (frg.), 8f.;
44,4; 174,9.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Zwei olbische Inschriften bezeichnen ihn als an[ēr gen]omenos progonōn episēmōn te / kai
sebastognōstōn kai ktisantōn tēn polin (IOSPE I2 42,5f.) bzw. [pr]ogonōn ge[gonōs la]mprōn
kai s[ebastognōstō]n (IOSPE I2 44,5). Der Rang des sebastognōstos, der nicht ihm, sondern
einem oder mehreren seiner Vorfahren zugeschrieben wird, erinnert – in Verbindung mit
seinem Namen und seiner herausgehobenen sozialen Stellung – an Ababos, den Vater des
Orontas, der vermutlich unter Tiberius nachweislich diesen Titel erhielt: vgl. die Ehrung des
Orontas in Byzantion, CIG II 2060 = IOSPE I2 79 = IK 58,3, Mitte des 1. Jhs. n.Chr.: mechri
tas tōn Sebastōn gnōseōs prokopsantos. Denn Ababos selbst war Sohn eines Kallisthenes und
Erbauer einer Säulenhalle zu Ehren des vergöttlichten Augustus, des lebenden Kaisers
Tiberius und des römischen Volkes in Olbia (IOSPE I2 181). Zum Titel s. zu Ababos.
Kallisthenes, Sohn des Kallisthenes, kann offenbar keinen direkten Kontakt zum Kaiserhaus
nachweisen, nicht einmal römisches Bürgerrecht hat er erlangt. Dennoch gehört er, wie sein
berühmter Vorfahre Ababos, zur Elite seiner Stadt. Es ist möglich, aber keinesfalls sicher,
dass ein weiterer Spross der Familie im Dienst des Kaisers gestanden oder als Gesandter an
dessen Hof gereist ist. Hierauf scheint jedenfalls der Plural der „edlen und kaiserbekannten
und stadtgründenden Vorfahren“ hindeuten. Allerdings muss nicht jedes Attribut in gleicher
Weise auf alle Vorfahren zutreffen. So ist auffällig, dass Orontas – wenigstens zur Zeit seiner
Ehrung in Byzantion – selbst noch keinen Kontakt mit dem Kaiser hergestellt zu haben
scheint. Auch unter den mehreren im kaiserzeitlichen Olbia bezeugten Kallisthenai (LGPN IV
S. 184, Nr. 24-32), darunter besonders Kallisthenes, Sohn des Dados, „aus berühmten und
kaiserbekanntem Geschlecht“ (Nr. 27), bleibt ohne einen Nachweis direkter Beziehungen
nach Rom. Mithin ist die Nachhaltigkeit der in julisch-claudischer Zeit in Olbia durch
kaiserliches Prestige wohl nicht begründeten, aber doch gefestigten sozialen Stellung bis
mindestens in die severische Zeit hinein hervorzuheben.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
215
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
3. Auswahlbibliographie
RE –. DNP –. PIR2 K –.
LGPN IV: A Lexicon of Greek Personal Names, vol. IV: Macedonia, Thrace, Northern Regions of the Black Sea,
ed. by P.M. Fraser and E. Matthews, assist. ed. R.W.V. Catling, Oxford 2005, S. 184 Nr. 28f.
Cojocaru, Victor: Von Byzantion nach Olbia: Zur Proxenie und zu den Außenbeziehungen auf der Grundlage
einer Ehreninschrift, in: Arheologia Moldovei 32, Bukarest 2009 (im Druck, erwartet im Frühjahr 2010).
IK 58: Die Inschriften von Byzantion (Inschriften griechischen Städte aus Kleinasien, Bd. 58). Teil I: Die
Inschriften, hg. von A. Łajtar, Bonn 2000.
IOSPE I2: Inscriptiones orae septentrionalis Ponti Euxini Graecae et Latinae, Vol. I 2. Inscriptiones Tyrae, Olbiae,
Chersonesi Tauricae aliorum locorum a Danubio usque ad Regnum Bosporanum. Iterum edidit Basilius
Latyschev, St. Petersburg 1916.
AC & VC/14.03.10
Kastor (I.) Tarkondarios, Tetrarch der galatischen Tektosagen [Var. Kastor
Saokondar(i)os]
0. Onomastisches
Tarcondarius Castor nach Caes. civ. 3,4,5; Kastor (Sohn des?) Saokondaros nach Strab.
geogr. 12,5,3 (568); Kastor nach dem kontaminierten Eintrag in Suda s.v. Es ist unklar, ob die
Varianz des ersten Namenbestandteils durch eine Verschreibung oder durch die
Transliteration aus dem Galatischen bedingt ist. Ersteres vermutet Holder 2, 1904, 1732, wo
er tar- und con- als Präfixe deutet sowie als Etymon dari (sic) wie in Dario-ritum vorschlägt;
vgl. auch Delamarre 2003, 136, der -kon-daro- mit ‘grande fureur’ interpretiert. Entgegen der
Interpretation als keltisches Patronym in APRRE_001 Nr. 22 wird Tarcondarius von Coskun
2007 E.II/V auf den luwischen Haupt- und Wettergott Tarxunt zurückgeführt; die
Verbindung mit Kastor wird in die Tradition der altanatolischen oder phrygischen
Doppelnamen gestellt.
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemma Galater / Deiotaros
Lebte ca. a. 110/90-42. Tetrarch der Tektosagen, vielleicht zum Teil anatolischer bzw.
kilikischer Herkunft; nach einem polemischen Zeugnis (Cic. Deiot. 30) unbedeutender
Abstammung; nach einer irrigen Quelle (Suda s.v. Kastor) Phanagoreier. Schwiegersohn des
Deiotaros (I.) Philorhomaios und Vater Kastors (II.). Burgherr von Gorbeous (Strab. geogr.
12,5,3 [568]). In der Forschung wohl zu Unrecht für einen Bruder des Domnekleios gehalten.
Vgl. jetzt Coskun 2007, Teil E.II.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
216
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Kastor scheint von Deiotaros (I.) Philorhomaios in seiner Machtstellung über die Tektosagen
nach a. 86 gefördert worden zu sein (vgl. Cic. Deiot. 30). Von Cn. Pompeius Magnus ca. a.
64 als Tetrarch bestätigt (ohne Nennung seines Namens: Strab. geogr. 12,3,1 [541]; App.
Mithr. 114,560). Sein Sohn Kastor (II.) kämpfte a. 51/50 unter M. Tullius Cicero procos.
Ciliciae und a. 48 auf Seiten des Pompeius vor Pharsalos, wo er ihm auch nach der
Niederlage noch die Treue hielt (Cic. Deiot. 28); er vertrat dort seinen Vater und führte
zusammen mit dem Tetrarchen Domnekleios 300 galatische Reiter (Caes. civ. 3,4,5).
Dennoch schlossen die Kastores bis Sommer 47 Freundschaft mit C. Iulius Caesar (Cic.
Deiot. 8), der sich durch dieses Nahverhältnis offenbar eine weitere Kontrolle des Deiotaros
versprach.
Die Kastores überwarfen sich bis a. 45 mit Deiotaros; der jüngere Kastor klagte ihn ca. Nov.
45 im Vertrauen auf die Freundschaft zu Caesar des Mordversuches an diesem a. 47 und des
Verrats a. 46/45 an (Cic. Deiot. 8). Der Hintergrund wird in der früheren Forschung in der
aggressiven Expansionspolitik des Deiotaros gesehen, der das nördliche Tektosagenland a. 47
besetzt und Caesar um das Trokmerland gebeten habe. Eher scheint Kastor (I.) Tarkondarios
aber selbst das Territorium des Domnekleios (†48) unter Übergehung von dessen Sohn
Adiatorix besetzt zu haben. Deiotaros könnte wiederum versucht haben, diesen zu
protegieren. Die Klage wurde wohl abgewiesen, aber eine Änderung des Status quo trat in
Galatien bis zu Caesars Tod am 15.3.44 nicht ein.
Eine Teilnahme der Tektosagen an der Schlacht von Philippoi im Gefolge des C. Cassius
Longinus ist wahrscheinlich, aber nicht belegt; zum nachgewiesenen Aufgebot, das Amyntas
(I.) im Namen des Deiotaros (I.) führte, werden sie kaum gehört haben. Nach Strab. geogr.
12,5,3 (568) fanden Kastor (I.) Tarkondarios und seine Frau, die Tochter des Deiotaros (I.), in
Gorbeous ihren Untergang, das der Tolistobogier zunächst belagern und dann schleifen ließ.
Aus der Grabinschrift des Deiotaros (II.) Philopator ist zu folgern, daß dies erst nach der
Schlacht von Philippoi sowie mit Genehmigung des M. Antonius geschah (a. 42/41). Vgl.
Coskun 2007, Teil C.VI und E.II.
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Vgl. Kubitschek: Kastor [8] von Rhodos, RE 10,2, 1919, 2347-57.
Spickermann, Wolfgang: Tarkondarios, DNP 12,1, 2002, 27.
Coskun, Altay: Amicitiae und politische Ambitionen im Kontext der causa Deiotariana, in: ders. (Hg.): Roms
auswärtige Freunde in der späten Republik und im frühen Prinzipat, Göttingen 2005, 127-54.
Coskun, Altay: Von der ‘Geißel Asiens’ zu ‘kaiserfrommen’ Reichsbewohnern. Studien zur politischen und
gesellschaftlichen Entwicklung der Galater unter besonderer Berücksichtigung der amicitia populi Romani
und der göttlichen Verehrung des Augustus (3. Jh. v.–2. Jh. n.Chr.), unveröff. Habil. Trier 2007, Teil C und
E.
Delamarre, Xavier: Dictionnaire de la langue gauloise, Paris 22003. (zu einzelnen Namenbestandteilen)
Hoben, Wolfgang: Untersuchungen zur Stellung kleinasiatischer Dynasten in den Machtkämpfen der
ausgehenden römischen Republik, Diss. Mainz 1969, 79-85; 92-96; 115-17.
Holder, Alfred: Alt-celtischer Sprachschatz, Bd. 2, Leipzig 1896, 1357; 1732.
Mitchell, Stephen: Anatolia. Land, Men, and Gods in Asia Minor, Bd. 1: The Celts in Anatolia and the Impact of
Roman Rule, Oxford 1993, 28; 37; 54.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
217
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Stähelin, Felix: Geschichte der kleinasiatischen Galater, 21907, Nd. Osnabrück 1973, 89-95; 116f.
Sullivan, Richard D.: Near Eastern Royalty and Rome, 100-30 B.C., Toronto 1990, 167-169.
AC/14.09.04–r/29.06.07/20.02.10
Kastor (II.), Sohn Kastors (I.), des Tetrarchen der galatischen Tektosagen
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemma Galater / Deiotaros
Wurde als Sohn des Kastor (I.) Tarkondarios, des Tetrarchen der galatischen Tektosagen mit
Stammsitz in Gorbeous, und einer Tochter des Deiotaros (I.) Philorhomaios, des damaligen
Tetrarchen der galatischen Tolistobogier, ca. a. 85/70 v.Chr. geboren. Trat spätestens seit a.
48 als Stellvertreter seines Vaters auf. Zuletzt als Ankläger seines Großvaters vor Caesar a. 45
belegt (Cic. Deiot., bes. 28-30).
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Kämpfte a. 51/50 unter M. Tullius Cicero procos. Ciliciae und a. 48 auf Seiten des Cn.
Pompeius Magnus vor Pharsalos, wo er ihm auch noch nach der Niederlage die Treue hielt
(Cic. Deiot. 28). Er vertrat dort seinen Vater und führte zusammen mit dem Tetrarchen
Domnekleios 300 galatische Reiter (Caes. civ. 3,4,5). Dennoch schlossen die Kastores bis
Sommer 47 Freundschaft mit C. Iulius Caesar (Cic. Deiot. 8), der sich durch dieses
Nahverhältnis offenbar eine weitere Kontrolle des Deiotaros versprach.
Die Kastores überwarfen sich bis a. 45 mit Deiotaros. Der jüngere Kastor klagte ihn an, a. 47
ein Attentat auf Caesar geplant sowie a. 46/45 mit dem Rebellen Caecilius Bassus konspiriert
zu haben (Cic. Deiot. bes. 8; 17-21; 23-25). Der Hintergrund wird in der früheren Forschung
in der aggressiven Expansionspolitik des Deiotaros gesehen. Eher scheinen sich die Kastores
aber selbst das Territorium des Domnekleios (†48) unter Übergehung von dessen Sohn
Adiatorix angeeignet zu haben. Deiotaros könnte wiederum versucht haben, diesen zu
protegieren; seit Ende 46 strebte er zudem offen nach der Rückgewinnung des
Trokmerlandes. Die Klage wies Caesar wohl ab, nahm aber bis zu seinem Tod am 15.3.44
keine Änderung des Status quo mehr vor.
Verzichtet man auf die allgemein akzeptierte (z.B. Niese 1883, 597; Buchheim 1960, 58;
Sullivan 1990, 169f. und stemma 3; Mitchell I 1993, 28), jedoch höchst unwahrscheinliche
Identifizierung mit dem gleichnamigen König von Paphlagonien (Strab. geogr. 12,3,41 [562])
bzw. von Galatien und Paphlagonien (Cass. Dio 48,33,5) (s. Kastor [III.]), dann ist die
Annahme plausibel, daß er vor oder während der Schlacht von Philippoi umkam. Dort wird er
im Gefolge des C. Cassius Longinus gestanden haben. Zu den bald darauf folgenden
Kämpfen um Gorbeous erwähnt ihn Strab. geogr. 12,5,3 (568) ad a. 42/41 jedenfalls nicht
mehr. Vgl. Coskun 2007, Teil C.VI und E.II.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
218
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Vgl. Kubitschek: Kastor [8] von Rhodos, RE 10,2, 1919, 2347-57.
Strobel, Karl: Kastor II. [5], DNP 12,2, 2002, 1034.
Buchheim, Hans: Die Orientpolitik des Triumvirn Marcus Antonius, Heidelberg 1960, 51; 59 mit Anm. 143.
Coskun, Altay: Von der ‘Geißel Asiens’ zu ‘kaiserfrommen’ Reichsbewohnern. Studien zur politischen und
gesellschaftlichen Entwicklung der Galater unter besonderer Berücksichtigung der amicitia populi Romani
und der göttlichen Verehrung des Augustus (3. Jh. v.–2. Jh. n.Chr.), unveröff. Habil. Trier 2007, Teil C und
E.
Hoben, Wolfgang: Untersuchungen zur Stellung kleinasiatischer Dynasten in den Machtkämpfen der
ausgehenden römischen Republik, Diss. Mainz 1969, I 79-85; 92-96; 115-17.
Mitchell, Stephen: Anatolia. Land, Men, and Gods in Asia Minor, Bd. 1: The Celts in Anatolia and the Impact of
Roman Rule, Oxford 1993, 28; 36f.; 54.
Niese, Benedictus: Straboniana, RhM 38, 1883, 567-602, 597.
Stähelin, Felix: Geschichte der kleinasiatischen Galater, 21907, Nd. Osnabrück 1973, 89-95; 116f.
Sullivan, Richard D.: Near Eastern Royalty and Rome, 100-30 B.C., Toronto 1990, 167-72.
AC/03.07.07
Kastor (III.), König von Paphlagonien
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemma Galater / Deiotaros
In der bisherigen Forschung wurde er mit Kastor (II.), dem Sohn des Kastor (I.) Tarkondarios,
identifiziert, doch aufgrund von politischen und genealogischen Überlegungen ist er von
diesem mit Coskun 2007, Teil E.IV zu unterscheiden. Vielmehr war er der Sohn des
Deiotaros (II.) Philopator und einer Tochter Kastors (II.) sowie ein Bruder des Brigatos.
Unstrittig gilt er als Vater des Deiotaros (III.) Philadelphos, des letzten Königs von
Paphlagonien (Strab. geogr. 12,3,41 [562]), der seine Herrschaft bis a. 31 übernahm und ca. a.
6 starb.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Nach Cass. Dio 48,33,5 übernahm „ein gewisser Kastor“ a. 41/40 die Herrschaft des Attalos
(sc. in Paphlagonien) und des Deiotaros (I.) Philorhomaios in Galatien. Sollte Cass. Dio recht
haben, dann wurde seine Herrschaft von M. Antonius beschränkt, indem dieser a. 37/36
Amyntas (I.) oder kurz zuvor Brigatos über Galatien einsetzte. Wahrscheinlicher ist indes, daß
Kastor von vorneherein lediglich Paphlagonien und sein Bruder Brigatos Galatien erhielten.
3. Auswahlbibliographie
RE –. DNP –.
Coskun, Altay: Von der ‘Geißel Asiens’ zu ‘kaiserfrommen’ Reichsbewohnern. Studien zur politischen und
gesellschaftlichen Entwicklung der Galater unter besonderer Berücksichtigung der amicitia populi Romani
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
219
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
und der göttlichen Verehrung des Augustus (3. Jh. v.–2. Jh. n.Chr.), unveröff. Habil. Trier 2007, Teil E.IV
und Stemma in Teil J.VI.1.
Weiteres unter Kastor (II.).
AC/03.07.07
Kastor (IV.), erster Sebastos-Priester von Ankyra
0. Onomastisches
Überliefert ist allein „[Ka]st[o]r, Sohn des Königs Brigatos“ (s. 2).
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemma Galater / Deiotaros
Als Sohn des Brigatos war er Enkel des Deiotaros (II.) Philopator und einer Tochter Kastors
(II.). Erster Ankyraner Sebastos-Priester a. 4/3 (OGIS II 533=Bosch, QGA 51, mit der
Chronologie von Coskun 2007, Teil G): Die umfassenden Stiftungen erweisen eine führende
Rolle für ihn auch nach der Provinzialisierung.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
S. 1.
3. Auswahlbibliographie
RE –. DNP –.
Coskun, Altay: Von der ‘Geißel Asiens’ zu ‘kaiserfrommen’ Reichsbewohnern. Studien zur politischen und
gesellschaftlichen Entwicklung der Galater unter besonderer Berücksichtigung der amicitia populi Romani
und der göttlichen Verehrung des Augustus (3. Jh. v.–2. Jh. n.Chr.), unveröff. Habil. Trier 2007, Teil E.V
und G.III.
Mitchell, Stephen: Anatolia. Land, Men, and Gods in Asia Minor, Bd. 1: The Celts in Anatolia and the Impact of
Roman Rule, Oxford 1993, 107.
AC/03.07.07
Kastoris Sotira von Eumeneia
0. Onomastisches
Ob Sōt<ē>ra ‘Retterin’ hier als von der Stadt verliehener Ehrentitel oder als Zweitname
aufzufassen ist, bleibt unsicher.
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
In augusteischer Zeit auf Münzen der phrygischen Stadt Eumeneia belegt (RPC I S. 509 Nr.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
220
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
3143). Eine Abstammung von Kastor (I.) Tarkondarios ist angesichts der anzunehmenden
Verwandtschaft mit dem Kelten Zmertorix, dem Sohn des Philonides (RPC I Nr. 3139 ca. a.
41/40 v.Chr.), sowie mit Valerios Zmertorix (RPC I Nr. 3144-46 unter Tiberius)
wahrscheinlich.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Die unter 1. zitierten Zeugnisse suggerieren eine dynastische Kontinuität, die eine Bestätigung
ihrer Herrschaft durch den jungen Caesar nach a. 31 sowie vielleicht bereits schon durch M.
Antonius voraussetzt.
3. Auswahlbibliographie
RE –. DNP –.
RPC I S. 509 Nr. 3143.
Coskun, Altay: Von der ‘Geißel Asiens’ zu ‘kaiserfrommen’ Reichsbewohnern. Studien zur politischen und
gesellschaftlichen Entwicklung der Galater unter besonderer Berücksichtigung der amicitia populi Romani
und der göttlichen Verehrung des Augustus (3. Jh. v.–2. Jh. n.Chr.), unveröff. Habil. Trier 2007, Teil E.V.
Mitchell, Stephen: Anatolia. Land, Men, and Gods in Asia Minor, Bd. 1: The Celts in Anatolia and the Impact of
Roman Rule, Oxford 1993, 40.
AC/03.07.07 – r/22.04.12
Kleon, Dynast von Gordiukome/Iuliopolis und Hohepriester von Komana Pontike
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
Als Dynast des im bithynisch-phrygisch-galatischen Grenzgebiets liegenden Gordiukome
während der späten 40er bis frühen 20er Jahre bezeugt.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Nach Strab. geogr. 12,8,8f. (574f.) war er ein „Räuberführer“. Unterstützte M. Antonius
gegen T. Quinctius Labienus, wechselte bei Aktion aber ins Lager des jungen Caesar, der
ihn u.a. zum Priester des mysischen Zeus Abrettenos, zum Herrscher der Morene (in der
Abrettene lag) und zuletzt sogar zum Priester von Komana Pontike machte. Gründete
Gordiukome neu als Iuliopolis.
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Stein, A.: Kleon [6], RE 11,1, 1921, 718.
Olshausen, Eckart: Kleon [5], DNP 6, 1999, 583.
Coskun, Altay: Von der ‘Geißel Asiens’ zu ‘kaiserfrommen’ Reichsbewohnern. Studien zur politischen und
gesellschaftlichen Entwicklung der Galater unter besonderer Berücksichtigung der amicitia populi Romani
und der göttlichen Verehrung des Augustus (3. Jh. v.–2. Jh. n.Chr.), unveröff. Habil. Trier 2007.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
221
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Magie, David: Roman Rule in Asia Minor to the End of the Third Century after Christ, Princeton/N.J. 1950, I
444.
Mitchell, Stephen: Anatolia. Land, Men, and Gods in Asia Minor, Bd. 1: The Celts in Anatolia and the Impact of
Roman Rule, Oxford 1993, 38; 41; 49.
AC/03.07.07
Kotys VIII., König der Thraker bzw. der Sapäer und Odrysen [Var. Cotys]
0. Onomastisches
Kurzform eines Vollnamens mit Vorderglied Koty-. Als PN diskutiert bei Detschew 1957,
259ff., mit Belegen in literarischen und epigraphischen Quellen, vgl. Cojocaru 2006, 42 und
48. Der Name scheint gemeinthrakisch zu sein, nach Beševliev 1970, 22 vom Namen eines
einheimischen Gottes abgeleitet. Zur Etymologie des Namens s. auch Georgiev 1981.
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemmata Astäer-Odrysen
Sohn des Rhoimetalkes I., benannt nach seinem Großvater Kotys VII. Verheiratet mit Antonia
Tryphaina. König seit ca. 12 n.Chr.; kurz vor 19 n.Chr. von seinem Onkel Rhaskuporis III.
ermordet (Tačeva 1987, 210; vgl. Eder 204, 190). Ein stemma regum Thraciae stirpis
Sapaeae bei Dessau 1913, 704 (übernommen von Mihailov in IGBulg I2, 368); vgl. das
stemma in PIR VI2 232 und bei Tačeva 1995, 467. Weitere wichtige Diskussionen bei Danov
1979, 133ff. und Sullivan 1979, 200-204.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
12 n.Chr. wies Augustus dem Kotys nach dem Tode seines Vaters Rhoimetalkes’ I. das
Erbland zu, das südlich des Haimos lag. Gleichzeitig bekam Rhaskuporis III., der Bruder des
Rhoimetalkes, den Schutz der ripa Thraciae (Tac. ann. 2,64; vgl. Patsch 1932, 128). Nach
Rostovtzeff 1934, 7f. kamen auch die griechischen Städte bei der Teilung unter Kotys’
Herrschaft, doch lässt sich hierfür nur eine Inschrift aus Kallatis anführen (ISM III 441: epi
basileōs Kotyos tu Rhoimētalka). Die Städte werden sonst als Reichsboden betrachtet (Lenk
1936, 448).
Rhaskuporis empfand die Verteilung als ungerecht, wenn er auch offene keine Auflehnung
wagte. Nach dem Tode des Augustus fühlte sich Rhaskuporis nicht mehr gebunden und
begann, Vorstöße seiner Leute über die Balkanpässe zu dulden und zu fördern (Tac. ann.
2,64). Nach der Ermordung des Kotys ließ sich Rhaskuporis von Pomponius Flaccus über die
Grenze locken und gefangennehmen (Vell. 2,129,1; Suet. Tib. 37,4; Tac. ann. 2,6). In Rom
wurde er vor den Senat gestellt, wo ihn die Witwe des Kotys, Antonia Tryphaina, anklagte. Er
wurde nach Alexandrien deportiert und dort bei einem Fluchtversuch ermordet (Tac. ann.
2,67).
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
222
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Ein Brief Ovids ist an Kotys gerichtet, weil dieser selbst dichtete und daher dem Verbannten
als Helfer in der Not erschien (Ov. Pont. 2,9,49ff.; vgl. Pârvan 1926, 166/7). Zur
Friedensliebe des Königs vgl. Pont. 2,9,46 (vgl. Pârvan 1928, 104 und Patsch 1932, 129); zur
Abstammung vom Heros Eumolpos Pont. 2,9,19. Positiv zu Kotys äußern sich auch
Antipatros von Thessalonike (Anth. Plan. IV 75) und Tacitus (ann. 2,64,2).
In einer Inschrift aus der thrakischen Binnenstadt Bizye (im Gebiet der Astai) ehren Römer
(Rhōmaioi hoi prōtōs kataklēthentes eis kēnson) einen König Kotys. Nach Dawkins/Hasluck
1905-6, 178 (gefolgt von Dessau 1913, 700) gehört die Inschrift in die augusteische Zeit und
könnte also Kotys VIII. betreffen. Dagegen identifiziert Sullivan 1979, 196 den Geehrten mit
dem Kotys VII., Sohn des Königs Rhaskuporis I.
Kotys VIII. und andere thrakische Dynasten aus der Zeit vom sog. Ersten Triumvirat bis zum
Prinzipat des Augustus waren nach Danov 1979, 133, und Tačeva 1995, 459-460 eher
„friendly kings“ als „client kings“.
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Kahrstedt: Kotys [8]. In: RE 11,2, 1922, 1554.
Lenk, B.: Thrakien (Geschichte), RE 6A,1, 1936, 443; 448f.
Peter, U.: Kotys [I 9], DNP 6, 1999, 784f.
PIR II2 1554; vgl. PIR VI2 232.
Beševliev, V.: Untersuchungen über die Personennamen bei den Thrakern, Amsterdam 1970.
Cojocaru, V.: Catalogue des anthroponymes nord et nord-ouest pontiques aux VIe-Ier siècles av. J.-C. chez les
anciens auteurs grecs et latins, in: L. Mihailescu-Birliba/ O. Bounegru (Hgg.): Studia historiae et religionis
daco-romanae. In honorem Silvii Sanie, Bukarest 2006, 35-59.
Danov, Chr.M.: Die Thraker auf dem Ostbalkan von der hellenistischen Zeit bis zur Gründung Konstantinopels,
ANRW 7.1, 1979, 21-185.
Dawkins, R.M./ Hasluck, F.W.: Inscriptions from Bizye, in: The Annual of the British School at Athens 12,
1905-1906, 175-180.
Detschew, D.: Die thrakischen Sprachreste, Wien 1957.
Eder, W.: X.4. Thrakien, in: W. Edler/ J. Renger (Hgg.): Herrscherchronologien der antiken Welt. Namen,
Daten, Dynastien (DNP, Suppl. Bd. 1), Stuttgart 2004, S. 186-190.
Dessau, H.: Miscellanea epigraphica. II. Reges Thraciae qui fuerint imperante Augusto, in: Ephemeris
Epigraphica 9, 1913, 697-706.
Georgiev, Vl.: La formation et l’étymologie des noms des rois thraces et daces, Linguistique balkanique 24.1,
1981, 5-29.
IGBulg I2: Mihailov, G. (Hg.): Inscriptiones Graecae in Bulgaria repertae. Bd. I: Inscriptiones orae Ponti Euxini.
Editio altera emendata, Sofia 1970.
ISM III: Avram, A. (Hg.): Inscriptions Grecques et Latines de Scythie Mineure. Bd. III: Callatis et son territoire,
Bukarest/Paris 1999.
Patsch, C.: Beiträge zur Völkerkunde von Südosteuropa. Bd. 5: Aus 500 Jahren vorrömischer und römischer
Geschichte Südosteuropas. 1. Teil: Bis zur Festsetzung der Römer in Transdanuvien, Wien 1932.
Pârvan, V.: Getica. O protoistorie a Daciei, Bukarest 1926.
Pârvan, V.: Dacia: an Outline of the Early Civilizations of the Carpatho-Danubian Countries, Cambridge/London
1928.
PIR II2: Groag, E./ Stein A. (Hgg.): Prosopographia Imperii Romani. Saec. I. II. III. Pars II. Editio altera,
Berlin/Leipzig 1936.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
223
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
PIR VI2: Petersen, L./ Wachtel K. et al. (Hgg.): Prosopographia Imperii Romani. Saec. I. II. III. Pars VI. Editio
altera, Berlin 1998.
Rostovtzeff, M.: Rezension zu Patsch 1932, Gnomon 10, 1934, 1-10.
Sullivan, R.D.: Thrace in the Eastern Dynastic Network, ANRW 7.1, 1979, 186-211.
Tačeva, M.: Corrigenda et addenda ad PIR (III, 1898: R 40-42, 50-52; II2, 1936: C 1552-1554; IV2, 1966, J 517)
pertinentia, in: Actes du IXe Congrès international d’épigraphie grecque et latine I. Acta Centri Historiae
‚Terra antiqua Balcanica‘ 2, 1987, 110-113.
Tačeva, M.: The Last Thracian Independant Dynasty of the Rhascuporis, in: A. Fol et al. (Hgg.): Studia in
honorem Georgii Mihailov, Sofia 1995, 459-467.
VC & AVLG/02.09.08–r/08.09.08
Lysanias, Tetrarch und Hohepriester von Chalkis am Libanon
 Stemma der Mennaiden
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
Im Jahr 40 v.Chr. folgte Lysanias seinem Vater Ptolemaios, Sohn des Mennaios, als ‚Tetrarch
und Hohepriester‘ von Ituräa nach: Ios. bell. Iud. 1,13,1 (248). Wohl während der
Vorherrschaft durch die Parther nahm er den Königstitel an, wurde aber 37/36 von M.
Antonius abgesetzt und sofort oder spätestens 34 v.Chr. hingerichtet (s. 2). Sein Sohn
Zenodoros folgte ihm aber von ca. 30 bis 20 v.Chr. als Tetrarch und Hohepriester nach.
Dessen Sohn Lysanias II. wurde Tetrarch der Abilene. Vgl. Seyrig 1970; Gatier 2002/2003.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Trotz seiner Unterwerfung unter die Triumvirn 42/41 v.Chr. verfolgte Ptolemaios weiterhin
eigenständige Ziele, so vor allem mit der Rückführung des Antigonos, des Sohnes des
Aristobulos II., auf den Thron von Jerusalem, die freilich am Widerstand des Herodes (I.)
scheiterte: Ios. ant. Iud. 14,12,1 (297); bell. Iud. 1,12,2 (239). Als Lysanias seinem Vater bis
zum Einfall des parthischen Prinzen Pakoros in Syrien 40 v.Chr. nachgefolgt war (Ios. bell.
Iud. 1,13,1 [248]), setzte er diesen selbstbewussten Kurs fort. So jedenfalls kann daraus
geschlossen werden, dass er auf seinen Münzen nicht nur die philippische Ära wieder aufgab,
sondern auch dem Porträt seines Vaters wieder das Diadem auflegte, welches M. Antonius
jenem genommen hatte: Burnett, RPC I 4770; Kindler 1993, 287; Herman 2006, 64-68; vgl.
die weiteren Verweise und die Diskussion unter Ptolemaios, Sohn des Mennaios.
Einen offenen Abfall scheint er zunächst aber nicht gewagt zu haben. Jedenfalls ist nichts von
einem Konflikt bezeugt, als M. Antonius den Libanon von Ägypten kommend im späteren
Frühjahr 40 v.Chr. durchzog: App. civ. 5,52; MRR II 378. Jedoch wurde die Position des
Triumvirn weiter durch den geplanten Krieg gegen Octavian geschwächt. So wird die
Entscheidung des Lysanias, mit den Parthern zu kollaborieren, im Verlauf des Sommers
gefallen sein, bevor bekannt wurde, dass sich der innerrömische Konflikt durch die
Verhandlungen von Brundisium entschärft hatte. Gemäß Josephus (bell. Iud. 1,13,1 [248]) trat
der Ituräer an den parthischen Statthalter Barzaphernes mit der Bitte heran, Antigonos nach
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
224
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Jerusalem zurückzuführen. Hierfür bot er den Parthern 1.000 Talente und 500 Frauen.
Josephus scheint im Wesentlichen die Dinge zu berichten, die aus jüdischer Perspektive
relevant waren, so dass offen bleibt, welche eigenen Ziele er verfolgte.
Nun bezeugen die literarischen Quellen einhellig, dass Lysanias gegen Ende seiner Herrschaft
den Königstitel führte: Ios. bell. Iud. 1,22,3 (440); Cass. Dio 49,32,5; vgl. auch Eus. chron. I
ed. Schoene p. 170, wo der Name in Lysimachos verschrieben ist. Cassius Dio schreibt hier
sogar M. Antonius die Verleihung der Würde zu, worin ihm heute meist gefolgt wird: Schürer
I 563; Schwahn 1934, 1096; Buchheim 1960, 19 (Ernennung im Herbst 39 v.Chr.); 69;
Schottroff 1982, 141; Herman 2006, 51; 53; Schwentzel 2009, 69. Doch abgesehen von dem
Spannungsverhältnis, das sich zur Titulatur auf den Münzen ergibt, wäre es auch sonderbar,
dass sich Lysanias gleich nach Erlangen dieses Gunstbeweises von seinem Gönner abgewandt
und mit den Parthern kollaboriert hätte. Alternativ wird hier auch immer wieder auf
terminologische Ungenauigkeiten der Quellen hingewiesen, welche durch die Ähnlichkeit von
Tetrarchen- und Königstitel bedingt seien: Schürer I 565; Schmitt 1982, 112: „loserer
Sprachgebrauch“; Schwentzel 2009, 69: „Le titre de basileus ne lui fut cependant jamais
octroyé par Antoine. Mais, en raison de ses prérogatives religieuses, le souverain pouvait se
comporter en véritable monarque local, doué d’une forte autorité sur l’ensemble des Ituréens“.
Abgelehnt wird der Königstitel für Lysanias mit Blick auf den numismatischen Befund von
Burnett, RPC I 4768-4770; Schrapel 1996, 182; Myers 2010, 109; wieder anders votiert
Sullivan 1990, 408f., demzufolge Lysanias den Königstitel angestrebt habe und deswegen von
M. Antonius hingerichtet worden sei. Vgl. auch die Diskussion zu Ptolemaios.
Plausibler ist aber die Annahme, dass Lysanias den höherrangigen Titel im Vertrauen auf die
parthische Deckung annahm, und dies vermutlich nicht später als Antigonos, dessen Macht
hinter derjenigen des Lysanias damals wohl zurückgestanden haben wird.
Nachdem die Parther endgültig vertrieben waren und sich Herodes in Judäa etabliert hatte,
veranlasste Kleopatra VII. M. Antonius dazu, Lysanias abzusetzen und ihr sein Territorium zu
unterstellen (37/36 v.Chr.). Etwa zwei Jahre später wurde er mit der Begründung hingerichtet,
den Parthereinfall verursacht zu haben: Ios. ant. Iud. 15,4,1 (92); bell. Iud. 1,22,3 (440); vgl.
Schrapel 1996, 178-182. Buchheim 1960, 19f.; 69f. und Sartre 2005, 78 datieren auch die
Hinrichtung auf 37/36 v.Chr., Schottroff 1982, 141 auf 36 v.Chr.
3. Auswahlbibliographie
RE –. Vgl. Stein: Lysanias (6), RE 13.2, 1927, 2507.
DNP –.
Buchheim, Hans: Die Orientpolitik des Triumvirn Marcus Antonius, Heidelberg 1960.
Coşkun, Altay: Die Tetrarchie als hellenistisch-römisches Herrschaftsinstrument. Mit einer Untersuchung der
Titulatur der Dynasten von Ituräa. Demnächst in den Beiträgen der Tagung: Client Kings between Centre and
Periphery (Exzellenzcluster TOPOI & Friedrich-Meinecke Institut, FU Berlin, 18.-19.2.2011), hg. von Ernst
Baltrusch und Julia Wilker, ca. 2013.
Gatier, Pierre-Louis: La principauté d’Abila de Lysanias dans l’Antilibanon, in: Saint Luc: évangéliste et
historien = Dossiers d’Archéologie 270, 2002/2003, 120-127.
Herman, Daniel: The Coins of the Itureans, Israel Numismatic Research 1, 2006, 51-72.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
225
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Kindler, Arie: On the Coins of the Ituraeans, in: Tony Hackens / Ghislaine Moucharte (Hgg.): Actes du XI e
Congrès International de Numismatique: organisé à l’occasion du 150e anniversaire de la Société royale de
numismatique de Belgique: Bruxelles, 8-13 septembre 1991, edités par le Séminaire de Numismatique
Marcel Hoc, Bruxelles, 8-13 septembre, Louvain-la-Neuve 1993, 283-288.
Myers, E.A.: The Ituraeans and the Roman Near East: reassessing the sources. Society for New Testament
Studies, monograph series 147. Cambridge 2010.
RPC I = Burnett, Andrew M., Amandry, Michel & Ripollès, Pere Pau: Roman Provincial Coinage, Vol. I (Part III), London 1992.
Sartre, Maurice: The Middle East under Rome. Translated by Catharine Porter and Elisabeth Rawlings,
Cambridge MA 2005.
Schmitt, Götz: Zum Königreich Chalkis, ZDPV 98, 1982, 110-124.
Schottroff, Willi von: Die Ituräer, ZDPV 98, 1982, 125-152.
Schrapel, Thomas: Das Reich der Kleopatra. Quellenkritische Studien zu den „Landschenkungen“ Mark Antons,
Trier 1996.
Schürer, Emil: The History of the Jewish People in the Age of Jesus Christ (175 B.C.-A.D. 135). A New English
Version Revised and Edited by Geza Vermes and Fergus Millar et al., Parts I-III.2, Edinburgh 1973-1987
(deutsches Original, 3.-4. Aufl. 1901-1909).
Schwahn, Walther: Tetrarch, RE 5A, 1, 1934, 1089-1097.
Schwentzel, Christian-Georges: La propagande des princes de Chalcis d’après les monnaies, ZDPV 125.1, 2009,
64-75.
Seyrig, Henri: L’inscription du tétrarque Lysanias à Baalbek, in: Arnulf Kuschke / Ernst Kutsch (Hgg.):
Archäologie und Altes Testament. Festschrift für Kurt Galling zum 8. Januar 1970, Tübingen 1970, 251-254.
Sullivan, Richard D.: Near Eastern Royalty and Rome, 100-30 B.C., Toronto 1990.
AC/25.04.12 – r/29.04.2012
Lysanias (II.), Tetrarch von Abilene
 Stemma der Mennaiden
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
Das Lukasevangelium (3,1) bezeugt Lysanias im Jahr 27/28 n.Chr. als Tetrarchen von
Abilene. Bis 37 n.Chr., als Gaius Caligula sein ehemaliges Gebiet dem König M. Agrippa I.
unterstellte, war er gestorben (s. 2). Er war Sohn des Tetrarchen und Hohepriesters Zenodoros
(I.) und über diesen Urenkel des Ptolemaios, des Sohnes des Mennaios. Für seinen eigenen
Sohn Zenodoros (II.) ist in seiner in Heliopolis gefundenen Grabinschrift (IGR III 1085 =
IGSyr VI 2851) keine Herrschaftsstellung mehr bezeugt. Ohne Grundlage ist deshalb die
Zuschreibung des Tetrarchentitels auch an den jüngeren Zenodoros in PIR V2 1, 1970, S. 118
= L 467. Vgl. Schürer I 566-569; Stein 1927; Seyrig 1970; Gatier 2002/2003, 122-127.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Mit dem Tod seines Vaters Zenodoros 20 v.Chr. gelangten Teile des ehemaligen
Ituräerreiches unter die Herrschaft des Königs Herodes I., während die Beka-Ebene zur
Provinz Syrien geschlagen wurde. Heliopolis wurde sogar römische Kolonie (15 v.Chr.).
Dennoch wurde ein großes Gebiet südlich und östlich des Antilibanon zu einem nicht genauer
bestimmbaren Zeitpunkt, aber doch wohl noch von Augustus, der Tetrarchenherrschaft des
Sohnes des Zenodoros unterstellt. Dass er den Hohepriestertitel nicht mehr führte, erklärt sich
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
226
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
also durch den Verlust entweder des Heiligtums von Chalkis oder von Heliopolis (s. auch die
Diskussion unter Ptolemaios). Dass der Name des Lysanias noch bis ins 2. Jh. n.Chr. mit der
Stadt Abila verbunden blieb (Ptol. 5,15,22: „Abila, mit Beinamen ‚des Lysanias‘“), legt nahe,
dass er die zwischen Chalkis und Damaskus gelegene Stadt gegründet oder zumindest
ausgebaut hat, nachdem ihm der Stammsitz der Familie nicht mehr zur Verfügung stand. Vgl.
Schmitt 1982, 116-120.
Josephus bezeichnet die Herrschaft des Lysanias auch noch an ihrem Ende als ‚Tetrarchie‘, so
dass dieser Titel als gesichert gelten kann: Ios. ant. Iud. 18,6,10 (237) zum Jahr 37 n.Chr.;
auch rückblickend in ant. Iud. 19,5,1 (275) zu 41 n.Chr. und 20,7,1 (138) zu ca. 52 n.Chr. Vgl.
zudem die Inschrift des Nymphaios, eines Freigelassenen des Tetrarchen Lysanias, von ca.
14/29 n.Chr. (OGIS II 606 = IGR III 1086), dazu Schürer I 568f.; Schottroff 1982, 143f.;
Gatier 2002/2003, 127.
Dass derselbe Josephus an zwei anderen Stelle vom (ehemaligen) ‚Königreich‘ des Lysanias
spricht, mag dagegen mit der immer noch beträchtlichen Größe des Territoriums
zusammenhängen: Ios. bell. Iud. 2,11,5 (215) zum Jahr 41 n.Chr. und 2,12,8 (247) zu ca. 52
n.Chr. (vgl. hier auch den Kontrast zur kleinen Tetrarchie des Varus). Allerdings kann die
größere terminologische Ungenauigkeit im bell. Iud. auch damit zusammenhängen, dass die
Griechisch-Kenntnisse des Josephus bis zum Ende des Krieges nur sehr begrenzt waren und
das Original des Werkes auf Aramäisch verfasst war. Vgl. hierzu allgemein Ios. ant. Iud.
20,11,1-2 (258-265); bell. Iud. praef. 1-2 (3-6); c. Ap. 1,9 (47-52); sowie Coşkun ca. 2013 Fn.
6 mit weiteren Beispielen zur Auswirkung auf die Herrschaftsterminologie.
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Stein: Lysanias (6), RE 13.2, 1927, 2507.
DNP –.
Coşkun, Altay: Die Tetrarchie als hellenistisch-römisches Herrschaftsinstrument. Mit einer Untersuchung der
Titulatur der Dynasten von Ituräa. Demnächst in den Beiträgen der Tagung: Client Kings between Centre and
Periphery (Exzellenzcluster TOPOI & Friedrich-Meinecke Institut, FU Berlin, 18.-19.2.2011), hg. von Ernst
Baltrusch und Julia Wilker, ca. 2013.
Gatier, Pierre-Louis: La principauté d’Abila de Lysanias dans l’Antilibanon, in: Saint Luc: évangéliste et
historien = Dossiers d’Archéologie 270, 2002/2003, 120-127.
Schmitt, Götz: Zum Königreich Chalkis, ZDPV 98, 1982, 110-124.
Schottroff, Willi von: Die Ituräer, ZDPV 98, 1982, 125-152.
Schürer, Emil: The History of the Jewish People in the Age of Jesus Christ (175 B.C.-A.D. 135). A New English
Version Revised and Edited by Geza Vermes and Fergus Millar et al., Parts I-III.2, Edinburgh 1973-1987
(deutsches Original, 3.-4. Aufl. 1901-1909).
Seyrig, Henri: L’inscription du tétrarque Lysanias à Baalbek, in: Arnulf Kuschke / Ernst Kutsch (Hgg.):
Archäologie und Altes Testament. Festschrift für Kurt Galling zum 8. Januar 1970, Tübingen 1970, 251-254.
AC/25.04.12 – r/29.04.2012
Machares, Prinzregent von Bosporanien
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
227
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
 Stemmata Mithradatiden
Sohn des Mithradates VI. Eupator Dionysos, des Königs von Pontos und Bosporanien.
Regierte als dessen Stellvertreter in Bosporanien, wo er a. 65 starb.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Ging nach den anfänglichen Niederlagen seines Vaters im Dritten Mithradatischen Krieg
gegen L. Licinius Lucullus procos. Ciliciae (et Asiae) 73-66/63 als amicus et socius auf die
römische Seite über (Plut. Luc. 24,1; App. Mithr. 83,375; Liv. per. 98,1) und unterstützte
Lucullus bei der Belagerung Sinopes (Memn., FGrH 434 F 37,6). Versuchte a. 65, vor
Mithradates zu fliehen, und beging Selbstmord (App. Mithr. 102,475) oder wurde ermordet
(Cass. Dio 36,50,2; ferner Oros. 6,5,3).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Obst: Machares, RE 14,1, 1928, 153.
Von Bredow, Iris: Machares, DNP 7, 1999, 623.
Ballesteros Pastor, Luis: Mitrídates Eupátor, rey del Ponto, Granada 1996, 243f.; 322.
Gajdukevic, V.F.: Das Bosporanische Reich, Berlin 21971, 318f.
McGing, B.C.: The Foreign Policy of Mithridates VI Eupator, King of Pontus, Leiden 1986, bes. 152; 164.
Shelov, D.B.: Machares, Ruler of Bosporus (russ.), VDI 1978, 1, 55-72.
Sullivan, Richard D.: Near Eastern Royalty and Rome, 100-30 B.C., Toronto 1990, bes. 48; 154.
MT/24.11.06–r/30.06.07
Mannos, Sohn des Izates, König von Osrhoene
0. Onomastisches / Namenvarianten / Homonyme
Syr. Namensform M‛NW BR ’YZṬ = Ma‛nu bar Izaṭ , ‚Mannos, Sohn des Izates‘ (Ps.Dionysius p. 121f., 125f.). Bei Elias Nisib. p. 85. M‛NW BR ’ZYṬ .
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemma Osrhoener
Vermutlich Vater des Königs M‛NW BR M‛NW = Ma‛nu bar Ma‛nu, ‚Mannos, Sohn des
Mannos‘ (=Mannos Philorhomaios), vgl. Elias Nisib. p. 88. Mehrere Kinder sind bezeugt
(Drijvers/Healey 1999, As 36 [D23] Z. 4). Eventuell Bruder des osrhoenischen Königs Abgar,
Sohn des Izates (vgl. Ps.-Dionysius p. 118f.).
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
228
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Er herrschte wohl 125/6-165/6; vgl. Elias Nisib. p. 88f. und Ps.-Dionysius p. 123, 125f. mit
Luther 1999. Ca. 149/150 wurde er durch den von den Parthern gestützten Prätendenten
Wā’el bar Saḥ ru abgesetzt und floh ins Römische Reich, konnte aber ca. 151/2 den Thron
zurückgewinnen; vgl. Ps.-Dionysius p. 123, 125f.; Babelon 1893, 222-226 Nr. 1-4, Pl. III 1-4;
Hill 1922, 91f. Nr. 1-3 Pl. XIII 6-8. Vielfach wird in der modernen Forschung die Usurpation
des Wā’el alternativ in die Jahre 162/3-164/5 verlegt (z.B. Drijvers 1977, 875;
Drijvers/Healey 1999, 36, 106), doch ist diese Chronologie das Ergebnis von Konjekturen.
Möglicherweise bezieht sich eine Nachricht der Historia Augusta auf die kurze Herrschaft des
Wā’el und das Exil des Mannos, wo es über Antoninus Pius heißt (SHA Pius 9,6): Abgarum
regem ex orientis partibus sola auctoritate deduxit. Pius könnte demnach zugunsten des auf
röm. Gebiet geflohenen Mannos interveniert und diesen wieder auf den osrhoenischen Thron
befördert haben. Zwar ist ein so genannter König für diese Zeit nicht belegt; Abgarus könnte
hier indes als generic name für die osrhoenische Dynastie gebraucht worden sein.
Das Ende von Mannos’ Herrschaft 165/6 fällt in die Zeit des römisch-parthischen Krieges von
161-166. Da das Gebiet um die osrhoenische Hauptstadt selbst Kriegsschauplatz war und
Edessa 165/6 von Rom erobert wurde (Angeli Bertinelli 1976, 27f.; Lucian. hist. conscr. 22;
Jacob. Edess. p. 282), scheinen die Osrhoener zuvor von Rom abgefallen oder ihr Gebiet von
den Parthern besetzt worden zu sein. Inwieweit Mannos hierin verwickelt war oder ob er
eventuell bereits im Vorfeld gestorben war, ist nicht bekannt. Jedenfalls war er noch im
Februar 165 Adressat einer altsyrischen Weihinschrift aus Sumatar Harabesi (Drijvers/Healey
1999, As 36 [D23]).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
RE –. DNP –.
Drijvers, H.J./Healey, J.F.: The Old Syriac Inscriptions of Edessa and Osrhoene. Texts, Translations and
Commentary (HdO 1, 42), Leiden 1999.
Drijvers, H.J.W.: Hatra, Palmyra und Edessa. Die Städte der syrisch-mesopotamischen Wüste in politischer,
kulturgeschichtlicher und religionsgeschichtlicher Beleuchtung, in: ANRW II 8 (1977), 799-905.
Luther, A.: Elias von Nisibis und die Chronologie der edessenischen Könige, Klio 81.1, 1999, 180-198.
AL/08.12.08–r/08.03.10
Mannos Philorhomaios, König von Osrhoene
0. Onomastisches / Namenvarianten / Homonyme
Auf Münzen Mannos. Syrisch M‛NW BR M‛NW = Ma‛nu bar Ma‛nu, ‚Mannos, Sohn des
Mannos‘. Zum Titel philorhōmaios s.u.
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemma Osrhoener
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
229
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Wohl Sohn des Königs Mannos, Sohn des Izates (Elias Nisib. p. 85; Ps.-Dionysius p. 121f.;
125f.). Eventuell Neffe des osrhoenischen Königs Abgar (VII.), Sohn des Izates, wenn dieser
mit ’BGR BR ’YZṬ ; zu identifizieren ist; vgl. Ps.-Dionysius p. 118f. Er war vermutlich der
Vater des Königs Abgar (IX.) = L. Aelius Aurelius Septimius Abgarus.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Er herrschte wohl 165/6-177/8 (Elias Nisib. p. 88f. und Ps.-Dionysius p. 123; 125f. mit Luther
1999). Die Thronbesteigung hängt möglicherweise mit den Ereignissen des römischparthischen Krieges der Jahre 161 bis 166 zusammen, denn die osrhoenische Residenzstadt
Edessa wurde während des Krieges durch römische Truppen belagert und 165/6
eingenommen (Angeli Bertinelli 1976, 27f.). Die Osrhoene schied spätestens zu diesem
Zeitpunkt aus dem parthischen Reich aus und stand fortan in einem Abhängigkeitsverhältnis
zu Rom (Jacob. Edess. p. 282). Er prägte Münzen mit Bild und Namen der Kaiser Marc
Aurel und Lucius Verus sowie ihrer Gattinnen Faustina und Lucilla auf dem Avers. Dabei
begegnet auf manchen Reversen die Legende Basileus Mannos Philorhōmai(o)s (Babelon
1893, 234f. Nr. 5-9, Pl. III 5-9; Hill 1922, 92f. Nr. 5-9, Pl. XIII 10-3).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
RE –. DNP –.
Angeli Bertinelli, M.G.: I Romani oltre l’Eufrate nel II secolo d.C., in: ANRW II 9.1, 1976, 3-45.
Babelon, E.: Numismatique d’Édesse en Mésopotamie, Paris 1893.
Hill, G.F.: Catalogue of the Greek Coins of Arabia, Mesopotamia and Persia in the British Museum, London
1922.
Luther, A.: Elias von Nisibis und die Chronologie der edessenischen Könige, Klio 81.1, 1999, 180-198.
Sommer, M.: Roms orientalische Steppengrenze, Stuttgart 2005, bes. 238f.
AL/08.12.08–r/08.03.10
Meniskos of Miletos
1. Central Biographical Dates and Family Relations
Meniskos of Miletos is mentioned in the so-called senatus consultum de Asclepiade sociisque
(Sherk, RDGE 22 = RGEDA 66) a bilingual bronze tablet found in Rome and known since
the XVI century, as one of the three Greek naval captains (nauarchs) who supported Rome
during a bellum Italicum (l. 7 of the Greek version, namely the Social War, or the fight of
Sulla against the Marian faction and some Italian people on his return to Rome from the East
in 83/82 BC). Meniskos was natural son of Thargelios and son by adoption of Eirenaios (l. 10
[Greek]). The other two captains named in the inscription are Asklepiades of Klazomenai
and Polystratos of Karystos. The senatus consultum was issued in 78 BC. Meniskos was
thus militarily active in the 80s; however, being unknown from other sources, it is not clear
how old he was at the time.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
230
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
2. Relations with Rome / Romans and Career
In the late Republic, several Greek cities supported Roman warfare, often following the
provision of a treaty. Meniskos, probably officially sent by his own city Klazomenai, joined
the Roman side during the troubled years which followed the Social War, and most possibly
operated in the Sullan navy in the 80s. He and the two fellow Greeks may have been at Rome
when the decree of the senate was issued (78 BC), for they had their name added at the
bottom of the document (ll. 32-33 [Greek]) on the bronze tablet.
On account of his support to the Roman cause, Meniskos was officially inscribed in the list
(formula) of the ‘friends of the Roman people’ (amici populi Romani) (l. 17 [Latin] = ll. 2425 [Greek]), and duly rewarded with significant fiscal, juridical and honorary privileges
enlisted in the senatus consultum. The decree is unique in that it is the only surviving
document to attest the granting of the status of amicus populi Romani to individual
provincials.
The three Greeks probably were notables of their own cities, who had either volunteered or
had been chosen in order to bring support to Rome in a dramatic situation. It is uncertain
whether they owned the ship they operated with or whether they only commanded its crew.
Upon his return to his hometown, Meniskos surely endeavoured to publish the decree of the
senate containing the privileges, in order to exploit them in his own city and in the province of
Asia. There is no positive evidence to prove that he held any city magistracy or lent support to
Rome in any of the crises that would follow soon.
3. Select Bibliography
RE –. DNP –.
Bowman A.: The Formula Sociorum in the Second and First Centuries B.C., CJ 85, 1989-1990, 330-336.
Gallet, L.: Essai sur le sénatus-consulte De Asclepiade sociisque, RD ser. 4, 16, 1937, 242-293; 387-425.
Marshall, A.J.: Friends of the Roman People, AJPh 89, 1968, 39-55.
Raggi, A.: Amici populi Romani, MediterrAnt 11, 2008 [2009], 97-113.
Raggi, A.: Senatus consultum de Asclepiade Clazomenio sociisque, ZPE 135, 2001, 73-116.
Rosenberger, V.: Bella et expeditiones. Die antike Terminologie der Kriege Roms, Stuttgart 1992, 35-41 on
bellum Italicum.
Sherk, R.K.: Roman Documents from the Greek East: Senatus Consulta and Epistulae to the Age of Augustus,
Baltimore 1969, 124-132 no. 22. (RDGE)
Sherk, R.K.: Roman and the Greek East to the Death of Augustus (Translated Documents of Greece and Rome,
4), Cambridge 1984, 81-83 no. 66. (RGEDA)
Wolff, H.: Die Entwicklung der Veteranenprivilegien vom Beginn des 1. Jahrhunderts v. Chr. bis auf Konstantin
d. Gr., in W. Eck / H. Wolff (Hgg.): Heer und Integrationspolitik. Die römischen Militärdiplome als
historische Quelle, Köln-Wien 1986, 44-115, esp. 56-67.
AR/28.12.11 – r/20.02.12
Menodotos, Priester von Pergamon
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
231
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
1.Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemma Galater / Deiotaros
Aristokrat und Priester. Bezeugt als Oberpriester Asiens sowie Priester des Dionysos
Kathegemon (IGR IV 1682). Beide Ämter wurden von Angehörigen seiner Familie „von
Geschlechts wegen” („dia genous“) erblich ausgeübt. Gatte der Adobogiona (I.), der
Schwester des Trokmers Brogitaros (s.u.)
Menodotos war Vater des Mithradates (VII.) von Pergamon, den C. Iulius Caesar 47 v.Chr.
zum König der Trokmoi und des Bosporos eingesetzt hatte. Die Vaterschaft bezeugen sowohl
eine nach der Schlacht von Pharsalos (a. 48) von den pergamenischen Stadtbehörden zu Ehren
des Mithradates von Pergamon verfaßte Inschrift (IGR IV 1682) als auch Strab. geogr. 13,4,3
(625). Allerdings erwähnt letzterer zugleich, daß Adobogiona ein Verhältnis mit Mithradates
VI. Eupator gehabt und Angehörige dem a. 87 oder 86 von ihr geborenen Sohn den Namen
Mithradates gegeben haben sollen, um so den Eindruck seiner Abkunft vom pontischen
König zu erwecken. Letzteres wird von einem Teil der Forschung als Faktum akzeptiert (z.B.
Gajdukevic 1971; s. auch den entsprechenden Eintrag), obwohl der Text keinen Beweis dafür
bietet und eher auf einen absichtlich falschen Anspruch (prospoiesamenous ek tou basileos
auton gegonenai) seitens der Namengeber hinweist (ausführlich hierzu Heinen 1994, 67-69
mit Anm. 19).
Die Hinweise auf die „königliche Herkunft“ und die vornehme Familie des Mithradates von
Pergamon in der procaesarischen Schrift Bell. Alex. (26,1: magna nobilitas domi; 78,2: regio
genere ortus, nobilitas) könnten zum einen auf den Bruder seiner Mutter, den König und
Tetrarchen der Trokmer Brogitaros Philorhomaios, zum anderen auch auf das Haus des
Menodotos hindeuten. Jedoch hat es – zumal angesichts der Notwendigkeit, seine neue
Stellung zu legitimieren (vgl. Coskun 2007, Teil D.IV), – den Eindruck, daß die Formulierung
bewußt offengelassen wurde, so daß die Assoziation mit dem König von Pontos geradezu
beabsichtigt erscheint, sei es auch nur hinsichtlich der ‚königlichen‘ Erziehung des
Mithradates im Feldlager Eupators (Bell. Alex. 78). Im übrigen könnte der Sproß der
prominenten pergamenischen Familie auch eine Geisel am Hof des letzteren gewesen sein.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Menodotos’ Verhältnis zu Rom wurde wahrscheinlich von den historischen Umständen und
Wandlungen bestimmt. Am Anfang des 1. Mithradatischen Krieges, als Mithradates VI.
Eupator Pergamon zu seiner Residenz machte, soll er bei Menodotos oft zu Gast gewesen
sein. Vermutlich stellte sich der pergamenische Aristokrat, entweder von dem Erfolg des
Königs beeindruckt oder einfach aus Furcht, an die Seite Eupators (vgl. Heinen 1994, 69-70).
Dennoch wird Menodotos in der bereits erwähnten Ehreninschrift (IGR IV 1682) offiziell als
Vater des amicus Caesaris Mithradates von Pergamon, des „von Geschlechts wegen
Oberpriesters und Priesters des Kathegemon Dionysos“ anerkannt und, gerade durch die
Aufzählung dieser erblichen, höchst ehrenvollen Priesterwürden, als ein typisches Mitglied
der städtischen Führungsschicht dargestellt.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
232
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
3.Auswahlbibliographie
RE –. DNP –.
Coskun, Altay: Von der ‘Geißel Asiens’ zu ‘kaiserfrommen’ Reichsbewohnern. Studien zur politischen und
gesellschaftlichen Entwicklung der Galater unter besonderer Berücksichtigung der amicitia populi Romani
und der göttlichen Verehrung des Augustus (3. Jh. v.–2. Jh. n.Chr.), unveröff. Habil. Trier 2007, 168-174.
Freber, Philipp-Stephan G.: Der hellenistische Osten und das Illyricum unter Caesar, Stuttgart 1993, 86; 89.
Gajdukevic, Viktor F.: Das Bosporanische Reich, Berlin 1971, 324.
Heinen, Heinz: Mithradates von Pergamon und Caesars bosporanische Pläne, in: Rosmarie Günther / Stefan
Rebenich (Hgg.): E fontibus haurire. Beiträge zur römischen Geschichte und zu ihren Hilfswissenschaften
(FS Heinrich Chantraine), Paderborn 1994, 63-79.
Magie, David: Roman Rule in Asia Minor to the End of the Third Century after Christ, Princeton 1950, I 406, II
1259 Anm. 4.
Sherk, Robert K.: Roman Documents from the Greek East: Senatus Consulta and Epistulae to the Age of
Augustus, Baltimore 1969, 280-284 Nr. 54 (Epistula C. Iulii Caesaris ad Pergamenos).
Sullivan, Richard D.: Near Eastern Royalty and Rome, 100-30 BC, Toronto 1990, 158f.
WKK 28.03.08–r/05.08.08
L. Mercello aus Italica/Hispania Ulterior
0. Onomastisches
Zur wahrscheinlich keltischen Etymologie und möglichen keltiberischen Abstammung vgl.
Zeidler 2005, 184-86.
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
Belegt für a. 48.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Beteiligte sich an der Verschwörung gegen den caesarischen Statthalter Q. Cassius Longinus
a. 48 in Hispanien. Wurde anschließend gefangengenommen und gefoltert (Bell. Alex. 52,4;
55,4).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Münzer, Friedrich: L. Mercello, RE 15,1, 1931, 972.
DNP –.
Zeidler, Jürgen: Onomastic Studies on Some Roman Amici in Hispania, in: Altay Coskun (Hg.): Roms
auswärtige Freunde in der späten Republik und im frühen Prinzipat, Göttingen 2005, 175-200, 184-86.
JL/29.09.04–r/28.06.07
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
233
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Metrodoros von Skepsis
0. Onomastisches
Trug den Beinamen Misorhomaios (Plin. nat. 34,34).
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
Philosoph und Schriftsteller (FGrH 184) mit offenbar romfeindlicher Tendenz (s. 0.). Stand in
Diensten des Mithradates VI. Eupator.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Lief im Rahmen einer Gesandtschaftsreise ca. a. 73-71 von Mithradates zu Tigranes I. über,
wurde von diesem an jenen ausgeliefert und kam daraufhin ums Leben (Plut. Luc. 22,2-5;
Strab. geogr. 13,1,55 [609f.]).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Bux/ Kroll: Metrodoros [23] von Skepsis, RE 15,2, 1932, 1481f.
DNP –.
Pédech, Paul: Deux grecs face à Rome au Ier siècle av. J.-C. Métrodore de Scepsis et Théophane de Mitylène,
REA 93, 1991, 66-71.
MT/06.12.06–r/30.06.07
Mithradates I. Kallinikos, König von Kommagene [Var. Mithridates]
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemma Orontiden
Sohn des Samos; verheiratet mit der Seleukidin Laodike Thea Philadelphos, Vater des
Antiochos I. Theos. Regierte ca. a. 100-70; ab Mitte der 80er Jahre Vasall des Tigranes I.
Stifter des Grabheiligtums in Arsameia am Nymphaios.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
S. 1.
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Geyer: Mithridates [29] I. Kallinikos, RE 15,2, 1932, 2213.
Schottky, Martin: Mithradates [16] I. Kallinikos, DNP 8, 2000, 283.
Facella, Margherita: La dinastia degli Orontidi nella Commagene ellenistico-romana, Pisa 2006, 209-24.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
234
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Sullivan, Richard D.: The Dynasty of Commagene, ANRW II 8, 1977, 753-763.
Sullivan, Richard D.: Near Eastern Royalty and Rome, 100-30 B.C., Toronto 1990, 60-62.
MT/24.11.06–r/30.06.07
Mithradates II., König von Kommagene [Var. Mithridates]
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemma Orontiden
Sohn des Antiochos I. Theos, Bruder des Antiochos II. Regierte ca. a. 36-20.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Unterstützte M. Antonius bei Actium (Plut. Ant. 61,2) und erhielt anschließend die
Rückendeckung des jungen Caesar.
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Geyer: Mithridates [30] II., RE 15,2, 1932, 2213f.
Schottky, Martin: Mithradates [17] II., DNP 8, 2000, 283.
Facella, Margherita: La dinastia degli Orontidi nella Commagene ellenistico-romana, Pisa 2006, 299-312.
Sullivan, Richard D.: The Dynasty of Commagene, ANRW II 8, 1977, 775-780.
Sullivan, Richard D.: Near Eastern Royalty and Rome, 100-30 B.C., Toronto 1990, 197f.
MT/24.11.06–r/30.06.07
Mithridates II. Epiphanes Philhellen, der Große, König des Partherreichs
0. Onomastisches
Zu Mithridates s. unter Mithridates IV of Pontus. – Wie seine Vorgänger Mithridates I.,
Phraates II. und Artabanos I. – führte er den Beinamen eines „Großkönigs“, der sowohl in der
Nachfolge der Achaimeniden als auch Alexanders und der Seleukiden zu stehen scheint. Er ist
nicht nur numismatisch auf allen Münzen belegt ist (so wie auch „König der Könige:
Sellwood 41, ii-viii), sondern auch in die antike literarische Tradition eingegangen (Iust.
42,2). Weitere Beinamen waren, wie numismatisch zu erschließen, Epiphanes und Philhellen.
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemmata Arsakiden
Neffe Mithridates’ I., Sohn und Nachfolger Artabanos’ I., Vorgänger Gotarzes’ und
wahrscheinlich Vater Orodes’ I, regierte ab ca. 124/3 das Partherreich und starb nach 88/7.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
235
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
2. Verhältnis zu Rom/ Römern und Karriereverlauf
Auf die Regierung Mithridates’ II. kann hier nicht ausführlich eingegangen werden; es soll
hier nur erwähnt werden, daß es diesem äußerst tatkräftigen König gelang, das unter seinem
Vorgänger Artabanos I im Westen wie im Osten schwer bedrohte Partherreich zunächst zu
stabilisieren, dann um 122/1 das verloren gegangene Babylonien zusammen mit Charakene
zurückzuerobern und die parthischen Grenzen 113 bis nach Dura Europos auszudehnen.
Ähnlich aktiv war Mithridates II. im Norden, wo er um 120 den armenischen König
Artavasdes angriff und dessen Sohn Tigranes (I.) gefangennahm (Iust. 42,2,3), den er 94 nach
dem Tod seines Vaters gegen Abtretung von 70 Grenztälern als König einsetzte (Strabo
11,14,15). Im Osten wehrte Mithridates II. einfallende skythisch-massagetische Nomaden ab
(Iust. 42,1), gliederte Areia und Parthien wieder ins Reich ein (Iust. 41,6,8) und nahm
diplomatische Beziehungen mit dem chinesischen Reich auf, welche zur Eröffnung der
Seidenstraße führten (Debevoise 1938, 253ff.).
Wenn auch nicht auszuschließen ist, daß informelle Kontakte zwischen der römischen
Republik und dem Partherreich bereits im 2. Jh. bestanden haben mögen, so stammt der erste
Beleg (als solcher auch hervorgehoben bei Vell. 2,24) für diplomatische Beziehungen beider
Staaten erst aus der Zeit des Mithridates II. Dieser schickte im Jahre 92 eine von Orobazos
geleitete Gesandtschaft zu L. Cornelius Sulla Felix, welcher damals als Propraetor Kilikien
verwaltete und sich am oberen Euphrat befand. Ziel der Gesandtschaft war es, den Römern
Freundschaft und Bündnis anzutragen (Liv. epit. 70: ut amicitiam p.R. peterent; Ruf. Fest.
15,2: amicitias p.R. rogavit; Plut. Sulla 5,4: συμμαχί ας καὶ φιλί ας δεομέ νους). Sulla hatte
zu jener Zeit den kappadokischen König Ariobarzanes I., welcher von Tigranes I. von
Armenien und Mithridates VI. von Pontos verjagt worden war, wieder in seine Herrschaft
eingesetzt. Da Sulla auch propagandistisch von dem Zusammentreffen zu profitieren suchte,
setzte er sich bei den Besprechungen ostentativ zwischen Ariobarzanes und Orobazos (Plut.
Sulla 5,4f.). Das Resultat der Verhandlungen ist nicht explizit überliefert; es ist aber davon
auszugehen, daß bereits durch die friedliche Kontaktaufnahme auch die amicitia hergestellt
wurde (Literaturüberblick zur Frage bei Ziegler 1964, 21f.), und da Florus auch vom
Abschluß eines foedus spricht (Florus 3,12; Plutarchs Verweis auf eine συμμαχί α gibt hier
wohl nur die mit der amicitia verbundene societas wieder; Oros. 6,13,2 spricht allerdings nur
von einem foedus des Lucullus und des Pompeius mit den Parthern), ist vermutet worden, daß
der Euphrat als gemeinsame Grenze beider Reiche festgelegt worden sein könnte (Ziegler
1964, 20-24; dagegen Wolski 1993, 92). Der parthische Botschafter wurde wohl auch von
einigen Magiern begleitet, welche Sulla eine großartige Zukunft vorhersagten; ein Ereignis,
welches auch in Sullas Rechenschaftsbericht Eingang fand (Sulla HRR I F 21, in: Plut. Sull.
37,1-2; Vell. 2,24,3; vgl. Engels 2007, 540f.).
Trotz des diplomatischen Erfolgs betrachtete der Partherkönig den Ablauf der Verhandlungen
wohl als demütigend, da die Plazierung Sullas die Parther als Bittsteller hatte erscheinen
lassen, und so wurde Orobazos nach seiner Rückkehr an den parthischen Hof zur Strafe
hingerichtet (Plut. Sulla 4). Inwieweit der Vertrag als Erfolg zu betrachten ist, bleibt unsicher:
Zum einen blieben die Parther im Ersten Mithridatischen Krieg trotz ihrer Freundschaft mit
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
236
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Mithridates VI. Eupator (App. Mithr. 15) tatsächlich neutral und respektierten somit die
amicitia; zum anderen wissen wir aber, daß sich Mithridates II. durchaus in den Streit
zwischen den verschiedenen seleukidischen Thronprätendenten einmischte und somit auf
Territorien westlich des Euphrats Einfluß nahm. So gelang es im Jahr 88/7 dem parthischen
Statthalter Mithradates Sinnakes anläßlich der Unterstützung des im westeuphratenischen
Beroia belagerten Seleukidenkönigs Philipp I., dessen Bruder und Bürgerkriegsgegner
Demetrios III. gefangenzunehmen und ins Partherreich zu deportieren (Ios. ant. 13,14).
Trotz dieser Erfolge scheint Mithridates II., der bald nach 88/7 gestorben sein muß, mit
schweren innenpolitischen Problemen gekämpf zu haben. So ist gegen Ende seiner
Regierungszeit in Mesopotamien seit 91/90 Gotarzes I. (sein Bruder?: Diakonov/Livshits
1960) als Gegenkönig belegt, dessen Macht sich später wohl bis in die Margiane ausdehnte,
wo er Münzen schlug (Sellwood 1971). Die Datierung seiner Regierungszeit, die auch durch
ein Relief aus Bisutun (OGIS 431: Identität mit Gotarzes: Herzfeld 1920) belegt ist, wo er
sich „Satrap der Satrapen“ nennt, ist jedoch unsicher und schwankt von 95-89/88 bis 91/9081/80. Ähnlich unsicher ist auch das Verhältnis zu Orodes I., Sohn oder Bruder Mithridates’
I., der, je nach Datierung, die Herrschaft zu usurpieren suchte, seinem Vater regulär
nachfolgte, oder erst später gegen Gotarzes rebellierte.
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Geyer, Fritz: Mithridates [22] II, RE XV 2, 1932, 2210-2211.
Schottky, Martin: Mithridates [13] II, DNP 12,2, 2002, 282.
Chaumont, Marie Louise: Études d’histoire parthe I: Documents royaux à Nisa, Syria 48, 1971, 143-164.
Colledge, Malcolm A.R.: The Parthians, London 1967, 32-34.
Debevoise, Neilson G.: A Political History of Parthia, Chicago 1938, 40-50.
Diakonov, J.M. / Livshits, V.A.: Dokumenty iz Nisy I, Moskau 1960.
Engels, David: Das römische Vorzeichenwesen, Stuttgart 2007.
Herzfeld, Ernst E.: Am Tor von Asien, Felsdenkmale aus Irans Heldenzeit, Berlin 1920.
Schippmann, Klaus: Grundzüge der parthischen Geschichte, Darmstadt 1980, 29-32.
Sellwood, David: An Introduction to the Coinage of Parthia, London 1971.
Sonnabend, Holger: Fremdenbild und Politik. Vorstellungen der Römer von Ägypten und dem Partherreich in
der späten Republik und frühen Kaiserzeit, Frankfurt a.M 1986, 159f.
Wolski, Józef: L’empire des Arsacides, Louvain 1993, 88-96.
Ziegler, Karl-Heinz: Die Beziehungen zwischen Rom und dem Partherreich, Wiesbaden 1964, 20-24.
DE/20.02.12 – r/30/04.12
Mithradates IV Philopator Philadelphos, King of Pontos [Var. Mithridates]
0. Onomastic Issues
Mithradata is an Iranian name, common in the royal Achaemenid and Arsakid houses, and in
other Eastern dynasties. It means ‘Given by Mithra’. On coins and Greek inscriptions it appears
transcribed as Mithradates, with very few exceptions though (Mithridates: OGIS 345: Delos,
early 1st century BC; Syll.3 741 IV, ll. 27-38: Chairemon, cf. the discussion by
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
237
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Baker/Thériault 2005, 343f.). He figures as Metradates in the Capitoline inscription (CIL I2
730). The transcription Mithridates was consolidated among the writers of the Roman Empire.
Mithradates IV was the first Pontic king to bear Greek epithets.
1. Central Biographical Dates and Family Relations
 Stemmata Mithradatids
Ruled ca. a. 155/154 (Heinen 2005). Son of Mithradates III of Pontos, brother of Pharnakes I of
Pontos. Husband of his sister Laodike Philadelpha. Uncle of Mithradates V Euergetes of Pontos.
2. Relations with Rome / Romans and Career
Renewed amicitia et societas with Rome, as it appears in the bilingual inscription on the Capitol
(CIL I2 730=OGIS I 375): [Rex Metradates Pilopator et Pil]adelpus, regus Metradati f., /
[poplum Romanum amicitiai e]t societatis ergo, quae iam [inter ipsum et Romanos optin]et.
legati coiraverunt / [Nemanes Nemani f. et Ma]hes Mahei f. Cf. the relevant Greek passage: ton
dēmon ton [Rhōmaiōn, ton philon kai] symmachon hautu. Naimanes and Mahes were the Pontic
ambassadors sent to renew the treaty. The date of that inscription has been discussed, and it has
been related to Mithradates VI Eupator (Canali de Rossi 1999) due to the scarce evidence about
Mithradates IV and according to a literal interpretation of App. Mithr. 10,30. However, the reign
of Mithradates IV Philopator is attested on coins (de Callataÿ 1999, 240), and Appian’s passage
is clearly mistaken (see Mithradates V Euergetes).
Took part in the treaty that ended the war of Pharnakes in a. 179 (Polyb. 25,2,3) (Heinen 2005,
47 n. 57, for discussion).
Fought against Prusias II of Bithynia to aid Attalos II of Pergamon, who was also an ally of
Rome (Polyb. 33,12,1).
3. Select Bibliography
Olshausen, Eckart: Mithradates [4], DNP 9, 2000, 278.
Cf. Olshausen, Eckart: Pontos, RE suppl. 15, 1978, 396-492.
Cf. Olshausen, Eckart: Mithradates, DNP 9, 2000, 275.
Baker; Patrick/Thériault, Gaétan: Deux nouvelles inscriptions à Xanthos, REG 118, 2005, 331-365, 343f.
Canali de Rossi, Filippo: Dedica di Mitridate a Giove Capitolino, Epigraphica 61, 1999, 37-46.
de Callataÿ, François: L’histoire des Guerres Mithridatiques vue par les monnaies, Louvain-la-Neuve 1997.
Heinen, Heinz: Die Anfänge der Beziehungen Roms zum nördlichen Schwarzmeerraum. Die Romfreundschaft der
Chersonesiten (IOSPE I2 402), in Altay Coskun (ed.): Roms auswärtige Freunde in der späten Republik und im
frühen Prinzipat, Göttingen 2005, 31-54.
Justi, Ferdinand: Iranisches Namenbuch, Marburg 1895.
Kallet-Marx, Robert: From Hegemony to Empire. The Development of the Roman Imperium in the East from 148 to
62 B.C., Berkeley/Cal. 1995.
McGing, Brian C.: The Foreign Policy of Mithridates VI Eupator, King of Pontus, Leiden 1986.
Reinach, Théodore: Mithridates Eupator, König von Pontos, Leipzig 1895.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
238
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
LBP 17.03.07/12.03.10–r/02.07.07/14.03.10
Mithradates V Euergetes, King of Pontos [Var. Mithridates]
0. Onomastic Issues
See Mithradates IV.
1. Central Biographical Dates and Family Relations
 Stemmata Mithradatids
Ruled ca.154-120 (rather than 123, as recently suggested by Ryan 2001; but cf. Gell. 11,10,4).
Son of Pharnakes I. Father of Mithradates VI Eupator Dionysos and his wife Laodike,
Mithradates Chrestos, Nysa, Roxane, Stateira, and another Laodike, wife of Ariarathes VI
Epiphanes Philopator of Kappadokia and thereafter of Nikomedes III of Bithynia.
2. Relations with Rome / Romans and Career
Treaty of friendship and alliance with Rome (App. Mithr. 10,30; 12,38; 56,228). Appian 10,30
tells that Mithradates was the first Pontic king to establish such relations with the Republic,
perhaps because this author does not mention at all the former rulers of Pontos, with the sole
exception of Mithradates I Ktistes (cf. Goukowsky 2001, 133 n. 71).
Sent ships to aid Rome in the Third Punic War (App. Mithr. 10,30).
Helped Rome in the war against Aristonikos, in particular P. Licinius Crassus Dives Mucianus
cos. 130, procos. Asiae 129 and M. Perpenna cos. 130, procos. Asiae 129. Was rewarded by
M.’ Aquillius cos. 129, procos. Asiae 128-126 with the cession of Greater Phrygia (App. Mithr.
12,39; 57,231; civ. 1,22; Iust. 37,1,2; 38,5,3; Strab. geogr. 14,1,38 [646]; Eutr. 4,20,1; Oros.
5,10,2). Aquillius was accused of having been bribed by Mithradates (Cic. div. Caec. 69; Liv.
per. 70; App. Mithr. 12,38; 57,231; civ. 1,22). C. Sempronius Gracchus, as tr. pl. 123 or 122,
attacked the rogatio Aufeia, which would assign some territory to Mithradates that was also
claimed by Nikomedes III of Bithynia, but should rather form part of the Roman province
according to Gracchus (Gell. 11,10,4); the dispute may be related to Phrygia.
3. Select Bibliography
Olshausen, Eckart: Mithradates [5], DNP 9, 2000, 278.
Vgl. Olshausen, Eckart: Pontos, RE suppl. 15, 1978, 396-492.
Ballesteros-Pastor, Luis: Mitrídates Eupátor, rey del Ponto, Granada 1996.
de Callataÿ, François: L’histoire des Guerres Mithridatiques vue par les monnaies, Louvain-la-Neuve 1997.
Goukowsky, Paul (ed.): Appien. Histoire Romaine Tome VII. Livre XII. La Guerre de Mithridate, Paris 2001.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
239
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Kallet-Marx, Robert: From Hegemony to Empire. The Development of the Roman Imperium in the East from 148 to
62 B.C., Berkeley/Cal. 1995.
Mastrocinque, Attilio: Studi sulle guerre Mitridatiche, Stuttgart 1999.
McGing, Brian C.: The Foreign Policy of Mithridates VI Eupator, King of Pontus, Leiden 1986.
Portanova, Joseph John: The Associates of Mithridates VI of Pontus, Diss. Columbia University, New York 1988.
Reinach, Théodore: Mithridates Eupator, König von Pontos, Leipzig 1895.
Ryan, Franz X.: Die Zurücknahme Großphrygiens und die Unmündigkeit des Mithridates VI. Eupator, Orbis
Terrarum 7, 2001, 99-107.
Sullivan, Richard D.: Near Eastern Royalty and Rome, 100-30 B.C., Toronto 1990.
LBP 17/03/2007–r/02.07.07/12.03.10
Mithradates VI Eupator Dionysos, King of Pontos and Bosporos [var. Mithridates]
0. Onomastic Issues
See Mithradates IV.
1. Central Biographical Dates and Family Relations
 Stemmata Mithradatids
Lived ca. a. 134-63. Ruled ca. a. 120-63 (an earlier date of the beginning of the reign has been
proposed by Ryan 2001). Son of Mithradates V Euergetes and Laodike. Brother of Mithradates
Chrestos, Laodike (his first wife), Laodike (the wife of Ariarathes VI of Kappadokia and
Nikomedes III of Bithynia), Nysa, Roxane, and Stateira. Married to his sister Laodike, further to
Monime and Hypsikrateia. Father of Mithradates, Ariarathes IX Eusebes Philopator of
Kappadokia, Machares, Arkathias, Artaphernes, Pharnakes II of Pontos and Bosporos, Xiphares,
Dareios, Xerxes, Oxatres, Kyros, Exipodras. His daughters were Kleopatra, the wife of Tigranes
I of Armenia, Athenais, married to Ariobarzanes II of Kappadokia, Drypetina, Orsabaris,
Eupatra, Mithradatis and Nysa (fiancées of Ptolemaios XII Theos [Auletes] and his brother
Ptolemaios, king of Kypros, respectively: App. Mithr. 536). The identity of Ariarathes and
Arkathias has been discussed (Ballesteros-Pastor 1996, 63f.; de Callataÿ 1997, 315 n. 237;
Mastrocinque 1999, 44ff.). It is doubtful that Mithradates of Pergamon was a son of Eupator; cf.
Strab. geogr. 13.4.3 (625); Bell. Alex. 78; IGR IV 1682; Portanova 1988, 346f.
2. Relations with Rome / Romans and Career
'Friend and ally' of the Roman people (App. Mithr. 12,38; 12,41; 15,51; 16,56; 56,228; SIG3
742). Mithradates had frequent contacts with Romans (Plut. Mar. 31,3; App. Mithr. 119,585). C.
Appuleius Decianus tr. pl. 98 (Schol. Bob. in Cic. Flacc., p. 95 Stangl) took refuge to
Mithradates’ court, probably along with his son, C. Appuleius Decianus. They stayed in Asia
for thirty years (Cic. Flacc. 70); Ryan 2006, 66f. doubts Decianus the elder’s adhesion to
Mithradates and rejects the statement of the scholion; but see the contrary opinion of Kelly 2006,
88f., 136.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
240
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Plut. Pomp. 37,2f. records a statement by Theophanes of Mytilene about a letter of P. Rutilius
Rufus cos. 105 to Mithradates found by Pompey in the fortress of Kainon. In this letter, Rutilius
incited Mithradates to the massacre of the Romans in Asia. Plutarch considers that this may be a
malicious invention due to Theophanes’ hatred towards Rutilius (for a different interpretation, cf.
Mastrocinque 1999, 56). In any case, it is true that Rutilius could escape from the ‘Asiatic
Vespers’ and lived on at least until a. 75.
M. Aemilius Scaurus cens. 109 was accused of taking money from Mithradates (Val. Max.
3,7,8). The senator Attidius fled to Mithradates to escape from a process in Rome and enjoyed
the king’s friendship. Attidius conspired against Mithradates in 67, but was discovered in this.
Out of respect for his senatorial rank, Attidius was executed without torture. His two coconspirators (probably also Romans) were tortured and put to death. However, his freedmen
were left unharmed, because they had only obeyed their master (App. Mithr. 90,410f.). Attidius
has been identified with M. Atilius Bulbus, who was accused of accepting bribes as juror in a
trial and of tampering a legion in Illyria (Kelly 2006, 187f.).
The presumed friendship of Mithradates with the father of L. Cornelius Sulla cos. 88, based on
an interpretation of App. Mithr. 54,216, has been rejected (Reams 1986; Madden/ Keaveney
1993). A perfumer (thurarius) called L. Lutatius Paccius was member of the household of a
King Mithradates (CIL I2 1334 A-B=ILS 7612). Whether the latter was Mithradates VI Eupator
(Portanova 1998, 314f., 486f. nn. 549-53), is uncertain.
Ca. a. 116, Rome decided to recover Greater Phrygia, which had been given to Mithradates V
Euergetes (OGIS II 436; App. Mithr. 11,34; 12,39; 13,45; 15,51; 56,228; 57,231f.; Iust. 38,5,3;
38,5,6); cf. also Ryan 2001 who suggests a. 118. Rome ordered Mithradates to give back some
territories that he had conquered from the Scythians (Memn., FGrH 434 F 22,3), probably in the
context of the Pontic campaigns in Northern Euxinos at the end of the 2nd century (Heinen 2005,
83ff.).
Ca. a. 106/105 he received a Roman mission, which demanded that the king should leave the
territories he had occupied in Paphlagonia. Mithradates alleged that the kingdom had been given
to his father by testament from king Pylaemenes V (Iust. 37,4,4f.). However, it seems that
Mithradates left Paphlagonia, following the orders of Rome (Iust. 38,5,6). Perhaps in relation
with that annexation, Mithradates sent an embassy to Rome ca. a. 101, with an important sum of
money to bribe the Senate. L. Appuleius Saturninus tr. pl. 103 treated the embassy with
insolence, and so the envoys presented charges against him, “with the support of the senators”
(Diod. 36,15); note, however, that the reference of this passage is very vague and, accordingly,
highly disputed; cf., e.g., McGing 1986, 71f.; Ballesteros-Pastor 1996, 60; Cavaggioni 1998,
75ff.
Ca. a. 101, a heroon in Delos was dedicated to the Dioskouroi-Kabeiroi, Poseidon Aisios and
Mithradates Eupator on behalf of the Athenian people and the Roman people (ID 1562).
Ca. a. 101/100, after having murdered his nephew Ariarathes VII Epiphanes Philometor of
Kappadokia, Mithradates put his son on the throne of that kingdom, who ruled under the name
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
241
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Ariarathes IX Eusebes Philopator. After that Mithradates sent to Rome a Kappadokian noble
called Gordios to convince the Senate that the new king was the son of Ariarathes V, and
therefore the legitimate heir to the throne (Iust. 38,2,5). However, the Republic declared
Kappadokia free, but afterwards, at the request of a part of the Kappadokian nobility, Rome
appointed Ariobarzanes I Philorhomaios as king (Strab. geogr. 12,2,11 [541]; Iust. 38,2,6-8).
Probably it was in this context that the meeting between C. Marius and Mithradates took place
(ca. 99/98). Marius warned the king to comply with the obligation to obey the orders of Rome
(Plut. Mar. 31).
Ariobarzanes I Philorhomaios was overthrown by Mithradates, who again installed his son on
the Kappadokian throne. L. Cornelius Sulla propr. Ciliciae ca. 96-92 expelled Ariarathes IX
and restored Ariobarzanes (Plut. Sull. 5,3; Liv. per.70; Vell. 2,24,3; Front. str. 1,5,18; App.
Mithr. 56,238; civ. 1,9,77; vir. ill.75.4).
Ca. a. 94/93, an inscription in Delos (ID 2039) was dedicated to Sarapis on behalf of
Mithradates, Dikaios the priest and his parents, the Athenian people and the Roman people.
When Nikomedes III Euergetes of Bithynia died, his son Nikomedes IV Philopator was
confirmed as king by the Roman Senate in a. 91. Mithradates invaded Bithynia to support
Sokrates Chrestos, who was Nikomedes’ IV half-brother (App. Mithr. 10,32; Iust. 38,5,8).
Sokrates became king for a brief period. Nikomedes went to Rome to request aid, and the Senate
declared that he should be restored. Trogus (Iust. 38,5,8) tells that the Roman Senate ordered
Mithradates to kill Sokrates.
M.’ Aquillius cos. 101 was sent together with Manlius Malthinus and Mancinus ca. a. 90 to
resolve the dispute between Mithradates and Nikomedes IV Philopator (Iust. 37,3,4; 38,3,4; App.
Mithr. 11,33). It has been proposed that the last two names may allude jointly to T. Manlius
Mancinus tr. pl. 107 (Mastrocinque 1999, 38; cf. Ballesteros-Pastor 1996, 85).
When Nikomedes invaded the territory of Pontos, Mithradates sent Pelopidas to complain before
the Roman commission, and perhaps sent another embassy before the Roman Senate (Cass. Dio
fr. 99,2; Eutr. 5,5,1; cf. App. Mithr. 15,52; Flor. 1,40,3; Goukowsky 2001, 140 n. 123). The First
Mithradatic War broke out in 89. The king ordered the murder of all the Romans and Italians
who were living in the province of Asia in the winter of 89/88 (so-called ‘Asiatic Vespers’).
Notwithstanding this, during the war Mithradates allowed the celebration of the festival in
honour of Q. Mucius Scaevola cos. 95, who had been governor of the province ca. 94 (Cic.
Verr. 2,2,51; Brennan 2000, II 549ff.).
Took as prisoners M.’ Aquillius cos. 101, Q. Oppius propr. Ciliciae ca. 89-85, and C. Cassius
Longinus propr. Asiae ca. 90-88 (Poseidon., FGrH 87 F 36=Athen. 5,213a; Cic. Scaur. 2; Tusc.
5,14; Liv. per. 78; Vell. 2,18,3; Memn., FGrH 434 F 31,7; App. Mithr. 112,544). Aquillius was
put to death in Pergamon (Cic. Manil. 11; App. Mithr. 21,80; 112,544; Plin. nat. 33,48). The
other two were set free after the peace between Mithradates and Sulla was concluded (App.
Mithr. 112,544; cf. Gran. Lic. 35, p. 27 Flemisch; Flor. 1,40,12).
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
242
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
During the war, Mithradates gave aid and, at the same time, received support from the Italians
who had risen against Rome in the Social War (Poseidon., FGrH 87 F 36=Athen. 5,213c; App.
Mithr. 16,55; Front. str. 2,3,17; Mastrocinque 1999, 43f.; for discussion of the numismatic
evidence cf. de Callataÿ 1997, 287f.). The Pontic troops fought against C. Sentius propr.
Macedoniae 93-87 and his legate C. Bruttius Sura, as well as against L. Cornelius Sulla cos.
88, procos. Asiae 87-82 and C. Flavius Fimbria (perhaps proquaest. of L. Valerius Flaccus,
cos. suff. 86; cf. Ballesteros-Pastor 1996, 161 n. 41).
The war ended with the Peace of Dardanos in 85, where Sulla made concessions to Mithradates
to conclude the agreement (Plut. Sull. 24,1-3; 43,2; App. Mithr. 56,227-58,240; 112,543; civ.
1,9,76; Cic. Manil. 8; Mur. 11; 32, Gran. Lic. 36, p. 31 Flemisch; Memn., FGrH 434 F 25,2;
Flor. 1,40,2; vir. ill. 76,5). This peace was not ratified by the Roman Senate (App. Mithr. 64,269;
65,270; 67,283f.; 70,297; Memn., FGrH 434 F 26,1); cf. however Eutr. 6,6,2 on the outbreak of
the Third Mithradatic War: Mithridates pace rupta Bithyniam et Asiam voluit invadere.
The lack of official confirmation of the Peace favoured the campaigns of L. Licinius Murena
propr. Asiae 84/83-81 in the Second Mithradatic War. Mithradates made complaints to the
Roman Senate on account of Murena’s invasion of his territory. Rome sent Calidius, who met
Murena in Galatia, perhaps C. Calidius praet. 79, a senator from the circle of Sulla (SherwinWhite 1984, 150), or Q. Calidius tr. pl. 99 (Goukowsky 2001, 188 n. 539). Calidius told in
public that the war might be stopped, because the king had not violated the treaty with Rome.
But Calidius probably had orders secretly to encourage Murena to continue the war (App. Mithr.
65,270-272). After further fights in which Murena was defeated, Sulla sent Aulus Gabinius tr.
mil. 86, cos. 58 (MRR II suppl. 27) to Kappadokia. The war was concluded in 81 with an
agreement between Mithradates and Ariobarzanes I Philorhomaios (App. Mithr. 66,279f.;
Memn., FGrH 434 F 26,3). Gabinius did not want to participate in the feast that was celebrated at
the end of the war.
Entered into negotiations with Q. Sertorius pr. 83, propr. Hispaniae Citerioris 82 through L.
Fannius and L. Magius (Cic. Verr. 2,1,87; App. Mithr. 68,287f.; 72,308; 112,546; 119,585;
Oros. 6,2,12f.; Cic. Mur. 32, Plut. Sert. 23f.; Ps.Ascon. in Cic. Verr. 2,1,87, p. 244 Stangl). They
were probably deserters of the army of Fimbria (Sall. hist. frg. 2,78 Maurenbrecher = 2,90
McGushin; on their identity, cf. Ballesteros-Pastor 1996, 203). Mithradates also sent an
ambassador to Cn. Pompeius Magnus in Hispania (Cic. Manil. 46). The king sent ships and
money to help Sertorius (Memn., FGrH 434 F 29,5; 29,33).
In a. 73 the Third Mithradatic War broke out when Mithradates invaded Bithynia, which became
a Roman province after the death of Nikomedes IV. Mithradates received help from members of
the Sertorian faction, in particular from M. Marius quaest. 76, who entered the province of Asia
as proconsul and became one of the king’s lieutenants (Plut. Sert. 24,3f.; Luc. 8,5; 12,5; App.
Mithr. 68,288; 70,298; 76,332; 77,335 [Appian calls him Varius]; Oros. 6,2,12f. and 20-22).
Marius had also brought some troops from Hispania (Plut. Sert. 24,1; Luc. 8,5). Fannius and
Magius also fought on Mithradates’ side, as well as other Roman deserters (App. Mithr. 70,298;
72,308; 98,452; Oros. 6,2,16-18) and people who had fled from Sulla’s proscriptions in Rome
(Oros. 6,2,22). After the death of Sertorius, both Fannius and Magius deserted from Mithradates
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
243
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
to the Roman side (Cass. Dio 36,8,2; App. Mithr. 72,308-10; Ps.Ascon. in Cic. Verr. 2,1,87, p.
244 Stangl). Marius remained loyal to the king and, caught by Lucullus, he was put to death
(Plut. Luc. 12,5; Oros. 6,2,22).
Besieged M. Aurelius Cotta cos. 74, procos. Bithyniae et Ponti 73-70 in Kalchedon ca. a. 73
and defeated his legate P. Rutilius Nudus. The senator L. Manlius (perhaps legatus of Cotta:
MRR II 105) died there.
L. Licinius Lucullus cos. 74, procos. Ciliciae et Asiae 73-66/63 fought with Mithradates and
conquered the kingdom of Pontos. After the battle of Kabeira in a. 71, Mithradates fled to
Armenia, where he took refuge beside his son-in-law Tigranes I. Lucullus invaded Armenia,
although he could not defeat the kings completely.
In Kabeira M. Pomponius praef. eq. was captured. Mithradates proposed that Pomponius be his
friend, but he answered that the king must first be friendly to the Romans. Mithradates spared
Pomponius’ life in acknowledgment of his valour (App. Mithr. 79,351f.; Plut. Luc. 15,2). This
Roman officer has been identified with M. Pompeius mentioned by Memnon (FGrH 434 F 45),
and with the uncle of Pompeius Trogus, who served in the East under Cn. Pompeius Magnus
procos. 66-62/61 (Iust. 43,5,11; Goukowsky 208f., n. 730).
On his return to Pontos Mithradates achieved victories over Lucullus’ legates M. Fabius
Hadrianus and L. Valerius Triarius in a. 68-67. Attidius tried to murder the king (see above).
Conducted negotiations with Cn. Pompeius Magnus when the latter invaded Pontos in 66, but no
agreement was reached (App. Mithr. 98,452; Cass. Dio 36,45,2-5). Pompeius forced Mithradates
to withdraw. A certain Marcius, who lead a military unit of Mithradates, deserted to Pompeius
with his men (Cass. Dio 36,48,2). Mithradates fled to the Kimmerian Bosporos. The king tried to
open negotiations with Pompeius again (App. Mithr. 107,506f.), but the latter demanded him to
be present. After the mutiny of his son Pharnakes (II), Mithradates was driven to commit suicide
in Pantikapaion (Kertch) in 63.
3. Select Bibliography
Olshausen, Eckart: Mithradates [6], DNP 9, 2000, 278-80.
Vgl. Olshausen, Eckart: Pontos, RE suppl. 15, 1978, 396-492.
Ballesteros-Pastor, Luis: Mitrídates Eupátor, rey del Ponto, Granada 1996.
Ballesteros Pastor, Luis: Marius’ Words to Mithridates Eupator, Historia 48, 1999, 506-508.
Brennan, T.C.: The Praetorship of the Roman Republic, Oxford 2000.
de Callataÿ, François: L’histoire des Guerres Mithridatiques vue par les monnaies, Louvain-la-Neuve 1997.
Cavaggioni, Andrea: L. Apuleio Saturnino. Tribunus plebis seditiosus, Venezia 1998.
Dmitriev, Sviatoslav: Cappadocian Dynastic Rearrangements on the Eve of the First Mithridatic War, Historia
55, 2006, 286-89.
Goukowsky, Paul: Appien. Histoire Romaine Tome VII. Livre XII. La Guerre de Mithridate, Paris 2001.
Heinen, Heinz: Mithradates VI. Eupator, Chersonesos und die Skythenkönige. Kontroversen um Appian, Mithr. 12f.
und Memnon 22,3f., in: Altay Coskun (Hg.): Roms auswärtige Freunde in der späten Republik und im frühen
Prinzipat, Göttingen 2005, 75-90.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
244
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Kallet-Marx, Robert: From Hegemony to Empire. The Development of the Roman Imperium in the East from 148 to
62 B.C., Berkeley/Cal. 1995.
Kelly, Gordon P.: A History of Exile in the Roman Republic, Cambrigde 2006.
Madden, John/ Keaveney, Arthur: Sulla Père and Mithridates, AJPh 88, 1993, 138-41.
Mastrocinque, Attilio: Studi sulle guerre Mitridatiche, Stuttgart 1999.
McGing, Brian C.: The Foreign Policy of Mithridates VI Eupator, King of Pontus, Leiden 1986.
Portanova, Joseph J.: The Associates of Mithridates VI of Pontus, Diss. Columbia University, New York 1988.
Reams, Lee E.: The ‘Friends’ of Mithridates VI. A Case of Mistaken Identity, CB 64, 1988, 21-23.
Reinach, Théodore: Mithridates Eupator, König von Pontos, Leipzig 1895.
Ryan, Francis X.: Die Zurücknahme Großphrygiens und die Unmündigkeit des Mithridates VI Eupator, Orbis
Terrarum 7, 2001, 99-106.
Ryan, Francis X.: Three Problematic Persons in the Defence of Flaccus (Cic. Flacc. 70,81,102), Exemplaria Classica
10, 2006, 63-81.
Sherwin-White, Adrian N.: Roman Foreign Policy in the East 168 B.C. to A.D.1, London 1984.
Sullivan, Richard D.: Near Eastern Royalty and Rome, 100-30 B.C., Toronto 1990.
LBP 17/03/07–r/03.07.07/15.03.10
Mithradates (VII) of Pergamon, King of the Trokmoi, King Designate of Kolchis and the
Bosporos [var. Mithridates]
0. Onomastic Issues
See under Mithradates (IV) Philopator Philadelphos.
1. Central Biographical Dates and Family Relations
 Stemma Galatians / Deiotaros
Son of Adobogiona (I), sister of Brogitaros Philorhomaios, king and tetrarch of the Galatian
Trokmoi, and grandson of a certain Trokmian Deiotaros, who has to be distinguished from the
Tolistobogian Deiotaros I Philorhomaios. His father was Menodotos of Pergamon (Strab. geogr.
13.4.3 [625]); Bell. Alex. 78.2f.; IGR IV 1682). But according to Strabo, Mithradates’ relatives
pretended that he was the son of Mithradates VI Eupator. Menodotos could therefore have been
an adoptive father (Reinach 1895, 292; Olshausen 1978, 279f., includes him in the stemma of the
Pontic dynasty). The account of Bell. Alex. 78.2 only attests that Mithradates was of royal birth.
Portanova 1988, 346f. wrongly relates this to his assumed descent from Deiotaros I
Philorhomaios. As a child, he and his mother stayed at Eupator’s camp, where he received
military training on account of his noble birth (Bell. Alex. 78.2). Died in 47/46 BC (see below).
2. Relations with Rome / Romans and Career
Friend of C. Iulius Caesar (Bell. Alex. 26; 78), helped him in the Alexandrian War (48 BC)
with an important army, that was decisive for Caesar’s victory (Bell. Alex. 26,1-78,2; Ios. ant.
Iud. 14.127-139; bell. Iud. 1.187-192; Cass. Dio 42,41,1-3; 42,43,1; 42,48,4; 47,26,5). In a. 47,
Caesar appointed him as king and tetrarch of the Galatian Trokmoi and ruler of the Bosporos.
On Mithradates’ plundering Kolchis, cf. Strab. geogr. 11.2.17 (498), though with the reservations
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
245
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
as expressed by Geyer 1932, 2206. Mithradates did not reach the Bosporan kingdom, because he
was defeated by Asandros, probably in a naval battle: Bell. Alex. 78; Strab. geogr. 13.4.3 (625);
Cass. Dio 42.48.4; Cic. div. 2.79; Hoben 1969, 28f.; Heinen 1994. The defeat of Mithradates has
been regarded as a proof of the weak support that he received from Rome (Panov 2008).
3. Select Bibliography
Geyer, F.: Mithridates [15], RE 15,2, 1932, 2205f.
Olshausen, Eckart: Pontos, RE suppl. 15, 1978, 396-492.
Olshausen, Eckart: Mithradates [6], DNP 9, 2000, 278-80.
Fündling, Jörg: Mithradates von Pergamon, DNP 8, 2000, 280.
Ballesteros Pastor, Luis: Mitrídates Eupátor, rey del Ponto, Granada 1996.
Goukowsky, Paul: Appien. Histoire Romaine. Tome VII. Livre XII. La Guerre de Mithridate, Paris 2001.
Heinen, Heinz: Mithradates von Pergamon und Caesars bosporanische Pläne. Zur Interpretation von Bellum
Alexandrinum 78, in: R. Günther/ S. Rebenich (eds.): E fontibus haurire. Beiträge zur römischen Geschichte und
zu ihren Hilfwissenschaften, Paderborn 1994, 63-79.
Heinen, Heinz: Die Mithradatische Tradition der bosporanischen Könige – ein mißverstandener Befund, in: K. Geus/
K. Zimmermann (eds.): Punica–Libyca–Ptolemaica. Festschrift für Werner Huß zum 65. Geburtstag, Leuven
2001, 355-370.
Heinen, Heinz: Antike am Rande der Steppe. Der nördliche Schwarzmeerraum als Forschungsaufgabe, Stuttgart
2006.
Hoben, Wolfgang: Untersuchungen zur Stellung kleinasiatischer Dynasten in den Machtkämpfen der ausgehenden
römischen Republik, Diss. Mainz 1969.
McGing, Brian C.: The Foreign Policy of Mithridates VI Eupator, King of Pontus, Leiden 1986.
Panov, Aleksander R.: The Kingdom of Bosporus in Rome’s Foreign Policy Plans (47-46 B.C.), VDI 2008. 4, 195204. (Russian with English summary).
Portanova, Joseph J.: The Associates of Mithridates VI of Pontus, Diss. Columbia University, New York 1988.
Reinach, Théodore: Mithridates Eupator, König von Pontos, Leipzig 1895.
Sherwin-White, Adrian N.: Roman Foreign Policy in the East 168 B.C. to A.D.1, London 1984.
Sullivan, Richard D.: Near Eastern Royalty and Rome, 100-30 B.C., Toronto 1990.
LBP/16.04.2008/14.03.10–r/07.08.08/14.03.10
Mithradates (VIII) Philopator, King of the Bosporos [Var. Philosymmachos, Philopatris]
0. Onomastic Issues
See under Mithradates IV Philopator Philadelphos. Minns 1913, 595ff. counted him as either
VIII or III of the Bosporos, because Mithradates of Pergamum can be considered either no. VII
of the dynasty or II of the Bosporos. CIRB 1123 seems to attest the epithet Philopatris (rather
than Philorhormaios). This might reveal an anti-Roman attitude (Ferrary 2001, 808f.; Muccioli
2006, 396f.). In his coins, he appears to bear the epithets Philopator and probably
Philosymmachos. Saprykin 2004, 174 interprets these titles as indications of tensions with Rome,
too. However, Heinen (in Coskun/Heinen 2004, 61-72) has questioned the underlying
assumptions.
1. Central Biographical Dates and Family Relations
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
246
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
 Stemmata Bosporani
Son of Aspurgos, king of the Bosporos, and Gepaepyris, considered either daughter of Kotys
(III) [VIII] of Thrakia and Antonia Tryphaina (Sullivan 1979, 207; 1980, 922), or daughter of
Rhoimetalkes (I) and a sister of Kotys (III) (Saprykin 2004, 172f.). King of Bosporos ca. a. 38/942/43, 44/5 and 49 A.D. Died in Rome after 68 A.D. (Tac. ann. 12.21; Plut. Galba 13.4; 15.1).
2. Relations with Rome / Romans and Career
Successor of his mother, who held the Bosporan throne in a. 37/38 A.D. after Aspurgos’ death.
Claudius confirmed him as king in a. 41. Sent his brother Kotys to Rome with a friendly
message for the Emperor (Cass. Dio 60.8). But Claudius appointed this prince as king, and
installed him on the throne ca. a. 42/43 A.D. with the aid of Roman troops commanded by A.
Didius Gallus cos. suff. 39; legatus Moesiae 42-44 (the date of his office is uncertain: see Birley
1981, 46ff.; Thomasson 1998, 239; on the chronology, see Saprykin 2004, 174f.). Gallus left
Iulius Aquila procurator Ponti et Bithyniae 57/58 in the Bosporos, with several cohorts to
strengthen the position of the new king. Aquila received the ornamenta praetoria for this action;
whether he is to be identified with C. Iulius Aquila, praef. Aegypti 10-11 A.D., remains doubtful
(Demougin 1992, 125; 443f.).
Mithradates fought against those troops with the support of certain peoples living east of his
kingdom, in particular the Syrakoi. Defeated by the Romans and their allies, the Bosporan ruler
took refuge beside Eunones, king of the Aorsi, who was a friend of Rome. Claudius decided to
spare the life of Mithradates, who was handed over by Eunones and brought to Rome by Iunius
Cilo (procurator Ponti et Bithyniae 49 A.D.; Demougin 1992, 428f.). The Bosporan ruler
showed much pride and insolence before Claudius, and was shown pro rostris to the people. He
lived in Rome for twenty years until his death (Tac. ann. 12.15-21; Cass. Dio 60.8.2; Petrus
Patricius, FHG IV 184f., fr. 3; Plut. Galba 13.4; 15.1; Plin. nat. 6.17).
Minted coins with the head of Caligula together with the name of Mithradates and his title of
king without abbreviation; Gajducevič 1971, 340. Saprykin 2005, 174 has inferred from it a
certain defiance of Rome, which he relates to his attempts at independence from the latter and to
his eventual war against Claudius.
In Ilion an inscription honouring Claudius has been found which was probably dedicated by
this king (Rose 1994).
3. Select Bibliography
Geyer, F.: Mithridates [16], RE 15.2, 1932, 2206f.
von Bedow, Iris: Mithradates [9], DNP 8, 2000, 281.
Barrett, Anthony A.: Gaius’ Policy in the Bosporus, TAPA 107, 1977, 1-9.
Birley, Anthony R.: The Fasti of Roman Britain, Oxford 1981.
Braund, David C.: Rome and the Friendly King. The Character of the Client Kingship, London 1984.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
247
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Coskun, Altay/Heinen, Heinz: Amici populi Romani. Das Trierer Projekt ‘Roms auswärtige Freunde’ stellt sich
vor, AncSoc 34, 2004, 45-75.
Demougin, Ségolène: Prosopographie des chevaliers romains julio-claudiens (43 av. J.-C.–70 ap. J.-C.), Paris
1992.
Ferrary, Jean-Louis: Le roi Archèlaos de Cappadoce à Délos, CRAI 145, 2001, 799-815.
Gajducevič, Victor F.: Das Bosporanische Reich, Berlin-Amsterdam 19712.
Goroncharovskij, Vladimir: The Roman-Bosporan Conflict in the 40s. A.D., VDI 2003.3, 161-170 (Russian, with
English summary).
Kolendo, Jerzy: Claude et l’annexion de la Thrace, in: Y. Burnand/ Y. Le Bohec/ J.-P. Martin (eds.): Claude de
Lyon, Empereur romain, Paris 1998, 321-330.
Levick, Barbara: Claudius, London 1990.
Minns, Ellis H.: Scythians and Greeks, Cambridge 1913.
Muccioli, Federicomaria: Filopatris e il concetto di patria in età ellenistica, in: B. Virgilio(ed.): Studi Ellenistici 19,
2006, 365-398.
Olbrycht, Marek Jan: Die Aorser, die oberen Aorser und die Siraker bei Strabon. Zur Geschichte und Eigenart
der Völker im nordpontischen und nordkaukasien Raum im 2.-1. Jh. v.Chr., Klio 83, 2001, 425-450.
Podossinov, Alexander V.: Am Rande der griechischen Oikumene, in: J. Fornasier/ B. Böttger (eds.): Das
Bosporanische Reich, Mainz 2002, 21-38.
Rose, Charles Brian: The Post-Bronze Age Excavations at Troia, Studia Troica 4, 1994, 75-104.
Saprykin, Sergey Yu.: Pliny the Younger and the Northern Black Sea, VDI 1998, 191-205 (Russian, with English
summary).
Saprykin, Sergey Yu.: Thrace and the Bosporus under the Early Roman Emperors, in: D. Braund (ed.): Scythians
and Greeks: Cultural Interaction in Scythia, Athens and the early Roman Empire (Sixth Century BC – First
Century AD), Exeter 2004, 167-175.
Sullivan, Richard D.: Thrace in the Eastern Dynastic Network, ANRW II 7.1, 1979, 186-211.
Sullivan, Richard D.: Dynasts in Pontus, ANRW II 7.2, 1980, 913-930.
Thomasson, B.E.: Provinces et gouverneurs sous Claude, in: Y. Burnand/ Y. Le Bohec/ J.-P. Martin (eds.):
Claude de Lyon, Empereur romain, Paris 1998, 229-242.
Wuilleumier, Pierre: Tacite, Annales, Livres XI-XII, Paris 1976.
LBP/16.04.2008/12.03.10–r/31.07.08/13.03.10
Moaphernes, Satrap von Kolchis
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
Großonkel des Geographen Strabon, als Satrap des Mithradates VI. Eupator in den 70er
Jahren bezeugt. Stammbaum bei Dueck 2000, 6.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Blieb dem Mithradates VI. Eupator – im Gegensatz zu seinem anonymen Bruder (Anonymus
MT001) – während des Dritten Mithradatischen Krieges treu (Strab. geogr. 12,3,33 [557];
ferner 11,2,18 [499]).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Honigmann, E.: Strabon [3], RE 4a,1, 1931, 76-155, hier 78.
DNP –.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
248
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Dueck, Daniela: Strabo of Amasia. A Greek Man of Letters in Augustan Rome, London 2000, 5f.
Engels, Johannes: Augusteische Oikumenegeographie und Universalhistorie im Werk Strabons von Amaseia,
Stuttgart 1999, 20f.; 318.
MT/24.11.06–r/30.06.07
Nearchos of Tarentum
1. Central Biographical Dates and Family Relations
Nearchos is recorded in Cic. Cato 41 as Nearchus Tarentinus hospes noster, qui in amicitia
populi Romani permanserat, and Plut. Cato 2.3 calls him a Pythagorean. Even though it
seems likely that this passage of Plutarch derives from Cicero, the existence of Nearchos
should not be doubted, for “on the whole Cicero’s practice in dialogues was to use existing
historical details with some concern for accuracy, and it would be strange to find him
indulging in completely unfounded invention at this point” (Powell 1988, 182-183).
2. Relations with Rome / Romans and Career
Nearchos will have been a prominent supporter of the Roman cause at Tarentum, and most
probably remained loyal to Rome when the city seceded and joined Hannibal’s side.
Cicero might in theory have learnt about Nearchos from the formula amicorum kept in the
urban archives. However, it is quite uncertain whether the phrase qui in amicitia populi
Romani permanserat is meant to imply formal enrolment in the formula amicorum. Powell
(187) states that the expression appears to be an official or semi-official phrase, clearly the
Latin equivalent of the Greek formulation found in the senatus consultum de Oropiis
concerning Hermodorus of Oropus (Sherk, RDGE 23 ll. 50f.).
3. Select Bibliography
Münzer, F.: Nearchos [4], RE 16,2, 1935, 2154-2155.
DNP –
Marshall, A. J.: Friends of the Roman People, AJPh 89, 1968, 39-55.
Powell, J. G. F.: Cicero. Cato Maior de senectute. Edited with introduction and commentary, Cambridge 1988,
182-183; 187.
Raggi, A.: Amici populi Romani, MeditAnt 11, 2008 [2009], 97-113.
Sherk, R.K.: Roman Documents from the Greek East. Senatus Consulta and Epistulae to the Age of Augustus,
Baltimore 1969.
AR 10.02.12 – r/10.02.12
Nestor von Tarsos
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
249
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Der Akademiker Nestor aus Tarsos (vgl. Modrze 1936, 124 und Goulet 2005, 660f.) zählte in
den frühen Jahren des augusteischen Prinzipates zu den einflußreichen griechischen
Philosophen am Hofe des Prinzeps in Rom. Nestor war vor 23 v.Chr. ‘Hauslehrer’ des
Claudius Marcellus, des Sohnes der Octavia, der Schwester des Augustus, und des
künftigen Kaisers Tiberius. Strabon, geb. ca. 63 v.Chr., nennt ihn einen seiner ungefähren
Zeitgenossen (kath’ hēmas, geogr. 14,5,14 C675). Nach dem Tode des Stoikers Athenodoros
Kananites wurde Nestor die ‘Regierung’ seiner Heimatpolis Tarsos im Sinne des Prinzeps in
der späten augusteischen Zeit und vermutlich auch während der ersten Jahre des Tiberius
übertragen. Das genaue Todesjahr Nestors wohl während der Regierung des Tiberius ist
unbekannt.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Nestor stand als akademischer Philosoph und Hauslehrer des Marcellus und des Tiberius
(Parker 1946, 29-50) am Kaiserhof in Rom in einem persönlichen Vertrauensverhältnis zu
Augustus, Marcellus und Tiberius. In späten Lebensjahren wurde er mit der Leitung der
politischen Verhältnisse in seiner Heimatstadt Tarsos im Sinne der Prinzipes Augustus und
Tiberius beauftragt, nahm also eine politisch-diplomatische Vertrauensstellung ein. Der
Übergang in der ‘Stadtregierung’ (prostasia) von der Phase unter Athenodoros zu derjenigen
unter Nestor (genaues Datum nicht bestimmbar) scheint konfliktfrei verlaufen zu sein. Seine
prostasia könnte eine parakonstitutionelle, primär auf das amicitia-Verhältnis zu Augustus
und Tiberius begründete Position gewesen sein. Ebenfalls möglich ist aber auch ein spezielles
kaiserliches imperium oder mandatum, das Nestor im Konfliktfall zu Eingriffen in die lokale
Autonomia der civitas libera Tarsos berechtigte. Falls Nestor städtische Ämter übernommen
hat, dürften sich die Positionen des Demarchos oder Prytanis angeboten haben (vgl. Franco
2006, 322-324, sowie Engels 2008).
Strabon zufolge wurde Nestor von den Tarsiern bis zu seinem Tode hoch geschätzt. Ein
Ehrendekret (vgl. Dagron/Feissel 1987, 73, Nr. 29) für einen Mann namens Nestor, Sohn des
Charmon, ist aus Tarsos aus dem 1. Jh. n.Chr. bekannt, in dem bereits auch der MetropolisTitel derselben Polis erwähnt ist. Es ist aber nicht zu beweisen, daß dieser Nestor mit dem bei
Strabon erwähnten Philosophen aus Tarsos identisch ist.
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Modrze, A.: Nestor [4], RE XVII 1, 1936, 124.
Dagron, G. / Feissel, D.: Inscriptions de Cilicie. Paris 1987.
Engels, J.: Athenodoros, Boethos und Nestor: ‘Vorsteher der Regierung’ in Tarsos und Freunde führender
Römer, in: A. Coskun (Hg.): Freundschaft und Gefolgschaft in den auswärtigen Beziehungen der Römer (2.
Jh. v.Chr. – 1. Jh. n.Chr.), Frankfurt a.M. 2008, 109-132.
Franco, C.: Tarso tra Antonio e Ottaviano (Strabone 14,5,14), Rudiae 18, 2006, 311-339.
Goulet, R.: Nestor de Tarse (26), in: R.Goulet (Hg.): Dictionnaire des philosophes antiques, Bd. IV: de Labeo à
Ovidius, Paris 2005, 660f.
Parker, E.R.: The Education of Heirs in the Julio-Claudian Family, AJPh 67, 1946, 29-50.
JE/14.08.08-r/25.08.08
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
250
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Niger aus Italica/Hispania Ulterior = Q. Pompeius Niger
0. Onomastisches
Zur Möglichkeit, alle drei Namen als keltisch-römische Interferenznamen zu deuten, vgl.
Zeidler 2005, 188f.
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
Belegt a. 45. Römischer Ritter; Badian 1958, 318; Dyson 1980/81, 288f. und Weinrib 1990,
60 vermuten, daß das nomen Pompeius auf Q. Pompeius cos. 141 zurückzuführen ist,
während Wiegels 1971, Nr. 312 glaubt, daß er sein Bürgerrecht Cn. Pompeius Magnus zu
verdanken habe.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Unterstützte C. Iulius Caesar im Kampf gegen die Pompeiussöhne a. 45 in Hispanien (Bell.
Hisp. 25,4).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Miltner, F.: Q.Pompeius Niger, RE 21,2, 1952, 2250.
DNP –.
Badian, Ernst: Foreign Clientelae (264-70 B.C.), Oxford 1958, 318.
Caballos Rufino, Antonio: Los senadores de origen hispano durante la república romana, in: Julián González
(Hg.): Estudios sobre Urso Colonia Iulia Genetiva, Sevilla 1989, 233-79, bes. 266.
Dyson, S.L.: The Distribution of Roman Republican Family Names in the Iberian Peninsula, AncSoc 11/12,
1980/81, 257-99.
Weinrib, Joseph E.: The Spaniards in Rome. From Marius to Domitian, New York 1990, 59f.
Wiegels, Rainer: Die römischen Senatoren und Ritter aus den hispanischen Provinzen bis Diokletian, Diss.
Solingen 1971, Nr. 312.
Zeidler, Jürgen: Onomastic Studies on Some Roman Amici in Hispania, in: Altay Coskun (Hg.): Roms
auswärtige Freunde in der späten Republik und im frühen Prinzipat, Göttingen 2005, 175-200, 188f.
JL/29.09.04–r/28.06.07
Onesimos, Son of Pithon, Macedonian Nobleman
1. Central Biographical Dates and Family Relations
The Macedonian nobleman Onesimos went over to the Romans in 169 BC after Perseus had
ignored his advice on appeasing the Romans. A certain Pithon who was in charge of the
Macedonian garrison at Cassandrea seems to have been his father (Livy 44.12.2 and 44.16.4
Pytho).
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
251
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
2. Relations with Rome / Romans and Career
Onesimos had previously reminded Perseus emphatically to honour the Peace Treaty that
Philip had concluded with the Romans (is pacis semper auctor regi fuerat monueratque, sicut
pater eius Philippus institutum usque ad ultimum uitae diem seruarat cotidie, bis in die
foederis icti cum Romanis perlegendi, ut eum morem, si non semper, crebro tamen usurparet).
Being under suspicion of high treason, he went over to the Romans in 169 BC and provided
the consul Q. Marcius with helpful information. Therefore, he was received in the Roman
senate in 169 BC and awarded with significant privileges. He most probably settled in
Tarentum, where the Roman senate granted him with a house (to be bought by the praetor C.
Decimius) and an estate of 200 iugera (Livy 44.16.4-7): iussit ... agri Tarentini, qui publicus
populi Romani esset, ducenta iugera dari, et aedes Tarenti emi.
The terms used by Livy (44.16.7) to describe the privileges granted by the Roman senate in
part resemble very closely the provisions of the senatus consultum de Asclepiade: senatus in
formulam sociorum eum referri iussit, locum, lautia praeberi (Sherk, RDGE no. 22, ll. 12f.).
Regarding the formula amicorum, Magie (1950 II 960 n. 76) holds the view that Livy’s
terminology, here as elsewhere, is inexact, rather claiming his enrolment in the formula
amicorum. But, most likely, this formula sociorum was simply a variant designation of the
same list of amici (cf. Bowman 1990; Valvo 2001).
3. Select Bibliography
RE –. DNP –.
Bowman, D.A.: The formula sociorum in the Second and First Centuries BC, CJ 85, 1990, 330-336.
Cimma, M.R.: Reges socii et amici populi Romani, Milano 1976, 28-32.
De Martino, F.: Storia della costituzione romana II, Napoli 19732, 34-35.
Magie, D.: Roman Rule in Asia Minor to the End of the third Century after Christ, Princeton 1950.
Marshall, A.J.: Friends of the Roman People, AJPh 89, 1968, 39-55.
Matthaei L.A.: On the Classification of Roman Allies, CQ 1, 1907, 182-204, esp. 186-187.
Raggi, A.: Amici populi Romani, MeditAnt XI, 2008 [2009], 97-113.
Raggi, A.: Senatus consultum de Asclepiade Clazomenio sociisque, ZPE 135, 2001, 73-116, esp. p. 112.
Sherk, R.K.: Roman Documents from the Greek East. Senatus Consulta and Epistulae to the Age of Augustus,
Baltimore 1969.
Valvo, A.: ›Formula amicorum‹, ›Commercium amicitiae‹, ›Philias koinonia‹, in: Bertinelli, M.G. / Piccirilli, L.
(eds.): Linguaggio e terminologia diplomatica dall’antico oriente all’impero bizantino. Atti del convegno
Nazionale, Genova 19 novembre 1998. Roma 2001, 133-145.
AR 10.02.12 – r/10.02.14
Orodes I Philopator Epiphanes Philhellen, König des Partherreichs
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemmata Arsakiden
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
252
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Sohn oder Bruder Mithridates’ II. des Großen, Bruder (?) und Nachfolger Gotarzes’ I., Bruder
(?) des Sinatrukes, regierte – je nach Datierung – von ca. 90 bzw. 88 bis 80 oder von 81/80 bis
77-5 das Partherreich; im ersten Fall von einem unbekannten König, im zweiten von
Sinatrukes in der Herrschaft nachgefolgt.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom / Römern und Karriereverlauf
Nur durch Keilschrifttexte belegt (Pinches/Strassmaier/Sachs 517; 1162f.; 1165; 1170f.; 1174
und 1446) und grob in die Zeit um 80 zu datieren, ist über die Regierung Orodes’ I., welche
im Rahmen der Bürgerkriege gegen Ende der Herrschaft Mithridates’ II. begann und mit der
Usurpation des Gotarzes koinzidierte, kaum weiteres bekannt; auch über das Verhältnis zu
den Römern ist nichts Präzises überliefert. Immerhin wissen wir, daß das Partherreich
bedeutende Territorien bzw. Einflußgebiete verlor, da sich Tigranes I. von Armenien als
äußerst tatkräftiger Herrscher erwies. Schon bald nach seinem Herrschaftsantritt eroberte
Tigranes die Sophene, wurde Schwiegersohn Mithridates’ VI. von Pontos und besetzte
zeitweise Kappadokien. Nach dem Tod Mithridates’ I. eroberte er auch die 70 Täler zurück,
die er im Jahre 94 dem Partherreich überlassen mußte (Strabo 11,14,15), schloß ein Bündnis
mit Atropatene, unternahm Expeditionen bis Ekbatana und annektierte Adiabene, Osrhoene
und Gordyene (Tigranes ließ den letzten König, Zarbienos, wegen Zusammenarbeit mit
Lucullus hinrichten: Plut. Luc. 29), somit weit in bisheriges parthisches Einflußgebiet
eingreifend. In diese Zeit nahm Tigranes auch den Titel eines „Königs der Könige“ (Plut.
Pomp. 38,2) an, welcher wohl dem schnell errichteten, weitgehend feudal strukturierten
Herrschaftsgebiet einen inneren Zusammenhalt geben sollte und Armenien als neuen Erben
der vorderorientalischen Weltreichstradition hervorheben sollte (Engels 2011). Auch fielen in
jene Jahre die ersten beiden Mithridatischen Kriege, in welche das Partherreich sich allerdings
nicht einmischte, wenn auch sicherlich eher aufgrund seiner inneren Schwäche als aufgrund
des mit Rom geschlossenen Vertrags. Sinatrukes, Orodes’ direkter oder indirekter Nachfolger
seit 77-75 (Chaumont 1971; Oelsner 1975, 38), scheint dann ebenfalls infolge innerer
Auseinandersetzungen die Macht ergriffen zu haben.
3. Auswahlbibliographie
RE: –
Schottky, Martin: Orodes (1) I., DNP 9, 2000, 47.
Chaumont, Marie Louise: Études d’histoire parthe I: Documents royaux à Nisa, Syria 48, 1971, 143-164.
Colledge, Malcolm A. R.: The Parthians, London 1967, 34-35.
Debevoise, Neilson G.: A Political History of Parthia, Chicago 1938, 51f.
Engels, David: Middle Eastern ‚Feudalism’ and Seleucid Dissolution, in: K. Erickson / G. Ramsay (Hg.),
Seleucid Dissolution. The Sinking of the Anchor, Wiesbaden 2011, 19-36.
Oelsner, J.: Randbemerkungen zur arsakidischen Geschichte anhand von babylonischen Keilschrifttexten,
Altorientalische Forschungen 3, 1975, 25-45.
Pinches, Theophilus G. / Strassmaier, Johann N. / Sachs, Abraham J.: Late Babylonian Astronomical and
Related Texts, Providence 1955.
Sellwood, David: An Introduction to the Coinage of Parthia, London 1971.
Schippmann, Klaus: Grundzüge der parthischen Geschichte, Darmstadt 1980, 33.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
253
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Wolski, Józef: L’empire des Arsacides, Louvain 1993, 96.
Ziegler, Karl-Heinz: Die Beziehungen zwischen Rom und dem Partherreich, Wiesbaden 1964, 24.
DE/20.02.12 – r/30.04.12
Orophernes Nikephoros, King of Kappadokia [Var. Holophernes]
0. Onomastic Issues
A Persian name, derived from the Iranian divinity Khvarenah (Avestan Xvarenah), ‘Glory’. The
etymology of the name is a matter of discussion, but it probably comes from *varufarnah,
‘having wide glory’ (Justi 1895, 234; de Jong 1999, 481). The transcription Orophernes appears
in Polybius (see below) and Diodorus (31.32), although the latter calls him Holophernes
elsewhere (31.19.7). Appian (Syr. 47.244) and Zonaras (11.24) record Olophernes. The general
Holophernes which appears in the Book of Judith could have been borrowed from this king
(Otto 1913, 2139; de Jong 1999, 481). The cognomen Nikephoros appears only on his coins, and
could have been related with the epithet of the Kappadokian goddess Ma, who was repeatedly
identified with Athena Nikephoros (Michels 2009, 224ff.).
1. Central Biographical Dates and Family Relations
 Stemmata Ariarathids / Ariobarzanids
King of Kappadokia ca. a. 158-155/4. Following Diodorus (31.19.7), he had been the son of
Antiochis, daughter of Antiochos III Megas prior to her marriage with Ariarathes IV, king of
Kappadokia. Zonaras (9.24) records that Orophernes was adopted by this king before the birth of
Ariarathes V. Nevertheless, it is probable that the genealogy of Orophernes could have been
manipulated by Diodorus’ source, in order to highlight Ariarathes’ rights to the throne. In fact,
some literary and epigraphic evidence shows that Orophernes was regarded as a legitimate prince
(Iust. 35.1.2; Pugliese Carratelli 1972; see further Will 1967, 313f.; Breglia Pulci Doria 1978,
105f.; Ballesteros Pastor 2008, 47 n. 7). Brother (or half-brother) of Ariarathes V Eusebes
Philopator and Stratonike, wife of Eumenes II of Pergamon, and thereafter of Attalos II of
Pergamon.
2. Relations with Rome / Romans and Career
Orophernes was educated in Ionia, where he became familiar with Greek culture (Polyb.
33.11.11; cf. Diod. 31.19.7).
In a. 158, he expelled his brother, Ariarathes V Eusebes Philopator, from the throne, although
this one had been confirmed as king by the Senate. Orophernes was supported by Demetrios I
Soter, king of Syria, who received 6,000 talents in exchange. Both brothers appealed to Rome for
arbitration. Orophernes sent the Greeks Timotheus and Diogenes to Rome with a golden crown.
They defended his cause before the Senate and asked for a renewal of the friendship and alliance
with the Roman people. The Kappadokian ruler was also supported by king Demetrios I, who
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
254
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
dispatched a certain Miltiades to Rome. Furthermore, Orophernes probably had the support of
the Cornelii Scipiones and the Aemilii, who had formerly helped Demetrios (Ballesteros Pastor
2008, 46ff.).
Rome decreed the co-regency of both brothers, but Ariarathes was deposed by Orophernes, who
became the sole ruler. Around 155/4, Ariarathes recovered his kingdom thanks to the aid of
Attalos II, king of Pergamon (Polyb. 3.5.2; 32.10; Diod. 31.32-32b; Zonar. 9.24; App. Syr.
47.244; see also under Ariarathes V Eusebes Philopator). The chronology is problematic, see
Henke 2005, 68; Michels 2009, 125. Orophernes took refuge with Demetrios I, encouraging him
to invade Kappadokia. But the Seleukid ruler refused such an intervention, to avoid breaking the
Treaty of Apamea (Polyb. 33.6; Iust. 35.1.2-5; Zonar. 9.24).
Orophernes conspired with the people of Antiocheia against Demetrios, but this was discovered
and resulted in his imprisonment (Iust. 35.1.3-5). Nothing is heard of Orophernes thereafter.
3. Select Bibliography
Otto, Walter: Holophernes, RE 8,2, 1913, 2137-2140.
Schottky, Martin: Orophernes [2], DNP 9, 2000, 51.
Cf. McGing, Brian: Ariarathes, OCD3 1996/2003, 156f.
Badian, Ernst: Foreign Clientelae (264-70 B.C.), Oxford 1958.
Ballesteros Pastor, Luis: Cappadocia and Pontus, Client Kingdoms of the Roman Republic. From the Peace of
Apamea to the Beginning of the Mithridatic Wars (188-89 B.C.), in A. Coşkun (ed.): Freundschaft und
Gefolgschaft in den auswärtigen Beziehungen der Römer (2. Jhr. v.Chr. – 1 Jhr. n. Chr.), Stuttgart 2008, 4563.
Breglia Pulci Doria, Luisa: Diodoro e Ariarate V. Conflitti dinastici, tradizione e propaganda politica nella
Cappadocia del II secolo a.C., PP 33, 1978, 104-129.
Broughton, Thomas R.S.: The Magistrates of the Roman Republic, vol. I, New York 1951.
Canali de Rossi, Filippo: Le ambascerie dal mondo greco a Roma in età repubblicana, Rome 1997.
de Callataÿ, François: L’histoire des Guerres Mithridatiques vue par les monnaies, Louvain-la-Neuve 1997.
Gruen, Erich S.: The Hellenistic World and the Coming of Rome, Berkeley 1984.
Henke, Michael: Kappadokien in hellenistischer Zeit, Diss. Münster 2005.
de Jong, F.A.: Xvarenah, in: K. van den Toorn / B. Becking / P. van der Horst (eds.): Dictionary of Deities and
Demons in the Bible, Leiden 1999, 481-483.
Magie, David: Roman Rule in Asia Minor to the End of the Third Century after Christ, Princeton 1950.
Michels, Christoph: Kulturtransfer und monarchischer “Philhellenismus”. Bithynien, Pontos und Kappadokien in
hellenistischer Zeit, Göttingen 2009.
Pugliese Carratelli, Giovanni: La regina Antiochide di Cappadocia, PP 27, 1972, 182-185.
Reinach, Théodore: Essai sur la numismatique des rois de Cappadoce, RN s. 3, 4, 1886, 301-335, 452-483.
Will, Édouard: Histoire politique du monde hellénistique 323-30 av. J.-C., vol. II. Nancy 1967.
LBP 16.07.09–r/06.03.10
Pacciaecus (I.) aus Hispania Ulterior = Vibius Pacciaecus [Var. Paciaecus]
0. Onomastisches
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
255
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Das cognomen ist aus den Quellen nicht eindeutig identifizierbar. Die Manuskripte von Plut.
Sert. 9,2 und Plut. Crass. 4,2 belegen sowohl Pac(c)ianus als auch Pac(c)iacus an. Laut
Münzer 1942, 2061 entstand das Problem bei der Übersetzung des lateinischen Namens
Paccianus ins Griechische. Ziegler 1964, 264 deutet es als Pac(c)ianus, ebenso MRR II 78,
der jedoch Pac(c)iacus als weitere Möglichkeit hinzufügt. Münzer 1942, 2061; Wiegels 1971,
Nr. 345; Wiseman 1971, 248; Caballos Rufino 1989, 247-250; Weinrib 1990, 59 und
Hernández Fernández 1998 lesen es als Pac(c)iaecus, da diese Variante in Inschriften öfters
als cognomen (CIL II2/7 372; V 1401; VIII 12241; XII 1803) und nomen (CIL II2/7 438; VI
33289-33291) belegt ist. Laut Schulze 1904, 28 handelt es sich ursprünglich um ein iberisches
nomen gentile, dem als cognomen das hispanische Suffix -aecus angefügt worden sei, so daß
es dem lateinischen Paccianus entspreche. Demgegenüber versteht Badian 1958, 308 es als
eine Ableitung vom oskischen nomen gentile Paccius, das nach der Emigration der Vibii nach
Hispanien durch Anhängen eines Suffixes zum cognomen umgewandelt worden sei. Dieser
Auffassung folgen auch Weinrib 1990, 22 und Hernández Fernández 1998, 169-174. Letzterer
hält das cognomen jedoch für indoeuropäischen und die Endung -aecus für ein
besitzanzeigendes Suffix keltischen Ursprungs (praedium Pacciaecum). Der Name könnte
laut Hernández Fernández der Vorläufer des heute besonders in Andalusien verbreiteten
Namens Pacheco sein. Die Vermutung von Wiseman 1971, 248, daß es sich bei dem Namen
Vibius um ein praenomen handeln könnte, scheint wenig überzeugend. – Vgl. jetzt aber
Zeidler 2005, 187f. zu sprachlichen Interferenzen von Vibius und Pacciacus.
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
Belegt von a. 85-80; wahrscheinlich Vater des L. Vibius Pacciaecus (II.) und des C.
Pacciaecus (III.). Römischer Ritter; Legat des L. Cornelius Sulla a. 81.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom/ Römern und Karrierverlauf
Unterhielt höchstwahrscheinlich freundschaftliche Kontakte zu P. Licinius Crassus cos. a. 97
während dessen Statthalterschaft in der Hispania Ulterior a. 96-93. Der wohlhabende
Pac(c)iaecus nahm M. Licinius Crassus a. 85 auf eines seiner Landgüter an der
südspanischen Küste (eventuell in der Nähe von Carteia) auf, als dieser vor den Verfolgungen
des C. Marius und des L. Cornelius Cinna flüchten mußte (Plut. Crass. 4,2; 6).
Wurde a. 80 als Legat von Sulla nach Nordafrika geschickt um Ascalis, König von
Mauretanien, gegen Q. Sertorius beizustehen (Plut. Sert. 9,2-3). Während dieser
Militäraktion fand er wahrscheinlich den Tod.
Ob ein Zusammenhang zwischen den bei Val. Max. 5,4 erwähnten Pacciaeci und dem
vorliegenden Vibius Pacciaecus besteht, bleibt ebenso offen wie seine öfters erwogene
Erhebung in den Senatorenstand.
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Münzer, Friedrich: Vibius Pac(c)iaecus, RE 18,1, 1942, 2061f.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
256
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
DNP –.
Caballos Rufino, Antonio: Los senadores de origen hispano durante la república romana, in: Julián González
(Hg.): Estudios sobre Urso Colonia Iulia Genetiva, Sevilla 1989, 233-79, bes. 247-250.
Hernández Fernández, Juan Sebastián: Los Vibii Pac(c)iaeci de la Bética: una familia de Hispanienses mal
conocida, Faventia 2, 1998, 163-176.
Schulze, W.: Zur Geschichte der lateinischen Eigennamen, Göttingen 1904, 28.
Weinrib, Joseph E.: The Spaniards in Rome. From Marius to Domitian, New York 1990, 21-25.
Wiegels, Rainer: Die römischen Senatoren und Ritter aus den hispanischen Provinzen bis Diokletian, Diss.
Solingen 1971, Nr. 345.
Wiseman, Timothy P.: New Men in the Roman Senate 139 B.C.-A.D. 14, Oxford 1971, 248.
Zeidler, Jürgen: Onomastic Studies on Some Roman Amici in Hispania, in: Altay Coskun (Hg.): Roms
auswärtige Freunde in der späten Republik und im frühen Prinzipat, Göttingen 2005, 175-200, 187f.
Ziegler, Konrat (Hg.): Plutarchus. Vitae parallelae, Bd. 2,1, Nd. Leipzig 1964, 264.
JL/29.09.04–r/28.06.07/17.04.10
Pacciaecus (II.) aus Hispania Ulterior = L. Vibius Pacciaecus (II.) [Var. Paciaecus]
0. Onomastisches
S. Vibius Pacciaecus (I.).
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
Belegt a. 46-45. Vermutlich Sohn des Vibius Pacciaecus (I.); möglicherweise Bruder des C.
Pacciaecus (III.). Senator a. 45.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Leistete C. Iulius Caesar wichtige Dienste im Kampf gegen die Pompeiussöhne a. 45. Bell.
Hisp. 3,4 beschreibt ihn als homo eius provinciae notus et non parum sciens. Dementierte den
allgemein vermuteten Aufenthalt des jungen Cn. Pompeius Magnus auf den Balearen, als
man diesen a. 46 in Hispanien erwartete (Cic. Att. 12,2,1=238 ShB). Später unterrichtete er
Caesar über die Truppenstärke der Pompejaner in der Hispania Ulterior (Cic. fam. 6,18,2=218
ShB). Während der Belagerung Ulias durch Pompeius schickte ihn Caesar mit sechs Kohorten
zu Hilfe, welche er geschickt durch die feindlichen Linien führte (Bell. Hisp. 3). Erhebung in
den Senatorenstand a. 45 (Cass. Dio 43,47,3).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Münzer, Friedrich: L. Vibius Pac(c)iaecus, RE 18,1, 1942, 2061f.
DNP –.
S. zu Vibius Pacciaecus (I.).
JL/29.09.04–r/28.06.07
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
257
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Pacciaecus (III.) aus Hispania Ulterior (?) = C. Pacciaecus [Var. Paciaecus]
0. Onomastisches
S. Vibius Pacciaecus (I.).
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
Belegt a. 53; möglicherweise Sohn des Vibius Pacciaecus (I.); möglicherweise Bruder des L.
Vibius Pacciaecus (II.). Seine hispanische Herkunft ist demnach nicht endgültig gesichert.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Unterstützte M. Licinius Crassus cos. II 55, procos. Syr. 54-53 bei seinem Felzug gegen die
Parther a. 53. Wurde nach der Schlacht von Karrhai gefangengenommen und in einem
Siegeszug vorgeführt (Plut. Crass. 32,2).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Münzer, Friedrich: Paccianus, RE 18,1, 1942, 2062.
DNP –.
S. zu Vibius Pacciaecus (I.).
JL/29.09.04–r/29.06.07
Panaitios von Rhodos
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
Stoiker. Der älteste von drei Söhnen des Nikagoras (Philodemus, Index Stoicorum 55), etwa
185 v.Chr. in Rhodos geboren. Panaitios, der einer vornehmen Familie auf Rhodos
entstammte (Strab. geogr. 14,2,13), wurde Priester des Poseidon Hippios in Lindos (ILind.
223). Er studierte bei den Philosophen Krates von Mallos, Diogenes von Babylon und
Antipatros von Tarsos (Cic. div. 1,3; Strab. geogr. 14,5,6). Bis 129 v.Chr. verbrachte er sein
Leben zwischen Rom und Athen (Philodemus, Index Stoicorum 63). Nach dem Tod des
Antipatros wurde er Leiter der Akademie in Athen, wo er um 109 v.Chr. starb. Panaitios'
Bildung war außerordentlich und von einer universalen Weite, und umfasste u.a.
geographische und mathematische Kenntnisse. Viele seiner philosophischen Werktitel sind
überliefert, jedoch besitzen wir nur Fragmente: z.B. περὶ προνοίας, περὶ τοῦ καθήκοντος, περὶ
εὐθυμίας, und περὶ τῶν αἱρέσεων (s. M. van Straaten 33-51a).
2. Verhältnis zu Rom und den Römern und der Verlauf seiner Karriere
P. Cornelius Scipio Aemilianus war Schüler und Freund (auditor et familiaris) des Panaitios
(Cic. off. 1,26). Plutarch beschreibt Scipios Verbindung mit Panaitios als φιλία ἡγεμονική, die
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
258
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Vorsorgeleistungen für Rhodos mitbrachte (Plut. mor. 814C-D). Um 140 v.Chr. finden wir
Panaitios in Rom im Gefolge Scipios, mit dem er 140-138 v.Chr. in den Osten reiste (Plut.
mor. 200F-201A). Panaitios' Werk Περὶ τοῦ καθήκοντος hatte eine besondere Wirkung auf
Ciceros De officis. Er verfasste auch einen Brief an Q. Aelius Tubero (Cic. Luc. 44; fin. 4,9;
Tusc. 4,2). Viele Römer waren Schüler des Panaitios: Scipios engster Freund C. Laelius (Cic.
fin. 2,8), C. Fannius, der Schwiegersohn des C. Laelius (Cic. Brut. 26), Q. Mucius Scaevola
(Cic. de orat. 1,17), P. Rutulius Rufus (Cic. off. 3,2), und der ansonsten unbekannte M.
Vigellius (vielleicht C. Aculeo Visellius?) (Cic. de orat. 3,21).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
M. Pohlenz: Panaitios [5], RE 18.3, 418-440.
B. Inwood: Panaitios [4], DNP 1, 226-228.
Alessi, Francesca: Panezio di Rodi e la tradizione stoica, Napoli 1994.
Alessi, Francesca: Panezio di Rodi. Testimonianzi, Napoli 1997.
Dorandi, Tiziano: Filodemo. Storia dei Filosofi: la Stoà da Zenone a Panezio (PHerc. 1018), Leiden 1994.
Dorandi, Tiziano: Chronology: in K. Algra (ed.): The Cambridge History of Hellenistic Philosophy, Cambridge
1999, 41-2.
Dyck, Andrew R.: A Commentary on Cicero, De Officiis, Ann Arbor MI 1996.
Gärtner, Hans Arnim: Cicero und Panaitios, Heidelberg 1974.
Puhle, Annekatrin: Persona - Zur Ethik des Panaitios, Frankfurt am Main 1987.
van Straaten, Modestus: Panétius, sa vie, ses écrits et sa doctrine, avec une édition des fragments, Amsterdam
1946.
van Straaten, Modestus: Panaetii Rhodii Fragmenta, Leiden 1962.
AF/08.12.11 – r/08.12.11
Pharnakes I, King of Pontos
0. Onomastic Issues
Iranian name derived from *Farnah, which means ‘fortune, majesty’ in the Avesta. The title
‘King of Pontos’ was not yet established in the time of Pharnakes: Polyb. 5,43,1 calls the
kingdom just Kappadokia.
1. Central Biographical Dates and Family Relations
 Stemmata Mithradatids
Ruled ca. a. 196-155. Son of Mithradates III. Brother of Mithradates IV Philopator Philadelphos,
king of Pontos, and of Laodike Philadelpha, queen of Pontos. Husband of Nysa, daughter of
Antiochos III (Tracy 1992, 307ff.). Father of Mithradates V Euergetes.
2. Relations with Rome / Romans and Career
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
259
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
He is the first king of the Mithradatid dynasty from which we know contacts with Rome.
Pharnakes established philia with the Roman people, as is stated in the treaty with Chersonesos
in a. 179 (IOSPE I2 402; cf. Heinen 2005).
Sent a mission to Rome (a. 183/2) to resolve a dispute with Eumenes II of Pergamon, who had
also dispatched another mission there. At the same time, the Rhodians too had sent ambassadors
to Rome to protest on account of Pharnakes’ conquest of Sinope (Polyb. 23,9,1-4; Liv. 40,2,6).
In a. 183/2 a war began between Pharnakes and several kingdoms which were connected with
Rome: Pergamon, Paphlagonia, and Kappadokia. The Republic had previously sent to the East a
mission led by a certain Marcus (Polyb. 24,1,2). In response to new missions of the fighting
kingdoms, Rome sent another legation (a. 181/180) to mediate the conflict (Polyb. 24,1,1-3;
Liv.40,20,1; cf. Diod. 29,22; Canali de Rossi 1997, 474). But even a third Roman mission could
not stop the war (Polyb. 24,5,7f.; 24,14,1). In a. 179 Rome sent a fourth legation (Polyb.
24,14,10-15,13); cf. Primo 2006, esp. 622f. At last peace was established (Polyb. 25,2; Diod.
29,24), probably with the participation of Rome (Heinen 2005).
Justin (38,6,1) probably reflects that Pharnakes was ill-treated by the Romans in relation with
Pergamon: Sic et avum suum (sc. Mithradates’) Pharnacen per cognitionum arbitria
succidaneum regi Pergameno Eumeni datum. The traditional interpretation of the naming of
Pharnakes as successor to Eumenes II (Ballesteros-Pastor 2000/1) has been discussed by Primo
2006.
3. Select Bibliography
Olshausen, Eckart: Pontos, RE suppl. 15, 1978, 396-492.
Olshausen, Eckart: Pharnakes [1], DNP 9, 2000, 752.
Ballesteros-Pastor, Luis: Pharnaces I of Pontus and the Kingdom of Pergamum, Talanta 32-33, 2000-2001, 61-66.
Burstein, Stanley M.: The Aftermath of the Peace of Apamea. Rome and the Pontic War, AJAH 5, 1980, 1-12.
Canali de Rossi, Filippo: Le ambascerie del mondo greco a Roma in età repubblicana, Rome 1997.
Heinen, Heinz: Die Anfänge der Beziehungen Roms zum nördlichen Schwarzmeerraum. Die Romfreundschaft der
Chersonesiten (IOSPE I2 402), in: Altay Coskun (ed.): Roms auswärtige Freunde in der späten Republik und im
frühen Prinzipat, Göttingen 2005, 31-54.
Højte, Jakob M.: The Date of the Alliance between Chersonesos and Pharnakes, in: Lise Hannestad/ Vladimir Stolba
(eds.): Chronologies of the Black Sea Area in the Period c. 400-100 B.C., Aarhus 2005, 137-47.
Justi, Ferdinand: Iranisches Namenbuch, Marburg 1895.
McGing, Brian C.: The Foreign Policy of Mithridates VI Eupator, King of Pontus, Leiden 1986.
Primo, Andrea: Il ruolo di Roma nella guerra pontico-pergamena del 183-179: Giustino XXXVIII, 6, 1, Studi
Ellenistici 19, 2006, 617-28.
Reinach, Théodore: Mithridates Eupator, König von Pontos, Leipzig 1895.
Tracy, Stephen V.: Inscriptiones Delicae: IG XI 713 and IG XI 1056, MDAI (A) 107, 1992, 303-14.
LBP/17.03.07/14.03.10–r/02.07.07/14.03.10
Pharnakes (II), King of the Bosporos (and of Pontos)
0. Onomastic Issues
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
260
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
See under Pharnakes (I), King of Pontos. Proclaimed himself as “King of Kings”: CIRB 31, 979;
Zograph 1977, 301f., pl. xliv.
1. Central Biographical Dates and Family Relations
 Stemmata Mithradatids,  Stemmata Bosporani
Lived ca. 97-47 BC. King of the Bosporos 63-47. King of Pontos 48-47. Son of Mithradates VI
Eupator Dionysos and probably of Stratonike, one of his concubines: therefore, he was the
brother of the Pontic princes Machares and Xiphares (Portanova 1988, 316f.; 371; Ballesteros
Pastor 2005). Father of Dynamis, queen of Pontos and the Bosporans, Darius, king of Pontos ca.
39-37, and Arsakes, usurper in Pontos ca. a. 37-36 (Sullivan 1990, 160f.). Led several campaigns
against peoples of the Northern Euxinus (Strab. geogr. 7.4.6 [311]; 11.2.17 [498]).
2. Relations with Rome / Romans and Career
Amicus et socius populi romani according to App. Mithr. 113.554; Bell. Alex. 65; 78; Cass. Dio
42.48.4. Obtained this status from Pompeius in a. 63 as a reward for having led the revolt that
impelled Mithradates to suicide. This friendship and alliance was lasted until Pharnakes’ death
(Cass. Dio 42.48.4; Heinen 1994). Appointed as king of the Bosporos by Pompey who, however,
did not give him the ancient realm of the Pontic kings in Anatolia. Sent a golden crown to C.
Iulius Caesar (Bell. Alex. 70.8). The interpretation of a monogram on his coins as an
abbreviation of the title Philorhomaios is doubtful (Hoben 1969, 15).
Taking advantage of the Civil Wars in Rome, he conquered the kingdom of Pontus in 48,
defeating in Nikopolis the troops led by Cn. Domitius Calvinus, cos. 53 and 40, who probably
acted as legate of C. Iulius Caesar (Bell. Alex. 34-41; 65; 69; 74; App. Mithr. 120.591, civ.
2.91; Cass. Dio 42.46.1f.; 42.47.1; Cic. Deiot. 14; 24; Suet. Iul. 36; Plut. Caes.50.1; Liv. per.
112; MRR II 277). In the next year, Caesar obtained a brilliant victory over Pharnakes at Zela
(Bell. Alex. 34-40, 65, 69, 74; Cass. Dio 47.1-3; Plin. nat. 6.10; App. Mithr. 120.592; civ. 2.91;
Plut. Caes. 50.2; Liv. per. 113; Flor. 2.3.11; Suet. Iul. 37; Strab. geogr. 12.3.14 [547]; Frontin.
2.2.3; Lucan. 10.475f.; Eutr. 6.22; MRR II 286). The king fled to Sinope and surrendered the city
to Domitius, who allowed Pharnakes to go back to his Bosporan kingdom. During this war,
Asandros, whom Pharnakes had left behind as governor of the Bosporos, rebelled against the
king. Pharnakes tried to recover his domain, but he was defeated by Asandros and died (App.
Mithr. 120.593-595; civ. 2.92; Cass. Dio 42.47f.; Strab. geogr. 13.4.3 [625]).
3. Select Bibliography
Diehl, Ernst: Pharnakes [2], RE 19,2, 1938, 1851-1853.
Olshausen, Eckart: Pontos, RE Suppl. 15, 1978, 396-492.
Olshausen, Eckart: Mithradates [6], DNP 9, 2000, 278-80.
von Bedow, Iris: Pharnakes [2], DNP 10, 2000, 732f.
Ballesteros Pastor, Luis: Mitrídates Eupátor, rey del Ponto, Granada 1996.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
261
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Ballesteros Pastor, Luis: Some Aspects of Pharnaces II’s Image in Ancient Literature, Antiquitas Aeterna 1, 2005,
211-217. (Russian, with English summary).
Dobesch, Gerhard: Caesar und Kleinasien, Tyche 11, 1996, 51-77.
Freber, Philipp-Stephan Graham: Der hellenistische Osten und das Illyricum unter Caesar, Stuttgart 1993.
Gajducevič, Victor F.: Das Bosporanische Reich, Berlin-Amsterdam 19712.
Goukowsky, Paul: Appien. Histoire Romaine Tome VII. Livre XII. La Guerre de Mithridate, Paris 2001.
Heinen, Heinz: Mithradates von Pergamon und Caesars bosporanische Pläne. Zur Interpretation von Bellum
Alexandrinum 78, in: R. Günther/ S. Rebenich (eds.): E fontibus haurire. Beiträge zur römischen Geschichte und
zu ihren Hilfwissenschaften, Paderborn 1994, 63-79.
Heinen, Heinz: Die Mithradatische Tradition der bosporanischen Könige – ein mißverstandener Befund, in: K. Geus/
K. Zimmermann (eds.): Punica-Lybica–Ptolemaica. Festschrift für Werner Huß zum 65. Geburtstag, Leuven
2001, 355-370.
Heinen, Heinz: Antike am Rande der Steppe. Der nördliche Schwarzmeerraum als Forschungsaufgabe, Stuttgart
2006.
Hoben, Wolfgang: Untersuchungen zur Stellung kleinasiatischer Dynasten in den Machtkämpfen der ausgehenden
römischen Republik, Diss. Mainz 1969.
Luther, Andreas: Nachrichten über das Bosporanische Reich bei Horaz, in: M. Huol/ U. Hartmann,
Grenzüberschreitungen, Formen des Kontakts zwischen Orient und Occident im Altertum. Oriens et
Occidens, 3, Stuttgart 2002, 259-277.
Meulder, Marcel: Frontin, Stratagèmes III, 2, 1: Domitius Calvinus ou Sextius Calvinus?, Latomus 66, 2007,
905-918.
Podossinov, Alexander V.: Am Rande der griechischen Oikumene, in: J. Fornasier/ B. Böttger (eds.): Das
Bosporanische Reich, Mainz 2002, 21-38.
Portanova, Joseph J.: The Associates of Mithridates VI of Pontus, Diss. Columbia University, New York 1988.
Reinach, Théodore: Mithridates Eupator, König von Pontos, Leipzig 1895.
Sherwin-White, Adrian N.: Roman Foreign Policy in the East 168 B.C. to A.D.1, London 1984.
Sullivan, Richard D.: Near Eastern Royalty and Rome, 100-30 B.C., Toronto 1990.
Sweeney John M.: The Career of Cn. Domitius Calvinus. AncW 1, 1978, 179-185.
Zograph, A.N.: Ancient Coinage, BAR supplementary series 33 (ii), Oxford 1977.
LBP/16.04.2008–r/07.08.08
Phasael, Tetrarch von Judäa = Iulius Phasael
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemmata Herodianer
Geboren als Sohn des Strategen Antipatros und der Kypros 77 v.Chr.; Bruder Herodes’ I. und
des Pheroras.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
A. 47 wird Phasael von Antipatros zum strategos von Jerusalem und Umgebung ernannt (Ios.
bell. Iud. 1,203; ant. Iud. 14,158), a. 42 setzt M. Antonius ihn als Tetrarchen über Jerusalem
und Iudäa ein (Ios. ant. Iud. 14,326; bell. Iud. 1,244). A. 40 wird er gemeinsam mit Hyrkanos
II. von den in Iudäa eingefallenen Parthern gefangen gesetzt und stirbt während der Haft (Ios.
ant. Iud. 14,339-348.365-369; bell. Iud. 1,271f.). Als Todesursache wird Suizid (Ios. bell. Iud.
1,271f.; ant. Iud. 14,13,10), Vergiftung (Ios. bell. Iud. 1,272) oder auch Tod im Kampf (Iulius
Africanus, PG 10,84f.) angegeben.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
262
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
3. Auswahlbibliographie:
Schaller, B.: Phasael [2], Suppl. 12, 1970, 1084-1086.
Wandrey, I: Phasael [1], DNP 9, 2000, 755.
Jones, A.H.M., The Herods of Judea, Oxford 1938.
Kokkinos, N.: The Herodian Dynasty. Origins, Role in Society and Eclipse, Sheffield 1998.
Richardson, P.: Herod. King of the Jews and Friend of the Romans, Columbia 1996.
Schalit, A. König Herodes. Der Mann und sein Werk, Berlin/New York 22001.
Schürer, E.: Geschichte des jüdischen Volkes im Zeitalter Jesu Christi, Band I, Leipzig 31901 (ND Hildesheim
1964).
JW/05.08.08–r/07.08.08
Pheroras, Tetrarch von Peräa = Iulius Pheroras
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemmata Herodianer
Jüngster Sohn des Strategen Antipatros und der Kypros, geboren ca. Mitte der 60er Jahre
v.Chr. Bruder Herodes’ I. und des Phasael. Verheiratet mit einer Schwester der Hasmonäerin
Mariamme, der Ehefrau Herodes’ I., in zweiter Ehe nach Ios. bell. Iud. 1,484; ant. Iud.
16,194-200 mit einer Sklavin, für die er die Hochzeit mit einer Tochter des Herodes
ausschlägt. Tod ca. 6/5 v.Chr. (Ios. bell. Iud. 1,578-581; ant. Iud. 17,58f.).
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Pheroras erweist sich als wichtiger Unterstützer seines Bruders Herodes I. in dessen Kampf
um die Machtsicherung in Judäa. 30 v.Chr. ernennt Herodes ihn während seines Besuchs des
Octavianus auf Rhodos zu seinem Stellvertreter (Ios. ant. Iud. 15,184). Augustus erlaubt a.
20/19 die Ernennung des Pheroras zum Tetrarchen von Peräa durch Herodes (Ios. bell. Iud.
1,483. ant. Iud. 15,362).
Im Rahmen der Intrigen und Konkurrenzkämpfe am herodianischen Hof unterstützt Pheroras
insbesondere Antipatros, den Sohn des Herodes I. 9/8 v.Chr. nimmt er am Prozess gegen
Alexander und Aristobulos, die Söhne des Herodes, in Berytus teil (Ios. bell. Iud. 1,538.545).
Wahrscheinlich 7/6 v.Chr. wird er von Herodes aus Jerusalem verbannt (Ios. bell. Iud. 1,578579. ant. Iud. 17,58).
3. Auswahlbibliographie:
Stein: Pheroras, RE 19.2, 1938, 2054-2056.
Wandrey, I.: Pheroras, DNP 9, 2000, 774.
Jones, A.H.M.: The Herods of Judea, Oxford 1938.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
263
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Kokkinos, N.: The Herodian Dynasty. Origins, Role in Society and Eclipse, Sheffield 1998.
Richardson, P.: Herod. King of the Jews and Friend of the Romans, Columbia 1996.
Schalit, A.: König Herodes. Der Mann und sein Werk, Berlin/New York 22001.
Schürer, E.: Geschichte des jüdischen Volkes im Zeitalter Jesu Christi, Band I, Leipzig 31901 (ND Hildesheim
1964).
JW/05.08.08–r/07.08.08
Philippos, Tetrarch von Gaulanitis, Trachonitis, Batanäa und Panias = Iulius Philippus
0. Onomastisches
Der zuweilen in der Literatur auftauchende Herodes-Name ist unhistorisch.
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemmata Herodianer
Philippos wird Mitte der 20er Jahre v.Chr. als Sohn von Herodes I. und Kleopatra geboren. Er
ist verheiratet mit Salome, der Tochter seines Halbbruders Herodes und seiner Nichte
Herodias (Ios. ant. Iud. 18,137, gegen diese Identifikation vgl. aber Kokkinos 1998, 237).
Nach seinem Tod ca. 33/34 n.Chr. wird sein Reich zunächst kommissarisch der Provinz Syria
zugeordnet, 37 n.Chr. jedoch von Caligula an Agrippa I. übertragen.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
In Analogie zu anderen Söhnen Herodes’ I. wird Philippos wahrscheinlich in Rom erzogen
(Ios. bell. Iud. 1,602f.; ant. Iud. 17,80f.). Als sein Bruder Archelaos nach dem Tod Herodes’ I.
4 v.Chr. nach Rom reist, um seine Ansprüche auf den Thron zu untermauern, überträgt er
Philippos die Aufsicht über das väterliche Reich (Ios. bell. Iud. 2,14; ant. Iud. 17,219).
Augustus ernennt ihn, dem Testament des Herodes I. folgend, zum Tetrarchen über den
Norden des herodianischen Reiches mit Batanäa, der Gaulanitis und der Trachonitis (Ios. bell.
Iud. 2,95; ant. Iud. 17,318f.). Er gründet in Panias, wo bereits Herodes I. einen AugustusTempel errichtet hatte, die Stadt Caesarea Philippi und am Nordufer des Sees Genezareth an
der Stelle der Siedlung Bethsaida die Stadt Iulias (Ios. bell. Iud. 2,168. ant. Iud. 18,28).
Nach Cassius Dio befindet sich Philippos mit seinem Halbbruder Herodes Antipas unter den
Anklägern des Herodes Archelaos vor Augustus 6 n.Chr. (Cass. Dio 55,27,6); Strabon nennt
dagegen alle drei herodianischen Klientelherrscher (Archelaos, Antipas und Philippos) als
Angeklagte, auch wenn Antipas und Philippos schließlich ihre Herrschaft retten konnten
(Strab. geogr. 16,2,46 [765]).
Unter der Statthalterschaft des Pontius Pilatus (PIR2 P 815) in Iudaea ist Philippos
wahrscheinlich an einer von den Juden bestimmten Delegation beteiligt, die bei dem
procurator gegen die Aufbewahrung vergoldeter Schilde in Jerusalem protestiert, deren
Inschriften gegen die religiösen Vorschriften der Juden verstoßen. Nach der Zurückweisung
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
264
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
der Proteste wenden sich die Vertreter schriftlich an Tiberius, der Pilatus den Befehl erteilt,
die Schilde umgehend aus Jerusalem zu entfernen (Phil. leg. 300).
3. Auswahlbibliographie:
Bringmann, K.: Philippos [26], DNP 9, 2000, 809.
Jones, A.H.M., The Herods of Judea, Oxford 1938.
Kokkinos, N.: The Herodian Dynasty. Origins, Role in Society and Eclipse, Sheffield 1998.
Schürer, E.: Geschichte des jüdischen Volkes im Zeitalter Jesu Christi, Band I, Leipzig 31901 (ND Hildesheim
1964).
Wilker, J.: Für Rom und Jerusalem. Die herodianische Dynastie im 1. Jahrhundert n.Chr., Frankfurt/M. 2007.
JW/05.08.08–r/05.08.08
Philippos II. Philorhomaios, König des Seleukidenreichs
0. Onomastisches
Der in den 60er Jahren bezeugte Beiname Philorhomaios (s. unter 2.) stellt ein Novum in der
Seleukidendynastie dar. Erstmals belegt ist er seit Ariobarzanes I. von Kappadokien
(Simonetta 1977, 39ff.). Zu verweisen ist aber auch auf die Zeitgenossen Deiotaros I. und
Brogitaros von Galatien sowie Antiochos I. Theos von Kommagene.
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemmata Seleukiden
Sein Geburtsdatum ist unbekannt, liegt wohl aber vor dem armenischen Einfall in Syrien um
83. Sohn des Philippos I. Epiphanes Philadelphos (Diod. 40,1a). Er herrschte zwischen 67/6
und 63 – in Rivalität zu Antiochos XIII. Philadelphos Asiatikos – über Teile des
seleukidischen Rumpfreichs als letzter König dieser Dynastie.
2. Verhältnis zu den Römern und Karriereverlauf
Philippos II. wuchs bei seinem Vater Philippos I. unter dem Schutze des kilikischen
Tempelstaats Olba auf (MAMA III 62; neuere Lesung in SEG XXVI 1976/7, 349, Nr. 14511453). Von dort erlebte er auch die Machtergreifung des von L. Licinius Lucullus cos. 74,
procos. 73-66/63 als rechtmäßigen König anerkannten Antiochos XIII. Philadelphos
(Asiaticus) (Iust. 30,2,1). Von aufständischen Antiochenern, die mit der militärischen
Schwäche des Antiochos XIII. unzufrieden waren, nach Syrien gerufen, gelang Philippos um
67/6 die Einnahme der Hauptstadt und die Vertreibung Antiochos’ XIII (Diod. 40,1a). Ob
hierbei auch römische Kreise, etwa auf Empfehlung von P. Clodius Pulcher leg. 68-67 (trib.
58, aed. 56) mithalfen, um Lucullus zu schwächen, wie Koehler 1978, 62 und 68ff. vermutet,
muß dahingestellt bleiben. Laut Mehl 2000, 808 waren hingegen gerade diese Aufstände
dafür verantwortlich, daß Philippos II. später den Thron verlieren sollte. Eine militärische
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
265
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Auseinandersetzung mit Antiochos XIII. endete mit dem Verrat der von beiden Seiten
angestellten arabischen Söldnerkontingente. Während es aber dem König von Emesa,
Sampsigeramos I., gelang, Antiochos XIII. gefangenzunehmen und vielleicht auch ermorden
zu lassen, entging Philippos II. einer ähnlichen Falle seines Verbündeten Azizos, eines
Phylarchen der Araber (Diod. 40,1b).
Ende 67 oder Anfang 66 erhielt Philippos II. Besuch von Q. Marcius Rex (cos. 68), der 67
als Proconsul von Kilikien amtierte. Er spendete von Philippos erhaltenes Geld zum
Wiederaufbau von Palast und Hippodrom von Antiocheia (Ioh. Malal. 9,225, 7ff.), die wohl
durch das Erdbeben in der Zeit des Tigranes II. beschädigt worden waren (Iust. 40,2,1). Dies
zeigt eindringlich, daß von offizieller römischer Seite eine Provinzialisierung Syriens noch
keineswegs beschlossene Sache war.
Eng mit der Frage nach den Beziehungen zu Rom hängt die Bewertung des in Olba für
Philippos II. bezeugten Beinamen Philorhomaios zusammen (MAMA III 62; SEG XXVI
1976/7, 349, Nr. 1451-1453; hierzu auch Bikerman 1937, 43, Anm. 1). Laut den
Herausgebern von MAMA III datiert der Stein aus der Zeit vor Philippos’ Machtübernahme
67 und soll in Konkurrenz mit dem von Lucullus unterstützten Antiochos XIII. die
prorömische Gesinnung des Exilprinzen belegen. Nach Treves (1938, 2557) hingegen soll
Philippos II. den Titel erst nach der Niederlage seines Konkurrenten im Jahre 66 und vor
seiner Vertreibung 63 ostentativ übernommen haben, um somit den Römern bzw. dem damals
im Osten gegen Mithradates VI. Eupator tätigen Cn. Pompeius Magnus (cos. 70, 55 und 52)
zu demonstrieren, daß er sich trotz seiner Feindschaft mit dem von den Römern unterstützten
Antiochos XIII. nicht der antirömischen Seite anzuschließen gedachte. Nach Ehling (2008,
262) belegt der Beiname indes, daß Philippos’ II. Herrschaft noch durch Lucullus anerkannt
wurde.
Antiochos XIII. wurde jedoch bald darauf wieder aus der Haft freigelassen und beherrschte
um 65/64 kurzfristig einige syrische Gebiete, während Philippos II. von Aufständischen
verdrängt worden zu sein scheint. Nach dem Einzug des Pompeius in Syrien im Jahre 63
fanden weder Antiochos XIII. noch Philippos II. die erhoffte Bestätigung ihrer Herrschaft.
Das Reich wurde unter Verweis auf die Unfähigkeit seiner Könige, welche bereits durch
Tigranes vertrieben worden seien, und die allgemeine Rechtlosigkeit im Lande aufgelöst
(App. Syr. 49; App. Mithr. 106; Plut. Pomp. 39,2; Iust. 40,2,4;). Pompeius organisierte es als
Bund freier Poleis im Rahmen der Provinz um (App. Syr. 50; civ. 5,10,50; Mithr. 106; Vell.
2,37,5; Euseb. chron. 1,261f. = Porphyr. FGrH 260 F 32,27; Iust. 40,2,5). Während
Sampsigeramos I., der Mörder des Antiochos XIII., von Pompeius als Herrscher über Emesa
und Arethus bestätigt wurde (Cic. Att. 2,16), ging Philippos nach Kilikien ins Exil, erhielt
aber im Jahre 56 das Angebot der Alexandriner, als Nachkomme der Kleopatra Tryphaina den
ptolemaischen Thron zu besteigen und Berenike IV. zu heiraten. A. Gabinius (cos. 58), der
Syrien ab 57 als proconsul verwaltete, hinderte ihn allerdings daran (Euseb. chron. 1,261f. =
FGrH 260 F 32,28).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
266
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Treves, Piero: Philippos [69] II., RE 19,2 1938, 2554-2558.
Mehl, Andreas: Philippos [25] II., DNP 9, 2000, 808f.
Schmitt, Hatto H.: Art. Seleukidenreich II 14, in: LH 2005, 983f.
Bellinger, Alfred R.: The End of the Seleucids. Transactions and Proceedings of the Connecticut Academy 38,
1949, 51-102.
Bevan, Edwyn R.: The House of Seleucus, London 1902, 266-268.
Bikerman, Elias: Les institutions des Séleucides, Paris 1938.
Bouché-Leclercq, Auguste: Histoire des Séleucides (323-64 avant J.-C.), Bd. 2, Paris 1913, 441-443.
Ehling, Kay: Untersuchungen zur Geschichte der späten Seleukiden (164-63 v.Chr.), Stuttgart 2008, 260-263
und 271-274.
Grainger, John D.: A Seleukid Prosopography and Gazetteer, Leiden/New York/Köln 1997, 52f.
Keil, Josef/Wilhelm, Adolf (Hgg.): Monumenta Asiae Minoris Antiqua, Bd. III, Manchester 1931.
Simonetta, Bono: The Coins of the Cappadocian Kings, Fribourg 1977.
DaE/08.11.09–r/23.02.10
Phraates III Euergetes Epiphanes Philhellen, König des Partherreichs
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemmata Arsakiden
Sohn und Nachfolger des Sinatrukes, Schwiegervater Tigranes II. (des Jüngeren) von
Armenien, zwischen 71 und 68 König des Partherreichs, 58/57 von seinen Söhnen und
Nachfolgern Mithridates III und Orodes II ermordet.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom / Römern und Karriereverlauf
Ebenso wie der Tod Sinatrukes’ ist das Datum des Regierungsantritts Phraates’ III. umstritten;
in Frage kommen 71/70 (Wolski 1993, 124), 70/69 (Ziegler 1964, 24) oder 68 (Chaumont
1971, 162); laut Sellwood (1976, 8) hatte er zwischen 70 und 66 mit einem „unknown king“,
identifiziert mit Dareios von Atropatene, um die Macht zu kämpfen. In die Regierungszeit
Phraates II fielen nicht nur die Bestrebungen, erneut die parthische Macht über das
Zweistromland zu festigen – verdeutlicht etwa durch die Gründung Ktesiphons (Strabo 6,743)
–, sondern auch die Expeditionen des Lucullus und des Pompeius, welche in die römische
Annektion Syriens mündeten und somit den Beginn der unmittelbaren territorialen
Nachbarschaft Roms und des Partherreichs bezeichneten.
Als L. Licinius Lucullus (cos. 74) im Jahre 74 den Oberbefehl im Dritten Mithridatischen
Krieg erhielt und sich die Auseinandersetzung zwischen Rom und Pontos auch auf das mit
letzterem verbündete Armenien ausweitete, sollte sich die geostrategische Situation Parthiens
bedeutsam ändern. Zwar hielt auch Phraates III zunächst an der Neutralität seines Vorgängers
Sinatrukes fest, als zunächst Tigranes I. von Armenien mit der Versprechung einer Rückgabe
der seit 94 umstrittenen (Strabo 11,14,15) 70 Täler und der seitdem besetzten Gebiete
Gordyene, Osrhoene und Adiabene an seine Hilfe appellierte (App. Mithr. 87; Cass. Dio
36,1,2 und 3,1), dann, im Jahre 69, auch Lucullus Phraates III zum Bündnis aufforderte;
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
267
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
angeblich in ultimativer Form (App. Mithr. 87), der sich der König allerdings verweigerte, da
er im römischen Botschafter einen Spion oder Provokateur vermutete (Cass. Dio 36,3,1f.;
Memnon FGrH 434, F 38,8; vgl. aber Plut. Luc. 30,1, dem zufolge die Initiative von Phraates
ausgegangen sei). Allerdings ist zu vermuten, daß es zum Abschluß eines foedus gekommen
sein könnte, das – erneut? – den Euphrat als Grenze festlegte (Ziegler 1964, 25-27 unter
Berufung auf Oros. 6,13,2). Daß Lucullus vorgesehen habe, nach einem Sieg über Pontos und
Armenien auch das Partherreich zu unterwerfen (Plut. Luc. 30f.), ist wohl in Anbetracht eines
fehlenden Mandats unglaubwürdig und wohl nur aus der späteren Erfahrung des CrassusFeldzugs erdichtet worden.
Als aber im Jahre 66 Cn. Pompeius Magnus mit dem Oberbefehl über den Osten beauftragt
wurde, gelang es ihm bald, den Partherkönig zum Eingreifen zu bewegen, indem er noch 66
ausrichten ließe, römischerseits nichts dagegen einzuwenden zu haben, wenn der Partherkönig
zwischen Phraates und Tigranes umstrittenen Gebiete – wesentlich die 70 Täler, Gordyene,
Osrhoene und Adiabene – besetzen würde (Cass. 36,45,3); sicherlich in der Hoffnung, daß
eine parthische Invasion Armeniens die armenischen Bündnistruppen des pontischen Königs
verringern und den römischen Vorstoß nach Osten erleichtern würde. Der Vertrag – als foedus
bezeichnet bei Florus 3,6 und 12; Ruf. Fest. 16; Oros. 6,13,2; bei Cass. Dio 36,45,4 und 51,1
auch als φιλί α apostrophiert – war daher wohl ein foedus aequum, was auch dadurch
nahegelegt wird, daß Pompeius dem Partherkönig – noch – den Titel eines „Königs der
Könige“ zubilligte (Plut. Pomp. 38,2; Cass. Dio 37,6,1; der Titel ist übrigens numismatisch
nicht belegt, erscheint auf allen Münzen doch nur der Titel des Großkönigs). Diese Invasion
wurde dadurch erleichtert, daß in der Zwischenzeit der Sohn Tigranes’ I. von Armenien,
Tigranes der Jüngere, sich mit seinem Vater entzweit und am parthischen Hof Zuflucht
gesucht hatte, wo er eine Tochter Phraates’ III. heiratete (Cass. Dio 36,51). Phraates III.
mochte gehofft haben, Tigranes den Jüngeren auf den armenischen Thron zu setzen und die
Konstellation der Zeit Mithridates’ II. zu erneuern, wobei unsicher ist, inwieweit der Vertrag
mit Pompeius Phraates III. zur Aufnahme des jüngeren Tigranes bewegte (so Cass. Dio
36,45,3), oder vielmehr umgekehrt (Cass. Dio 36,51).
Der zunächst erfolgreiche parthische Einfall kam allerdings bald vor den Mauern der
armenischen Hauptstadt Artaxata zum Stillstand, und die wie so oft schlecht auf
Belagerungen vorbereiteten Parther zogen sich zurück und überließen Tigranes d.J. die
Fortführung der Auseinandersetzungen. Dieser wurde aber von seinem Vater geschlagen und
flüchtete sich zu Pompeius (App. Mithr. 104; Plut. Pomp. 33), der im Jahre 65 in Armenien
einmarschierte und nun seinerseits gegen Artaxata zog, wo es schnell zu einer persönlichen
Begegnung mit dem älteren König kam. Die Begegnung mit Tigranes von Armenien
allerdings bewirkte einen Sinneswandel bei Pompeius, der aller Erwartung entgegen den alten
König in seiner Macht bestätigte, zum amicus et socius populi Romani machte (Ziegler 1964,
30) und seinen Sohn auf Gordyene und Sophene beschränkte (App. Mithr. 104f., der diese
Territorien
irrtümlich
mit
Kleinarmenien
identifiziert:
vgl.
die
Karte:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Maps_of_the_Armenian_Empire_of_Tigranes.gif);
später
dann, als dieser die Auslieferung eines Teils des königlichen Schatzes verweigerte, setzte er
ihn gefangen (Plut. Pomp. 33). Seine Auslieferung an Phraates III. verweigerte Pompeius.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
268
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Bald darauf kam es auch aus ungeklärten Gründen zu einer römischen Expedition des A.
Gabinius (cos. 58) in parthisches Territorium, wo die Euphratgrenze überschritten und der
Tigris erreicht wurde (Cass. Dio 37,5,2). Auch auf Phraates’ III. Klagen reagierte Pompeius
nur mit Hochmut (Cass. Dio 37,5,3) und machte deutlich, daß er nicht gewillt war, sich an den
geschlossenen Vertrag zu halten (Plut. Pomp. 33,6). Weiter verschlechtert wurde das
Verhältnis auch dadurch, daß Pompeius sich weigerte, nach der Festnahme Tigranes’ des
Jüngeren Gordyene in parthischen Besitz zurückzuführen, und vielmehr seinen Legaten L.
Afranius (cos. 60) aussandte, dieses Gebiet zu besetzen und Großarmenien anzuschließen
(Cass. Dio 57,5; Plut. Pomp. 36,2); ein Unternehmen, bei dem wieder die parthischen
Grenzen verletzt wurden, da Afranius durch Mesopotamien nach Syrien marschierte (Cass.
Dio 37,5,5f.). Schließlich ist auch überliefert, daß Pompeius dem Partherkönig den
offensichtlich früher durchaus zugestandenen Titel eines „Königs der Könige“ verweigerte
und diesen vielmehr Tigranes zugestand (Cass. Dio 37,6,1f.; Plut. Pomp. 38,2), gleichzeitig
auch Gesandtschaften der parthischen Vasallenkönige der Elymais und Mediens empfing
(Plut. Pomp. 36,2) und ihnen somit völkerrechtliche Eigenständigkeit suggerierte. Diese
Probleme führten dann im Jahr 64 zu einer allgemeinen Absprache, bei welcher Pompeius
eine Dreimännerkommission als Schiedsrichter über die jeweiligen Territorien der Parther
und Armenier aussandte (Plut. 39,3; Cass. Dio 37,7,3): Tigranes erhielt Gordyene und Nisibis,
die Parther die Adiabene.
58/7 wurde Phraates von seinen Söhnen Orodes und Mithridates III. ermordet, wobei in
Anbetracht der fast unverzüglich ausbrechenden Bruderkriege unsicher ist, wer von beiden
zunächst die Nachfolge antrat und wer gegen die Herrschaft zu usurpieren suchte.
3. Auswahlbibliographie
RE: –
Schottky, Martin: Phraates [3] III, DNP 9, 2000, 959f.
Arnaud, P.: Les guerres parthiques de Gabinius et de Crassus et la politique occidentale des Parthes Arsacides
entre 70 et 51 av. J.C., in: D. Dabrowa (Hg.): Ancient Iran and the Mediterranean World (Electrum 2), 1998,
13-43.
Chaumont, Marie Louise: Études d’histoire parthe I: Documents royaux a Nisa, Syria 48, 1971, 143-164.
Colledge, Malcolm A. R.: The Parthians, London 1967, 36f.
Debevoise, Neilson G.: A Political History of Parthia, Chicago 1938.
Gelzer, Matthias: Pompeius. Lebensbild eines Römers. Neudruck der Ausgabe von 1984 mit einem
Forschungsüberblick und einer Ergänzungsbibliographie von Elisabeth Herrmann-Otto, Stuttgart 2005.
Schippmann, Klaus: Grundzüge der parthischen Geschichte, Darmstadt 1980, 34-36.
Sellwood, David G.: The drachms of the Parthian ‘Dark Age’, JRAS 1976, 2-25.
Wirth, Gerhard: Pompeius – Armenien – Parther. Mutmaßungen zur Bewältigung einer Krisensituation, BJb 183,
1983, 1-60.
Wolski, Józef: L’empire des Arsacides, Louvain 1993, 124-127.
Ziegler, Karl-Heinz: Die Beziehungen zwischen Rom und dem Partherreich, Wiesbaden 1964, 24-32.
DE/10.02.12 – r/20.02.12
Polystratos of Karystos
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
269
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
1. Central Biographical Dates and Family Relations
Polystratos of Karystos is mentioned in the so-called senatus consultum de Asclepiade
sociisque (Sherk, RDGE 22 = RGEDA 66) a bilingual bronze tablet found in Rome and
known since the XVI century, as one of the three Greek naval captains (nauarchs) who
supported Rome during a bellum Italicum (l. 7 of the Greek version, namely the Social War,
or the fight of Sulla against the Marian faction and some Italian people on his return to Rome
from the East in 83/82 BC). Polystratos was son of Polyarkos (l. 10 [Greek]). The other two
captains named in the inscription are Asklepiades of Klazomenai and Meniskos of Miletos.
The senatus consultum was issued in 78 BC. Polystratos was thus militarily active in the 80s;
however, being unknown from other sources, it is not clear how old he was at the time.
2. Relations with Rome / Romans and Career
In the late Republic, several Greek cities supported Roman warfare, often following the
provision of a treaty. Polystratos, probably officially sent by his own city Klazomenai, joined
the Roman side during the troubled years which followed the Social War, and most possibly
operated in the Sullan navy in the 80s. He and the two fellow Greeks may have been at Rome
when the decree of the senate was issued (78 BC), for they had their name added at the
bottom of the document (ll. 32-33 [Greek]) on the bronze tablet.
On account of his support to the Roman cause, Polystratos was officially inscribed in the list
(formula) of the ‘friends of the Roman people’ (amici populi Romani) (l. 17 [Latin] = ll. 2425 [Greek]), and duly rewarded with significant fiscal, juridical and honorary privileges
enlisted in the senatus consultum. The decree is unique in that it is the only surviving
document to attest the granting of the status of amicus populi Romani to individual
provincials.
The three Greeks probably were notables of their own cities, who had either volunteered or
had been chosen in order to bring support to Rome in a dramatic situation. It is uncertain
whether they owned the ship they operated with or whether they only commanded its crew.
Upon his return to his hometown, Polystratos surely endeavoured to publish the decree of the
senate containing the privileges, in order to exploit them in his own city and in the province of
Asia. There is no positive evidence to prove that he held any city magistracy or lent support to
Rome in any of the crises that would follow soon.
3. Select Bibliography
RE –. DNP –.
Bowman A.: The Formula Sociorum in the Second and First Centuries B.C., CJ 85, 1989-1990, 330-336.
Gallet, L.: Essai sur le sénatus-consulte De Asclepiade sociisque, RD ser. 4, 16, 1937, 242-293; 387-425.
Marshall, A.J.: Friends of the Roman People, AJPh 89, 1968, 39-55.
Raggi, A.: Amici populi Romani, MediterrAnt 11, 2008 [2009], 97-113.
Raggi, A.: Senatus consultum de Asclepiade Clazomenio sociisque, ZPE 135, 2001, 73-116.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
270
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Rosenberger, V.: Bella et expeditiones. Die antike Terminologie der Kriege Roms, Stuttgart 1992, 35-41 on
bellum Italicum.
Sherk, R.K.: Roman Documents from the Greek East: Senatus Consulta and Epistulae to the Age of Augustus,
Baltimore 1969, 124-132 no. 22. (RDGE)
Sherk, R.K.: Roman and the Greek East to the Death of Augustus (Translated Documents of Greece and Rome,
4), Cambridge 1984, 81-83 no. 66. (RGEDA)
Wolff, H.: Die Entwicklung der Veteranenprivilegien vom Beginn des 1. Jahrhunderts v. Chr. bis auf Konstantin
d. Gr., in W. Eck / H. Wolff (Hgg.): Heer und Integrationspolitik. Die römischen Militärdiplome als
historische Quelle, Köln-Wien 1986, 44-115, esp. 56-67.
AR/28.12.11 – r/20.02.12
Poseidonios von Apameia, Gelehrter auf Rhodos
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
Lebte ca. a. 135-ca. 51. Stoischer Philosoph; Schüler des Panaitios. Autor zahlreicher
Schriften, darunter Historien in Fortsetzung der Geschichte des Polybios (FGrH 87). Ließ sich
in Rhodos nieder.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Mitglied einer rhodischen Gesandtschaft nach Rom a. 87/86, wo er dem greisen C. Marius
cos. VII 86 begegnete (Plut. Mar. 45,7). A. 66 und erneut a. 62 von Cn. Pompeius Magnus
procos. 66-62/61 besucht (Strab. geogr. 11,1,6 [492]; Cic. Tusc. 2,61; Plut. Pomp. 42,10; Plin.
nat. 7,112). M. Tullius Cicero hörte ihn in Rhodos (Cic. nat. 1,6; Plut. Cic. 4,5). Behandelte
in seinen Historien oder in einem separaten Werk die Feldzüge des Pompeius (Strab. geogr.
11,1,6 [492]; vgl. bes. Malitz 1983, 69-74 und passim; Engels 1999, 169-174). Cicero
ersuchte ihn vergebens um eine Darstellung seines Consulats (Cic. Att. 2,1,2=21 ShB).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Reinhardt, K.: Poseidonios [3] von Apameia, RE 22,1, 1953, 558-826.
Inwood, Brad: Poseidonios [3], DNP 10, 2001, 211-15.
Alonso-Núñez, José Miguel: Die Weltgeschichte bei Poseidonios, GB 20, 1994, 87-108.
Desideri, Paolo: L’interpretazione dell’Impero romano in Posidonio, RIL 106, 1972, 481-93.
Engels, Johannes: Augusteische Oikumenegeographie und Universalhistorie im Werk Strabons von Amaseia,
Stuttgart 1999, 166-201.
Kidd, I.G.: Posidonius as Philosopher-Historian, in: Miriam Griffin/ Jonathan Barnes (Hgg.): Philosophia
togata. Essays on Philosophy and Roman Society, Oxford 1989, 38-50.
Laffranque, Marie: Poseidonios d’Apamée. Essai de mise au point, Paris 1964.
Malitz, Jürgen: Die Historien des Poseidonios, München 1983.
Strasburger, Hermann: Poseidonios on Problems of the Roman Empire, JRS 55, 1965, 40-53.
von Fritz, Kurt: Poseidonios als Historiker, in: Historiographia antiqua. Commentationes Lovanienses in
honorem W. Peremans septuagenarii editae, Löwen 1977, 163-93.
MT/06.12.06–r/30.06.07
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
271
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Potamon von Mytilene
1.Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
Aristokrat und Rhetor, angeblich vom königlichen Geschlecht der Penthiliden stammend (IG
XII Suppl. 7). Sohn des Philosophen Lesbonax (Suda, s.vv. Potamon und Lesbonax; vgl.
Strab. geogr. 13,2,3 [617], Sen. suas. 2,15f.), belegt zwischen ca. 75 v. und ca. 15 n.Chr
(Lukian. macr. 23). Möglicherweise war Dada, die als Tochter des Dies, Gattin des Lesbonax
und Priesterin der (Persephone) Etephila bezeugt ist (IG XII.2, 222), Potamons Mutter
(Diskussion bei Parker 1991, 124-127).
Sein Sohn, C. Claudius Diaphenes, wurde als Oberpriester der Thea Rhome und des Sebastos
Zeus Olympios ebenfalls mit proedria und der Bezeichnung euergetes geehrt (IG XII.2, 656).
Weitere Nachfahren sind als prominente Mitglieder der sozialen Oberschicht von Mytilene
bezeugt (Belege und Diskussion bei Parker 1991, 123-129; vgl. auch PIR).
In der Suda (s.v. Potamon) werden folgende Werke Potamon zugeschrieben: eine
Alexandergeschichte, eine Lokalgeschichte von Samos, eine Schrift Über den vollkommenen
Redner, Lobreden auf Brutus und Caesar. Nach Seneca (s.o. 1.) hat sich Potamon auch mit
Leonidas und der Thermopylenschlacht, einem bekannten Rednertopos, literarisch
beschäftigt.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom /Römern und Karriereverlauf
Leitete drei Gesandtschaften: a. 48 und a. 46/45 zu C. Iulius Caesar sowie a. 25 zu
Augustus. Mit Caesar möglicherweise schon früher als Literat bekannt (vgl. Parker 1991,
117, bes. Anm. 9), verfügte er auch später über gute Beziehungen zum Haus der Julier, wie
seine Bewerbung ca. a. 33 um die Stelle des Lehrers des jungen Tiberius nahelegt. Allerdings
siegte beim Wettstreit Theodoros aus Gadara (Suda, s.v. Theodoros aus Gadara).
Potamons politische Tätigkeit zugunsten der Heimatstadt bezeugen mehrere, vorwiegend von
seinem Ehrenmonument (Monumentum Potamonis) stammende Dokumente, darunter Caesars
Briefe und Senatsbeschlüsse (IG XII.2, 23-57; IG XII Suppl. 7-12.112; IGR IV 26-38; vgl.
Charitonides 1968, Nr. 6-15.26.27.69; Sherk 1969, Nr. 26). Darin enthaltene Hinweise (z.B.
IG XII.2, 24.32 = IGR IV 26.31) sowie die von den Stadtbehörden dem Rhetor zugewiesenen
Ehrungen führen zu der berechtigten Annahme, daß Potamon an allen drei Missionen
entscheidend mitgewirkt hatte. Unter den Gesandten tritt auch ein anderer Literat, der Dichter
Krinagoras, Sohn des Kallippos, hervor (IG XII.2, 35 = IGR IV 33; vgl. Parker 1991, 117f.
für relevante Hinweise in Krinagoras-Epigrammen).
Umstände und Verlauf der Gesandtschaften:
a) Nach der Niederlage und Ermordung des Cn. Pompeius Magnus, der den Mytilenäern –
durch die Vermittlung seines Freundes Theophanes – ihren Übertritt zu Mithradates VI.
Eupator verziehen und ihnen die Freiheit wiedergegeben hatte, sah sich die Stadt gezwungen,
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
272
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
mit dem neuen Machthaber Kontakt aufzunehmen und ihn ihrer Loyalität zu versichern. Die
erste Gesandtschaft machte Caesar (cos. II) die ihm beschlossenen Ehrungen bekannt und
gewann, wie sein Brief belegt, seine Zuneigung (IG XII.2, 35 col. a = IGR IV 33 col. a; vgl.
Sherk 1969, Nr. 26 col. a).
b) Einer zweiten Gesandtschaft gelang es, für die Mytilenäer einen Senatsbeschluß zur
Erneuerung der amicitia und societas zu erhalten (charita philian symmachian ananeousthai).
Durch ein von Caesar (dict. III) verfaßtes Reskript wurde den in Mytilene ansässigen Römern
die Abgaben- und Leistungsfreiheit gegenüber der Stadt entzogen (IG XII.2, 35 col. b = IGR
IV 33 col. b; vgl. SIG3 764; Sherk 1969, Nr. 26 col. b).
c) Die letzte Gesandtschaft, die Augustus (cos. IX) in Spanien aufsuchte (IG XII.2, 44 = IGR
IV 38) und dann in Rom verhandelte, hatte den Abschluß eines foedus zwischen Rom und
Mytilene zur Folge (IG XII.2, 35 col. c,d = IGR IV 33 col. c; vgl. Sherk 1969, Nr. 26 col.
c,d).
Für seine Dienste wurde er durch das erwähnte Potamoneion und Statuen (IG XII.2, 25 = IGR
IV 27; vgl. Charitonides 1968, Nr.6) sowie durch das Recht des Ehrenplatzes (proedria: IG
XII.2, 272) und durch Kranz-Verleihung (Charitonides 1968, Nr. 6) geehrt. Überdies wurde
Potamon von den Mytilenäern – genauso wie Theophanes und Pompeius vorher sowie Caesar
und Augustus nachher – als euergetes, soter und ktistes der Stadt gefeiert (IG XII.2, 159162.163c = SIG3 754; vgl. auch IG XII Suppl. 43f.). Der Gründer-Titel bezieht sich in allen
Fällen auf den Beitrag des Geehrten zur Anerkennung und Bestätigung des günstigen
Rechtsstatus der Stadt. IG XII Suppl. 44 bezeugt einen Altar für ihn.
Es ist ferner möglich, daß Potamon für die Errichtung des Roma- und Augustuskultes in
Mytilene eintrat. Zudem läßt IG XII.2, 154 = IGR IV 60 vermuten, daß er das Amt des Romaund Augustuspriesters bekleidete.
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Stegeman W.: Potamon [3], RE 22,1, 1953, 1023-1027.
Weißenberger, Michael: Potamon, DNP 10, 2001, 229f.
Vgl. PIR2 P 914 (Potamo).
Bowersock, Glen W.: Augustus and the Greek World, Oxford 1965, 11; 86; 123.
Charitonides, S.: Ai Epigraphai tes Lesbou: Sympleroma, Athen 1968.
Freber, Philipp-Stephan G.: Der hellenistische Osten und das Illyricum unter Caesar, Stuttgart 1993, 96-98.
Labarre, G.: Les cités de Lesbos aux époques hellénistique et impériale, Paris 1996, 99-106; 109-116.
Magie, David: Roman Rule in Asia Minor to the End of the Third Century after Christ, Princeton 1950, I
416.417; II 1269-1271, Anm. 39 und 43.
Parker, R.W.: Potamon of Mytilene and His Family, ZPE 85, 1991, 115-129.
Quaß, Friedemann: Die Honoratiorenschicht in den Städten des griechischen Ostens, Stuttgart 1993, 143.
Sherk, R.K.: Roman Documents from the Greek East: Senatus Consulta and Epistulae to the Age of Augustus,
Baltimore 1969, 146-157, Nr. 26 (Epistulae et Senatus Consulta de Mytilenaeis).
WKK 28.03.08–r/05.08.08
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
273
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Propylos of Heraclea Pontica
0. Onomastic Issues
No variants attested. The name Propylos is also attested at Delos (IG XI 2, 154 and 161).
1. Central Biographical Dates and Family Relations
Propylos was the son of Brithagoras, a prominent individual from Heraclea Pontica who was
active in the mid-first century BC (FGrH 434 F 1.40). He is mentioned in two passages of the
historical work of Memnon of Heraclea (both § 40). There is no evidence that he held any city
magistracy, although it is presumable that he did at some point, since he joined his father on
the important diplomatic mission to Julius Caesar, which probably took place in 59 BC. Like
his father, he spent twelve years in Caesar’s retinue, hoping to receive a freedom grant for his
city. It is not known what happened to him after Brithagoras’ death, and it is also unclear how
old he was at the time.
2. Relations with Rome / Romans and Career
Nothing is known about Propylos’ political and diplomatic work; he always appears in his
father’s shadow.
3. Select Bibliography
RE –. DNP –.
Desideri, Paolo: I Romani visti dall’Asia: riflessioni sulla sezione romana della Storia di Eraclea di Memnone, in
G. Urso (ed.): Tra Oriente e Occidente. Indigeni, Greci e Romani in Asia Minore, Pisa 2007, 45-59, esp. 58.
Dueck, Daniela: Memnon of Herakleia on Rome and the Romans, in J.M. Højte (ed.): Mithridates VI and the
Pontic Kingdom, Aarhus 2009, 43-61, esp. 56.
FS 16.03.10–r/16.03.10
Ptolemaios II. Philadelphos, König von Ägypten
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemmata Ptolemäer
Sohn Ptolemaios’ I. und der Berenike, lebte a. 308-246. Zwischen 285 und 281 erste Ehe mit
Arsinoë I., woraus die Kinder Ptolemaios III., Lysimachos, Berenike und wahrscheinlich ein
weiterer Ptolemaios hervorgingen. Um 278 zweite Ehe mit Arsinoë II. Basileus ab 282.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
274
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Mitregent ab a. 284; Alleinherrscher ab 282. Unterstützte Pyrrhos 281/80 im Krieg gegen
Rom mit Truppen (Pomp. Trog. prol. 17; Iust. 17,2,13-15); führte den dynastischen Kult ein;
betrieb expansionistische Außenpolitik: Gebietserweiterungen im Syrischen Erbfolgekrieg a.
280/279; ab 276 gegen Makedonien gerichtete Bündnispolitik mit Athen und Sparta brachte
keine Erfolge; 274 Beginn des 1. Syrischen Krieges, der 271 mit Erhalt des Status quo endete.
273 schickte Ptolemaios eine Gesandtschaft nach Rom, um freundschaftliche Beziehungen zu
etablieren (App. Sic. 1; Cass. Dio 10,41; Liv. per. 14), Rom antwortet mit einer
Gegengesandtschaft unter Q. Fabius Maximus Gurges in Begleitung von Q. Ogulnius
Gallus und N. Fabius Pictor (Dion. Hal. 20,14,1f.; Liv. per. 14; Val. Max. 4,3,9; Iust. 18,2,9;
Cass. Dio 10,41; Zonar. 8,6,11; Eutrop. 2,15). Diese diente aber vermutlich eher
handelspolitischen Zielen.
Im 1. Punischen Krieg a. 264-241 versuchte er als Freund beider Parteien vergeblich zu
vermitteln (App. Sic. 1). 260 begann der 2. Syrische Krieg, in dem eine Niederlage a. 253 nur
durch eine politische Heirat abgewendet werden konnte. Versuche, Kyrene wieder unter
ptolemäische Herrschaft zu bringen, blieben vergeblich. Ptolemaios schuf Handelswege nach
Arabien und Indien über das Rote Meer und einen Nil-Suez-Kanal. Im Innern führte er
verschiedene wirtschaftliche Reformen durch.
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Volkmann, Hans: Ptolemaios [19] II. Philadelphos, RE 23,2, 1959, 1654-66.
Ameling, Walter, Ptolemaios [3] II. Philadelphos, DNP 10, 2001, 534-36.
Bennet, Chris: The Ptolemaic Dynasty, Tyndale House, Cambridge 2001-2009.
URL: http://www.tyndalehouse.com/Egypt/ptolemies/ptolemies.htm [20.02.10].
Hölbl, Günther: Geschichte des Ptolemäerreiches, Darmstadt 1994, 32-68.
Huß, Werner: Ägypten in hellenistischer Zeit 332-30 v.Chr., München 2001, 251-331 (mit weiterer bis dahin
erschienener Literatur).
Lampela, Anssi: Rome and the Ptolemies of Egypt. The Development of Their Political Relations 273-80 B.C.,
Helsinki 1998.
SP & ST/24.02.07–r/21.06.07/20.02.10
Ptolemaios III. Euergetes I. Tryphon, König von Ägypten
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemmata Ptolemäer
Sohn Ptolemaios’ II. und Arsinoës I. Geboren um 284; gestorben 221 v.Chr. Ab 246 Ehe mit
Berenike II. sowie Basileus. Namentlich bekannte Kinder: Ptolemaios IV., Berenike, Arsinoë
III., Magas.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
275
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Sofort nach Herrschaftsantritt 246 mit Ausbruch des 3. Syrischen Krieges konfrontiert, der
241 mit einem für Ptolemaios vorteilhaften Frieden und großer Beute endete. Kurz darauf soll
eine Gesandtschaft aus Rom, das soeben den 1. Punischen Krieg gewonnen hatte, nach
Alexandria gekommen sein, um Hilfe im Krieg gegen die Seleukiden anzubieten, dies wurde
jedoch abgelehnt, da der Krieg bereits beendet war (Eutr. 3,1). 241 war das Ptolemäerreich
also zur stärksten hellenistischen Macht geworden. In Griechenland betrieb Ptolemaios eine
anti-makedonische Politik. Der Dynastiekult wurde nach dem Vorbild seines Vaters
fortgesetzt. 239/8 beschließt eine ägyptische Priestersynode das sog. Kanopos-Dekret, in dem
sämtliche Wohltaten des Königspaares genannt werden und der Herrscherkult ausgebaut wird.
229/8 wird die Gaustrategie eingeführt. 221 stirbt Ptolemaios an einer Krankheit.
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Volkmann, Hans: Ptolemaios [21] III. Euergetes, RE 23,2, 1959, 1667-1678.
Ameling, Walter: Ptolemaios [6] III. Euergetes, DNP 10, 2001, 537f.
Bennet, Chris: The Ptolemaic Dynasty, Tyndale House, Cambridge 2001-2009.
URL: http://www.tyndalehouse.com/Egypt/ptolemies/ptolemies.htm [20.02.10].
Hölbl, Günther: Geschichte des Ptolemäerreiches, Darmstadt 1994, 45-66.
Huß, Werner: Ägypten in hellenistischer Zeit 332-30 v.Chr., München 2001, 332-380.
Lampela, Anssi: Rome and the Ptolemies of Egypt. The Development of Their Political Relations 273-80 B.C.,
Helsinki 1998.
SP & ST/20.08.08–r/25.08.08/20.02.10
Ptolemaios IV. Philopator, König von Ägypten
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemmata Ptolemäer
Sohn Ptolemaios’ III. und Berenikes II. Geboren 245/244; Basileus ab 221; 220 Ehe mit
Arsinoë III., daraus ein Sohn: Ptolemaios V.; gestorben 204 v.Chr.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Seine Regierung stand unter dem Einfluss von Sosibios und Agathokles, die sofort zu Beginn
seiner Regierung große Teile der königlichen Familie umbringen ließen, um jegliche
Opposition zu vermeiden. 221 beginnt Antiochos III. den 4. Syrischen Krieg, den Ptolemaios
in der Schlacht von Raphia 217 dank eines erstmals gemischt makedonisch-ägyptischen
Heeres gewinnen konnte. Danach wurde er zusehends passiv und ging seinem
Privatvergnügen nach. Im Inneren hatte er mit Inflation und Aufständen zu kämpfen. 215 kam
Zoippos, der Schwager des Syrakuser Königs Hieronymos, mit einer Gesandtschaft nach
Ägypten, um für einen Pakt mit Karthago gegen Rom zu werben, Hieronymus’ Tod 214
machte diesen Plänen jedoch ein Ende. Da der 2. Punische Krieg (218-201) es den Römern
unmöglich machte, Getreide zu importieren, schickten sie 210 eine Gesandtschaft unter M.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
276
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Atilius und M.’ Acilius nach Alexandria zur Erneuerung der Freundschaft (Liv. 27,4,10) und
mit der Bitte um Getreide (Polyb. 9,11). Im 1. Makedonischen Krieg versuchte Ptolemaios
zusammen mit anderen neutralen Staaten zu vermitteln (Liv. 27,30,4-15/28,7,13-15 und
Polyb. 11,4,1-6,10 a. 209-207), wobei bei einem Treffen mit P. Sulpicius Galba Maximus
von römischer Seite ein Frieden abgelehnt wurde (App. Mac. 3).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Volkmann, Hans: Ptolemaios [22] IV. Philopator, RE 23,2, 1959, 1678-1691.
Ameling, Walter: Ptolemaios [7] IV. Philopator, DNP 10, 2001, 538f.
Bennet, Chris: The Ptolemaic Dynasty, Tyndale House, Cambridge 2001-2009.
URL: http://www.tyndalehouse.com/Egypt/ptolemies/ptolemies.htm [20.02.10].
Hölbl, Günther: Geschichte des Ptolemäerreiches, Darmstadt 1994, 45-66.
Huß, Werner: Ägypten in hellenistischer Zeit 332-30 v.Chr., München 2001, 332-380.
Lampela, Anssi: Rome and the Ptolemies of Egypt. The Development of Their Political Relations 273-80 B.C.,
Helsinki 1998.
SP & ST/20.08.08–r/25.08.08/20.02.10
Ptolemaios V. Epiphanes, König von Ägypten
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemmata Ptolemäer
Sohn Ptolemaios’ IV. und Arsinoës III. Geboren 210; Basileus ab 204; selbstständige
Herrschaft ab 196; 194/3 Ehe mit Kleopatra I.; gestorben 181 v.Chr. Kinder: Ptolemaios VI.,
Kleopatra II., Ptolemaios VIII.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom/ Römern und Karriereverlauf
Ptolemaios war bereits seit 210 offiziell Mitregent. Er sollte wohl ursprünglich bis zu seiner
Regierungsfähigkeit unter der Vormundschaft seiner Mutter stehen, diese wurde jedoch von
Sosibios und Agathokles ermordet und die zwei wurden selbst zu Ptolemaios’ Vormündern.
Sogleich wurde eine von Ptolemaios von Megalopolis geführte Gesandtschaft nach Rom
geschickt, um den Herrscherwechsel bekannt zu machen (Polyb. 15,25,13-15). Die Römer
entsandten ihrerseits C. Claudius Nero, M. Aemilius Lepidus und P. Sempronius
Tuditanus, die 201/200 in Alexandria eintrafen. Sie dankten Ptolemaios IV. Philopator für
seine Treue im Krieg gegen Hannibal und baten um eine Fortführung der Beziehungen in
diesem Geiste auch im Falle eines römischen Krieges gegen Philipp V. (Liv. 31,2,3f.).
Unterdessen war Sosibios gestorben und 203
umgebracht und durch Tlepolemos ersetzt worden.
eine anti-ptolemäische Allianz und 202 brach der
wieder alexandrinische Gesandte auf den Weg zu
der beim Volk ungeliebte Agathokles
Antiochos III. und Philippos V. bildeten
5. Syrische Krieg aus. 200 machten sich
den Römern, um zu beraten, wie und ob
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
277
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
man den von Philipp bedrohten Athenern helfen solle (Liv. 31,9,1-5; evtl. bezieht sich Iust.
30,2,8-3,4 auf die selbe Gesandtschaft). Eventuell kam hier auch Antiochos’ Angriff auf
ägyptische Besitzungen zur Sprache. Angeblich habe Lepidus tutorio nomine die
Vormundschaft über Ptolemaios übernommen und daher, als Philipp Abydos belagerte, ein
Ultimatum gestellt, um die römischen socii zu schützen (Iust. 30,2,8-3,4/31,1,2; Val. Max.
6,6,1; Tac. ann. 2,67,2; Cic. fin. 5.64).
201 erhielt Ptolemaios wieder einen neuen Vormund: Aristomenes ersetzte Tlepolemos. Rom
vermittelte auch zwischen Antiochos und Ptolemaios (Iust. 30,3,3; App. Mac. 4,2). Auf der
Konferenz von Nikaia vertrat T. Quinctius Flaminius im Jahr 198 ptolemäische Interessen
gegenüber Philipp (Polyb. 18,1,4; Liv. 32,33,4). Im Krieg mit Antiochos erlitt Ptolemaios
große Gebietsverluste und bat 197 Rom wieder um Hilfe (App. Syr. 2). Nach Unruhen am
Hofe war im November 197 Ptolemaios trotz seines Alters von erst 13 Jahren für mündig
erklärt worden, womit Roms Vormundschaft endete. Auf der Konferenz von Lysimacheia
196, die von der falschen Todesnachricht des Ptolemaios unterbrochen wurde, traten L.
Cornelius Lentulus, L. Terentius, P. Lentulus und P. Villius für die ptolemäischen
Interessen ein (Polyb. 18,50,5-7; Liv. 33,39; App. Syr. 3 ). Nach dieser Falschmeldung
versuchte Antiochos sofort, Ägypten zu erobern, scheiterte aber und schloss Frieden mit
Ptolemaios, der 194/3 auch Antiochos’ Tochter Kleopatra heiratete. Seine verlorenen Gebiete
erhielt er jedoch nicht zurück.
In Rom ließ das Interesse an den ptolemäischen Angelegenheiten nach. Während des Krieges
gegen Antiochos 191 bot Ptolemaios Rom über eine erneute Gesandtschaft vergeblich
finanzielle und militärische Hilfe an (Liv. 36,4,1-4). 190 wurden seine Glückwünsche zum
römischen Sieg bei den Thermophylen übermittelt (Liv. 37,3,9-11). Trotzdem ging
Ptolemaios nach Ende des Syrischen Krieges 188 leer aus. Daher bemühte er sich nun
verstärkt um Verbündete gegen die Seleukiden unter den griechischen Städten. Im Inneren
hatte er wie schon sein Vorgänger mit Aufständen zu kämpfen. Da er für die Kostendeckung
des geplanten Krieges die Einziehung des Vermögens seiner Freunde beabsichtigte, wurde er
181 umgebracht.
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Volkmann, Hans: Ptolemaios [23] V. Epiphanes, RE 23,2, 1959, 1691-1702.
Ameling, Walter: Ptolemaios [8]V. Epiphanes, DNP 10, 2001, 539f.
Bennet, Chris: The Ptolemaic Dynasty, Tyndale House, Cambridge 2001-2009.
URL: http://www.tyndalehouse.com/Egypt/ptolemies/ptolemies.htm [20.02.10].
Hölbl, Günther: Geschichte des Ptolemäerreiches, Darmstadt 1994, 45-66.
Huß, Werner: Ägypten in hellenistischer Zeit 332-30 v.Chr., München 2001, 332-380.
Lampela, Anssi: Rome and the Ptolemies of Egypt. The Development of Their Political Relations 273-80 B.C.,
Helsinki 1998.
SP & ST/20.08.08–r/25.08.08/20.02.10
Ptolemaios VI. Philometor, König von Ägypten
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
278
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemmata Ptolemäer
Sohn Ptolemaios’ V. und Kleopatra I. Geboren zwischen 197 und 183 v.Chr.;
vormundschaftliche Regierung von 180-170; 170-164 Samtregierung mit Bruder Ptolemaios
VIII. und Schwester Kleopatra II.; Regierung mit Kleopatra II. 163-145; ab 175/174 Ehe mit
Kleopatra II.; gestorben 145. Kinder: Ptolemaios Eupator, ein weiterer Sohn (Ptolemaios
(VII.) Neos Philopator ?), Kleopatra Thea, Kleopatra III.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Nach dem Tod Ptolemaios’ V. 181 regierte Philometor zunächst unter Vormundschaft seiner
Mutter Kleopatra I.; nach ihrem Tod 176 unter der des Ex-Sklaven Lenaios und des Eunuchen
Eulaios. 175/4 Heirat Philometors mit Kleopatra II.
173 römische Gesandtschaft mit C. Valerius, Cn. Lutatius Cerco, Q. Baebius Sulca, M.
Cornelius Mummula und M. Caecilius Denter nach Ägypten, um Stimmungslage bezüglich
des 3. Makedonischen Krieges auszuloten und renovandae amicitiae causa (Liv. 42,6,4f.;
App. Mak. 11,4). Philometor habe versprochen, alles zu tun, was Rom befehle (Liv.
42,26,7f.). Lenaios und Eulaios begannen 170 den 6. Syrischen Krieg gegen Antiochos IV.
Dieser erhob in Rom Beschwerde, während eine ägyptische Gesandtschaft ebendort das
amicitia-Verhältnis erneuern und zwischen Rom und Makedonien vermitteln wollte (Polyb.
28,1,6f.; Diod. 30,2). Im selben Jahr Mündigkeit des Philometor und Samtregierung der 3
Geschwister. Schlechter Kriegsverlauf führte zur Ablösung von Lenaios und Eulaios durch
Komanos und Kineas.
Weil Philometor selbständig ein Abkommen mit Antiochos traf, wurde in Alexandria
Ptolemaios VIII. als König ausgerufen. Antiochos belagert Alexandria, Philometors
Geschwister baten Rom um Hilfe, ihre Gesandten kamen aber erst 168 vor den Senat (Liv.
44,19,6-11/45,11,7). Nach Abbruch der Belagerung Versöhnung der Geschwister. Rom hatte
mit T. Numisius vergeblich einen Vermittler geschickt und bat die Achäer um Vermittlung
(Polyb. 29,25). Als Antiochos nochmals Alexandria bedrohte, wurde 169 wieder Rom um
Hilfe gebeten (Iust. 34,2) und zur Günstigstimmung eine Getreidespende an die römische
Flotte in Chalkis gemacht (OGIS II 760). 168 schickte der Senat C. Popilius Laenas, der
Antiochos am sog. ‚Tag von Eleusis‘ zum Rückzug zwang (Polyb. 29,27,2-10; Iust. 34,3) und
die Ptolemäer zur Eintracht mahnte (Polyb.29,27,9). Man ließ dem Senat überschwänglich
danken (Polyb. 30,16,1; Liv. 45,13,4ff.).
Um 165 wurden ägyptische Aufstände von Philometor niedergeschlagen. Trotzdem musste er
164 nach einem Bruderstreit fliehen und ging nach Rom (Diod. 31,18; Val. Max. 5,1,1).
Schon Anfang 163 Rückkehr, da Unzufriedenheit über seinen Bruder Euergetes herrschte.
Einige Quellen berichten, Rom habe für die Wiedereinsetzung gesorgt (Trog. prol. 34; Liv.
per. 46), doch die Gesandtschaft unter Cn. Octavius (Polyb. 31,2,14) brauchte wohl nicht
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
279
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
mehr einzugreifen. Philometor überließ seinem Bruder Kyrene. Dieser wollte 162 mit
römischer Hilfe Zypern erhalten und, obwohl L. Canuleius Dives und Q. Marcius Philippus
zu Philometors Gunsten vor dem Senat aussagten, trat Rom an die Seite des Jüngeren und
schickte ihm Gesandte (Polyb. 31,10). 161 beendete Rom das Bündnis mit Philometor (Polyb.
31,20,1-5). Euergetes griff Zypern vergeblich an; 154 daher Veröffentlichung seines
Tesatments zu Roms Gunsten, das die Allianz in besonderer Weise demonstrierte (vgl.
Braund 1983; Herrmann-Otto 1994).
Philometor besiegte seinen Bruder dennoch, zeigte sich aber gnädig. Um 150 griff Philometor
sowohl durch Heiratspolitik als auch militärisch in die seleukidischen Thronfolgestreitigkeiten
ein und gewann Koilesyrien. Er starb 145 an den Folgen eines Sturzes im Kampf gegen
Alexander Balas.
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Volkmann, Hans: Ptolemaios [24] VI. Philometor, RE 23,2, 1959, 1702-1719.
Ameling, Walter: Ptolemaios [9] VI. Philometor, DNP 10, 2001, 540-542.
Bennet, Chris: The Ptolemaic Dynasty, Tyndale House, Cambridge 2001-2009.
URL: http://www.tyndalehouse.com/Egypt/ptolemies/ptolemies.htm [20.02.10].
Braund, David: Royal Wills and Rome, PBSR 51, 1983, 16-57.
Herrmann-Otto, Elisabeth: Die Bedeutung politischer Testamente in der späten Republik. Nachfolgeregelungen
kinderloser Könige, in: Rosmarie Günther/ Stefan Rebenich (Hgg.): E fontibus haurire (FS Heinrich
Chantraine), Paderborn 1994, 81-94.
Hölbl, Günther: Geschichte des Ptolemäerreiches, Darmstadt 1994, 45-66.
Huß, Werner: Ägypten in hellenistischer Zeit 332-30 v.Chr., München 2001, 332-380.
Lampela, Anssi: Rome and the Ptolemies of Egypt. The Development of Their Political Relations 273-80 B.C.,
Helsinki 1998.
SP & ST/20.08.08 – r/30.08.08/20.02.10 – ST 05.03.12
Ptolemaios Eupator, König von Ägypten
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemmata Ptolemäer
Sohn Ptolemaios’ VI. und Kleopatras II. Geboren vor dem 21.9.164, gestorben vor dem
31.8.152. Mitregent 153/2.
2. Karriereverlauf
Eupator wurde 158/7 in das Amt des Alexanderpriesters eingesetzt. Spätestens Anfang des
Jahres 152 wurde er als Mitregent in die Herrschaft seines Vaters aufgenommen (P. dem. Ryl.
III, 16). Um Zypern wieder näher an das Reich anzubinden, wurde Eupator gemeinsam mit
seinem Erzieher Andromachos dorthin gesandt. Er amtierte jedoch nicht als selbstständiger
König auf der Insel (vgl. Huß 1994). In einem Papyrus vom 31.8.152 wird Eupator in der
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
280
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Reihe der vergöttlichten Ptolemäer geführt, muss also vor diesem Datum gestorben sein (P.
dem. Tur. Botti 5).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Volkmann, Hans: Ptolemaios [25] Eupator, RE 23,2, 1959, 1719-1720.
Ameling, Walter: Ptolemaios [10] Eupator, DNP 10, 2001, 542.
Bennet, Chris: The Ptolemaic Dynasty, Tyndale House, Cambridge 2001-2009.
URL: http://www.tyndalehouse.com/Egypt/ptolemies/ptolemies.htm [20.02.10].
Braund, David: Royal Wills and Rome, PBSR 51, 1983, 16-57.
Hölbl, Günther: Geschichte des Ptolemäerreiches, Darmstadt 1994, 169.
Huß, Werner: Ptolermaios Eupator, Proc. of the XXth International Congress of Papyrologists, Kopenhagen
1994, 555-560.
Huß, Werner: Ägypten in hellenistischer Zeit 332-30 v.Chr., München 2001, 576-577.
Lampela, Anssi: Rome and the Ptolemies of Egypt. The Development of Their Political Relations 273-80 B.C.,
Helsinki 1998.
ST/02.03.12 – r/05.03.12
Ptolemaios (VII.) Memphites, Neos Philopator (?), König von Ägypten (?)
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemmata Ptolemäer
Sohn Ptolemaios’ VIII. und Kleopatras II. Geboren 144/3, gestorben 131. Möglicherweise
130/1 kurzzeitig Samtherrschaft mit Kleopatra II.
2. Karriereverlauf
Die Geburt des Memphites in der alten Hauptstadt Ägyptens (Diod. 33,13) war von
Ptolemaios VIII. arrangiert worden als Sinnbild seiner Hinwendung zur ägyptischen
Bevölkerung (Huß 2001, 604). Bereits als Säugling könnte er das Amt des AlexanderPriesters inne gehabt haben, wenn es sich in dem Zeugnis (P.Köln VIII 350) nicht um einen
Sohn Ptolemaios‘ VI. handelt (Huß 2001, 604). Spätestens nach der Entzweiung seiner Eltern
132/1 wurde Memphites von seiner Mutter nach Kyrene geschickt, von wo ihn Ptolemaios
VIII. zu sich ins Exil nach Zypern lockte (Iust. 38,12). Dort angekommen wurde Memphites
ermordet, obwohl er sich offenbar offiziell von seiner Mutter abgewendet hatte (I.Delos
1530). Seine abgetrennten Glieder schickte Ptolemaios VIII. nach Alexandria.
Kleopatra II. ließ die Körperteile dem Volk Alexandrias zeigen, um die Grausamkeit ihres
Bruders zu demonstrieren (Diod. 34,14; Iust. 38,8,13f.; Liv. per. 59; Oros. 5,10,7). Die
ausführliche Behandlung der Episode bei Livius (per. 59) gab Anlass zu der Vermutung, dass
die Angelegenheit im römischen Senat behandelt worden sei (vgl. Volkmann, 1959; Lampela
1998). Ob Memphites mit dem in den Datierungsformeln verschiedener Papyri aufgelisteten
Neos Philopator (Dem. P. Berlin 3101; P. dem. Pavia 1120) identisch ist, oder ob es sich
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
281
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
dabei um einen weiteren Sohn Ptolemaios’ VI. (Ptolemaios, Sohn des Ptolemaios) handelt, ist
nicht abschließend geklärt (vgl. Chauveau 1990+1991, Heinen 1997).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Volkmann, Hans: Ptolemaios [27] VIII. Euergetes II., RE 23,2, 1959, 1721-1736.
Ameling, Walter: Ptolemaios [12] VIII. Euergetes II., DNP 10, 2001, 542-544.
Bennet, Chris: The Ptolemaic Dynasty, Tyndale House, Cambridge 2001-2009.
URL: http://www.tyndalehouse.com/Egypt/ptolemies/ptolemies.htm [20.02.10].
Chauveau, Michel: Un été 145, in: BIFAO 1990, 135-168.
Ders.: Un été 145. Post-scriptum, in: BIFAO 1991, 129-134.
Heinen, Heinz: Der Sohn des 6. Ptolemäers im Sommer 145. Zur Frage nach Ptolemaios VII. Neos Philopator
und zur Zählung der Ptolemäerkönige, in: Akten des 21. Internationalen Papyrologenkongresses (Archiv für
Papyrusforschung, Beiheft 3), Berlin 1997, 449-460.
Hölbl, Günther: Geschichte des Ptolemäerreiches, Darmstadt 1994, 173-175.
Huß, Werner: Ägypten in hellenistischer Zeit 332-30 v.Chr., München 2001, 604-611.
Lampela, Anssi: Rome and the Ptolemies of Egypt. The Development of Their Political Relations 273-80 B.C.,
Helsinki 1998.
ST/14.02.12 – r/05.03.12
Ptolemaios VIII. Euergetes II. (Physkon), König von Ägypten
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemmata Ptolemäer
Sohn Ptolemaios’ V. und Kleopatras I. Geboren 182/1, gestorben am 28. Juni 116. 170-164
Samtherrschaft mit Geschwistern Ptolemaios VI. und Kleopatra II., 164-163 nur mit
Kleopatra II.; 163-145 König der Kyrenaika; 145-131 und 127-116 Basileus Ägyptens. 145
Ehe mit Kleopatra II.; daraus Sohn Ptolemaios (VII.) Memphites. Ab 141/0 zusätzliche Ehe
mit seiner Nichte Kleopatra III.; daraus Kinder Ptolemaios IX. Soter II. (Lathyros),
Ptolemaios X. Alexandros, Kleopatra IV., Tryphaina, Kleopatra Selene. Von unbekannter
Frau Vater des Ptolemaios Apion.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
170 Aufnahme der Samtregierung mit Ptolemaios VI. und Kleopatra II. Als Antiochos IV. bei
seinem Einmarsch in Ägypten ein Abkommen mit Ptolemaios VI. schloss, wurde Euergetes
II. in Alexandria zum König ausgerufen; Antiochos belagerte Alexandria; Hilfegesuch von
Euergetes II. und Kleopatra II. an Rom wurde erst 168 vom Senat angehört (Liv. 44,19,611/45,11,7). Nach Abbruch der Belagerung erfolgte Versöhnung der Geschwister; 164 musste
Ptolemaios VI. aber fliehen und Euergetes übernahm mit Kleopatra II. die Alleinherrschaft bis
zur Rückkehr des Bruders 163.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
282
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Danach herrschte Euergetes bis 145 über Kyrenaika. Währenddessen unternahm er mehrere
Versuche, um mit Hilfe Roms wieder die Herrschaft über Ägypten zu erlangen: T. Manlius
Torquatus und Cn. Merula wurden in Folge seines Auftritts vor dem Senat zu ihm geschickt
(Polyb. 31,10) und hielten ihn von einem Angriff auf Zypern ab, verhandelten aber
ergebnislos mit Ptolemaios VI. (Polyb. 31,17,1-8). Außerdem hatte Ptolemaios VI. in der
Kyrenaika einen Aufstand angezettelt, der Euergetes zur Rückkehr zwang. 161 wandte er sich
erneut an Rom, das nun seine Beziehungen zu Ptolemaios VI. beendete und Euergetes
weitergehende Unterstützung gewährte. Die Gesandten P. Apustius und Cn. Cornelius
unterrichteten Euergetes davon (Polyb. 31,20,2f; Diod. 31,23). Ursache für Roms
Sinneswandel dürfte das neue Testament gewesen sein, in dem Rom Euergetes’ Reich erben
sollte, wenn er keine Nachkommen haben sollte (vgl. Braund 1983; Herrmann-Otto 1994).
Euergetes begann Söldner anzuwerben; 154 erschien er nochmals persönlich vor dem Senat,
um die Spuren eines Attentatversuchs auf ihn zu zeigen. Rom schickte fünf Senatoren unter
der Leitung von Cn. Merula und Lucius Thermus mit fünf Begleitschiffen nach Zypern
(Polyb. 33,11,1ff.). Weitere militärische Unterstützung blieb aber aus, und so unterlag
Euergetes seinem Bruder, der sich aber gnädig zeigte und ihn wieder in Kyrene einsetzte.
152 warb Euergetes vergeblich um die Hand der Cornelia, Witwe des Ti. Sempronius
Gracchus (Plut. Tib. Gr. 1,3), um so die Gunst römischer Politiker zu erlangen. Nach dem
Tod Ptolemaios’ VI. sicherte sich Euergetes Zypern und ging von dort aufs Festland, wo auch
dank Vermittlung des römischen Gesandten L. Minucius Thermus eine Einigung erzielt
werden konnte (Iust. 38,8,3). Euergetes heiratete 145 Kleopatra II., mit der er nun die
Regierung teilte, brachte aber noch am Hochzeitstag ihren namentlich nicht gesicherten Sohn
von Ptolemaios VI. um (vgl. Heinen 1997) und schaltete dessen Anhänger aus (Iust. 38,8).
Die zusätzliche Ehe mit Kleopatra III., die auch Mitregentin wurde, führte zu Streit. 140/39
unterstützte Kleopatra II. wohl einen Putschversuch gegen ihren Mann. Ende dieses Jahres
kamen P. Cornelius Scipio Aemilianus, Sp. Mummius und L. Metellus auf ihrer
Inspektionsreise nach Ägypten und trafen Euergetes, der einen lächerlichen Eindruck auf sie
machte (Diod. 33,28b,1-3; Cic. rep. 6,11; Iust. 38,8,8; Plut. mor. 200f).
Euergetes ging innenpolitisch gegen die Juden und die griechische Bildungselite vor. 132
brach Bürgerkrieg aus und Euergetes floh mit Kleopatra III. nach Zypern, konnte aber 130
zurückkehren und Kleopatra II. musste fliehen. 124 erfolgte eine Versöhnung und die
Wiederaufnahme der Dreierregierung. Im Seleukidenreich konnte mittels Heiratspolitik
vorübergehend Einfluss gewonnen werden. Am 28. Juni 116 starb Euergetes.
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Volkmann, Hans: Ptolemaios [27] VIII. Euergetes II., RE 23,2, 1959, 1721-1736.
Ameling, Walter: Ptolemaios [12] VIII. Euergetes II., DNP 10, 2001, 542-544.
Bennet, Chris: The Ptolemaic Dynasty, Tyndale House, Cambridge 2001-2009.
URL: http://www.tyndalehouse.com/Egypt/ptolemies/ptolemies.htm [20.02.10].
Braund, David: Royal Wills and Rome, PBSR 51, 1983, 16-57.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
283
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Heinen, Heinz: Der Sohn des 6. Ptolemäers im Sommer 145. Zur Frage nach Ptolemaios VII. Neos Philopator
und zur Zählung der Ptolemäerkönige, in: Akten des 21. Internationalen Papyrologenkongresses (Archiv für
Papyrusforschung, Beiheft 3), Berlin 1997, 449-460.
Herrmann-Otto, Elisabeth: Die Bedeutung politischer Testamente in der späten Republik. Nachfolgeregelungen
kinderloser Könige, in: Rosmarie Günther/ Stefan Rebenich (Hgg.): E fontibus haurire (FS Heinrich
Chantraine), Paderborn 1994, 81-94.
Hölbl, Günther: Geschichte des Ptolemäerreiches, Darmstadt 1994, 45-66.
Huß, Werner: Ägypten in hellenistischer Zeit 332-30 v.Chr., München 2001, 332-380.
Lampela, Anssi: Rome and the Ptolemies of Egypt. The Development of Their Political Relations 273-80 B.C.,
Helsinki 1998.
Nadig, Peter: Zwischen König und Karikatur. Das Bild Ptolemaios’ VIII. im Spannungsfeld der Überlieferung,
München 2007.
SP & ST/20.08.08 – r/30.08.08/20.02.10 – ST 05.03.12
Ptolemaios IX. Philometor II. Soter II. (Lathyros), König von Ägypten [Var. Physkon]
0. Onomastisches
Spottnamen: Physkon (‘Fettwanst’), Lathyros (‘Kichererbse’).
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemmata Ptolemäer
Unbekanntes Geburtsjahr. Sohn des Ptolemaios VIII. Euergetes II. (Physkon) und der
Kleopatra III., älterer Bruder von Ptolemaios X. Alexandros I. Gemeinsame Herrschaft mit
Kleopatra II. und Kleopatra III., nach dem Tod der erstgenannten allein mit Kleopatra III.
Geschwisterehe mit Kleopatra IV., später auf Drängen seiner Mutter mit der jüngeren
Schwester Kleopatra Selene. Zwei gemeinsame Söhne mit der letztgenannten: Ptolemaios
XII. Theos (Auletes) und Ptolemaios von Zypern. Zwischenzeitlich aus Ägypten vertrieben
herrschte er von 116-107 und von 88-81 v.Chr. bis zu seinem Tod.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom / Römern und Karriereverlauf
Gegen den Willen Kleopatras III., der Ptolemaios VIII. per Testament die Nachfolgeregelung
anvertraut hatte, setzte Kleopatra II. Ptolemaios IX. gegen den jüngeren Ptolemaios X.
Alexandros I. durch, der als Ausgleich den Außenbesitz Zypern erhielt. Die zweite
ptolemäische Provinz Kyrene ging dagegen an den unehelichen Halbbruder Ptolemaios Apion
(Iust. 39,3,1f.; 39,5,2). Bald nach dem Tod Kleopatras II. bildete Soter eine Zweierherrschaft
mit Kleopatra III. Die ältesten lateinischen Inschriften Ägyptens auf Philae (SEG XXVIII
1485; SEG XXX 1750) belegen den steten Kontakt zwischen Rom und Ägypten. 112
besuchte der Senator L. Memmius das Land am Nil (P.Teb. I 33).
Zunehmende Differenzen zwischen Soter und seiner Mutter Kleopatra III. gipfelten 107
v.Chr. in einem Komplott der Mutter, die ihrem Sohn vorwarf, ihren Tod zu planen. Soter
floh daraufhin nach Seleukia und wurde durch seinen jüngeren Bruder Alexandros I. ersetzt,
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
284
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
der zuvor Zypern regiert hatte (Iust. 39,4,1). Bereits 106/5 gelang es Soter, von Syrien aus
Zypern einzunehmen, wo er bis zu seiner späteren Rückkehr nach Ägypten als König
herrschte (Iust. 39,4,1f.; Diod. 34/35,39a) und 100 als Verbündeter Roms im Kampf gegen die
Seeräuberei auftrat (Lex de piratis persequendis: SEG III 378). Bis ca. 102 behielt er zudem
die Oberherrschaft über Kyrene, bis sich dort Ptolemaios Apion durchsetzen konnte. Dieser
verstarb 96 und vermachte die Kyrenaika testamentarisch den Römern (Liv. per. 70; Cic. leg.
agr. 2,51).
103 begann Soter nach einem Hilferuf der Stadt Ptolemais einen Feldzug gegen den König
der Juden und Bundesgenossen Roms Alexandros Iannaios, den er mit der Eroberung einiger
Ortschaften in Syrien-Palästina erfolgreich gestalten konnte. Die ebenfalls in den Konflikt
eingreifenden Kleopatra III. und Alexandros I. versuchte er mit einem Angriff auf Ägypten zu
überraschen, doch er scheiterte bei Pelusion im Kampf gegen seinen Bruder und zog sich nach
Zypern zurück (Ios. ant. 13,324-364).
Zunehmende Unruhen in Ägypten – vor allem in der südlichen Thebais – und in Alexandria
führten 88 zur Vertreibung des Alexandros und zur Rückkehr Soters, der die Aufstände im
Land niederschlagen konnte (Paus. 1,9,3). Alexandros versuchte weiterhin, Ägypten
zurückzugewinnen, nahm dafür zahlreiche Kredite bei den Römern auf und verfügte in einem
Testament, daß für den Fall seines Ablebens Ägypten an Rom fallen solle. Obwohl
Alexandros bei den folgenden Kämpfen mit Soter ums Leben kam, entschied man sich in
Rom, Ägypten zunächst nicht als Provinz einzuziehen (Iust. 39,5,1; Porphyr. FGrH 260 F
2,8f.; Paus. 1,9,3; Cic. leg. agr. 1,1; 2,41f.), wenn auch die – umstrittene – Existenz des
Testaments die diplomatische Position des Ptolemäerreiches gegenüber Rom deutlich
schwächen sollte.
Weiteres Konfliktpotential steuerte in den letzten Jahren von Soters Herrschaft der Erste
Mithradatische Krieg bei. Bei seinem Feldzug gegen Rom und seine Bundesgenossen in
Kleinasien fielen Mithradates VI. Eupator Dionysos die von Kleopatra III. nach Kos
gebrachten Staatsschätze sowie die Enkel der Kleopatra in die Hände, darunter der spätere
Ptolemaios XI. Alexandros II., Ptolemaios XII. und Ptolemaios von Zypern (App. civ. 1,102;
App. Mithr. 23,93). Möglicherweise nutzte Mithradates dieses Druckmittel, um ein Eingreifen
der Ptolemäer an der Seite Roms zu verhindern. Jedenfalls erhielt der 86 in Ägypten weilende
L. Licinius Lucullus von Soter zwar eine freundschaftliche Behandlung und freies Geleit
aber keine Unterstützung für die Flotte, die der Römer als Legat des L. Cornelius Sulla
aufstellen sollte (Plut. Luc. 2f.; App. Mithr. 33). Diese weitestgehend neutrale Haltung wahrte
Soter für den Rest seiner Herrschaftszeit bis zu seinem Ableben 81. Auf eine gute Behandlung
der oben genannten Prinzen durch Mithradates weist jedenfalls hin, dass er später zwei seiner
Töchter mit Ptolemaios XII. und Ptolemaios von Zypern verloben sollte (so App. 111,536
zum Jahr 63: zur Heirat selbst war es wohl wegen des lange anhaltenden Krieges mit Rom
noch nicht gekommen).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Volkmann, Hans: Ptolemaios [30], RE 23,2, 1959, 1738-1743.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
285
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Ameling, Walter: Ptolemaios [15], DNP 10, 2001, 544f.
Braund, David: Royal Wills and Rome, PBSR 51, 1983, 16-57.
Della Monica, Madeleine: Les derniers pharaons. les turbulents Ptolémées d’Alexandre le Grand à Cléopâtre la
Grande, Paris 1993, 96-104.
Foucart, Paul François: Un sénateur Romain en Egypte sous le règne de Ptolémée X, in: Mélanges Boissier.
Recueil de mémoires concernant la littérature et les antiquités romaines, dédié à Gaston Boissier à
l’occasion de son 80e anniversaire, Paris 1903, 197-207.
Hölbl, Günther: Geschichte des Ptolemäerreiches. Politik, Ideologie und religiöse Kultur von Alexander dem
Großen bis zur römischen Eroberung, Darmstadt 1994, 145-152, 182f.
Huß, Werner: Ägypten in hellenistischer Zeit: 330-30 v.Chr., München 2001, 626-670.
Lampela, Anssi: Rome and the Ptolemies of Egypt. The Development of Their Political Relations 273-80 B.C.,
Helsinki 1998, 204-232.
Olshausen, Eckart: Rom und Ägypten von 116 bis 51 v.Chr., Diss. Erlangen 1963, 6-21.
Otto, W./Bengtson, H.: Zur Geschichte des Niederganges des Ptolemäerreiches. Ein Beitrag zur Regierungszeit
des 8. und 9. Ptolemäers, München 1938, Nd. Hildesheim 1978, 112-193.
Sullivan, Richard D.: Near Eastern Royalty and Rome, 100-30 B.C. Toronto 1990, 81-95.
Van’t Dack, E. u.a.: The Judean-Syrian-Egyptian Conflict of 103-101 B.C. A Multilingual Dossier Concerning a
“War of Scepters“, Brüssel 1989.
HP/08.03.10 – r/09.03.10
Ptolemaios X. Alexandros I., König von Ägypten
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemmata Ptolemäer
Unbekanntes Geburtsjahr. Sohn des Ptolemaios VIII. Euergetes II. (Physkon) und der
Kleopatra III., jüngerer Bruder von Ptolemaios IX. Philometor II. Soter II. (Lathyros).
Verheiratet mit Kleopatra Berenike III., eine gemeinsame Tochter. Selbsternannter König von
Zypern ab 114/3 v.Chr., ab 107 dann König von Ägypten, 88 vertrieben, 87 im Kampf
gefallen.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom / Römern und Karriereverlauf
In der von Kleopatra II. durchgeführten Nachfolgeregelung nach dem Tod Ptolemaios’ VIII.
(116) wurde ihm entgegen dem Wunsch seiner Mutter der ältere Bruder Ptolemaios IX.
vorgezogen. Alexandros erhielt stattdessen Zypern als Strategie, das er ab 114/3 als König
regierte (Iust. 39,3,1f.).
Kleopatra III. gelang es 107 seinen Bruder aus Ägypten zu vertreiben und rief Alexandros als
Mitregenten nach Alexandria (Iust. 39,4,1f.). In den bald beginnenden Konflikt um SyrienPalästina (103-101) griff sein Bruder Ptolemaios IX. Philometor II. Soter II. ein, der bereits
kurz nach seiner Vertreibung Zypern für sich gewinnen konnte. Durch dessen Erfolge in ihrer
Position in Ägypten gefährdet ließ Kleopatra III. einen Teil des Staatsschatzes sowie ihre
Enkel, die späteren Ptolemaios XI. Alexandros II., Ptolemaios XII. Theos (Auletes) sowie
Ptolemaios von Zypern auf die Insel Kos in Sicherheit bringen (Ios. ant. 13,349; App. Mithr.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
286
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
23). Militärische Erfolge des Alexandros in Phönikien und bei der Abwehr Soters vor
Pelusion sowie die Einnahme der Stadt Ptolemais durch Kleopatra zwangen jedoch den
älteren Bruder zum Rückzug nach Zypern (Ios. ant. 13,324-364).
Spannungen mit Kleopatra III. nötigten Alexandros 101 zur kurzzeitigen Flucht aus
Alexandria. Nach seiner Rückkehr veranlasste er die Ermordung seiner Mutter und vermählte
sich mit seiner Nichte Kleopatra Berenike III. Durch die römische Lex de piratis persequendis
(100) wurde das Ptolemäerreich bald danach als Verbündeter Roms zum Kampf gegen die im
Mittelmeer zu einer Plage herangewachsene Seeräuberei aufgefordert (SEG III 378). Dies galt
ebenso für die in dieser Zeit autonom regierten Außenbesitzungen des Ptolemäerreiches
Zypern und Kyrene. In der letztgenannten Provinz herrschte der Halbbruder des Alexandros,
Ptolemaios Apion, seit ca. 102. Mit seinem Tod ging 96 die Kyrenaika testamentarisch an die
Römer, die jedoch zunächst den dortigen Griechenstädten Autonomie gewährten und das
Gebiet erst 75/4 als Provinz einzogen (Liv. per. 70; Cic. leg. agr. 2,51).
Ab 91 wurde Alexandros verstärkt mit sozial und wirtschaftlich bedingten Unruhen vor allem
in Südägypten konfrontiert, die schließlich zu einer Loslösung der Thebais führten (Paus.
1,9,3). Ein Aufstand in Alexandria gegen die angeblich zu judenfreundliche Politik des
Alexandros führte schließlich 88 zu einer Vertreibung des Herrschers aus Ägypten und zu
einer Rückführung Soters II. (Porphyr. FGrH 260 F 2,9). Alexandros lieh sich daraufhin große
Geldsummen bei den Römern und versuchte im Kampf seinen Thron zurückzugewinnen,
unterlag jedoch in einer Seeschlacht und kam bei dem Versuch, Zypern zu erobern, ums
Leben (Iust. 39,5,1; Porphyr. FGrH 260 F 2,8f.; Paus. 1,9,3). Ein bis heute in seiner
Authentizität umstrittenes Testament setzte Rom als Erben Ägyptens im Falle seines
Ablebens ein. Der römische Senat entschied jedoch, Ägypten vorerst nicht als Provinz
einzuziehen (Cic. leg. agr. 1,1; 2,41f.). Diplomatisch geriet das Ptolemäerreich dadurch aber
umso mehr in römische Abhängigkeit.
[Nachtrag: Als Autor des Testaments zu Gunsten Roms dürfte mit Braund 1983, 24-28 eher
Ptolemaios XI. betrachtet werden; s. ebendort.]
[AC/03.12.10]
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Volkmann, Hans: Ptolemaios [81], RE 23,2, 1959, 1743-1747.
Ameling, Walter: Ptolemaios [16], DNP 10, 2001, 545f.
Badian, Ernst: The Testament of Ptolemy Alexander, RhM 110, 1967, 178-192.
Braund, David: Royal Wills and Rome, PBSR 51, 1983, 16-57.
Della Monica, Madeleine: Les derniers pharaons. les turbulents Ptolémées d’Alexandre le Grand à Cléopâtre la
Grande, Paris 1993, 101f.
Hölbl, Günther: Geschichte des Ptolemäerreiches. Politik, Ideologie und religiöse Kultur von Alexander dem
Großen bis zur römischen Eroberung, Darmstadt 1994, 148-151, 182ff.
Huß, Werner: Ägypten in hellenistischer Zeit: 330-30 v.Chr., München 2001, 626-670.
Lampela, Anssi: Rome and the Ptolemies of Egypt. The Development of Their Political Relations 273-80 B.C.,
Helsinki 1998, 204-232.
Santangelo, Federico: Sylla et l’Égypte, Revue de Philologie 79, 2005,2, 325-328.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
287
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Sullivan: Near Eastern Royalty and Rome, 100 - 30 B.C. Toronto 1990, 81-95.
Van’t Dack, E. u.a.: The Judean-Syrian-Egyptian Conflict of 103-101 B.C. A Multilingual Dossier Concerning a
“War of Scepters“, Brüssel 1989.
HP/08.03.10 – r/09.03.10/03.12.10
Ptolemaios XI. Alexandros II., König von Ägypten
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemmata Ptolemäer
Ca. a. 105-80. Sohn des Ptolemaios X. Alexandros I. Im Jahr 103 von seiner Großmutter
Kleopatra III. nach Kos gebracht, von wo ihn Mithradates VI. Eupator a. 88 an den pontischen
Hof brachte (App. civ. 1,102,476). Im Jahr 80 zum König von Ägypten gekrönt. Heiratete
seine verwitwete Stiefmutter Kleopatra Berenike III., die er nach kurzer gemeinsamer
Regierung ermorden ließ. In der darauffolgenden Revolte der Bevölkerung kam der König
ums Leben.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Während der Verhandlungen a. 84 zwischen L. Cornelius Sulla und Mithradates in Dardanos
floh Ptolemaios zu ersterem, der ihn mit nach Rom nahm. Seine Erhebung zum König von
Ägypten dürfte er wohl Sulla verdanken. Als Gegenleistung vermachte er Ägypten und
Zypern testamentarisch an Rom. Die Existenz des Testaments wurde in der Antike
angezweifelt; es diente bei den römischen Gesetzesanträgen zur Einziehung Ägyptens in den
60er Jahren als Argumentationsbasis; vgl Plut. Crass. 13,2 ad a. 65; Cic. leg. agr. 2,41 a. 63
quis enim vestrum hoc ignorat, dici illud regnum testamento regis Alexae populi Romani esse
factum. Das Testament dürfte die Hauptmotivation für die Anerkennungsbemühungen seines
Cousins Ptolemaios’ XII. gewesen sein.
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Volkmann, Hans: Ptolemaios [32], RE 23,2, 1959, 1747f.
Ameling, Walter: Ptolemaios [17], DNP 10, 2001, 546.
Bennet, Chris: The Ptolemaic Dynasty, Tyndale House, Cambridge 2001-2009.
URL: http://www.tyndalehouse.com/Egypt/ptolemies/ptolemies.htm [20.02.10].
Badian, Ernst: The Testament of Ptolemy Alexander, RhM 110, 1967, 178-192.
Bloedow, Edmund: Beiträge zur Geschichte Ptolemaios’ XII., Diss. Würzburg 1964, 26-29, 36.
Braund, David: Royal Wills and Rome, PBSR 51, 1983, 24-28.
Olshausen, Eckart: Rom und Ägypten von 116 bis 51 v.Chr., Diss. Erlangen 1963, 22-37.
KC/30.09.04–r/30.09.04/30.06.07/03.09.08/27.10.10
Ptolemaios XII. Theos (Auletes), König von Ägypten
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
288
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
0. Onomastisches
Griechische Kulttitel bzw. Herrscherbeinamen: Theos Neos Philopator Philadelphos. Wohl
eher nur ein Spottname: Auletes (‘Flötenbläser’).
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemmata Ptolemäer
Ca. a. 115/107-51. Sohn des Ptolemaios IX. Philometor (Lathyros); nach der Ermordung
seines Cousins Ptolemaios XI. Alexandros II. a. 80 zum König von Ägypten erhoben; a. 76 in
Alexandreia gekrönt. Heirat mit der Schwester Kleopatra V. Tryphaina a. 80/79; Tochter
Berenike IV. Später Heirat mit einer Ägypterin; Kinder: Kleopatra VII., Ptolemaios
(XIII./XIV.), Arsinoe. A. 59 Anerkennung als socius et amicus populi Romani; a. 58-55 Exil;
a. 55 Rückkehr nach Ägypten.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Sein Cousin vermachte Ägypten und Zypern per Testament dem römischen Volk. Dennoch
trat Ptolemaios a. 80 die Herrschaft an und bemühte sich um römische Anerkennung.
Römische Anträge zur Einziehung Ägyptens in den 60er Jahren blieben erfolglos (Plut. Crass.
13,2 ad a. 65; Cic. leg. agr. 2,41.44 a. 63). Besondere Beziehungen zu Cn. Pompeius
Magnus (Ios. ant. 14,35; App. Mithr. 114,557; Plin. nat. 33,136), der den König als seinen
Klienten betrachtete, aber trotz der reichen Beschenkung durch denselben die erbetene
Intervention in Ägypten mit Rücksicht auf den Senat verweigerte. C. Iulius Caesar
verschaffte ihm gegen ein Geldversprechen die römische Anerkennung a. 59 (Suet. Iul. 54,3;
Plut. Caes. 48,8; Diod. 17,52,6; Cass. Dio 39,12,1; Caes. civ. 3,107,2).
Lebte von 103-88 auf Kos, wo er 88 in die Hände Mithradates’ VI. fiel; 80 aus Syrien nach
Alexandrien geholt, um Nachfolge seines Vaters anzutreten. Benötigte Anerkennung seiner
Herrschaft durch Rom wegen Testament Ptolemaios’ X. Senat lehnte zwar a. 75 seleukidische
Ansprüche auf Ägypten ab (Cic. Verr. 2,2,76), diskutierte aber a. 65 Einziehung als Provinz
auf Antrag des Censors Crassus (Plut. Crassus 1,3,2). A. 64/3 plante Servius Rullus,
Ägypten an römische Veteranen zu verteilen (Cic. leg. agr. 2,41;44). [Ergänzung SP &
ST/24.02.07]
Ein Aufstand der Bevölkerung a. 58 zwang Ptolemaios, Ägypten zu verlassen (Strab. geogr.
17,1,11 [796]; Dio Chrys. 32,70; Plut. Cat. Min. 35,4; App. Syr. 51,257; Cass. Dio 39,12,2;
Liv. per. 104). Er begab sich nach Rom, um Hilfe für seine Rückführung zu erbitten.
Aufnahme bei Pompeius a. 57, der wohl den Oberbefehl für sich selbst erhoffte. M. Tullius
Cicero versuchte, Pompeius von diesem Vorhaben abzubringen (Cic. fam. 1,1,2=12 ShB):
Pompeium et hortari et orare et iam liberius accusare monere, ut magnam infamiam fugiat,
non desistimus. Der Senat betraute P. Cornelius Lentulus Spinther cos. 57, einen engen
Freund Ciceros, mit dieser Aufgabe.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
289
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Auf Betreiben des Königs wurde eine alexandrinische Gesandtschaft unter der Leitung des
Dion von Alexandreia ausgeschaltet. Das Verhalten des Königs und seine
Bestechungsversuche lösten Empörung im Senat aus (Cic. fam. 1,1,1= 12 ShB; Cass. Dio
39,4,1). Ende 57 verließ er Rom. Sein dortiger Sellvertreter war Ammonios, vgl. Cic. fam.
1,1,1=12 ShB Hammonius, regis legatus, aperte pecunia nos oppugnat. Ein Orakelspruch
Anfang 56 verbot jegliche militärische Hilfe für Ptolemaios (Cass. Dio. 39,15,2). Das Orakel
war offensichtlich eine Reaktion des Senates auf das Verhalten des Königs, vgl. Cic. fam.
1,1,1=12 ShB senatus religionis calumniam non religione, sed malevolentia et illius regiae
largitionis invidia comprobat. Folgende Debatten verliefen ohne Ergebnis (Cic. fam. 1,1-5;
Cass. Dio 39,12,3; 39,15,2), so daß schließlich die ägyptische Frage ohne eine definitive
Lösung beigelegt wurde. Cicero versuchte erfolglos, Spinther zu einer eigenmächtigen
Rückführung des Königs zu bewegen (Cic. fam. 1,7,4-5=8 ShB).
Auf Betreiben des Pompeius gelangte Ptolemaios a. 55 durch A. Gabinius, dem Ptolemaios
10.000 Talente zusagte (Cic. Rab. Post. 8; 11; Plut. Ant. 3,4), ohne Zustimmung des Senates
wieder an die Macht (Cic. Rab. Post. 19; 21; 30f.; Strab. geogr. 17,1,11; Plut. Ant. 3,8; App.
Syr. 51,257f.; Cass. Dio 39,55f.). Er ließ seine Tochter Berenike IV. und weitere reiche
Ägypter hinrichten. Ptolemaios bezahlte mit diesem Geld römische Gläubiger (Cic. Rab. Post.
8; 11; Cass. Dio 39,12,1), darunter vor allem C. Rabirius Postumus, vgl. Cic. Rab. Post. 4
dedit se etiam regibus; huic ipsi Alexandrino grandem iam antea pecuniam credidit.
Römische Hilfstruppen verblieben zur Verfügung des Königs in Alexandreia (Caes. civ. 3,4,4;
3,103,5; 3,110,2). Anklagen gegen A. Gabinius nach dessen Rückkehr nach Rom;
Verteidigung durch Cicero (Cic. Cael.). C. Rabirius Postumus wurde ebenfalls angeklagt;
Verteidigung durch Cicero (Cic. Rab. Post.).
Ptolemaios setzte in seinem Testament seine Kinder Kleopatra VII. und Ptolemaios XIII. als
Nachfolger ein; das römische Volk wurde als Garant ihrer Herrschaft betrachtet. Ein
Exemplar wurde im Haus des Pompeius deponiert (Caes. civ. 3,108,3; Bell. Alex. 33,1).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Volkmann, Hans: Ptolemaios [33], RE 23,2, 1959, 1748-1755.
Ameling, Walter: Ptolemaios [18], DNP 10, 2001, 546-548.
Bennet, Chris: The Ptolemaic Dynasty, Tyndale House, Cambridge 2001-2009.
URL: http://www.tyndalehouse.com/Egypt/ptolemies/ptolemies.htm [20.02.10].
Bloedow, Edmund: Beiträge zur Geschichte Ptolemaios’ XII., Diss. Würzburg 1964, 47-80.
Christmann, Kathrin: Ptolemaios XII. von Ägypten, Freund des Pompeius; in: Altay Coskun (Hg.): Roms
auswärtige Freunde in der späten Republik und im frühen Prinzipat, Göttingen 2005, 113-126.
Hölbl, Günther: Geschichte des Ptolemäerreiches, Darmstadt 1994, 195-205.
Huß, Werner: Ägypten in hellenistischer Zeit, 332-30 v.Chr., München 2001, 671-702.
Olshausen: Eckart: Rom und Ägypten von 116 bis 41 v.Chr., Diss. Erlangen 1963, 45-63.
Siani-Davies, Mary: Ptolemy XII Auletes and the Romans, Historia 46, 1997, 306-340.
Shatzman, Isreal: The Egyptian Question in Roman Politics (59-54 B.C.), Latomus 30, 1971, 363-369.
Sullivan, Richard D.: Near Eastern Royalty and Rome, 100-30 B.C., Toronto 1990, 227-248.
KC/30.09.04–r/30.09.04/28.06.07/03.09.08/20.02.10
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
290
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Ptolemaios XIII. Theos Neos Philadelphos, König von Ägypten
0. Onomastisches
Ptolemaios XII. verlieh allen seinen Kindern die Kultnamen Theos Neos Philadelphos bzw.
Thea Nea Philadelphos, vgl. Hölbl 1994, 204.
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemmata Ptolemäer
Sohn Ptolemaios’ XII. und einer Ägypterin. Geboren 61, gestorben 14.1.47. Ab 51
Samtherrschaft mit Kleopatra VII.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Ab 51 führte Ptolemaios XIII. nach dem Testament des Vaters die Regierung mit seiner
Schwester Kleopatra VII., die ihn aber bald darauf entmachtete. Seine Partei konnte sich aber
am 27.10.50 durchsetzen. Die Macht lag faktisch bei den Regenten Achillas, Potheinos und
Theodotos.
Da Pompeius bereits Ptolemaios XII. das hospitium gewährt hatte, galt er fortan als patronus
der Ptolemäerdynastie, was möglicherweise sogar testamentarisch von Ptolemaios XII. so
vorgesehen war (vgl. Heinen, 1966): Pompeius war der tutor Ptolemaios’ XIII. (Ampelius
35,6; Eutrop 6,21,3; Lucan 8,448ff.), letzterer damit der pupillus des Römers (Liv. per. 112).
Dieses Verhältnis verpflichtete die Ptolemäer zur militärischen Hilfestellung im Bürgerkrieg:
Auf Bitten des nach Alexandria gereisten Cn. Pompeius stellten sie ein Flottenkontingent
(Caes. civ. 3,40; Cass. Dio 42,12) und 500 germanische und gallische Reiter aus den Truppen
der Gabiniani bereit (Caes. civ. 3,4,4; App. civ. 2,49). Zwischen Juni und August 49 kam es
zum Bruch zwischen Ptolemaios XIII. und Kleopatra VII. Letztere musste Alexandria
verlassen. Ptolemaios XIII. wurde vom Gegensenat der Pompeianer in Thessalonike als
rechtmäßiger König anerkannt (Lucan 5,58ff.).
Nach der Niederlage bei Pharsalos floh Pompeius nach Ägypten, wo ihn Ptolemaios XIII. und
seine Regenten noch am Strand umbringen ließen, nachdem sie ihm zum Schein die
Aufnahme gewährt hatten (Caes. civ. 3,104; Lucan 8,721ff.; Plut. Pomp. 79,3). Dem wenige
Tage später eintreffendem Julius Caesar präsentierte man den Kopf des Ermordeten in der
Hoffnung, diesen damit zufrieden zu stellen (Plut. Pomp. 80,5). Caesar beklagte jedoch den
Tod seines Gegners und marschierte mit seinen Liktoren in Alexandria ein (Caes. civ.
3,112,8). Caesars Plan, die Streitigkeiten zwischen Ptolemaios XIII. und Kleopatra VII. zu
schlichten und beide wieder in eine gemeinsame Regierung einzusetzen, endete im
Alexandrinischen Krieg, in dessen Zuge Ptolemaios XIII. zeitweise von Caesar als Geisel
gehalten wurde und nach seiner Freilassung persönlich sein Heer in die Schlacht führte, bei
der er den Tod fand.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
291
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Volkmann, Hans: Ptolemaios [35] XIII., RE 23,2, 1959, 1756-1759.
Ameling, Walter: Ptolemaios [20] XIII., DNP 10, 2001, 548-549.
Bennet, Chris: The Ptolemaic Dynasty, Tyndale House, Cambridge 2001-2009.
URL: http://www.tyndalehouse.com/Egypt/ptolemies/ptolemies.htm [20.02.10].
Heinen, Heinz: Rom und Ägypten von 51 bis 47 v. Chr. Untersuchungen zur Regierungszeit der 7. Kleopatra
und des 13. Ptolemäers, Tübingen 1966.
Hölbl, Günther: Geschichte des Ptolemäerreiches, Darmstadt 1994, 204-212.
Huß, Werner: Ägypten in hellenistischer Zeit 332-30 v.Chr., München 2001, 697-720.
Lampela, Anssi: Rome and the Ptolemies of Egypt. The Development of Their Political Relations 273-80 B.C.,
Helsinki 1998.
ST/15.02.12 – r/05.03.12
Ptolemaios XIV. Theos Neos Philadelphos, Philopator II., König von Ägypten
0. Onomastisches
Ptolemaios XII. verlieh allen seinen Kindern die Kultnamen Theos Neos Philadelphos bzw.
Thea Nea Philadelphos, vgl. Hölbl 1994, 204.
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemmata Ptolemäer
Sohn Ptolemaios’ XII. und einer Ägypterin. Geboren 59, gestorben nach Juli 44. König von
Zypern mit seiner Schwester Arsinoe IV. ab Oktober 48. 47-44 Samtherrschaft (und Ehe?) mit
Kleopatra VII.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Julius Caesar setzte während seines Aufenthaltes in Alexandria im Jahr 48 Ptolemaios XIV.
gemeinsam mit dessen Schwester Arsinoe IV. als Herrscher über Zypern ein (Cass. Dio
42,35,5) und löste die Insel damit von der römischen Provinzialherrschaft. Der Diktator hoffte
durch diese Umsetzung des Testamentes Ptolemaios’ XII. die alexandrinische Volksmenge zu
beruhigen und seine Lage vor Ort zu entschärfen. Dennoch befand sich Ptolemaios XIV. mit
Arsinoe IV. weiter im Palast in Alexandria unter Caesars Obhut, als Arsinoe IV. die Flucht zu
ihren Truppen gelang. Nach seinem Sieg über die ägyptischen Verbände setzte Caesar
Ptolemaios XIV. als Mitregenten Kleopatras ein und veranlasste die Eheschließung der
Geschwister (bell. Al. 33; Cass Dio 43,27,3; Porph. FGrH 260,2,16; Strab. 17,1,11; Suet. Iul.
35,1). Im Jahr 46 begleitete Ptolemaios XIV. Kleopatra nach Rom, wo beide unter die reges
socii et amici populi Romani aufgenommen wurden (Cass. Dio 43,27,3; Cic. Att. 15,15,2;
Suet. Iul. 52,1). Bald nach ihrer Rückkehr nach Ägypten ließ Kleopatra Ptolemaios XIV.
ermorden, zuletzt erwähnt wurde er jedenfalls am 26.7.44 (P. Oxy. XIV 1629).
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
292
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Volkmann, Hans: Ptolemaios [36] XIV., RE 23,2, 1959, 1759-1760.
Ameling, Walter: Ptolemaios [21] XIV., DNP 10, 2001, 549-550.
Bennet, Chris: The Ptolemaic Dynasty, Tyndale House, Cambridge 2001-2009.
URL: http://www.tyndalehouse.com/Egypt/ptolemies/ptolemies.htm [20.02.10].
Braund, David: Royal Wills and Rome, PBSR 51, 1983, 16-57.
Heinen, Heinz: Rom und Ägypten von 51 bis 47 v. Chr. Untersuchungen zur Regierungszeit der 7. Kleopatra
und des 13. Ptolemäers, Tübingen 1966.
Hölbl, Günther: Geschichte des Ptolemäerreiches, Darmstadt 1994, 204-214.
Huß, Werner: Ägypten in hellenistischer Zeit 332-30 v.Chr., München 2001, 703-727.
Lampela, Anssi: Rome and the Ptolemies of Egypt. The Development of Their Political Relations 273-80 B.C.,
Helsinki 1998.
ST/15.02.12 – r/05.03.12
Ptolemaios XV. Kaisar (Kaisarion), König von Ägypten
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemmata Ptolemäer
Sohn Kleopatras VII. und Gaius Julius Caesars. Geboren 23.6.47, gestorben im Jahr 30.
Mitregent 44-30.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Die Vaterschaft Julius Caesars wurde in Ägypten nie angezweifelt, weshalb die
Alexandriner Ptolemaios XV. den Spitznamen Kaisarion gaben (Cass. Dio 42,31,5 + 49,41,1).
In Rom hingegen wurde die Vaterschaft des Diktators bezweifelt, auch wenn Marcus
Antonius später im Senat bekannt gab, Caesar habe Kaisarion als seinen Sohn anerkannt
(Suet. Iul. 52). Eine Vaterschaft des Antonius kann ausgeschlossen werden (vgl. Heinen
1969). Wahrscheinlich begleitete Kaisarion seine Mutter 44 nach Rom, Kleopatra konnte dort
jedoch nicht die erhoffte Anerkennung des Jungen als legitimen Sohn Caesars erreichen. Nach
dem Tod Caesars, ihrer Rückkehr nach Ägypten und der Ermordung Ptolemaios’ XIV. erhob
Kleopatra Kaisarion zum Mitregenten. Sie schloss ein Bündnis mit dem Caesarianer P.
Cornelius Dolabella, der Kaisarion offiziell als König anerkannte (App. civ. 4,61; Cass. Dio
47,31,5 + 30,4). Nach der Schlacht von Actium erklärten Antonius und Kleopatra Kaisarion
für volljährig und ließen ihn in die Ephebenliste eintragen (Plut. Ant. 71,3; Cass. Dio 51,6,1).
Wenig später wurde Kaisarion auf der Flucht nach Indien an Octavian verraten und ermordet
(Suet. Aug. 17; Plut. Ant. 81; Cass. Dio 51,15,5).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Volkmann, Hans: Ptolemaios [37] XV Kaisar., RE 23,2, 1959, 1760-1761.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
293
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Ameling, Walter: Ptolemaios [22] XV., DNP 10, 2001, 550.
Bennet, Chris: The Ptolemaic Dynasty, Tyndale House, Cambridge 2001-2009.
URL: http://www.tyndalehouse.com/Egypt/ptolemies/ptolemies.htm [20.02.10].
Heinen, Heinz: Rom und Ägypten von 51 bis 47 v. Chr. Untersuchungen zur Regierungszeit der 7. Kleopatra
und des 13. Ptolemäers, Tübingen 1966.
Heinen, Heinz: Cäsar und Kaisarion, Historia 18, 1969, 181-203.
Hölbl, Günther: Geschichte des Ptolemäerreiches, Darmstadt 1994, 213-227.
Huß, Werner: Ägypten in hellenistischer Zeit 332-30 v.Chr., München 2001, 722-749.
ST/02.03.12 – 05.03.12
Ptolemaios Apion, König der Kyrenaika
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemmata Ptolemäer
Sohn Ptolemaios’ VIII. und einer Mätresse. Als Mutter kommt die Kyrenaierin Eirene in
Frage; andere halten eine ägyptische Mutter für wahrscheinlicher (vgl. Huß, 2001, 627).
Geboren nach 154, gestorben 96. König der Kyrenaika von 116 (102)-96.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Ptolemaios Apion hatte testamentarisch von seinem Vater Ptolemaios VIII. die Kyrenaika als
selbstständiges Königreich erhalten (Iust. 39,5,2). Jedoch konnte er seine Herrschaft nicht
sofort antreten, da Ptolemaios IX. dort die Kontrolle ausübte. Erst ab 100 ist Ptolemaios
Apion als tatsächlicher König in Kyrene belegt: In diesem Jahr beschloss Rom das
Seeräubergesetz und veranlasste befreundete Herrscher im Mittelmeerraum – unter anderem
Apion als König in Kyrene –, Maßnahmen gegen die Piraterie zu ergreifen (SEG III 378 B8
f.). Möglicherweise hatte ihm Kleopatra III. gegen 102 auf den Thron geholfen. Vermutet
wird auch eine Unterstützung Roms (vgl. Huß 2001, 655), dem Apion nach seinem Tod sein
Reich vermachte (Cic. leg. agr. 2,5,1; Sall. hist. 2,42; App. Mithr. 600). Die Städte der
Kyrenaika wurden vom Senat, nicht bereits im Testament Apions, für frei erklärt (vgl. Braund
1983). Erst 75 wurde die Kyrenaika wirklich römische Provinz.
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Volkmann, Hans: Ptolemaios [29] Apion, RE 23,2, 1959, 1737-1738.
Ameling, Walter: Ptolemaios [14] Apion, DNP 10, 2001, 544.
Bennet, Chris: The Ptolemaic Dynasty, Tyndale House, Cambridge 2001-2009.
URL: http://www.tyndalehouse.com/Egypt/ptolemies/ptolemies.htm [20.02.10].
Braund, David: Royal Wills and Rome, PBSR 51, 1983, 16-57.
Hölbl, Günther: Geschichte des Ptolemäerreiches, Darmstadt 1994, 182-189.
Huß, Werner: Ägypten in hellenistischer Zeit 332-30 v.Chr., München 2001, 627-655.
Lampela, Anssi: Rome and the Ptolemies of Egypt. The Development of Their Political Relations 273-80 B.C.,
Helsinki 1998.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
294
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
ST/15.02.12 – r/05.03.12
Ptolemaios, König von Zypern
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemmata Ptolemäer
Ca. a. 115/107-58 (Selbstmord). Sohn des Ptolemaios IX. Philometor (Lathyros) und Bruder
des Ptolemaios XII. Theos (Auletes) von Ägypten. Wurde a. 103 mit anderen Prinzen wegen
Thronstreitigkeiten in Ägypten nach Kos in Sicherheit gebracht; a. 88 kam er an den Hof des
Mithradates VI. Eupator. Vor a. 84 mit dessen Tochter Nysa verlobt. A. 80 zum König von
Zypern gekrönt.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Keine Bemühung um römische Anerkennung, obwohl das Testament seines Cousins, des
Ptolemaios XI. Alexandros II., sowohl Ägypten als auch Zypern den Römern vermachte.
Keine Ernennung zum socius et amicus populi Romani; doch bezeichnet ihn M. Tullius
Cicero dennoch als rex amicus (Cic. Sest. 57).
A. 67 Gefangennahme des P. Clodius Pulcher durch kilikische Piraten. Aufforderung an
Ptolemaios, sich an Lösegeldzahlungen zu beteiligen. König Zyperns zahlte nur zwei Talente,
wodurch er Clodius empörte. A. 59 brachte Clodius mit Verweis auf das Testament
Ptolemaios’ IX. erfolgreich die lex Clodia de Cypro ein (Einziehung Zyperns als römische
Provinz). Ausführung des Beschlusses durch M. Porcius Cato, der Ptolemaios als Ausgleich
das Priesteramt der Aphrodite von Paphos anbot (Plut. Cat. min. 35,2). Ptolemaios zog
Selbstmord vor. Eine Reaktion Ptolemaios’ XII. von Ägypten blieb aus; seine Tatenlosigkeit
war eine der Ursachen des alexandrinischen Aufstandes.
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Volkmann, Hans: Ptolemaios [34], RE 23,2, 1959, 1755f.
Ameling, Walter: Ptolemaios [19], DNP 10, 2001, 548.
Bennet, Chris: The Ptolemaic Dynasty, Tyndale House, Cambridge 2001-2009.
URL: http://www.tyndalehouse.com/Egypt/ptolemies/ptolemies.htm [20.02.10].
Bloedow, Edmund: Beiträge zur Geschichte Ptolemaios’ XII., Diss. Würzburg 1964, 47f.
Hölbl, Günther: Geschichte des Ptolemäerreiches, Darmstadt 1994, 199f.
Huß, Werner: Ägypten in hellenistischer Zeit, 332-20 v.Chr., München 2001, 684f.
Olshausen, Eckart: Rom und Ägypten von 116 bis 51 v.Chr., Diss. Erlangen 1963, 38-44.
Oost, Irvin: Cato Uticensis and the Annexation of Cyprus, CPh 50, 1955, 98-112.
Sullivan; Richard D.: Near Eastern Royalty and Rome, 100-30 B.C., Toronto 1990, 236f.
KC/30.09.04–r/30.09.04/30.06.07/13.03.10
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
295
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Ptolemaios, Sohn des Mennaios, König bzw. Tetrarch und Hohepriester von Chalkis
(am Libanon)
 Stemma der Mennaiden
0. Onomastisches
Zum Namen Mennaios, der mit dem semitischen Götternamen Monimos verwandt sein dürfte,
vgl. z.B. Seyrig 1950, 39 Fn. 2; Schwentzel 2009, 68; 73. Wie der Ptolemaios-Name Eingang
in die semitische Herrscherfamilie gefunden hat, ist völlig offen.
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
Ptolemaios ist ab dem Jahr 84 v.Chr. als Herrscher der Ituräer greifbar (s. 2). Lag der
Ursprung seiner Machtstellung in Chalkis am Antilibanon, so dehnte sich sein Territorium auf
die gesamte Beka-Ebene sowie zumindest zeitweise auch bis Damaskus und in den Hauran
hinein aus. Seine Titulatur wirft viele Fragen auf, doch könnte seine Stellung als Hohepriester
(eher von Chalkis als von Heliopolis, vgl. Schwentzel 2009; Myers 2010, 90-101; 108f.
gegenüber Seyrig 1954; Herman 2000-2002; Gatier 2002/2003, 122) sogar schon vor
Erlangung der Autonomie erworben worden sein. Den Königstitel nahm er spätestens 64
v.Chr. an, doch wurde er ihm nach der Niederlage von Philippi entzogen. Von 42/41 bis zu
seinem Tod 41/40 v.Chr. war er Tetrarch und Hohepriester (s. 2).
Alle Versuche, die Souveränität des Ptolemaios noch vor den Untergang der
Seleukidenherrschaft über Damaskus zu datieren (z.B. Sullivan 1990, 71), geschweige denn,
bereits seinem Vater Mennaios den Tetrarchenrang zuzuschreiben (z.B. Vollmer 1991, 439
Fn. 85; Schwentzel 2009, 64f.; 68; 70), entbehren jeglicher Quellengrundlage und sind wenig
überzeugend (Coşkun ca. 2013). Jedenfalls ist es unzulässig, für einen früheren Beginn der
ituräischen Unabhängigkeit Ärendatierungen von Münzen seines Enkels Zenodoros
heranzuziehen. Auf diesen findet sich die Datierung L ZΠ (= Jahr 87), was mit Blick auf
einen weiteren Typen des Zenodoros mit L BΠΣ (= Jahr 282) entweder als eine bewusste
Abkürzung (Seyrig 1950, 46f.; vgl. Kindler 1993, 285; 287) oder Verschreibung (Burnett,
RPC I S. 662; vgl. Herman 2006, 53) eines seleukidischen Ärenjahres (Jahr 1 = 312/11
v.Chr., also 26/25 bzw. 31/30 v.Chr.) zu deuten ist. Immerhin ist es möglich, wenngleich ganz
unsicher, dass ein gewisser Monikos, den Stephanos von Byzanz (s.v. Chalkis ed. Meineke p.
784, 15-17) als Gründer des in der Beka-Ebene gelegenen Stammsitzes Chalkis nennt, ein
Vorfahre oder Verwandter des Mennaios war (vgl. z.B. Buchheim 1960, 16).
Einer seiner Söhne, Philippion, heiratete 49/48 v.Chr. Alexandra, eine Tochter des
Aristobulos II. von Judäa, erregte dadurch aber die Eifersucht seines Vaters: Dieser tötete ihn
und nahm Alexandra selbst zur Frau: Ios. ant. Iud. 14,7,4 (126). Von einer früheren Frau
stammte indes sein Sohn Lysanias (I.), der ihn 40 v.Chr. beerbte: Ios. bell. Iud. 1,13,1 (248).
Als Letzterer 37/36 v.Chr. abgesetzt wurde, scheint Zenodoros, der ihm offiziell erst 30 v.Chr.
nachfolgte, bereits erwachsen gewesen zu sein. Dass er der Sohn des Lysanias und damit der
Enkel des Ptolemaios war, geht aus IGR III 1085 = IGSyr VI 2851 = Seyrig 1970 hervor. Ein
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
296
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
naher Verwandter (Neffe?) mag Ptolemaios, Sohn des Sohaimos, gewesen sein. Vgl. Seyrig
1970; Gatier 2002/2003.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Ptolemaios tritt in den Quellen erstmals unmittelbar nach dem Tod Antiochos XII. Dionysos
(87-84/83 v.Chr.) in Erscheinung. Nachdem dieser im Kampf gegen den Nabatäer Aretas III.
gefallen war, kontrollierte Ptolemaios Damaskus für kurze Zeit, bevor auch er Aretas weichen
musste: Ios. ant. Iud. 13,15,1-2 (387-392); bell. Iud. 1,4,7-8 (99-103). In der älteren Literatur
wird der Tod des Antiochos meist auf ca. 85 v.Chr. datiert (z.B. Schürer I 564; weiterhin z.B.
Healey 2003, 776); vgl. demgegenüber Ehling 2008, 247-249. Josephus unterstellt den
Damaskenern einen „Hass“ auf die Ituräer, weswegen ihre Präsenz im Allgemeinen als
Raubzug gedeutet wird. Jedoch warnt Myers (2010, 24-38) vor einer verzerrenden
Feindseligkeit des Geschichtsschreibers gegen das mit den benachbarten Juden rivalisierende
Volk: Die Ituräer gelten ihm durchweg als Räubergesindel und ihre Führer als illegitime
Herrscher: Ios. ant. Iud. 14,3,2 (39); 14,7,4 (126); 14,12,1 (297); 14,13,3 (330); bell. Iud.
1,4,8 (103); 1,5,3 (115); 1,9,2 (185f.); 1,12,2 (239). Pauschal als „Übeltäter“ werden die
Ituräer aber auch von Strab. geogr. 16,2,18 (755) bezeichnet; vgl. 16,2,20 (756). Myers (2010,
155f.) erwägt deswegen vorsichtig, ob Ptolemaios damals bereits in Absprache mit Tigranes I.
von Armenien seine Herrschaft auf Damaskus auszudehnen suchte. Wahrscheinlicher noch
handelte er aber auf eigene Rechnung (z.B. Buchheim 1960, 116; Schottroff 1982, 133f.;
Coşkun ca. 2013).
Irgendwann während der Herrschaftszeit der Königin Alexandra (76/67 v.Chr.), der Witwe
des Alexander Iannaios von Judäa, hatte er begonnen, Druck auf das damals wohl von Aretas
wieder freigegebene Damaskus auszuüben, was seinerseits den hasmonäischen Prinzen
Aristobulos (II.) zu einem Angriff provozierte. Nach dem früheren Zeugnis (Ios. bell. Iud.
1,5,4 [115]) wurde Ptolemaios verdrängt, nach dem späteren (Ios. ant. Iud. 13,16,3 [418])
musste Aristobulos unverrichteter Dinge wieder abziehen. Josephus berichtet im je folgenden
Paragraphen vom Einfall des Tigranes I. in Syrien, welcher in der Belagerung von Ptolemais
gipfelte ([116] / [419]; Ehling 2008, 250-256). Obwohl Damaskus dabei unerwähnt bleibt,
gelang dem Armenier damals offenbar die Eroberung der Stadt, wie aus den dort von ihm
geprägten Münzen mit den seleukidischen Ärenjahren 241-243 (72/71-70/69 v.Chr.)
hervorgeht. Den Abbruch dieser kurzen Serie – und damit auch der Besetzung – hatte
wiederum der Einmarsch des L. Licinius Lucullus in Armenien während des Dritten
Mithradatischen Krieges verursacht (69 v.Chr.).
Die Chronologie der Ereignisse bleibt unsicher, so dass die Besetzung von Damaskus durch
Ptolemaios oft auf ca. 70 v.Chr. datiert wird: Schürer I 564; Volkmann 1959, 1767; Schottroff
1982, 134; Kindler 1993, 283; Gatier 2002/2003, 122. Auf früher datieren wiederum Sullivan
1990, 71; 78 und Sartre 2005, 14 (Vertreibung des Ptolemaios 72 v.Chr. durch Tigranes);
unhaltbar datiert Buchheim 1960, 116 (um 83 v.Chr.). Eher ist aber mit Ehling 2008, 259 an
einen Zeitpunkt nach dem Abzug des Tigranes zu denken. Dabei muss die Situation sogar für
eine dauerhafte Herrschaftserrichtung günstig erschienen sein (Coşkun ca. 2013).
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
297
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Sollte es überhaupt jemals soweit gekommen sein, bliebe ferner offen, wann und von wem der
Ituräer erneut zum Rückzug gezwungen wurde. So ist unklar, wer 66/65 v.Chr. Damaskus
gegen die zwei Legaten des Pompeius, Lollius und Metellus, verteidigte, welche es damals
einnahmen: Ios. ant. Iud. 14,2,3 (29); bell. Iud. 1,6,2 (127). Am ehesten kommen hierfür wohl
wiederum die Nabatäer in Betracht, da diese damals im Bündnis mit Antipatros und Hyrkanos
II. gegen Aristobulos Krieg führten (Ios. ant. Iud. 14,1,2-14,2,3 [4-33]) und Pompeius gleich
nach seiner Ankunft in der Stadt 64 v.Chr. einen Feldzug gegen die Nabatäer unternahm (Ios.
ant. Iud. 14,3,3-4 [46; 48]); vgl. Coşkun ca. 2013; anders z.B. Sullivan 1990, 72; 206.
Damals beseitigte Pompeius viele kleine lokale ‚Tyrannen‘ im Großraum Syrien und
verwüstete auch das Territorium des Ptolemaios, der aber nicht zuletzt dank der Zahlung von
1.000 Talenten in seiner Herrschaft bestätigt wurde (64/63 v.Chr.): Ios. ant. Iud. 14,3,2 (39).
Es ist sogar wahrscheinlich, dass hiermit die Erlaubnis einherging, seine Machtstellung in den
nördlichen Hauran auszudehnen: Ehling 2008, 275; Myers 2010, 158-162; vgl. auch
Volkmann 1959, 1767. So ist anzunehmen, dass Pompeius hiermit nicht nur eine
Gegenleistung für die Bestechung erbrachte, sondern mit einem starken Ituräa auch ein
effektives Gegengewicht zum geschwächten, aber unkalkulierbaren Judäa sowie zum
weiterhin mächtigen Reich der Nabatäer schaffen wollte, deren Kontrolle jene Landstriche
entrissen worden sein dürften.
Danach hören wir erst wieder von Ptolemaios im Verlauf des römischen Bürgerkrieges. Etwa
49/48 v.Chr. nahm er die Witwe und Kinder des Aristobulos II. auf. In jene Zeit fiel auch die
Heirat der Tochter Alexandra zuerst mit Philippion, dann mit Ptolemaios selbst (s. 1). Wenig
später kam er dem Aufruf des Antipatros, des Strategen von Judäa, zur Unterstützung des
Mithradates von Pergamon und damit Caesars nach, der damals in den Alexandrinischen
Bürgerkrieg verstrickt war (48/47 v.Chr.). Derselben Kampagne schlossen sich auch sein
Verwandter Ptolemaios, der Sohn des Sohaimos, und Iamblichos, der König von Emesa, an:
Ios. ant. Iud. 14,8,1 (129); bell. Iud. 1,9,3 (188).
Im weiteren Verlauf des Konflikts wechselte Ptolemaios aber die Seite und arbeitete mit dem
Rebellen Caecilius Bassus zusammen, der sich zuletzt in Apameia am Orontes verschanzt
hielt (45/43 v.Chr.): Strab. geogr. 16,2,10 (753); vgl. Buchheim 1960, 17. Die letzte von ihm
berichtete Tat ist, dass er Antigonos, den überlebenden Sohn des Aristobulos II., beim
Einmarsch in Judäa unterstützte, von wo jener aber nicht viel später – um die Zeit der
Schlachten von Philippi (Okt./[Nov.] 42 v.Chr.) – von Herodes wieder vertrieben wurde: Ios.
ant. Iud. 14,12,1 (297); vgl. auch bell. Iud. 1,12,2 (239). Beim Einfall desParthers Pakoros in
Syrien 40 v.Chr. war ihm bereits sein Sohn Lysanias nachgefolgt: Ios. bell. Iud. 1,13,1 (248).
Schwierigkeiten bereitet die Identifizierung der Titulatur sowohl des Ptolemaios als auch des
Lysanias. Von großer Bedeutung sind hier die ituräischen Münzen: Einige Typen des
Ptolemaios sowie alle des Lysanias (und des Zenodoros) führen den Doppeltitel „Tetrarch und
Hohepriester“ (vgl. die Dokumentation bei Herman 2006; daneben Kindler 1993). Oft wird
Ptolemaios dieser Doppeltitel schon vor dem Wirken des Pompeius im Osten zugeschrieben,
wobei Letzterer diese Stellung nur bestätigt habe: z.B. Schwahn 1936, 1096; Seyrig 1950,
47f. (nach der Unabhängigkeit von Tigranes); Schottroff 1982, 133; Sullivan 1990, 206;
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
298
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Healey 2003, 776; Myers 2010, 104; implizit auch Burnett, RPC I, 662; Gatier 2002/2003,
122; Ehling 2008, 260; 275. Andere Forscher sehen dagegen erst in Pompeius den Verleiher
des Tetrarchentitels, wenngleich das Hohepriesteramt schon zuvor ausgeübt worden sei:
Vollmer 1991, 439; Schwentzel 2009, 65f.; vgl. Sartre 2005, 53: Erst die Anerkennung durch
Pompeius habe aus einem „outlaw leader“ einen „respectable prince“ gemacht.
Jedoch gilt Ptolemaios manchmal auch als König, wobei hierfür regelmäßig auf die
literarische Überlieferung zu Lysanias verwiesen wird. Denn ihn bezeichnet Josephus (bell.
Iud. 1,22,3 [440]), der ansonsten auf Titelangaben bei den Ituräern verzichtet, zum Ende
seiner Herrschaft als „König“; Cassius Dio (49,32,5) behauptet sogar, M. Antonius habe
Lysanias zum König ernannt; vgl. auch Eus. chron. I ed. Schoene p. 170, wo der Name in
Lysimachos verschrieben ist. Auf die Titulatur des Ptolemaios hat diese Quellen zuerst
Schürer I 563 bezogen (auch mit Verweis auf das „Königreich“ des Lysanias [II.]); ebenso
Schalit 1969, 36; Sullivan 1990, 70-72; ohne Diskussion auch Herman 2006, 51. Unklar wird
die Argumentation aber, wenn pauschal behauptet wird, dass spätere Autoren den Königstitel
häufiger unscharf auch auf Tetrarchen bezogen hätten (Schürer I 565, gefolgt von Schmitt
1982, 112).
Zur Lösung des Problems führen die weiteren Zeugnissen für Lysanias. Wie erwähnt, ließ
auch dieser Münzen mit der rückseitigen Legende „Tetrarch und Hohepriester“ prägen.
Allerdings trägt die Porträtbüste auf dem Avers ein Diadem. Ein Teil dieser Münzen stammt
von 272 SE (41/40 v.Chr.), während andere undatiert bleiben: Burnett, RPC I 4770; Kindler
1993,
287;
Herman
2006,
64-68;
vgl.
die
Abbildungen
unter
http://wildwinds.com/coins/greece/syria/chalkis/BMC_06.jpg
und
http://www.wildwinds.com/coins/sg/sg5898.t.html.
Überwiegend folgt die Forschung den literarischen Quellen und nimmt dabei teilweise sogar
in Kauf, dass Lysanias seinen Rang zwar M. Antonius verdankt, aber dennoch nicht gezögert
habe, mit den Parthern zu kollaborieren: Schürer I 563; Schwahn 1934, 1096; Buchheim
1960, 19 (Ernennung im Herbst 39 v.Chr.); 69; Schottroff 1982, 141; Schmitt 1982, 112
(„loserer Sprachgebrauch“); möglich nach Schwentzel 2009, 69: „Le titre de basileus ne lui
fut cependant jamais octroyé par Antoine. Mais, en raison de ses prérogatives religieuses, le
souverain pouvait se comporter en véritable monarque local, doué d’une forte autorité sur
l’ensemble des Ituréens“; Herman 2006, 51; 53. Beachtung verdient hier auch der
Kompromissvorschlag Sullivans (1990, 408f.), demzufolge Lysanias den Königstitel
angestrebt habe und deswegen von M. Antonius hingerichtet worden sei. Unklar bleibt bei
dieser Erklärung aber, ob Lysanias den Titel wirklich usurpiert hat, und zudem, ob dies
gegebenenfalls noch unter der Vorherrschaft der Parther geschah oder erst nach ihrem Abzug.
Entscheidend ist aber, dass das Porträt mit Diadem auf den erwähnten Münzaversen nicht
Lysanias, sondern ganz sicher seinem Vater zugewiesen werden muss. Denn das begleitende
Monogramm ist ohne Zweifel in Pto(lemaios) aufzulösen (anders Kindler 1993, 284; 287;
Herman 2006, 64; Schwentzel 2009, 69). Dies hat bereits treffend Burnett (RPC I 4768-4770)
hervorgehoben, hieraus aber lediglich den Schluss gezogen, dass Lysanias den Königstitel gar
nicht geführt habe; vgl. Myers 2010, 109; auch Schrapel 1996, 182. Jedoch scheint
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
299
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Ptolemaios tatsächlich zunächst den Königstitel geführt zu haben, mag er ihm nun von
Pompeius verliehen oder nur bestätigt worden sein. Seine Stellung in der Levante mag zwar
hinter derjenigen des Alexander Iannaios ein wenig nachgestanden haben; jedoch überragte
seine Macht diejenige des Hyrkanos II., dem der Königsrang damals wegen der dauerhaften
Unruhen in Judäa vorenthalten wurde und der als regionaler Ordnungsfaktor ausschied.
Mithin war es M. Antonius, der Ptolemaios – wohl wegen seiner Kooperation mit den
Gegnern bzw. Mördern Caesars – degradierte. Vgl. hierzu auch die Antonius-Vita Plutarchs
(36, mit Coşkun ca. 2013): „Und doch schenkte er vielen Tetrarchien und Königreiche über
große Völker, auch wenn sie Privatleute waren, vielen aber entriss er ihre Königreiche, wie
dem Juden Antigonos“.
Folglich setzen die Münzen, welche Ptolemaios den Titel „Tetrarch und Hohepriester“
zuschreiben und in einem Jahr 2 geprägt sind, nicht, wie gemeinhin angenommen wird, eine
pompeische Ära voraus (Seyrig 1950, 48; Volkmann 1959, 1767; Burnett, RPC I S. 662;
Kindler 1993, 283; Schrapel 1996, 182; Herman 2006, 60-62 Nr. 4-6; Schwentzel 2009, 68;
Myers 2010, 108), sondern vielmehr eine philippische, gehören daher also ins Jahr 41/40
v.Chr. (Coşkun ca. 2013 unter Berücksichtigung sämtlicher auf ituräischen Münzen bezeugten
Ären).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Mehl, Andreas: Ptolemaios [58], DNP 10, 2001, 557.
Volkmann: Ptolemaios (60-61), RE 23.2, 1959, 1766f.
Buchheim, Hans: Die Orientpolitik des Triumvirn Marcus Antonius, Heidelberg 1960.
Coşkun, Altay: Die Tetrarchie als hellenistisch-römisches Herrschaftsinstrument. Mit einer Untersuchung der
Titulatur der Dynasten von Ituräa. Demnächst in den Beiträgen der Tagung: Client Kings between Centre and
Periphery (Exzellenzcluster TOPOI & Friedrich-Meinecke Institut, FU Berlin, 18.-19.2.2011), hg. von Ernst
Baltrusch und Julia Wilker, ca. 2013.
Ehling, Kay: Untersuchungen zur Geschichte der späten Seleukiden (164-63 v.Chr.), Stuttgart 2008.
Engels, David: Die politische Geschichte des Hauran in hellenistischer Zeit, BJ 207, 2007 (2009) 75-102.
Gatier, Pierre-Louis: La principauté d’Abila de Lysanias dans l’Antilibanon, in: Saint Luc: évangéliste et
historien = Dossiers d’Archéologie 270, 2002/2003, 120-127.
Healey, John F.: Art. Ituraea, in: OCD, Revised Third Edition, Oxford 2003, 776.
Herman, Daniel: Certain Iturean Coins and the Origin of the Heliopolitan Cult, Israel Numismatic Journal 14,
2000-2002, 84-98.
Herman, Daniel: The Coins of the Itureans, Israel Numismatic Research 1, 2006, 51-72.
Kindler, Arie: On the Coins of the Ituraeans, in: Tony Hackens / Ghislaine Moucharte (Hgg.): Actes du XI e
Congrès International de Numismatique: organisé à l’occasion du 150 e anniversaire de la Société royale de
numismatique de Belgique: Bruxelles, 8-13 septembre 1991, edités par le Séminaire de Numismatique
Marcel Hoc, Bruxelles, 8-13 septembre, Louvain-la-Neuve 1993, 283-288.
Myers, E.A.: The Ituraeans and the Roman Near East: reassessing the sources. Society for New Testament
Studies, monograph series 147. Cambridge 2010.
RPC I = Burnett, Andrew M., Amandry, Michel & Ripollès, Pere Pau: Roman Provincial Coinage, Vol. I (Part III), London 1992.
Sartre, Maurice: The Middle East under Rome. Translated by Catharine Porter and Elisabeth Rawlings,
Cambridge MA 2005.
Schalit, Abraham: Namenwörterbuch zu Flavius Josephus, Leiden 1968.
Schalit, Abraham: König Herodes. Der Mann und sein Werk, Berlin 1969 (vgl. auch die 2. Aufl. 2001).
Schmitt, Götz: Zum Königreich Chalkis, ZDPV 98, 1982, 110-124.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
300
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Schottroff, Willi von: Die Ituräer, ZDPV 98, 1982, 125-152.
Schrapel, Thomas: Das Reich der Kleopatra. Quellenkritische Studien zu den „Landschenkungen“ Mark Antons,
Trier 1996.
Schürer, Emil: The History of the Jewish People in the Age of Jesus Christ (175 B.C.-A.D. 135). A New English
Version Revised and Edited by Geza Vermes and Fergus Millar et al., Parts I-III.2, Edinburgh 1973-1987
(deutsches Original, 3.-4. Aufl. 1901-1909).
Schwahn, Walther: Tetrarch, RE 5A, 1, 1934, 1089-1097.
Schwentzel, Christian-Georges: La propagande des princes de Chalcis d’après les monnaies, ZDPV 125.1, 2009,
64-75.
Seyrig, Henri: Sur les ères de quelques villes de Syrie, Syria 27, 1950, 5-50.
Seyrig, Henri: Questions héliopolitaines, Syria 31, 1954, 86-98.
Seyrig, Henri: L’inscription du tétrarque Lysanias à Baalbek, in: Arnulf Kuschke / Ernst Kutsch (Hgg.):
Archäologie und Altes Testament. Festschrift für Kurt Galling zum 8. Januar 1970, Tübingen 1970, 251-254.
Sullivan, Richard D.: Near Eastern Royalty and Rome, 100-30 B.C., Toronto 1990.
Vollmer, Dankward: Tetrarchia: Bemerkungen zum Gebrauch eines antiken und modernen Begriffs, Hermes
119, 1991, 435-449.
AC/25.04.12 – r/30.04.2012
Ptolemaios, Sohn des Sohaimos
 Stemma der Mennaiden
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
Ptolemaios, Sohn eines Sohaimos, ist allein für 48/47 v.Chr. als ein im Libanongebirge
ansässiger Dynast bezeugt (s. 2). Name, Zeitstellung und Lage deuten auf eine enge
Verwandtschaft mit dem berühmteren Ptolemaios, dem Sohn des Mennaios, hin, der vielleicht
sein Onkel oder Vetter war. Anders votiert Schalit 1968, 99, der das überlieferte Patronym
anzweifelt und ihn ebenfalls für einen Sohn des Mennaios hält. Sein Vatersname verweist auf
die benachbarte Herrschaft des Iamblichos von Emesa. Josephus nennt jedenfalls die beiden
Ptolemaioi und Iamblichos in einem Atemzug (s. 2). Wohl auf einer Fortsetzung der
Heiratsverbindungen zwischen den jeweiligen Sippen basiert die Tatsache, dass mit Varus,
Sohn eines Tetrarchen Sohaimos, ein Nachkomme des Ptolemaios aus dem mittleren Verlauf
des 1. Jhs. n.Chr. zugleich ein enger Verwandter des Königs von Emesa sein würde.
Allerdings ist diese ituräische Seitenlinie nicht im Stemma der Emesener von Sullivan 1977,
200a = 1990 Nr. 6 berücksichtigt.
Vielleicht ein Sohn oder Neffe des Ptolemaios war der Ituräer Sohaimos, der zunächst ein
Vertrauter des Herodes gewesen war, aber 29 v.Chr. hingerichtet wurde: Ios. ant. Iud. 15,6,5
(185); 15,7,1.4 (205; 229); vgl. Volkmann 1959, 1767 Nr. 61 (ohne dynastische Einordnung);
Schalit 1968, 114; 1969, 115f.; PIR VII2 2, 2006, S. 290 = S 763.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Auf Vermittlung des Antipatros, des Strategen von Judäa, unterstützte Ptolemaios, Sohn des
Sohaimos, Mithradates von Pergamon im Jahr 48/47 v.Chr. auf seinem Feldzug nach
Ägypten, wo er dem in Bedrängnis geratenen Caesar zu Hilfe kam: Ios. ant. Iud. 14,8,1 (129);
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
301
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
vgl. bell. Iud. 1,9,3 (188); Sartre 2005, 50. Mithradates, Antipatros sowie Hyrkanos II.
wurden für diesen Einsatz reichlich belohnt. Ähnliches, wenn auch in geringerem Umfang, ist
für den Sohn des Sohaimos anzunehmen, doch fehlen Belege hierfür. Wenn aber seine
Nachkommen als Tetrarchen belegt sind (ihr Territorium wird nordöstlich von Ituräa
vermutet), so könnte diese Herrschaft schon auf eine Verleihung durch Caesar zurückgehen.
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Volkmann: Ptolemaios (60-61), RE 23.2, 1959, 1766f.
DNP –.
Coşkun, Altay: Die Tetrarchie als hellenistisch-römisches Herrschaftsinstrument. Mit einer Untersuchung der
Titulatur der Dynasten von Ituräa. Demnächst in den Beiträgen der Tagung: Client Kings between Centre and
Periphery (Exzellenzcluster TOPOI & Friedrich-Meinecke Institut, FU Berlin, 18.-19.2.2011), hg. von Ernst
Baltrusch und Julia Wilker, ca. 2013.
Sartre, Maurice: The Middle East under Rome. Translated by Catharine Porter and Elisabeth Rawlings,
Cambridge MA 2005.
Schalit, Abraham: Namenwörterbuch zu Flavius Josephus, Leiden 1968.
Schalit, Abraham: König Herodes. Der Mann und sein Werk, Berlin 1969 (vgl. auch die 2. Aufl. 2001).
Stein: Sohaimos Nr. 1-5, RE 3A.1, 1927, 795-798.
Sullivan, Richard D.: The Dynasty of Emesa, ANRW II 8, 1977, 198-219.
Sullivan, Richard D.: Near Eastern Royalty and Rome, 100-30 B.C., Toronto 1990.
AC/25.04.12 – r/29.04.2012
Pylaimenes, Dynast von Paphlagonien
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
Stammte aus der Familie der Pylaimeniden (zu diesen vgl. Strab. geogr. 12,3,1.8 [541; 543]).
Bezeugt ca. a. 64/62 (Eutr. 6,14,1).
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Bei der Neuordnung des Ostens a. 64/62 gab Cn. Pompeius Magnus procos. 67-62/61
„einigen Nachkommen des Pylaimenes das Binnenland der Paphlagoner zum Beherrschen
(basileuesthai), so wie die Galater Männern aus Tetrarchengeschlecht“. Die Gewährung des
Königstitels sollte hieraus entgegen Sullivan 1990, 168f. nicht gefolgert werden. Namentlich
genannt ist Pylaimenes allein in Eutr. 6,14,1 neben Attalos, der wohl aus demselben
Geschlecht stammt (zu letzterem vgl. auch App. Mithr. 114,560 ad a. 64/62; Cass. Dio
48,33,5 ad a. 41/40).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Wilcken, U.: Attalos [12], RE II,2, 1896, 2177.
DNP –.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
302
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Hoben, Wolfgang: Untersuchungen zur Stellung kleinasiatischer Dynasten in den Machtkämpfen der
ausgehenden römischen Republik, Diss. Mainz 1969, 119f.
Magie, David: Roman Rule in Asia Minor to the End of the Third Century after Christ, Princeton/N.J. 1950, II
1234f. Anm. 37.
Mitchell, Stephen: Anatolia. Land, Men, and Gods in Asia Minor, Bd. 1: The Celts in Anatolia and the Impact of
Roman Rule, Oxford 1993, 33; 37.
Sullivan, Richard D.: Near Eastern Royalty and Rome, 100-30 B.C., Toronto 1990, 156; 160; 168f.
AC/03.07.07
Pylaimenes von Galatien, Sebastos-Priester, Sohn des Königs Amyntas
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemma Galater / Deiotaros
Sohn des Amyntas (I.), des Königs von Galatien († a. 26/25). Dritter bzw. elfter Ankyraner
Sebastos-Priesters(2/1 v. bzw. 7/8 n.Chr. (OGIS II 533=Bosch, QGA 51, mit der Chronologie
von Coskun 2007, Teil G.III): Die umfassenden Stiftungen erweisen eine führende Rolle für
ihn auch nach der Provinzialisierung.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Er könnte mit demjenigen Pylaimenes identisch sein, für den das Geschenk eines Helmes an
P. Sulpicius Quirinius leg. Aug. Galatiae pro praet. 6-4/2 bezeugt ist (Antipatros, AP 6,241).
Allerdings gab es in der damaligen galatischen Elite mindestens einen weiteren Namenträger.
Vgl. Coskun 2007, Teil F.III zu Chronologie und weiterer Lit.
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Stein, A.: Pylaimenes [5], RE 23,2, 1959, 2107f.
DNP –.
Coskun, Altay: Von der ‘Geißel Asiens’ zu ‘kaiserfrommen’ Reichsbewohnern. Studien zur politischen und
gesellschaftlichen Entwicklung der Galater unter besonderer Berücksichtigung der amicitia populi Romani
und der göttlichen Verehrung des Augustus (3. Jh. v.–2. Jh. n.Chr.), unveröff. unveröff. Habil. Trier 2007,
Teil E.V; F.III; G.III.
Mitchell, Stephen: Anatolia. Land, Men, and Gods in Asia Minor, Bd. 1: The Celts in Anatolia and the Impact of
Roman Rule, Oxford 1993, 105-12, bes. 107.
Stähelin, Felix: Geschichte der kleinasiatischen Galater, 21907, Nd. Osnabrück 1973, 99; 103; 119.
AC/03.07.07
Pythodoris (I) Philometor, Queen of Pontos and of the Bosporos
0. Onomastic Issues
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
303
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Her name was due to that of her father Pythodoros of Tralleis (Strab. geogr. 12.3.29 [555];
14.1.42 [649]).
1. Central Biographical Dates and Family Relations
 Stemmata Bosporani,  Stemmata Archelaids
Born around 33 BC or rather around 40. Daughter of Pythodoros of Nysa and Tralleis (Strab.
geogr. 14.1.42 [649]). It has been deduced from OGIS I 377 that her mother was Antonia, the
daughter of M. Antonius (triumvir rei publicae constituendae 43-32; see MRR II 337ff.), but
this hypothesis has been questioned by Braund 1984, 48 n. 16; idem 2005, 259f. Married
Polemon (I), king of Pontos and the Bosporos around 13 BC. After his death ca. 8 BC, she ruled
alone in Pontos. Ca. AD 3/2, she married Archelaos (I), king of Kappadokia (Saprykin 2004,
171; for the traditional date, in AD 8, see Olshausen 1980, 911). After Archelaos’ death in Rome
in AD 17, Pythodoris returned to Pontos. Died after AD 19 and before AD 38. From her first
marriage she had three children: Antonia Tryphaina, wife of Kotys (VIII) of Thrakia; ZenoArtaxias, king of Armenia; and another son whose name is unknown (Strab. geogr. 12.3.29
[556]). He has been identified with M. Antonios Polemo Philopatris of Laodikeia, see
Thonemann 2004, 146; on his possible identity, cf. also Hanslik 1963, 581f.
2. Relations with Rome / Romans and Career
Changed the name of the royal city of Kabeira-Diospolis to Sebaste in honour of Augustus
(Strab. geogr. 12.3.31 [557]). Perhaps at that time another city was named Liviopolis (Plin. nat.
6.4.11; Kearsley 2005, 101).
Tiberius’ permission of the sole rule to a woman has been considered a proof of the Emperor’s
regard towards Pythodoris (Braund 2005, 259).
Travelled to Rome in AD 17 with her husband Archelaos (I), who had to defend himself from
certain charges before Tiberius and died there (Hoben 1969, 193f.; Sullivan 1980, 920f.).
In Hermonassa, she dedicated a statue to Livia, who is called “her benefactress” (SEG 39, 1989
no. 695; Boltunova 1989). Two busts of Livia have been found in her kingdom, and they can
probably be related to the friendship between either Dynamis or Pythodoris and Augustus’ wife
(Braund 2005, 258).
Another statue, probably of Tiberius, has been found in Pantikapaion. The inscription
demonstrates a friendly relation with Aspurgos, who had received Roman citizenship from the
Emperor, and his wife Gepaepyris (Saprykin/Fedoseev 2009, though going as far as suggesting
adoption).
For coins with the head of Augustus and/or Tiberius, cf. Waddington/ Babelon/ Reinach, Recueil
I 20ff.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
304
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
3. Select Bibliography
Hanslik, Rudolf/ Schmitt, Hatto H.: Pythodoris [1], RE 24, 1963, 581-586.
von Bedow, Iris: Pythodoris [I] Philometor, DNP 10, 2000, 668.
Boltunova, Ana I.: The Inscription of Pythodoris from Hermonassa, VDI 188, 1989, 86-91. (Russian with English
summary).
Braund, David C.: Rome and the Friendly King. The Character of the Client Kingship, London 1984.
Braund, David C.: Polemo, Pythodoris and Strabo. Friends of Rome in the Black Sea Region, in: A. Coskun (ed.):
Roms auswärtige Freunde in der späten Republik und im frühen Prinzipat, Göttingen 2005, 253-270.
Gajducevič, Victor F.: Das Bosporanische Reich, Berlin-Amsterdam 19712.
Heinen, Heinz: Rome et le Bosphore: notes épigraphiques, CCG 7, 1996, 81-101.
Heinen, Heinz: Antike am Rande der Steppe. Der nördliche Schwarzmeerraum als Forschungsaufgabe, Stuttgart
2006.
Heinen, Heinz: Die Mithradatische Tradition der bosporanischen Könige – ein mißverstandener Befund, in: K. Geus/
K. Zimmermann (eds.): Punica–Libyca–Ptolemaica. Festschrift für Werner Huß zum 65. Geburtstag, Leuven
2001, 355-370.
Hoben, Wolfgang: Untersuchungen zur Stellung kleinasiatischer Dynasten in den Machtkämpfen der ausgehenden
römischen Republik, Diss. Mainz 1969.
Kearsley, R.A.: Women and Public Life in Imperial Asia Minor: Hellenistic Tradition and Augustan Ideology, AWE
4, 2005, 98-121.
Olshausen, Eckart: Pontos und Rom (63 v.Chr.-64 n.Chr.), ANRW II 7.2, 1980, 903-912.
Podossinov, Alexander V.: Am Rande der griechischen Oikumene, in: J. Fornasier/ B. Böttger (eds.): Das
Bosporanische Reich, Mainz 2002, 21-38.
Rostovtzeff, Mijail: Iranians and Greeks in Southern Russia, Oxford 1922.
Saprykin, Sergey Yu.: Thrace and the Bosporus under the Early Roman Emperors, in: D. Braund (ed.): Scythians
and Greeks: Cultural Interaction in Scythia, Athens and the early Roman Empire (Sixth Century BC – First
Century AD), Exeter 2004, 167-175.
Saprykin, Sergey Yu./Fedoseev, Nikolai F.: Epigraphica Pontica II. New Inscription of Pythodoris from
Panticapaeum, VDI 2009.3, 138-147.
Sullivan, Richard D.: Dynasts in Pontus, ANRW II 7.2, 1980, 913-930.
Sullivan, Richard D.: Near Eastern Royalty and Rome, 100-30 B.C., Toronto 1990.
Thonemann, Peter J., Polemo, son of Polemo (Dio 59.12.2), EA 37, 2004, 144-150.
Waddington, William H./ Babelon, Ernest/ Reinach, Théodore: Recueil général des monnaies grecques d’Asie
Mineure, I.1 (Paris 1904).
LBP/16.04.2008/14.03.10–r/07.08.08/14.03.10
Pythodoris (II), Queen of Thrakia
0. Onomastic Issues
She is called the second to differentiate her from Pythodoris (I) of Pontos, although she was the
first queen in Thrakia bearing this name.
1. Central Biographical Dates and Family Relations
 Stemmata Bosporani,  Stemmata Archelaids,  Stemmata Astaei-Odrysii
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
305
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Queen of the Thrakians (IGR I 777; 1503) from ca. 38 to 46 A.D., although we have no
evidences about her use of the royal title. Daughter of Rhoimetalkes (II), king of Thrakia and of a
daughter of Dynamis and Polemon (I) of Pontos and the Bosporos. Wife of Rhoimetalkes (III),
king of Thrakia (Saprykin 1984; Kolendo 1998, 325f.). However, other scholars have held that
she was the daughter of Kotys (VIII) and Antonia Tryphaina, and also the wife of Rhoimetalkes
(II) (Sullivan 1979, 204 ff.; 1990, 323f). Pythodoris had two sons, whose names are unknown
(Sullivan 1979, 211). She probably murdered her husband ca. a. 45. After that moment, we have
no more evidence about her.
2. Relations with Rome / Romans and Career
C. Iulius Proclus dedicated an inscription to Theos Hypsistos for the sake of Pythodoris and
Rhoimetalkes in a war against the Keletae (IGR I 777; Ustinova 1999, 246).
In ca. 45/46 A.D., a rebellion against Rome arose in Thrakia, perhaps instigated by Pythodoris
herself (Kolendo 1998, 325). The independent kingdom of Thrakia ended and was incorporated
into the Roman Empire.
3. Select Bibliography
Peter, Ulrike: Pythodoris [2], DNP 10, 2000, 669.
Kolendo, Jerzy: Claude et l’annexion de la Thrace, in: Y. Burnand/ Y. Le Bohec/ J.-P. Martin (eds.): Claude de
Lyon, Empereur romain, Paris 1998, 321-330.
Saprykin, Sergey Yu.: Pythodoris, Queen of Thracia, VDI 168, 1984, 141-153. (Russian, with English summary).
Saprykin, Sergey Yu.: From the History of the Pontic Kingdom under the Polemonids, VDI 1993, 2, 25-49.
(Russian, with English summary).
Saprykin, Sergey Yu.: Thrace and the Bosporus under the Early Roman Emperors, in: D. Braund (ed.): Scythians
and Greeks: Cultural Interaction in Scythia, Athens and the early Roman Empire (Sixth Century BC – First
Century AD), Exeter 2004, 167-175.
Sullivan, Richard D.: Thrace in the Eastern Dynastic Network, ANRW II, 7.1, 1979, 186-211.
Ustinova, Yulia: The Supreme Gods of the Bosporan Kingdom. Celestial Aphrodite and the Most High God, Leiden
1999.
LBP/16.04.2008–r/31.07.08/14.03.10
Pythodoros (II.) von Tralleis und Nysa
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemmata Archelaiden
Aristokrat und Asiarch. Mitglied einer prominenten, aus dem karischen Nysa stammenden
Familie. Vermutlich Sohn des Chairemon von Nysa und Enkel eines Pythodoros (I.) (so z.B.
Magie 1950 II 1130f.). Im 1. Mithradatischen Krieg wurde Chairemon 88 v.Chr. wegen
prorömischer Aktivität (Syll.3 741,1) von Mithradates VI. Eupator, samt den Söhnen
Pythodoros (II.) und Pythion, geächtet und kam folglich ums Leben (Syll.3 741, II/ΙΙΙ =
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
306
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Welles 73f.). Der in Syll.3 741 belegte Sohn Chairemons dürfte mit dem bei Strabon
bezeugten von Nysa nach Tralleis übergesiedelten Pythodoros identisch sein (Strab. geogr.
14,1,42 [649]). Strabon datiert zwar seine Akme zu seinen eigenen Lebenszeiten (geb. 64/63
v.Chr., gestorben unter Tiberius), jedoch setzt der Gebrauch der Vergangenheitstempora den
Tod des Pythodoros bei der Abfassung von Strabons Werk voraus. Auch der in Rom
bekannte, von M. Tullius Cicero a. 59 als nobilis aus Tralleis bezeichnete Pythodoros (Cic.
Flacc. 52) dürfte der damals mindestens fünfzigjährige Sohn Chairemons gewesen sein.
Die von einem Teil der Forschung vertretene Ansicht (Fiehn 1931, 58; Welles 1934, 297;
Schmitt 1963, 593; Bartels 2001), man müsse zwischen dem inschriftlich bezeugten Sohn
Chairemons (Pythodoros [II.]) und dem von Strabon erwähnten Pythodoros (III)
unterscheiden und in letzterem einen Enkel Chairemons erkennen, scheint weniger
überzeugend. Für eine Identität sprechen sich z.B. Hanslik 1963, 590; Bernhardt 1985;
Mratschek-Halfmann 1993 aus. Jedoch bleibt das Problem strittig; vgl. Magie 1950 II 1130f.
Anm. 60; Bowersock 1965, 8; Quaß 1984).
Die zuerst von Mommsen 1872, 271 und dann auch von anderen oft vertretene Ansicht (z.B.
Welles 1934, 297 und Hanslik 1963, 591; dagegen: Magie 1950 II 1130f. Anm. 60; Schmitt
1963, 592; Bowersock 1965, 8 Anm. 4), die Gattin des Pythodoros mit dem Namen Antonia
(IK 24,1,614) sei eine Tochter des Triumvirn M. Antonius gewesen, bleibt ebenfalls eine
unbewiesene Annahme (vgl. auch die Kritik bei Braund 2005, 259f.).
Eine Tochter aus dieser Ehe war jedenfalls Pythodoris Philometor I., Königin von Pontos
(Strab. geogr. 14,1,42 [649]), Gemahlin zunächst des Königs Polemon I. Eusebes von Pontos
und nach dessen Tod des Archelaos I. Sisenes (?) Philopatris von Kappadokien (Strab. geogr.
12,3,29 [556]). Möglicherweise waren zum einen der bei Agathias 2,17 belegte Chairemon,
der Ende des 1. Jhs. als Gesandter von Tralleis Augustus um Hilfe für die vom Erdbeben
getroffene Stadt bat, und zum anderen der in Ephesos (IK 13,615) bezeugte M. Antonius
Pythodoros Nachfahren des Pythodoros (III).
2. Verhältnis zu Rom/Römern und Karriereverlauf
Prominenter Freund und Anhänger des Cn. Pompeius Magnus (Strab. geogr.14,1,42 [649]).
Von Nysa nach Tralleis übergesiedelt, erwarb er eine führende Stellung in der Stadt und der
Provinz Asia (Asiarch). Wurde von C. Iulius Caesar a. 48-44 wegen der Freundschaft zu
Pompeius durch Konfiskation seines von Strabo auf über 2.000 Talente geschätzten und als
„königlich “ bezeichneten Vermögens bestraft. Jedoch gelangt es ihm, seinen Besitz
zurückzuerwerben und ihn vollkommen seinen Kindern zu hinterlassen.
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Hanslik, Rudolf: Pythodoros [13], RE 24, 1963, 590-592.
Schmitt, Hatto: Pythodoros [13a; 13b], RE 24, 1963, 592f.
Fiehn, K.: Chaeremon [2a], RE Suppl. 5, 1931, 57f.
Elvers, Karl-Ludwig: Pythodoros [3], DNP 10, 2001, 669. (=Pythodoros [II.])
Bartels, Jens: Pythodoros [4], DNP 10, 2001, 669f. (=Pythodoros [III.])
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
307
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Vgl. PIR2 P 1116 (Pythodorus, Nysaeus, deinde Trallianus).
Bernhardt, Rainer: Polis und römische Herrschaft in der späten Republik (149-31 v.Chr.), Berlin 1985, 217f.
Bowersock, Glen W.: Augustus and the Greek World, Oxford 1965, 8; 53; 87.
Braund, David C.: Polemo, Pythodoris and Strabo. Friends of Rome in the Black Sea Region, in: A. Coşkun (Hg.):
Roms auswärtige Freunde in der späten Republik und im frühen Prinzipat, Göttingen 2005, 253-270.
Freber, Philipp-Stephan G.: Der hellenistische Osten und das Illyricum unter Caesar, Stuttgart 1993, 107.
Magie, David: Roman Rule in Asia Minor to the End of the Third Century after Christ, Princeton 1950, I
257.406.449; II 992 Anm. 29; 1130f. Anm.60.
Mommsen, Theodor, Ephem. Epigr. 1, 1872, 271.
Mratschek-Halfmann, Sigrid: Divites et praepotentes. Reichtum und soziale Stellung in der Literatur der
Prinzipatszeit, Stuttgart 1993, bes. Anhang: Prosopographie der Reichen unter dem Prinzipat, Nr. 32.
Quaß, Friedemann: Zum Einfluß der römischen Nobilität auf das Honoratiorenregime in den Städten des
Griechischen Ostens, Hermes 112, 1984, 199-215, 213f.
Sherwin-White, Adrian N.: Roman Foreign Policy in the East (168 B.C. to A.D. 1), London 1984, 248; 254.
Welles, B.C.: Royal Correspondence in the Hellenistic Period: a Study in Greek Epigraphy, 1934, 294-299
Nr.73f.
WKK 05.08.08–r/05.08.08/06.02.11
Rholes, getischer König
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
König eines Getenstammes im östlichen Moesien, wohl im Süden der Dobrudscha. Für die
Jahre 29-28 bezeugt.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Kam M. Licinius Crassus cos. 30 zu Hilfe, als dieser eine bastarnische Festung belagerte.
Besuchte Octavian und erhielt wegen dieser Hilfeleistung den Titel eines philos kai
symmachos; zugleich wurden seine Soldaten mit Kriegsgefangenen belohnt (Cass. Dio
51,24,6). Verlangte und erhielt später Hilfe von Crassus, als ihn ein weiterer getischer König
namens Dapyx angriff (Cass. Dio 51,26,1f.).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Weiss, J.: Getae, RE 7.1, 1910, 1334.
Stein, A.: Roles, RE 1A.1, 1914, 1008.
Groag, E.: Licinius Crassus (58), RE 13.1, 1926, 279f.
Daicoviciu, C.: Dakien und Rom in der Prinzipatszeit, ANRW II 6, 1977, 910.
Lica, V.: Philorhomaios oder philokaisar?, BJ 192, 1992, 225-230.
Ştefan, Al. S.: Les guerres daciques de Domitien et de Trajan. Architecture militaire, topographie, images et
histoire (Collection de l’École Française de Rome 353), Rom 2005, 388-389.
Suceveanu, Al./ Barnea, Al.: La Dobroudja romaine, Bukarest 1991, 25f.
LR/15.02.2006–r/29.07.08
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
308
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Salvianus = Calpurnius Salvianus
0. Onomastisches
Der Name Calpurnius ist besonders in Hispanien weit verbreitet. In republikanischer Zeit
bekleideten mehrere Caplurnii Pisones hohe Ämter in den Provinzen der iberischen Halbinsel
(Castillo García 1975, 637; Hofmann-Löbel 1996, 328-330).
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
Belegt a. 48. Seine hispanische Herkunft ist nicht eindeutig nachweisbar. Castillo García
1975, 637 vermutet eine Verwandtschaft mit dem Calpurnius Salvianus, der später Sex.
Marius vor Tiberius anklagte und ins Exil geschickt wurde.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Beteiligte sich a. 48 an der Verschwörung gegen den caesarischen Statthalter Q. Cassius
Longinus in Hispanien. Wurde anschließend gefangengenommen und verriet nach seiner
Folterung weitere Mitverschwörer. War sehr wohlhabend, da er sich später für 60.000
Sesterzen seine Freilassung erkaufen konnte (Bell. Alex. 53,2; 54,3-5; Val. Max. 9,4,2).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Münzer, Friedrich: Calpurnius Salvianus, RE 3,1, 1897, 1401.
DNP –.
Castillo García, Carmen: Städte und Personen der Baetica, ANRW II 3, 1975, 601-53, bes. 637.
Hofmann-Löbel, Iris: Die Calpurnii. Politisches Wirken und familiäre Kontinuität, Frankfurt/M. 1996, 328-30.
JL/29.09.04–r/30.06.07
Sampsigeramos I., Phylarch oder König von Emesa [Var. Sampsikeramos]
0. Onomastisches
Sampsikeramos bei Strab. geogr. 16,2,10f. (753) und Diod. 40,1b. Weiteres unter
Sampsigeramos II.
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemmata Emesener
Belegt für die Mitte des 1. Jhs.; Vater des Iamblichos I.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
309
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Nahm Antiochos XIII. Philadelphos (Asiatikos) während dessen Herrschaft Mitte der 60er
Jahre gefangen und ließ ihn später umbringen (Diod. 40,1b). Verständigte sich offenbar mit
Cn. Pompeius Magnus procos. 66-62/61. Cicero verwendet seinen Namen a. 59 wiederholt
als Sobriquet für Pompeius im Zusammenhang mit dessen politischen Schwierigkeiten (Att.
2,14,1=34 ShB; 2,16,2=36; 2,17,1f.=37; 2,23,2f.=43). Unterstützte mit seinem Sohn die
Rebellion des Caecilius Bassus gegen C. Iulius Caesar ca. a. 46/43. Vgl. Strab. geogr.
16,2,10 [753], wo Sampsigeramos und Iamblichos als Phylarchen bezeichnet werden.
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Stähelin: Sampsigeramos [1], RE 1A,2, 1920, 2226f.
Schottky, Martin: Sampsigeramos [1], DNP 11, 2001, 29.
Rochette, Bruno: Les sobriquets de Pompée dans la correspondance de Cicéron, Latomus 61, 2002, 43f.
Sullivan, Richard D.: The Dynasty of Emesa, ANRW II 8, 1977, 199-205.
Sullivan, Richard D.: Near Eastern Royalty and Rome, 100-30 B.C., Toronto 1990, 64; 199f.
MT/06.12.06–r/03.07.07/03.03.12
Sampsigeramos II., König von Emesa
0. Onomastisches
Lat. Samsigeramus (CIL 3,14387a = IGLS 6,2760 = D 8958), griech. Σαμψιγέραμος (Ios.
Ant. 19,338–342). Aram. Namensform [ŠM]ŠGRM (PAT 2754). Der aram. Name bedeutet
wohl ‚ŠMŠ hat entschieden‘ und ist auch z.B. in Edessa bezeugt (vgl. Drijvers/Healey 1999,
49f. [Nr. As 2:4]; 165. Liber Legum Regionum ed. F. Nau [PO 2] Paris 1907, p. 536. Doctrina
Addai ed. G. Phillips, London 1876, p. A: ŠMŠGRM). Da sein Vater Iamblichus bereits die
tria nomina trug, lautete der volle römische Name wohl C. Iulius Samsigeramus (vgl. auch
CIL 6,35556a).
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
Bezeugt als König von Emesa (lat. Titel: rex magnus, aram.: [ML]K’ RŠY’) ab ca. 17–19
n. Chr. (PAT 2754); seine Regierung endete zwischen 42 und 53 n. Chr. (Ios. Ant. 19,338.
20,139). Sartre 2005, 76 nennt als Regierungsdaten 14–48 n. Chr., doch sind diese Daten
unsicher. Verheiratet wohl mit Iotape, Tochter des Königs Mithradates III. von Kommagene
(Sullivan 1977, 212). Kinder: Azizus (König und Nachfolger, Ios. Ant. 20,158); rex magnus
C. Iulius Sohaemus (CIL 3,14387a = IGLS 6,2760 = D 8958), Iotape (verheiratet mit dem
Herodianer Aristobulos; deren Tochter hieß ebenfalls Iotape, Ios. Ant. 18,135). Ein in Italien
verstorbener Freigelassener dieses (?) Königs ist durch eine Inschrift in Rom bezeugt (CIL
6,35556a: C. Iulio, regis / Samsicerami / l(iberto), Glaco. Vgl. Ricci 1996, 592 mit Inschrift
Nr. 29). Ein weiterer C. Iulius Samsigeramus, der im Jahre 78/9 n.Chr. ein Grabmonument in
Emesa errichten ließ (IGLS 5,2212), ist möglicherweise ein Familienangehöriger (vgl. PIR2 I
542. Millar 1993, 84; 303. Chad 1972, 92f. Sullivan 1990, Stemma 6 [Cousins?]); auch die
benachbarte Nekropole von Tell Abou Saboun (bes. das in die 1. Hälfte bzw. Mitte des 1. Jhs.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
310
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
n.Chr. zu datierende Grab Nr. 1) wurde mit der emesenischen Königsdynastie in Verbindung
gebracht (vgl. Oenbrink 2009, bes. 205).
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Teilnehmer an der Fürstenkonferenz von Tiberias als Gast Agrippas I. (42 n.Chr., Ios. Ant.
19,338-342); der römische Statthalter von Syria, C. Vibius Marsus, schickte Sampsigeramus
und die anderen Fürsten indes in ihre Reiche zurück, weil er (so Ios.) argwöhnte, die
Zusammenarbeit der Dynasten könnte für Rom von Nachteil sein. Ricci 1996, 592 vermutet
aufgrund der Inschrift CIL 6,35556a, daß er zu unbestimmter Zeit zu einem Besuch nach Rom
kam, doch ist dies spekulativ. Um 17-19 n.Chr. erscheint sein Name im Zusammenhang mit
der Aussendung des Palmyreners Alexandros durch Germanicus an den Hof des Königs von
Charakene-Mesene (PAT 2754, vgl. Schuol 2000, 47f.); die Hintergründe sind hier leider
unklar, die Inschrift zeigt aber, daß diplomatische Kontakte mit der römischen Führung
existierten.
3. Auswahlbibliographie
PIR2 I 541
Chad, C.: Les dynastes d’Émèse. Beyrouth 1972, 62ff.
Drijvers, H.J.W./Healey, J.F.: The Old Syriac Inscriptions of Edessa and Osrhoene. Texts, Translations and
Commentary (HdO 1,42). Leiden 1999
Millar, F.: The Roman Near East 31 BC – AD 337. Cambridge, Mass. u.a. 1993, bes. 301ff.
Oenbrink, W.: „… nach römischer Art aus Ziegelsteinen …“ Das Grabmonument des Gaius Iulius
Samsigeramos im Spannungsfeld zwischen Fremdeinflüssen und lokaler Identität, in: M. Blömer u.a. (Hrsg.):
Lokale Identität im Römischen Nahen Osten (Oriens et Occidens 18). Stuttgart 2009, 189–221
PAT = Hillers, D.R./Cussini, E. (Eds.): Palmyrene Aramaic Texts. Baltimore 1996
Ricci, C.: Principes et reges externi (e loro schiavi e liberti) a Roma e in Italia. Testimonianze epigrafiche di età
imperiale, in: Accademia nazionale dei Lincei, Classe di scienze morali, storiche e filologiche, Rendiconti
Ser. 9, 7 (1996), 561–592
Sartre, M.: The Middle East under Rome. Cambridge u.a. 2005, 76f.
Schuol, M.: Die Charakene. Ein mesopotamisches Königreich in hellenistisch-parthischer Zeit (Oriens et
Occidens 1). Stuttgart 2000
Seyrig, H.: Antiquités syriennes 53. — Antiquités de la nécropole d’Émèse (lre partie), in: Syria 29 (1952), 204–
250
Sullivan, R.D.: Near Eastern Royalty and Rome, 100–30 BC. Toronto u.a. 1990, 202; 326f.
Sullivan, R.D.: The Dynasty of Emesa, in: ANRW II,8 (1977), 212–215
AL/15.3.2011 – r/03.03.12
Saxa (I.) aus Hispanien = L. Decidius Saxa
0. Onomastisches
Cicero beschreibt ihn als ex ultima Celtiberia (Cic. Phil. 11,12) und ex ultimis gentibus (Cic.
Phil. 13,27), was Münzer 1901, 2271 und Wiegels 1971, Nr. 69 als Beleg für eine indigene
Herkunft deuten. Syme 1937, 132f. hat jedoch auf die Verbreitung des Namens Decidius in
Zentralitalien hingewiesen. Demnach handele es sich um einen römischen Bürger, dessen
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
311
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Familie italischen Ursprungs gewesen und später nach Hispanien emigriert sei. Zeidler 2005,
181 erwägt im vorliegenden Fall dagegen eine keltische Etymologie.
Das Cognomen Saxa ist bei Kajanto 1965 nicht berücksichtigt; er erwähnt jedoch S. 106 den
Namen Saxula, für den er eine etruskische Herkunft vermutet. Demgegenüber erkennt
Dondin-Payre 2001, 288 einen keltischen Ursprung von Saxxa. Ausführlicheres zur
Möglichkeit einer keltischen Herleitung bei Zeidler 2005, 181f., der aber die Entscheidung
offenläßt. Sowohl das (?Pseudo-) Gentiliz als auch das Cognomen scheinen keltisch-römische
Interferenznamen zu sein.
[AC/28.09.04–r/28.06.07]
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
Belegt a. 49-41. Bruder des Decidius Saxa. Syme 1939, 80 erwägt ebenfalls eine
Verwandschaft mit dem samnitischen Proskribierten Cn. Decidius, der von C. Iulius Caesar
vor Gericht verteidigt wurde (Tac. dial. 21,6; Cic. Cluent. 161). Tr. pleb. 44; procos. Syr. 41.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Diente C. Iulius Caesar als castrorum metator in seiner ersten Kriegskampagne gegen die
Legaten des Cn. Pompeius Magnus in Hispanien a. 49 (Cic. Phil. 11,12; 14,10). Dort leistete
er besonders als Ortskundiger wichtige Arbeit: postero die Petreius cum paucis equitibus
occulte ad exploranda loca proficiscitur. hoc idem fit ex castris Caesaris. mittitur L. Decidius
Saxa cum paucis, qui loci perspiciat (Caes. civ. 1,66,3).
Wahrscheinlich auch am Feldzug gegen die Pompeiussöhne in Hispanien a. 45 beteiligt. A. 44
von Caesar zum tribunus plebis ernannt (Cic. Phil. 11,12; 13,27; Cass. Dio 43,51,6). Wohl in
diesem Zusammenhang als einer der ersten Provinzialen in den Senatorenstand erhoben.
Nach dem Tod Caesars Anschluß an M. Antonius. Dieser verschaffte ihm Ländereien in
Campanien (Cic. Phil. 8,9). Syme 1937, 135f. vermutet ebenfalls seine Zugehörigkeit als
VIIvir agr. divid. zur Kommission der divisores Italiae, die im Juni 44 eingesetzt wurde.
Unterstützte Antonius in der Schlacht bei Mutina, wofür er von Cicero scharf kritisiert wurde
(Cic. Phil. 8,9; 8,26; 10,22; 11,12; 11,37; 12,20; 13,2; 13,27; 14,10). Führte zusammen mit L.
Norbanus die Vorhut des Heeres der Triumvirn gegen M. Iunius (Q. Servilius Caepio)
Brutus und C. Cassius Longinus a. 42 nach Makedonien (App. civ. 4,87,368; 102/3,430/1;
Cass. Dio 47,35,2; Plut. Brut. 38; Zon. 10,19).
Begleitete Antonius nach der Schlacht von Philippoi als Legat in die Provinz Asia (Vell.
2,78,1). Ernennung zum procos. Syr. 41 (Cass. Dio 48,24,3). Beim Parthereinfall des Q.
Labienus erlitt Saxa eine schwere Niederlage und starb kurze Zeit später (Liv. per. 127; Flor.
2,19,4; Vell. 2,78,1; Cass. Dio 48,25,3f.).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
312
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Münzer, Friedrich: L. Decidius Saxa, RE 4,2, 1901, 2271.
Elvers, Karl-Ludwig: L. Decidius Saxa, DNP 3, 1997, 345.
Caballos Rufino, Antonio: Los senadores de origen hispano durante la república romana, in: Julián González
(Hg.): Estudios sobre Urso Colonia Iulia Genetiva, Sevilla 1989, 233-79, bes. 256-258.
Dondin-Payre, Monique/ Rapsaet-Charlier, Marie-Thérèse (Hgg.): Noms, identités culturelles et romanisation
sous le haut empire, Brüssel 2001, 288.
Kajanto, I.: The Latin Cognomina, Helsinki 1965, 106.
Syme, Ronald: Who was Decidius Saxa?, JRS 27, 1937, 127-137.
Syme, Ronald: The Roman Revolution, Oxford 1939, Nd. 1966, 80.
Weinrib, Joseph E.: The Spaniards in Rome. From Marius to Domitian, New York 1990, 58f.
Wiegels, Rainer: Die römischen Senatoren und Ritter aus den hispanischen Provinzen bis Diokletian, Diss.
Solingen 1971, Nr. 69.
Wiseman, Timothy P.: New Men in the Roman Senate 139 B.C.-A.D. 14, Oxford 1971, 228.
Zeidler, Jürgen: Onomastic Studies on Some Roman Amici in Hispania, in: Altay Coskun (Hg.): Roms
auswärtige Freunde in der späten Republik und im frühen Prinzipat, Göttingen 2005, 175-200, 180-82.
JL/29.09.04–r/30.06.07
Saxa (II.) aus Hispanien = Decidius Saxa aus Hispanien
0. Onomastisches
Praenomen unbekannt. Zum nomen gentile und cognomen s. L. Decidius Saxa.
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
Belegt a. 41-40. Bruder des L. Decidius Saxa. Quaest. und proquaest. Syr. 41/40.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Ernennung zum Quästor durch C. Iulius Caesar und Erhebung in den Senatorenstand.
Fungierte als Proquästor seines Bruders L. Decidius Saxa procos. Syr. a. 41-40 in Syrien.
Verteidigte während des Parthereinfalls des Q. Labienus als Befehlshaber die Stadt Apameia
(Cass. Dio 48,25,2), wobei er wahrscheinlich getötet wurde.
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Münzer, Friedrich: Decidius Saxa, RE 4,2, 1901, 2271.
DNP –.
Wiegels, Rainer: Die römischen Senatoren und Ritter aus den hispanischen Provinzen bis Diokletian, Diss.
Solingen 1971, Nr. 68.
Weiteres unter L. Decidius Saxa.
JL/29.09.04–r/28.06.07
Scapula (I.) aus Hispania Ulterior = Annius Scapula
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
313
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
Belegt a. 48. Wahrscheinlich römischer Ritter. Cognomen und politische Parteinahme
könnten auf eine Verwandtschaft mit T. Quinctius Scapula hinweisen.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Wird in Bell. Alex. 55,2 als homo provincialis maximae dignitatis et gratiae bezeichnet.
Anstifter der Verschwörung gegen den caesarischen Statthalter der Hispania Ulterior Q.
Cassius Longinus (Bell. Hisp. 33,3f.). Dieser ließ ihn daraufhin trotz des vorher guten
Verhältnisses töten (Bell. Alex. 55,2).
Castillo García 1975, 634 glaubt in der Inschrift von Salpensa (CIL II 1290) ebenfalls eine
Spur des Annius Scapula zu besitzen.
3. Auswahlbibliographie
RE –; DNP –.
Caballos Rufino, Antonio: Los senadores de origen hispano durante la república romana, in: Julián González
(Hg.): Estudios sobre Urso Colonia Iulia Genetiva, Sevilla 1989, 233-79, bes. 266.
Castillo García, Carmen: Städte und Personen der Baetica, ANRW II 3, 1975, 601-654, bes. 634f.
Wiegels, Rainer: Die römischen Senatoren und Ritter aus den hispanischen Provinzen bis Diokletian, Diss.
Solingen 1971, Nr. 217.
JL/29.09.04.-r/29.09.04/30.06.07/17.04.10
Scapula (II.) aus Hispania Ulterior (?) = T. Quinctius Scapula
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
Belegt für a. 46-45. Römischer Ritter; seine Herkunft aus der Hispania Ulterior ist nicht
absolut gesichert. Cognomen und politische Parteinahme könnten auf Verwandtschaft mit
Annius Scapula aus Hispania Ulterior hinweisen.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Einer der führenden Hetzer gegen C. Iulius Caesar in Hispanien a. 46 (Cass. Dio 43,29,3;
Cic. fam. 9,13,1=311 ShB) und Anhänger der Pompeius-Söhne (Cass. Dio 43,30,2). Gehörte
dem Ritterstand an (Bell. Hisp. 33).
Beteiligte sich a. 45 an der Schlacht bei Munda und gab sich anschließend in Corduba den
Tod (Bell. Hisp. 33): Scapula, totius seditionis familiae et libertinorum caput, ex proelio
Cordubam venisset, familiam et libertos convocavit, pyram sibi extruxit [...]: pecuniam et
argentum in praesentia familiae donavit.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
314
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
M. Tullius Cicero erwähnt in zwei Briefen des gleichen Jahres anläßlich des Kaufs eines
Grundstücks heredes Scapulae und horti Scapulani in Rom (Cic. Att. 12,38a,2=279 ShB und
12,40,4=281 ShB). Wiegels 1971, Nr. 321 erwägt, daß es sich um Besitzungen des Quinctius
Scapula handeln könnte, was trotzdem nicht zwingend auf eine italische Herkunft hindeuten
müßte.
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Gundel, H.: T. Quinctius [54] Scapula, RE 24, 1963, 1103.
Fündling, Jörg: T. Quinctius Scapula, DNP 10, 2001, 711.
Caballos Rufino, Antonio: Los senadores de origen hispano durante la república romana, in: Julián González
(Hg.): Estudios sobre Urso Colonia Iulia Genetiva, Sevilla 1989, 233-79, bes. 266.
Wiegels Rainer: Die römischen Senatoren und Ritter aus den hispanischen Provinzen bis Diokletian, Diss.
Solingen 1971, Nr. 321.
JL/29.09.04-r/29.09.04/30.06.07/08.03.10/17.04.10
Seleukos Kybiosaktes
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältisse
 Stemmata Seleukiden,  Stemmata Ptolemäer
Jüngerer Sohn von Antiochos X. Eusebes und Kleopatra Selene, der ehemaligen
Schwestergattin des Ptolemaios IX. Philometor (Lathyros); Bruder des Antiochos XIII.
Philadelphos (Asiatikos).
2. Verhältnis zu Rom/ Römern und Karrierverlauf
Meldete a. 73 zusammen mit seinem Bruder in Rom unter Berufung auf die Mutter Ansprüche
auf den ägyptischen Thron an, den seit a. 80 Ptolemaios XII. innehatte. Ansprüche wurden
vom Senat abgelehnt. Heirat mit Berenike IV., die während des Exils ihres Vaters Ptolemaios
XII. über Ägypten herrschte. Wurde nach kurzer Zeit wegen seines angeblich schlechten
Charakters auf Befehl der Königin ermordet (Strab. geogr. 17,1,11 [796]; Cass. Dio 39,37,1).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Stähelin, Felix: Seleukos [10] und [11], RE 2,A,1, 1921, 1246.
Ameling, Walter: Seleukos [12], DNP 11, 2001, 365.
Bloedow, Edmund: Beiträge zur Geschichte Ptolemaios’ XII., Diss. Würzburg 1964, 69f.
Heinen, Heinz: Séleucos Cybiosactès et le problème de son identité, in: L. Cerfaux u.a. (Hgg.): Antidorum W.
Peremans, Stud. Hellenistica 16, 1968, 105-114.
Hölbl, Günther: Geschichte des Ptolemäerreiches, Darmstadt 1994, 201.
Huß, Werner: Ägypten in hellenistischer Zeit, 332-30 v.Chr., München 2001, 693.
Olshausen, Eckart: Rom und Ägypten von 116 bis 51 v.Chr., Diss. Erlangen 1963, 59.
Siani-Davies, Mary: Ptolemy XII Auletes and the Romans, Historia 46, 1997, 306-340, bes. 324.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
315
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Sullivan, Richard D.: Near Eastern Royalty and Rome, 100-30 B.C., Toronto 1990, 241.
KC/30.09.04-r/30.09.04/30.06.07
Seleukos III. Soter Keraunos, König des Seleukidenreichs
0. Onomastisches
Seleukos III. hieß vor seiner Thronbesteigung Alexandros und nahm erst als König den
dynastischen Namen Seleukos an (Porphyr. FGrH 260 F 32,9).
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemmata Seleukiden
Älterer Sohn und Nachfolger Seleukos’ II. Kallinikos, Bruder und Vorgänger Antiochos’ III.
des Großen. Um 244/3 v.Chr. geboren; regierte ab 226/5 das Seleukidenreich; wurde 223 auf
einem Feldzug in Phrygien vergiftet.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Nach dem Tod seines Vaters 226/5 an die Regierung gelangt (Polyb. 4,48,5), versuchte
Seleukos III., die unter seinem Vater Seleukos II. weitgehend an Attalos I. Soter von
Pergamon verlorenen kleinasiatischen Besitzungen zurückzugewinnen (Polyb. 4,48,6f.). Nach
Mißerfolgen seiner Feldherrn (OGIS I 272 und 277) zog Seleukos III. im Jahre 223 persönlich
mit einem Heer nach Kleinasien. In Phrygien wurde er von Höflingen vergiftet (Polyb. 4,48,8;
App. Syr. 66); seine Truppen riefen zunächst seinen General Achaios zum König aus, einen
Sohn des Andromachos, der aus einer Seitenlinie des Seleukidenhauses stammte. Achaios
verzichtete jedoch (vorübergehend) auf die Herrschaft (Polyb. 5,48,10f.) zugunsten
Antiochos’ III., des jüngeren Bruders des verstorbenen Seleukos’ III., der dann im Sommer
223 die Regierung übernahm (Polyb. 5,34,2 und 40,6; App. Syr. 66; Iust. 29,1,3).
Seleukos III. mag eine wichtige Rolle in der Etablierung römisch-seleukidischer Beziehungen
gehabt haben, bedenkt man die bei Sueton erhaltene Tradition, Kaiser Claudius habe einen
alten Brief des römischen Staats an einen ansonsten nicht näher umschriebenen König
Seleukos gefunden. Senat und Volk forderten Seleukos hierin auf, die Autonomie der
kleinasiatischen Stadt Ilion zu respektieren, und versprachen im Gegenzug amicitia und
societas (Suet. Claud. 25,3): Iliensibus quasi Romanae gentis auctoribus tributa in perpetuum
remisit recitata vetere epistula Graeca senatus populique R. Seleuco regi amicitiam et
societatem ita demum pollicentis, si consanguineos suos Ilienses ab omni onere immunes
praestitisset.
Die Authentizität des Briefs ist umstritten und hier letztlich kaum zu klären (Fälschung:
Holleaux 46-60; authentisch: De Sanctis 1,269; Schmitt 1964, 291 und 293; Gruen 64f.;
Grainger 2002, 10f.). Hauptstreitpunkte sind zum einen der Nutzen, den der Brief der Stadt
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
316
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Ilion brachte und der daher auch eine Fälschung motivieren mochte, zum anderen das durch
den Brief implizierte, sehr frühe Einsetzen einer gezielt mit der angeblichen troischen
Abstammung der Römer argumentierenden Orientpolitik des Senats. Betrachtet man den Brief
als authentisch, kommen als Datierung zunächst nur die Mitt-240er in Frage, als Seleukos II.
Kleinasien vor dem Aufstand seines Bruders Antiochos Hierax kontrollierte, oder aber die
kurze Regierungszeit Seleukos’ III. Bedenkt man nun, daß Hierax in Ilion eine Münzstätte
besaß (vgl. Boehringer 1993), die er bis zu seinem Tod um 229/8 kontrollierte, wird die Stadt
erst danach durch einen potentiellen Angriff eines Seleukiden gefährdet und für Rom
interessant geworden sein. Da Rom in den 240er Jahren zudem durch den Ersten Punischen
Krieg beschäftigt war, scheint eine Datierung in die Zeit Seleukos’ III. wohl die
wahrscheinlichste, zumal sich der König zur Zeit seines Todes gerade in Phrygien aufhielt,
also in unmittelbarer Nähe zu Ilion (Grainger 2002, 10f.).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Stähelin, Felix: Seleukos [5] III. Soter oder Keraunos, RE 2A 1, 1921, 1241f.
Mehl, Andreas: Seleukos [5] III. Soter Keraunos, DNP 11, 2001, 363.
Bevan, Edwyn R.: The House of Seleucus, London 1902, 203-205.
Boehringer, Christof: Antiochos Hierax am Hellespont, in: Martin Price et al. (Hgg.): Essays in Honour of
Robert Carson and Kenneth Jenkings, London 1993, 37-47.
Bouché-Leclercq, Auguste: Histoire des Séleucides (323-64 avant J.-C.), Bd. 1, Paris 1913, 120-122.
De Sanctis, Gaetano: Storia dei Romani, Bd. 3, Teil 1, Turin/Florenz 21957.
Grainger, John D.: A Seleukid Prosopography and Gazetteer, Leiden/New York/Köln 1997, 63.
Grainger, John D.: The Roman War of Antiochos the Great, Leiden/Boston 2002.
Gruen, Erich S.: The Hellenistic World and the Coming of Rome, Berkeley 1984.
Holleaux, Maurice: Rome, la Grèce et les monarchies hellénistiques au IIIe siècle avant J.-C. (273-205), Paris
1921.
Otto, Walter: Beiträge zur Seleukidengeschichte des 3. Jhs. v.Chr., München 1928.
Schmitt, Hatto H.: Untersuchungen zur Geschichte Antiochos’ des Großen und seiner Zeit, Wiesbaden 1964.
Schmitt, Hatto H.: Art. Seleukidenreich II 7 (Seleukos III.), LH 2005, 967f.
DaE/31.07.08–r/31.07.08
Seleukos IV. Philopator, König des Seleukidenreichs
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemmata Seleukiden
Sohn und Nachfolger Antiochos’ III. des Großen, Bruder und Vorgänger Antiochos’ IV.
Epiphanes, Vater Demetrios’ I. Soter. Nach 220 v.Chr. geboren; regierte ab 187 das
Seleukidenreich; wurde am 3.9.175 von seinem Kanzler Heliodoros ermordet.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Seit 196 Vizekönig Thrakiens (Polyb. 18,51,8; Liv. 33,40f.; App. Syr. 3), führte Seleukos IV.
mehrere Militärkommanden im Krieg seines Vaters gegen die Pergamener und Römer, wobei
er L. Cornelius Scipio praet. 174 gefangen nehmen konnte (Liv. 37,8,5; 11,15; 12,5; 18,1-6;
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
317
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
19,7; 21,4). Bei der Schlacht von Apameia befehligte er den linken Flügel des seleukidischen
Heeres (Liv. 37,41,1; App. Syr. 33). Nach der Niederlage mußte er Cn. Manlius Vulso cos.
189 auf seinem Zug gegen die Galater unterstützen (Liv. 38,13,8f.) und wirkte seit 189 als
Mitregent seines Vaters Antiochos III. Nach dem Tod seines Vaters 187 versuchte er, das
durch den Frieden von Apameia im Westen auf die cistaurischen Regionen beschränkte und
im Osten durch den Abfall weiter Teile der Oberen Satrapien geschwächte Reich innen und
außen neu zu konsolidieren. Daher war er zunächst um gute Kontakte zu den Römern und
ihren Alliierten bemüht und erneuerte etwa den Freundschaftsvertrag mit dem Achaischen
Bund (Polyb. 22,10-12; Diod. 29,17).
Als allerdings der pontisch-pergamenische Konflikt (183-179) zwischen Pharnakes I. von
Pontos und Mithradates von Kleinarmenien auf der einen Seite und Eumenes II. von
Pergamon, Ariarathes IV. von Kappadokien und Prusias II von Bithynien auf der anderen
Seite Kleinasien in zwei Lager teilte, marschierte Seleukos IV. im Jahr 183 zunächst mit
starken Truppen zu den Tauruspässen, um Kappadokien anzugreifen, wahrte aber im letzten
Moment trotz eines Angebots von 500 Talenten seitens Pharnakes die Neutralität (Polyb. frg.
96; Diod. 29,24). Hierzu hatte ihn vielleicht die Gegenwart des T. Quinctius Flamininus cos.
198 im Osten des Mittelmeers bewogen, der als Botschafter Roms zu Prusias und auch
Seleukos IV. geschickt worden war (Polyb. 23,5).
Ähnlich bezeichnend ist, daß Seleukos IV. nach dem Tod Philipps V. von Makedonien 178
dessen Nachfolger Perseus seine Tochter Laodike zur Ehe anbot (IG XI 4, 1074; Liv. 42,12,3)
und durch diese Hochzeit nicht nur enge familiäre Beziehungen zu den Antigoniden schuf,
sondern auch seine unabhängige Haltung gegen Rom zum Ausdruck brachte. Hierin wurde er
unterstützt durch Rhodos, welches die Seleukidenprinzessin ostentativ mit einer starken Flotte
nach Makedonien geleitete (Polyb. 25,4,8) und durch diese Ehrung der beiden ehemals
feindlich gesinnten hellenistischen Monarchien Rom bewußt brüskierte. Denn Rhodos fühlte
sich doch trotz der Territorialgewinne durch den Vertrag von Apameia durch die zunehmend
unverhüllt hegemoniale Ostpolitik der Römer zurückgesetzt und wollte seine Autonomie
demonstrieren (Gruen 1975). Daß sowohl die seleukidische als auch die rhodische Haltung als
antirömisch aufgefaßt werden konnte, beweist die Rede Eumenes’ II. in Rom, welcher
Perseus, die Seleukiden und die Rhodier als unzuverlässige, ja sogar verdächtige Verbündete
Roms erscheinen lassen wollte (App. Mak. 18); lediglich Rhodos wurde allerdings 177 durch
eine Uminterpretation des Vertrags von Apameia bestraft, da die eben erst Rhodos
zugesprochenen Lykier nun als Bundesgenossen und nicht mehr als Untertanen gelten sollten
(Polyb. 25,5).
Dennoch ist zu vermuten, daß Seleukos IV. als amicus des römischen Volkes galt (Stähelin
1921, 1244), war doch auch sein Vater Antiochos III. durch die Vertragsbedingungen von
Apameia zum amicus geworden (Liv. 38,38,12-18). Konkrete Belege für den amicus-Titel
fehlen allerdings. Zwar sollte sich Antiochos IV. explizit auf die vertraglich festgelegte
Freundschaftsbeziehung zwischen Antiochos III. und Rom berufen, um eine Erneuerung
derselben zu erbitten (Liv. 42,6,8 und 10): petere regem, ut, quae cum patre suo societas
atque amicitia fuisset, ea secum renovaretur, imperaretque sibi populus Romanus, quae bono
fidelique socio regi essent imperanda [...]. legatis benigne responsum, et societatem renovare
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
318
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
cum Antiocho, quae cum patre eius fuerat, A. Atilius praetor urbanus iussus. Doch ist
zumindest erstaunlich, daß Antiochos’ Gesandter Apollonios Livius zufolge nur auf den Vater
Antiochos III., nicht aber, wie eigentlich zu erwarten wäre, auch auf den Bruder Seleukos IV.
verweist.
Bemüht um die Zahlung der im Vertrag von Apameia festgesetzten Kriegskontributionen,
welche in Rückstand geraten war (Liv. 42,6,6f.), beauftragte Seleukos IV. im Jahr 180 seinen
Kanzler Heliodoros (OGIS I 247) mit der Einziehung von Depositengeldern des Jerusalemer
Tempels. Diese Maßnahme stieß offenbar auf Widerstand (Dan 11,20; 2 Makk 3,2-4,7;
Hieron. in Dan. 11,20), welcher vielleicht eine Bestechung des Heliodoros durch die jüdische
Elite kaschieren sollte, tötete dieser doch angeblich am 3.9.175 seinen König (App. Syr. 45).
Kurz vor seiner Ermordung hatte Seleukos IV. allerdings seinen als Geisel in Rom
befindlichen Bruder Antiochos (IV.) durch Stellung seines eigenen Sohnes Demetrios (I.)
ausgelöst (Polyb. 31,12,1; App. Syr. 45), vielleicht auf Druck Roms, welches im späteren
Antiochos IV. ein Druckmittel gegen Seleukos IV. sah (Will 1972, 617; Mittag 2006, 40).
Inwieweit seine Ermordung durch Heliodoros daher zunächst den Beifall Roms fand, das
eventuell an einer Vormundschaftsregierung für den in Rom befindlichen Demetrios oder
sogar für einen anderen, unmündigen Sohn Seleukos’ IV. (Diod. 30,7,2; Ioh. Ant. frg. 58 =
FHG IV 558; Porphyr. FGrH 260 F 32,11) interessiert gewesen sein mochte oder gar den Weg
für Antiochos IV. freimachen wollte (Bouché-Leclercq 1913, 240f.), ist ungewiß. Denkbar ist
auch, daß Seleukos IV. eines natürlichen Todes starb und Heliodor erst später durch
Antiochos IV. des Mordes bezichtigt wurde (Grainger 1997, 23).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Stähelin, Felix: Seleukos [6] IV. Philopator, RE 2A,1, 1921, 1242-1245.
Mehl, Andreas: Seleukos [6] IV. Philopator, DNP 11, 2001, 363-364.
Bevan, Edwyn R.: The House of Seleucus, London 1902, 120-125.
Bikerman, Elias: Héliodore au temple de Jérusalem, AIPhO 7, 1939-1944, 5-40.
Bouché-Leclercq, Auguste: Histoire des Séleucides (323-64 avant J.-C.), Bd. 1, Paris 1913, 227-243.
Grainger, John D.: A Seleukid Prosopography and Gazetteer, Leiden/New York/Köln 1997, 63-65.
Gruen, Erich S.: Rome and Rhodes in the Second Century B.C., CQ 69, 1975, 58-81.
Le Rider, Georges: Les ressources financières de Séleucos IV (187-175) et le paiement de l’indemnité aux
Romains, in: Martin J. Price et al. (Hgg.): Essays in Honour of Robert Carson and Kenneth Jenkins, London
1993, 49-67.
Mittag, Peter: Antiochos IV. Epiphanes. Eine politische Biographie, Berlin 2006.
Schmitt, Hatto H.: Seleukidenreich II 7 (Seleukos IV), LH 2005, 972f.
Will, Edouard: Rome et les Séleucides, ANRW I 1, 1972, 590-632.
DaE/22.07.08–r/31.07.08
Seleukos V., König des Seleukidenreichs
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienvrhältnisse
 Stemmata Seleukiden
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
319
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Älterer Sohn des Demetrios II. Theos Philadelphos Nikator und der Kleopatra Thea,
Herrscher des Seleukidenreichs 125, von seiner Mutter ermordet und von seinem Bruder
Antiochos VIII. Epiphanes Philometor Kallinikos (Grypos) in der Herrschaft gefolgt. Er ist
nicht mit Seleukos, dem Sohn Antiochos’ VII. Euergetes Sidetes, der 129 in parthische
Gefangenschaft geriet, zu verwechseln; vgl. Fischer, 1970, 49ff.
2. Verhältnis zu den Römern und Karriereverlauf
Nach dem Tode Demetrios’ II. erklärte sich dessen Frau Kleopatra Thea zur Regentin (Newell
1977, LSM 10, Nr. 7). Seleukos V. nahm ohne Zustimmung der Mutter (Iust. 39,1,9: sine
matris auctoritate) das Diadem auf, wurde von dieser aber fast unverzüglich hinterlistig
ermordet (Euseb. chron. 1,257f. = FGrH 260 F 32,22; Iust. 39,1,9). Offenbar hatte der König
keine Zeit zu eigener Münzprägung. Der Bericht bei Johannes Antiochenus (Müller, FHG IV
561, F 66,3 = Roberto F 144) demzufolge ein Seleukos genannter Sohn Demetrios’ II. von
seiner Mutter Apama in Damaskos ermordet wurde, ist wohl eine etwas verzerrte Dublette
dieses Falls (Ehling 2008, 213).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Stähelin, Felix: Seleukos [8] V., RE 2,A,1, 1921, 1245.
Vgl. Mehl, Andreas: Antiochos [9] VII. Euergetes, DNP 1, 1996, 770.
Schmitt, Hatto H.: Art. Seleukidenreich II 13 (Demetrios II.; sic), in: LH 2005, 978-983.
Bevan, Edwyn R.: The House of Seleucus, London 1902, 250.
Bouché-Leclercq, Auguste: Histoire des Séleucides (323-64 avant J.-C.), Bd. 2, Paris 1913, 396.
Ehling, Kay: Untersuchungen zur Geschichte der späten Seleukiden (164-63 v.Chr.), Stuttgart 2008, 213.
Grainger, John D.: A Seleukid Prosopography and Gazetteer, Leiden/New York/Köln 1997, 65.
Newell, E.T.: Late Seleucid Mints in Ake-Ptolemais and Damascus, New York 1977.
DaE/08.11.09–r/23.02.10
Silo aus Hispanien = Minucius Silo
0. Onomastisches
(?Pseudo-) Gentiliz und Cognomen könnten auf eine keltiberische Abstammung verweisen;
vgl. Zeidler 2005, 186f.
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
Belegt für a. 48. Seine hispanische Herkunft ist nicht eindeutig nachweisbar.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
320
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Klient des L. Racilius. Beteiligte sich a. 48 an der Verschwörung gegen den caesarischen
Statthalter Q. Cassius Longinus in Hispanien. Wurde dabei gefangengenommen und verriet
nach seiner Folterung weitere Mitverschwörer (Bell. Alex. 52,2; 53,3; 55,2-3).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Münzer, Friedrich: L. Minucius Silo, RE 15,2, 1932, 1965.
Elvers, Karl-Ludwig: L. Minucius Silo, DNP 8, 2000, 240.
Zeidler, Jürgen: Onomastic Studies on Some Roman Amici in Hispania, in: Altay Coskun (Hg.): Roms
auswärtige Freunde in der späten Republik und im frühen Prinzipat, Göttingen 2005, 175-200, 186f.
JL/29.09.04–r/28.06.07
Sitas, King of the Dentheletes
0. Onomastic Issues
The name Sitas is of Thracian origin (Tomaschek 1894/1980, 43; Detschew 1957, 452).
Detschew (1957, 453) hypothesizes that it might have been an abbreviation of Seitavenis, which
is epigraphically attested for the region of the Dentheletes (cf. Detschew 1957, 429). Sittas, Sita,
Seitas, Seitēs (with equivalents in the female names Sita and Seitē) may be encountered in Greek
inscriptions from Roman Thrace (Detschew 1957, 452-453). Cf. the Latin (Sitinius, Sitius,
Sitonius, Sittilius) and Celtic (Sita, Sitas, Sittia) parallels (Detschew 1957, 453) as well as Illyrian
Sita (Tomaschek 1894/1980, 43).
1. Central Biographical Data and Family Relations
Our records about the Thracian tribe of the Dentheletes are meagre (cf. Detschew 1957, 115116). They lived along the Upper Strymon River south of the Haemus range (Cass. Dio
51.23.4; Solin 10.6; Ptol. 3.11.6) and west of Mount Scombrus (now Vitosha; cf. Detschew
1957, 153) and Mount Dunax (now Rila; Detschew 1957, 459). Sitas is the only king mentioned
in the ancient tradition, and this solely within Cassius Dio’s narrative of the campaigns of M.
Licinius Crassus against the Bastarnae, Dacians, and the Getae in 29-28 BC (51.23-27).
Sitas was king (basileus) of the Dentheletes (51.23.4; 25.3). As in the case of other rulers of the
Bastarnae (Deldo: 51.24.4) and the Getae (Rholes: 51.24.6-7, 26.1; Dapyx: 51. 26.1-2,5;
Zyraxes: 51.26.5), Dio omits Sitas’ patronym. It is likely that this practice goes back to the
sources of the historian, if not to the official reports of Crassus’ campaign (cf. 51.27.2). In 29
BC, Sitas was renowned for being a blind man (51.23.4), which may be suggestive of his
advanced age by that time. Thus he might have seized power long before the Battle of Actium
(31 BC) and probably after the campaigns of L. Calpurnius Piso cos. 58, procos.
Macedoniae 57 against the Dentheletes, at the end of which a treaty with the Romans was
concluded (cf. Sullivan 1990, 146, 150, 322).
2. Relations with Rome/Romans and Career.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
321
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
The conditions of the treaty (spondai) of 57 BC are unknown (51.24.3). But considering the
historical role of the tribes up the Strymon (cf. Arr. anab. 1.5.2-5 on Alexander the Great; Livy
40.22.9-11; 40.57.5 on Philipp V), the Dentheletes would have been considered to function as a
bulwark for the Roman province of Macedon (cf. Sullivan 1990, 146). At the same time, they
too would have appreciated the alliance with a strong ally in the south in the face of frequent
invasions from the Lower Danube or the Haemus regions.
According to Dio, Crassus defended Sitas from the raids of the Bastarnae twice within one year
(51.23.4-7; 25.3). The first time, Crassus expelled the Bastarnae who had crossed the Haemus
and invaded the territory of the Dentheletes, without a major combat (51.23.4). After the
winter, they returned, and this time they were conquered by Crassus whose peace conditions
they had to accept (51.25.3; cf. Stein 1927, 382; Danov 1979, 124). This service to the
Dentheletes seems to imply that they had honoured the treaty with Piso, in contrast to the
neighbouring Maedi and Serdi (Liv. 51.25.4).
Select Bibliography
Stein: Sitas, RE, 3 A.1, 1927, 382.
Danov, Christo: The Thraker auf dem Ostbalkan von der hellenistischen Zeit bis zur Gründung Konstantinopels,
ANRW II 7.1, 1979, 21-185, esp. 91.
Detschew, Dimiter: Die thrakischen Sprachreste, Wien 1957.
Sullivan, Richard: Near Eastern Royalty and Rome, 100-30 BC, Toronto – Buffalo – London 1990.
Tomaschek, Wilhelm: Die alten Thraker. Eine ethnologische Untersuchung II.2 (= Sitzungsberichte der
philosophisch-historischen Klasse der kaiserlichen Akademie der Wissenschaften, 131, I. Abh.), Wien
1894/1980, 1-102.
KB/18.04.2012 – r/21.04.12
Sinatrukes Euergetes Epiphanes Philhellen, König des Partherreichs
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemmata Arsakiden
Vielleicht ein Sohn Artabanos’ I. und Bruder Phraates II., Nachfolger Orodes’ I., geboren um
157/5, bestieg um 77/75 den Thron des Partherreichs. Vater Phraates’ III., der nach seinem
Tod zwischen 71 und 68 auch sein Nachfolger wurde.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom / Römern und Karriereverlauf
Laut Lukian verbrachte Sinatrukes den größten Teil seines Lebens im Exil bei den
skythischen Sarauken und wurde im hohen Alter von 80 Jahren von diesen zum Partherkönig
eingesetzt (Luk. macr. 15), was darauf verweist, daß das Partherreich aufgrund der
armenischen Eroberung der 70 Täler, Sophenes, Gordyenes, Adiabenes und Osrhoenes wie
auch der Autonomie weiterer mesopotamischer und persischer Territorien wesentlich auf
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
322
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
seine östlichen Besitzungen beschränkt war. Diese Situation wie auch die Abhängigkeit von
den zentralasiatischen Nomaden bewirkte wohl einen bedeutenden Machtverlust des Königs
in den parthischen Restgebieten (Colledge 1967, 35), wo sich auch Arachosien und Sakastene
unabhängig gemacht hatten und ein eigenständiges indo-skythisches Königreich bildeten.
Lukian zufolge blieb Sinatrukes sieben Jahre lang König. Über seine Regierungszeit ist kaum
etwas bekannt; immerhin fiel sie in die Zeit des Ausbruchs des Dritten Mithridatischen Kriegs
im Jahre 74. Erneut blieben die Parther zunächst neutral; laut Memnon (FGrH 434 F 29,6)
lehnte Sinatrukes 73 sogar ein Hilfegesuch Mithridates’ VI. von Pontos ab, starb aber wenig
später gegen 71/70 (Wolski 1993, 124), 70/69 (Ziegler 1964, 24) oder 68 (Chaumont 1971,
162). Nachfolger wurde sein Sohn Phraates III. (App. Mithr. 104; Phlegon FGrH 257, F
12,6f.).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Stähelin, Felix: Sinatrukes, RE A 5, 1927, 222-223.
Schottky, Martin: Sanatrukes [1], DNP 11, 2001, 30.
Chaumont, Marie Louise: Études d’histoire parthe I: Documents royaux à Nisa, Syria 48, 1971, 143-164.
Colledge, Malcolm A. R.: The Parthians, London 1967, 35.
Debevoise, Neilson G.: A Political History of Parthia, Chicago 1938, 51.
Schippmann, Klaus: Grundzüge der parthischen Geschichte, Darmstadt 1980, 33f.
Wolski, Józef: L’empire des Arsacides, Louvain 1993, 122-124.
Ziegler, Karl-Heinz: Die Beziehungen zwischen Rom und dem Partherreich, Wiesbaden 1964, 24.
DE/20.02.12
Solovettios, regulus der galatischen Tolistobogier
0. Onomastisches
Der einzig bei Liv. 45,34,10-14 zum Jahr 167 v.Chr. bezeugte Name gilt zwar bei
Weisgerber, GS 155 und Freeman, GL 64 als keltisch (und fehlt wohl auch deswegen bei
Zgusta, KPN), doch scheint seine Etymologisierung unsicher, weswegen Delamarre, DLG 2
ihn ignoriert. Verweisen könnte man indes auf so-/su- ‚gut‘ (s. z.B. Eposognatos; vgl. DLG2
283) bzw. soli- < suli- ‚schöner Blick‘ (DLG2 287, vgl. z.B. die Göttin Minerva Sulis >
Sulinos/Solinus; oder Solimaros); sowie etu- ‚Weide‘ (DLG2 168, vgl. z.B. Suedius, Etuuius)
oder eher vid-/vissu- ‚Wissen‘ (DLG2 318f.).
Unsicherheiten verbleiben aber zudem mit Blick auf einen gewissen Soloettos, der auf einer in
Pisidien gefundenen Münze belegt ist. Ihr Herausgeber datierte sie auf ca. 100 v.Chr. und
betonte stilistische Parallelen zu anderen pisidischen Münzen (von Sallet 1886 mit Taf. I 9;
vgl. Regling 1927). Mitchell I 26 mit Anm. 155 schlägt aber vorsichtig die Identifikation mit
dem Galater vor. Hierfür beruft er sich u.a. auf Inschriften aus dem nordpisidischen Amblada,
welche während des „galatischen Krieges“ (also 168-166 v.Chr., s.u.) von Eumenes
abgefallen waren (vgl. bes. OGIS 751 = Welles, RC 54). Einerseits spricht für Mitchells
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
323
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Vorschlag, dass Soloettos ohne überzeugenden Anschluss an altanatolische Namen bleibt (und
wiederum bei Zgusta, KPN fehlt). Andererseits wäre es die erste Münze, die den Namen eines
Galaters trägt, wobei diese nicht nur weit außerhalb des galatischen Territoriums gefunden
wurde, sondern auch etwa ein Jahrhundert früher als die ersten sicher einem galatischen
Herrscher zuweisbaren Münzen (s. Deiotaros I., Brogitaros Philorhomaios). Unabhängig von
der Erklärung des Münzfundes erlaubt der Kontext in Livius (s.u. 1-2) aber kaum einen
Zweifel an einer keltischen Deutung von Solovettios.
AC/10.03.10
0.1 Onomastisches – Nachtrag JZ
Keltischer Ursprung ist tatsächlich sehr wahrscheinlich. Zu soli- / suli- vgl. demnächst auch
Zeidler, Ms. 2006, S. 8f. betr. der gallorömischen Formen Sollius, Solinus (‚einen guten Blick
habend‘). Die Wortfuge -o- statt -i- ist nicht ungewöhnlich (vgl. Schmidt KGPN 91: Brog-irix : Brog-o-rix), aber womöglich liegt gar ein stammhaftes -o- vor (also Sol-o-vettios oder
Solo-vettios).
Für vettio- sind mehrere Anschlussmöglichkeiten in Betracht zu ziehen (die mit * markierten
Wörter sind urkeltisch, soweit nicht als IE=indoeuropäisch qualifiziert):
1. *we:ti- ‘Weide’ (< IE *weyh1ti- willow, withe)
2. *wet-e/o- ‘sagen’
3. IE *wet- ‘Jahr, Wende’, wovon eventuell *wet-e/o- ‘bekannt sein mit’
4. IE *weid-/wid- ‘Wissen’
5. *we:t(t)a: ‘Bach, Moor’
Vgl. neben DLG2 318f. auch Matasović 2009, 418f. Die Deutungen 3 und 4 sind am
wahrscheinlichsten, aber ob der PN Solovettios als solcher überhaupt eine Bedeutung hat, sei
dahin gestellt. Falls ja, dann vielleicht ‚Der gut zu sehen weiß‘, ‚Der vertraut ist mit dem
guten (scharfen?) Blick‘.
JZ/10.03.10
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
Nach Liv. 45,34,10-14, dem einzigen und zudem durch die Überlieferung teilweise entstellten
Zeugnis für Solovettios (vgl. ed. Briscoe p. 385), war dieser im späteren Frühling 167 v.Chr.
dux Gallorum bzw. regulus Gallorum.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Nach Livius verhandelte er damals mit dem römischen Gesandten P. Licinius (cos. 171) bei
Synnada über einen Friedensschluss mit Eumenes II. von Pergamon. Die Unterredung sei aber
ergebnislos geblieben, so dass der 168 begonnene und für den Winter durch Waffenstillstand
sistierte Krieg im Frühjahr 167 fortgesetzt wurde. Erst 166 gelang Eumenes ein
entscheidender Sieg. Doch erreichte eine galatische Gesandtschaft in Rom, dass der Senat ihr
Territorium für autonom erklärte, dies freilich an die Bedingung knüpfte, nicht über ihr
Territorium hinaus zu greifen (Polyb. 30,28; vgl. auch 30,19 zum Scheitern eines erneuten
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
324
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
diplomatischen Versuchs seitens des Eumenes in 167/66). Ob Solovettios die Teil dieser
Gesandtschaft war, bleibt offen.
Der Kontext wirft zahlreiche Fragen auf. So hatten Galater noch 171 unter der Führung des
Kassignatos sowie im Verlauf des Jahres 168 im pergamenischen Kontingent auf römischer
Seite gegen Perseus von Makedonien gekämpft. Beide Einsätze endeten desaströs. Im
letzteren Fall kostete eine Fehleinschätzung der pergamenischen Flottenführung 800
galatische Reiter das Leben und 200 weitere die Freiheit (Liv. 44,28,7-16). Eine mögliche
Verbitterung hierüber wird den Abfall der Galater von Pergamon (vgl. Liv. 45,20,1 Gallorum
defectionem; vgl. Polyb. 29,22; 30,1,2f.; 30,2,8 zum Jahr 168) mindestens beschleunigt
(Walbank 1979 III 395), wenn nicht verursacht haben.
Nach der Mehrheitsmeinung war die Erhebung freilich im Wesentlichen von Rom
angestachelt worden, da der Senat über Eumenes’ Vermittlungsversuche im Perseuskrieg
empört war. Vgl. z.B. Stähelin 1907, 66-72 (der eigentliche Grund sei gewesen, dass nach
dem Untergang Makedoniens kein starkes Pergamon mehr gebraucht worden sei); Hansen
1971, 120f. (allerdings unter Berücksichtigung von „restiveness under the rule of the
Attalid“); Habicht 1989, 333f. Widerspruch erhebt Gruen 1989, 569ff., bes. 576f., der
hervorhebt, dass Rom durchaus nach Stabilisierung in Kleinasien gestrebt, diese aber nur
halbherzig verfolgt habe. Wieder anders Allen 1983, 142: „the Galatians, Perseus’ former
allies, launched a surprise attack on Eumenes.“ Jedoch ist es wenig wahrscheinlich, dass die
von Diod. 31,14 erwähnten 20.000 „galatischen“ Söldner in Zentralanatolien rekrutiert
wurden. Zutreffen könnte indes die Ansicht einer politischen Zersplitterung Galatiens in jener
Zeit (S. 142-144).
Jedenfalls äußert selbst Livius Unverständnis über das schwache Auftreten des P. Licinius in
der Verhandlung mit den Galatern, von denen die Pergamener ausgeschlossen waren (Liv.
45,34,14). Noch weiter scheint Polybios gegangen zu sein, der im Kontext der Aussendung
der von Licinius geführten Gesandtschaft zwar feststellt, dass Ihr eigentlicher Auftrag
unbekannt gewesen sei, „doch sei es nicht schwer, [ihn] anhand der späteren Ereignisse zu
erschließen“ (30,3,7-9; im folgenden wird die abschätzige Behandlung der Rhodier berichtet).
Die moderne Forschung schwankt hier zwischen absichtlich unterlassener Hilfeleistung,
Provokation und ausdrücklicher Aufforderung zur Fortsetzung des Krieges (letzteres z.B.
auch bei Mitchell 1993, I 25). Nicht ohne Belang für eine Entscheidung ist ferner die Frage,
ob der Krieg noch vor dem römischen Sieg von Pydna oder erst danach ausgebrochen war, da
dies auch Rückschlüsse auf die Rolle Roms zuließe. Eine sichere Entscheidung ist aber auch
hier nicht möglich, auch wenn sich Walbank für den späteren Zeitpunkt ausspricht.
Welchen Anteil Solovettios in den Nachfolgekonflikten zwischen Pergamon, Bithynien und
Galatien spielte, bleibt ebenfalls offen.
3. Auswahlbibliographie
RE –. DNP –.
Vgl. Regling: Soloettes, RE 3A, 1927, 935.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
325
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Allen, R.E.: The Attalid Kingdom. A Constitutional History, Oxford 1983, 142-144.
Briscoe, John: Titi Livi Ab urbe condita libri XLI–XLV, Stuttgart 1986.
Crombet, Pierre: Art. Solovettius, in: Arbre Celtique – Encyclopédie, 1999-2010.
URL: http://www.arbre-celtique.com/encyclopedie/solovettius-2706.htm [07.03.2010]
Delamarre, Xavier: Dictionnaire de la langue gauloise, Paris 2001, 22003. (DLG2)
Freeman, Philip: The Galatian Language. A Comprehensive Survey of the Language of the Ancient Celts in
Greco-Roman Asia Minor, Lewiston/NY 2001.
Gruen, Erich Stephen: The Hellenistic World and the Coming of Rome, 2 Bde., Berkeley 1984.
Habicht, Christian: The Seleucids and Their Rivals, CAH VIII 2, 1989, 324-387.
Hansen, E.: The Attalids of Pergamon, Ithaka-London 19712, 120-129.
Matasović, Ranko: Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Celtic, Leiden 2009.
Mitchell, Stephen: Anatolia. Land, Men, and Gods in Asia Minor, Bd. 1: The Celts in Anatolia and the Impact of
Roman Rule, Oxford 1993, I 26 mit Anm. 155.
Schmidt, Karl Horst: Die Komposition in gallischen Personennamen, ZCP 26, 1957, 33-301. (KGPN)
Stähelin, Felix: Geschichte der kleinasiatischen Galater, 21907, Nd. Osnabrück 1973, 66-72; 119.
von Sallet, A.: Die Erwerbungen des Königlichen Münzkabinetts vom 1.4.1885 bis 1.4.1886, ZfN 14, 1886, 1-30
mit Taf.1-4, bes. I 9.
Walbank, F.W.: Historical Commentary to Polybius, vol. III, Oxford 1979, 417f.
Weisgerber, J. Leo: Galatische Sprachreste, in R.W.O. Helm (Hg.): Natalicium. Johannes Geffken zum 70.
Geburtstag, Heidelberg 1931, 151-75.
Zeidler, Jürgen: Gallia Celto-Romanica. Onomastische, sprachliche und kulturelle Interferenzen in Gallien
während der Römischen Kaiserzeit, demnächst in den Beiträgen zur Tagung: Interferenz-Onomastik –
Namen in Grenz- und Begegnungsräumen in Geschichte und Gegenwart (Saarbrücken, Oktober 2006), hg.
von Wolfgang Haubrichs.
Zgusta, Ladislav: Die Personennamen griechischer Städte der nördlichen Schwarzmeerküste, Prag 1955. (KPN)
AC/11.03.10
Squillus aus Hispanien = L. Licinius Squillus
Onomastisches
Bei Val. Max. 9,4,2 als Silius bezeichnet. Zur Erörterung von Gentilnomen und Cognomen
vgl. Zeidler 2005, 183f.
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
Belegt a. 48. Seine hispanische Herkunft ist nicht eindeutig belegt.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
War an der Verschwörung gegen den Statthalter der Provinz Hispania Ulterior Q. Cassius
Longinus a. 48 beteiligt. Bezahlte für seine Freilassung 50.000 Sesterzen bezahlen (Bell.
Alex. 52,4; 55,4-5; Val. Max. 9,4,2).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Münzer, Friedrich: L. Licinius Squillus, RE 8,1, 1926, 464.
Frigo, Thomas: L. Licinius Squillus, DNP 7, 1999, 171.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
326
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Castillo García, Carmen: Städte und Personen der Baetica, ANRW 3,2, 1975, 601-53, bes. 646.
Zeidler, Jürgen: Onomastic Studies on Some Roman Amici in Hispania, in: Altay Coskun (Hg.): Roms
auswärtige Freunde in der späten Republik und im frühen Prinzipat, Göttingen 2005, 175-200, 183f.
JL/29.09.04–r/30.06.07
Straton, Dynast von Amisos
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
Bezeugt für die 30er Jahre. Seine Herkunft ist unbekannt. Gelegentlich wird sein Name aber
als Hinweis auf eine kilikische Abstammung betrachtet, da Tarkondimotos I. Philantonios
Sohn eines Straton und Großvater des C. Iulius Strato war. Zur Unsicherheit betreffs einer
kilikischen Herkunft vgl. aber z.B. Sullivan 1990, 402 Anm. 161. Alternativ erwägt Coskun
2007, Teil E.V mit Blick auf Stratoneike, die Gattin des Deiotaros (II.) Philopator (Plut. mor.
258d), die Möglichkeit einer galatischen Verbindung. Letztlich muß die Herkunft
offenbleiben.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Nach Strab. geogr. 12,3,14 (547) Stattherr von Amisos unter M. Antonius.
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Obst: Straton [8], RE IV A1, 1931, 274.
DNP –.
Coskun, Altay: Von der ‘Geißel Asiens’ zu ‘kaiserfrommen’ Reichsbewohnern. Studien zur politischen und
gesellschaftlichen Entwicklung der Galater unter besonderer Berücksichtigung der amicitia populi Romani
und der göttlichen Verehrung des Augustus (3. Jh. v.–2. Jh. n.Chr.), unveröff. Habil. Trier 2007, Teil E.V.
Hoben, Wolfgang: Untersuchungen zur Stellung kleinasiatischer Dynasten in den Machtkämpfen der
ausgehenden römischen Republik, Diss. Mainz 1969, 37.
Magie, David: Roman Rule in Asia Minor to the End of the Third Century after Christ, Princeton/N.J. 1950, I
444.
Mitchell, Stephen: Anatolia. Land, Men, and Gods in Asia Minor, Bd. 1: The Celts in Anatolia and the Impact of
Roman Rule, Oxford 1993, 40.
Sullivan, Richard D.: Near Eastern Royalty and Rome, 100-30 B.C., Toronto 1990, 402 Anm. 161.
AC/03.07.07 – r/06.02.11
Tarkondimotos I. Philantonios, König des Ebenen Kilikien [Var. Tarkondemos]
0. Onomastisches
Tarkondemos bei Plut. Ant. 61,2; Belege für den Beinamen in RPC I, Nr. 3871.
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
327
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Sohn des Straton, Vater Tarkondimotos’ II.; starb a. 31.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Seine Einsetzung durch Cn Pompeius Magnus procos. 66-62/61 ist möglich, aber nicht
belegt. Informierte M. Tullius Cicero procos. Ciliciae 51/50 über die Aktivitäten der Parther
(Cic. fam. 15,1,2=104 ShB). In diesem Zusammenhang als fidelissimus socius trans Taurum
amicissimusque populo Romano bezeichnet. Unterstütze Pompeius im Bürgerkrieg gegen C.
Iulius Caesar (Cass. Dio 41,63,1; Flor. 2,13,5). Nach seiner Begnadigung durch Caesar und
dessen Ermordung kämpfte er aufseiten des C. Cassius Longinus procos. Orientis 43-42
(Cass. Dio 47,26,2) und schließlich für M. Antonius bei Actium a. 31, wo er fiel (Cass. Dio
50,14,2; Plut. Ant. 61,2). Tobin 2001, 383 deutet den Namen seines Enkels C. Iulius Straton
als Indiz für eine Bürgerrechtsverleihung durch Caesar.
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Stein: Tarcondimotus, RE 4A,2, 1932, 2297f.
Spickermann, Wolfgang: Tarkondimotos [1] I. Philantonios, DNP 12,1, 2002, 27.
Hoben, Wolfgang: Untersuchungen zur Stellung kleinasiatischer Dynasten in den Machtkämpfen der
ausgehenden römischen Republik, Diss. Mainz 1969, 195-211.
Sayar, Mustafa Hamdi: Tarkondimotos. Seine Dynastie, seine Politik und sein Reich, in: Éric Jean/ Ali M.
Dinçol/ Serra Durugönül (Hgg.): La Cilicie. Espaces et pouvoirs locaux, Paris 2001, 373-75.
Sullivan, Richard D.: Near Eastern Royalty and Rome, 100-30 B.C., Toronto 1990, 187-91.
Syme, Ronald: Tarcondimotus, in: ders.: Anatolica. Studies in Strabo, Oxford 1995, 161f.
Tobin, Jennifer: The Tarcondimotid Dynasty in Smooth Cilicia, in: Éric Jean/ Ali M. Dinçol/ Serra Durugönül
(Hgg.): La Cilicie. Espaces et pouvoirs locaux, Paris 2001, 381-84.
MT/20.12.06–r/30.06.07
Tarkondimotos II. Philopator, König des Ebenen Kilikien
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
Sohn des Tarkondimotos I. Philantonios; starb 17 n.Chr.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Nach der Schlacht bei Actium entzog der junge Caesar ihm oder seinem Bruder zunächst die
Herrscherwürde (Cass. Dio 51,2,2; 7,3f.). Doch erhielt er sie a. 20 zurück (Cass. Dio 54,9,2).
Jones 1971, 204 vermutet, daß er dies im folgenden Jahr mit der Umbenennung der Stadt
Anazarbos in Kaisareia feierte (vgl. dazu Plin. nat. 5,93). Neu gefundene Inschriften belegen
eine längere Regierungszeit; daher ist entgegen der älteren Forschung (z.B. noch Sullivan
1990, 191f., der Tarkondimotos II., Philopator I und Philopator II. unterscheidet) von seiner
Identität mit dem bei Tac. ann. 2,42,5 genannten Philopator auszugehen, der 17 n.Chr. starb
(vgl. Sayar 2001, 376-78).
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
328
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Stein: Tarcondimotus, RE 4A,2, 1932, 2297f.
Spickermann, Wolfgang: Tarkondimotos [2] II. Philopator, DNP 12,1, 2002, 28.
Hoben, Wolfgang: Untersuchungen zur Stellung kleinasiatischer Dynasten in den Machtkämpfen der
ausgehenden römischen Republik, Diss. Mainz 1969, 209-211.
Jones, A.H.M.: The Cities of the Eastern Roman Provinces, Oxford 21971.
Sayar, Mustafa Hamdi: Tarkondimotos. Seine Dynastie, seine Politik und sein Reich, in: Éric Jean/ Ali M.
Dinçol/ Serra Durugönül (Hgg.): La Cilicie. Espaces et pouvoirs locaux, Paris 2001, 373-80, hier 375-79.
Schmitt, Tassilo: Provincia Cilicia. Kilikien im Imperium Romanum von Caesar bis Vespasian, in: in: Tassilo
Schmidt/ Winfried Schmitz/ Aloys Winterling (Hgg.), Gegenwärtige Antike – antike Gegenwarten.
Kolloquium zum 60. Geburtstag von Rolf Rilinger, München 2005, 189-222, hier 195-98.
Sullivan, Richard D.: Near Eastern Royalty and Rome, 100-30 B.C., Toronto 1990, 191.
Syme, Ronald: Tarcondimotus, in: ders.: Anatolica. Studies in Strabo, Oxford 1995, hier 162f.
Tobin, Jennifer: The Tarcondimotid Dynasty in Smooth Cilicia, in: Éric Jean/ Ali M. Dinçol/ Serra Durugönül
(Hgg.): La Cilicie. Espaces et pouvoirs locaux, Paris 2001, 381-87, hier 384f.
MT/20.12.06–r/03.07.07
Theophanes von Mytilene = Cn. Pompeius Theophanes
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
Aristokrat und Schriftsteller (s. 2); Adoptivvater des L. Cornelius Balbus.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Berater und Historiograph des Cn. Pompeius Magnus. Begleitete diesen auf dem Feldzug
gegen Mithradates VI. Eupator und verherrlichte die politischen und militärischen Leistungen
seines Patrons im Osten (FGrH 188). Erhielt a. 62 von Pompeius das römische Bürgerrecht
(Cic. Arch. 24) und gewann für seine Heimatstadt die Freiheit zurück (Plut. Pomp. 42,8; Vell.
2,18,3; Strab. geogr. 13,2,3 [617]). Unterhielt zahlreiche politische Kontakte in Rom, u.a. zu
M. Tullius Cicero und zu seinem Adoptivsohn Balbus. Vor allem übte er bedeutenden
Einfluß auf Pompeius aus (z.B. Cic. Att. 5,11,3=104 ShB; Plut. Pomp. 49,13f.; Strab. geogr.
13,2,3 [617f.]). Riet diesem nach der Schlacht bei Pharsalos zur Flucht nach Ägypten (Plut.
Pomp. 76,7-9). Eine Begnadigung durch C. Iulius Caesar ist nicht ausdrücklich belegt. Nach
seinem Tod in Mytilene als Theos Zeus Eleutherios Philopatris Theophanes verehrt (IG XII,2
163b = SIG3 753; vgl. Tac. ann. 6,18,2; Grimm 2004).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Laqueur, Richard: Theophanes [1] von Mytilene, RE 5a,2, 1934, 2090-127.
Meister, Klaus: Theophanes [1] von Mytilene, DNP 12,1, 2002, 378f.
Anderson, William S.: Pompey, His Friends, and the Literature of the First Century B.C., Berkeley/Cal. 1963,
34-41.
Gold, Barbara K.: Pompey and Theophanes of Mytilene, AJPh 106, 1985, 312-27.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
329
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Gold, Barbara K.: Literary Patronage in Greece and Rome, Chapel Hill/N.C. 1987, 87-107.
Grimm, Günter: “Der als Gott erscheint”. Gnaeus Pompeius Theophanes von Mytilene. Ein wenig bekannter
Wohltäter Griechenlands, AW 35, 2004, 63-70.
Pédech Paul: Deux grecs face à Rome au Ier siècle av. J.-C. Métrodore de Scepsis et Théophane de Mitylène,
REA 93, 1991, 71-78.
Robert, Louis: Théophane de Mytilène à Constantinople (1969), in: Opera minora selecta. Epigraphie et
antiquités grecques, Bd. 5, Amsterdam 1989, 561-83.
MT/06.12.06–r/30.06.07
Theopompos von Knidos = C. Iulius Theopompus
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
Aristokrat und Mythograph des mittleren 1. Jhs. (FGrH 21).
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Einflußreicher Freund des C. Iulius Caesar (Strab. geogr. 14,2,15 [656]). Gewann für seine
Heimat a. 48 die Freiheit (Plut. Caes. 48,1) und bezeugte a. 45 den Abschluß eines
Bündnisvertrags mit Rom (Inschr. Knidos 33, frg. A, Z. 7). Wahrscheinlich identisch mit dem
Theopompos, der a. 45 M. Tullius Cicero in Tusculum besuchte (Cic. Att. 13,7,1=314 ShB).
Ihm wurden zahlreiche Ehrungen als Wohltäter im östlichen Mittelmeerraum zuteil (Belege
und Diskussion bei Thériault 2003).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Bux, E.: Theopompos [5], RE 5a,2, 1934, 2174.
Matthaios, Stephanos: C. Iulius Theopompos [5], DNP 12,1, 2002, 398.
Freber, Philipp-Stephan G.: Der hellenistische Osten und das Illyricum unter Caesar, Stuttgart 1993, bes. 25f.
Kajava, Mika: Teopompo di Cnido e Laodicea al Mare, Arctos 39, 2005, 79-92.
Thériault, Gaétan: Evergétisme grec et administration romaine. La famille cnidienne de Gaios Ioulios
Théopompos, Phoenix 57, 2003, 232-56.
MT/06.12.06–r/30.06.07
T. Thorius aus Italica [Var. Torius]
0. Onomastisches
Münzer 1936, 345 führt ihn als T. Torius. Zeidler 2005, 177f. erwägt eine tartessische oder
keltiberische Etymologie von Turrinus neben einer römisch-etruskischen.
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
Belegt a. 48.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
330
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf .
Führte a. 48 eine Meuterei der legio vernacula, der 2. Legion und vier weiterer Kohorten der
5. Legion in der Hispania Ulterior an. Die Hintergründe der Revolte bleiben unklar. Obwohl
Thorius mehrmals verkündete, er wolle die Provinz für Cn. Pompeius Magnus einnehmen,
glaubt der Autor des Bellum Alexandrinum, daß sich der Angriff vor allem gegen den
Statthalter Q. Cassius Longinus gerichtet habe (Bell. Alex. 57,3; 58).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Münzer, Friedrich: T. Torius, RE 6A,1, 1936, 345.
DNP –.
Zeidler, Jürgen: Onomastic Studies on Some Roman Amici in Hispania, in: Altay Coskun (Hg.): Roms
auswärtige Freunde in der späten Republik und im frühen Prinzipat, Göttingen 2005, 175-200, 177f.
JL/29.09.04–r/30.06.07/17.04.10
Thrasymedes of Heraclea Pontica
0. Onomastic Issues
The name Thrasymedes is widely attested throughout Asia Minor and Greece. An inscription
from Heraclea (IK Heraclea Pont. 10, l. 5, II-III cent. AD) mentions an Aurelios
Thrasymedianos Heracleides, clearly the natural son of a Thrasymedes adopted by an
Aurelios Heracleides.
1. Central Biographical Dates and Family Relations
Thrasymedes was a citizen of Heraclea who publicly denounced the behaviour that M.
Aurelius Cotta (cos. 74) had during the sack of the city in 72. The likeliest date for
Thrasymedes’ speech is 67 BC. After his return to Heraclea several years later, Thrasymedes
set out to direct the repopulation of the city, but did not manage to gather more than 8,000
settlers. His initiative was crucial in enabling the recovery of the city which later enabled
Brithagoras to plan a negotiation with Caesar on the juridical status of the city. The date of
Thrasymedes’ death is unknown. The only source for his life and career is Memnon of
Heraclea (FGrH 434 F 1.39f.).
2. Relations with Rome / Romans and Career
According to Memnon, Thrasymedes was one of the Heraclean prisoners taken to Rome by
Cotta and released by the Senate when details of Cotta’s treatment of the city started to
emerge. According to Memnon, he gave a speech against Cotta in Rome, but it is unclear
whether he addressed an assembly or gave evidence at a trial. One would normally expect a
foreign representative to address the Senate, but Thrasymedes was not on a formal diplomatic
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
331
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
mission; Memnon states that the speech was addressed to the ekklesia. It is possible that Cotta
was put on trial under a charge de maiestate, de peculatu, or de repetundis, but it is also
conceivable that Memnon is inaccurate and that Cotta’s conduct was just discussed within the
Senate. The evidence does not allow a safe conclusion.
In his speech, probably delivered in Greek, Thrasymedes defended the city’s conduct towards
Rome before the sack. He claimed that any hostile action to Rome had been determined either
by the treacherous behaviour of some individuals or by the interference of the Mithridatic
forces. He also deplored the devastation and plundering of the city, and claimed that Cotta had
depredated the temples and the monuments of the city. The speech made a deep impact on the
audience. Cotta gave a brief statement in his defence, but he received a scathing reply from C.
Papirius Carbo and was expelled from the Senate (on Cotta’s downfall and his enmity with
Carbo, cf. Val. Max. 5.4.4 and Dio 36.40.3f.). The Senate returned to Heraclea all its territory.
Thrasymedes arranged the return of the Heraclean prisoners to the motherland, but stayed in
Rome for longer, along with Brithagoras and Propylos, ostensibly to consolidate his ties with
the Roman elite.
3. Select Bibliography
RE –. DNP –.
Alexander, Michael C.: Trials in the Late Roman Republic. 149 BC to 50 BC, Toronto 1990, 97, no. 192.
Canali de Rossi, Filippo: Le ambascerie dal mondo greco a Roma in età repubblicana, Rome 1997, 332f., no.
371.
Desideri, Paolo: I Romani visti dall’Asia: riflessioni sulla sezione romana della Storia di Eraclea di Memnone, in
G. Urso (ed.): Tra Oriente e Occidente. Indigeni, Greci e Romani in Asia Minore, Pisa 2007, 45-59, esp.
57f.
Dueck, Daniela: Memnon of Herakleia on Rome and the Romans, in J.M. Højte (ed.): Mithridates VI and the
Pontic Kingdom, Aarhus 2009, 43-61, esp. 56f.
Santangelo, Federico: Memnone di Eraclea e il dominio romano in Asia Minore, Simblos 4, 2004, 247-261, esp.
259f.
Yarrow, Liv M.: Historiography at the end of the Republic: Provincial Perspectives on Roman Rule, Oxford
2006, 189f.
FS 16.03.10–r/17.03.10
Tigranes I., Großkönig von Armenien [Var.: Tigranes II., Tigranes Theos]
0. Onomastisches
Pomp. Trog. prol. 41: Tigranes cognomine deus. However, Van Wickevoort Crommelin 1998,
266f. argues for a confusion.
[LBP 14.03.10]
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
332
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
 Stemmata Artaxiaden
Ca. 140 v.Chr. geboren als Sohn eines weiteren Tigranes (App. Syr. 48,247), der vielleicht
vor ihm herrschte und oftmals als Tigranes I. bezeichnet wird. Um a. 120 kam er als Geisel an
den parthischen Hof; a. 96/5 wurde er – möglicherweise von den Parthern eingesetzt – König
von Großarmenien. Annahme des Titels „König der Könige“ in der ersten Hälfte der 80er
Jahre. Gründete die Stadt Tigranokerta. Gatte der Kleopatra, Tochter von Mithradates VI.
Eupator. Seine Tochter Aryazate verheiratete er mit Mithradates II. von Parthien. Vater des
Tigranes (des Königs von Sophene) und des Artavasdes II. Verstarb ca. a. 55/54. (Lukian.
macr. 15).
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Kurz nach seinem Regierungsantritt fügte er die Sophene seinem Herrschaftsgebiet hinzu
(Strab. geogr. 11,14,15 [532]). Mit Mithradates VI. Eupator suchte er von Beginn an ein gutes
Verhältnis, so etwa durch die Heirat von dessen Tochter Kleopatra (Iust. 38,3,1-4). Im Jahr
91/90 überfiel er das romfreundliche Kappadokien und unterstützte dort die propontische
Partei (App. Mithr. 10-11,33-35). Wahrscheinlich plünderten die Armenier aber nur, zogen
sich wieder zurück und waren nicht an den folgenden Kämpfen der propontischen Partei mit
Rom beteiligt. In den 80er Jahren gelangen Tigranes zahlreiche Eroberungen, die Armenien
zu einem vorderasiatischen Großreich werden ließen. So gehörten zu seinen Eroberungen
bzw. Unterwerfungen im Süden Media Atropatene, Gordyene, Adiabene, Osrhoene,
Kommagene, Teile Kilikiens, Syrien und Phönikien sowie im Norden die Gebiete der Albaner
und Iberer (Strab. geogr. 11,14,15 [532]). Seine Siege über die Parther verwertete er auch
ideologisch mit der Annahme des parthischen Titels „König der Könige“, den zahlreiche
Münzfunde belegen.
In den ersten beiden Mithradatischen Kriegen verhielt er sich neutral, überfiel aber in den
70er Jahren noch vor Beginn des Dritten Mithradatischen Krieges erneut Kappadokien und
verschleppte von dort viele Einwohner in seine neue Residenzstadt Tigranokerta (App. Mithr.
67,285; Plut. Luc. 21,4). In den dritten Krieg zwischen Rom und Pontos griff er zunächst
nicht ein. Erst als Mithradates nach mehreren Niederlagen nach Armenien floh, wurde er
involviert. Lucullus sandte a. 71/70 App. Claudius Pulcher (=P. Clodius) als Legaten nach
Armenien, wo er die Auslieferung des pontischen Königs forderte (Plut. Luc. 21,1). Tigranes
stand zu diesem Zeitpunkt vor den Toren der Stadt Ptolemais, der römische Gesandte mußte
auf seine Rückkehr warten. Das nutzte dieser zu Geheimverhandlungen mit armenischen
Vasallen und einzelnen Städten, um diese im Falle eines Krieges auf die römische Seite
ziehen zu können (Plut. Luc. 21,2). Tigranes lehnte eine Auslieferung des Mithradates ab
(Plut. Luc. 21,7), und so eröffnete Lucullus bald darauf den Krieg mit dem Überschreiten des
Euphrat (App. Mithr. 84,377). Trotz überwältigender Siege in zwei Feldschlachten, mußte
Lucullus sich bald aus Armenien zurückziehen, da seine Truppen ihm zunehmend den
Gehorsam verweigerten (Plut. Luc. 32,1-3; Cic. Manil. 29,23f.). Mithradates und Tigranes
führten den Kampf nun gemeinsam fort, der armenische König fiel erneut in Kappadokien ein
(Plut. Luc. 35; Cass. Dio 36,9-17).
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
333
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Konnte Tigranes zwar einen Teil seiner Macht zurückgewinnen, hatten die Niederlagen gegen
Lucullus doch tiefe Wunden hinterlassen, die einen wirksamen Widerstand gegen den neuen
römischen Oberbefehlshaber Pompeius unmöglich machten. Zudem wechselte der
gleichnamige Sohn des Tigranes die Seiten und versuchte so selbst den armenischen Thron zu
gewinnen (Cass. Dio 36,51,3; Plut. Pomp. 33,1; App. Mithr. 104,487f.; Vell. 2,37,3). Der
armenische König kapitulierte, als Pompeius a. 66 kurz vor Artaxata stand. Er unterwarf sich
dem römischen General vollständig, gewann aber mit dem Einsatz gewaltiger Geldsummen
seinen Thron zurück und galt fortan als amicus et socius populi Romani.
Der junge Tigranes wurde mit der Sophene abgespeist, während sein Vater nur noch über das
armenische Kernreich und Nordmesopotamien herrschte (Cass. Dio 36,52,2-4; Plut. Pomp.
33,3-5; App. Mithr. 104f.,484-495; Vell. 2,37,4f.). Die armenischen Könige mußten fortan
vom römischen Senat ernannt bzw. bestätigt werden (Flor. 2,32). In bald darauf beginnenden
Konflikten mit den Parthern griffen die Römer zugunsten Armeniens ein und sicherten
Tigranes noch für einige Jahre die Herrschaft über die Gordyene (Plut. Pomp. 36; Cass. Dio
37,5,2-5; Strab. geogr. 16,1,24 [747]). In weiteren Auseinandersetzungen verzichtete
Pompeius jedoch auf den Einsatz militärischer Mittel (Cass. Dio 37,5,5-7,4; Plut. Pomp. 39,3;
App. Mithr. 106,501). So wird die Gordyene bald wieder unter parthische Herrschaft gefallen
sein.
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Geyer, F.: Tigranes [1], RE 6A,1, 1936, 970-978.
Schottky, M.: Tigranes [2], DNP 12,2, 2002, 567.
Asdourian, Pascal: Die politischen Beziehungen zwischen Armenien und Rom von 190 v.Chr. bis 428 n.Chr. Ein
Abriß der armenischen Geschichte in dieser Periode, Diss. Freiburg (CH), Venedig 1911.
Eckhardt, Kurt: Die armenischen Feldzüge des Lukullus, Klio 9, 1909, 400-412; Klio 10, 1910, 72-115 und 192231.
Kerouzian, Yessai Ohannes: Armênia e Roma. Relações políticas nos anos de 190-A.C.–387-D.C. (Universidade
de São Paulo, Fac. de Filosofia, Letras e Ciências Humanas, N.S 8; Departamento de Linguística e Línguas
Orientais, 1; Curso de Armenio, 1), São Paulo 1977.
Manadyan, Hakop: Tigrane II & Rome. Nouveaux éclaircissements à la lumière des sources originales, traduit de
l’Armenien oriental par H. Thorossian, Lissabon 1963.
Manaseryan, R.L.: The formation of the Empire of Tigranes II, VDI 1982, Heft 1, 122-39 (russ., mit
englischsprachiger Zusammenfassung).
Ders.: International Relations in the Near East in the Years 80-70 B.C. Tigranes II and the Troops from the
Banks of the Araxes, VDI 1992, Heft 1, 152-60 (russ., mit englischsprachiger Zusammenfassung).
Schottky, Martin: Media Atropatene und Groß-Armenien in hellenistischer Zeit, Diss. Erlangen-Nürnberg 1988,
Bonn 1989.
Sherwin-White, Adrian N.: Roman Foreign Policy in the East 168 B.C. to A.D. 1, London 1984.
Sullivan, Richard D.: Near Eastern Royalty and Rome, 100-30 B.C., Toronto 1990, 281f.; 307.
Van Wickevoort Crommelin, B.: Die Parther und die Parthische Geschichte bei Pompeius Trogus – Justin, in: J.
Wiesehöfer Hg.): Das Partherreich und Seine Zeugnisse, Stuttgart 1998.
HP/31.07.08–r/31.07.08/14.03.10
Tigranes II. Philopator, König von Armenien [Var.: Tigranes III.]
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
334
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemmata Artaxiaden
Sohn Artavasdes’ II., Bruder Artaxias’ II., Vater Tigranes’ III. und der Erato. Wurde 20/19
v.Chr. von Tiberius im Auftrag des Augustus als König in Armenien eingesetzt, aber bereits
nach weniger als einem Jahr durch seine Kinder abgelöst.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Im Jahr 34 wurde er gemeinsam mit seinem Vater von Antonius gefangengenommen, nach
Alexandria gebracht und dort bei einem Triumphzug mitgeführt (Cass. Dio 49,39,3-40,4). Er
fiel Octavian a. 30 in die Hände und lebte fortan in Rom (Cass. Dio 51,16,2). Der römische
Princeps entschied a. 20, ihn von seinem Stiefsohn Tiberius nach Armenien begleiten und dort
als König einsetzen zu lassen. Nach der Ermordung Artaxias’ II. stieß Tiberius auf wenig
Widerstand, und so konnte er den Sohn Artavasdes’ II. zum König krönen (Tac. ann. 2,3; Ios.
ant. Iud. 15,105; Cass. Dio 54,9,4-5; Suet. Tib. 9, Aug. RG 27). Seine Herrschaft währte wohl
nur ca. ein halbes Jahr. Unter heute nicht mehr nachvollziehbaren Umständen verlor er die
Krone an seinen Sohn Tigranes III. und seine Tochter Erato, die fortan in Koregenz über
Armenien herrschten (Tac. ann. 2,3). Ob Tigranes II. bei dem Umsturz ums Leben kam, bleibt
unklar, jedenfalls berichten die Quellen danach nichts mehr über ihn.
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Geyer, F.: Tigranes [3], RE 6A,1, 1936, 979f.
Schottky, M.: Tigranes [4], DNP 12,2, 2002, 567f.
Asdourian, Pascal: Die politischen Beziehungen zwischen Armenien und Rom von 190 v.Chr. bis 428 n.Chr. Ein
Abriß der armenischen Geschichte in dieser Periode, Diss. Freiburg (CH), Venedig 1911.
Chaumont, Marie-Louise: L’Arménie entre Rome et l’Iran, I: De l’avènement d’Auguste a l’avènement de
Dioclétien, in: H. Temporini (Hg.), Aufstieg und Niedergang der römischen Welt. Geschichte und Kultur
Roms im Spiegel der neueren Forschung, II: Principat, 9,1, Berlin/ New York 1976, 71-194.
Kerouzian, Yessai Ohannes: Armênia e Roma. Relações políticas nos anos de 190-A.C.–387-D.C. (Universidade
de São Paulo, Fac. de Filosofia, Letras e Ciências Humanas, N.S 8; Departamento de Linguística e Línguas
Orientais, 1; Curso de Armenio, 1), São Paulo 1977.
Sherwin-White, Adrian N.: Roman Foreign Policy in the East 168 B.C. to A.D. 1, London 1984.
Sullivan, Richard D.: Near Eastern Royalty and Rome, 100-30 B.C., Toronto 1990, 281f.; 307.
HP/31.07.08–r/31.07.08/22.02.10
Tigranes, Sohn Tigranes’ I., König der Sophene
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
 Stemmata Artaxiaden
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
335
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Sohn Tigranes’ I. von Armenien und Kleopatra, der Tochter Mithradates’ VI. Eupators.
Bruder Artavasdes’ II. von Armenien. Nach 58 v.Chr. in römischer Gefangenschaft getötet.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Begehrte a. 66 mit parthischer Unterstützung gegen seinen Vater auf (Cass. Dio 36,50,1; Plut.
Pomp. 32,9). Lief beim Einmarsch des Pompeius auf armenisches Territorium im selben Jahr
zu diesem über und diente ihm als Führer (Cass. Dio 36,51,3; Plut. Pomp. 33,1; App. Mithr.
104,487f.; Vell. 2,37,3). Nach der Kapitulation Tigranes des Großen suchte Pompeius eine
Aussöhnung zwischen Vater und Sohn, gab ihm die Sophene (laut Appian auch die
Gordyene) als eigenständigen Herrschaftsbereich und zwang den armenischen König, ihn als
Thronerben anzuerkennen (App. Mithr. 105,495). Der junge Tigranes fiel aber schon bald
beim römischen Feldherren in Ungnade. Unklar bleibt, ob dies geschah, weil der junge
Armenier die Herausgabe der in der Sophene lagernden Schätze verweigerte (Cass. Dio
36,53,1-4), er einen Anschlag auf das Leben seines Vaters unternahm und die Parther gegen
Pompeius aufzuhetzen versuchte (App. Mithr. 105,493f.) oder ob er den Römer beleidigte
(Plut. Pomp. 33,5f.). Eine Beteiligung seines Vaters an seiner Entmachtung ist jedenfalls
anzunehmen. Pompeius setzte den jungen Tigranes gefangen, nahm ihn mit nach Rom und
führte ihn dort in seinem Triumphzug mit (Cass. Dio 37,6,2). Aus seiner anschließenden
Gefangenschaft bei einem Vertrauten des Pompeius versuchte ihn der Volkstribun P. Clodius
a. 58 zu entführen (Cic. Mil. 7). Wohl nicht zufällig hatte sich dieser ein Jahr zuvor in
Armenien aufgehalten (Cic. Att. 2,4,2 = 24 SB). Nach dem Scheitern des Unternehmens ließ
Pompeius den jungen Tigranes umbringen (App. Mithr. 117,578).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Geyer, F.: Tigranes [2], RE 6A,1, 1936, 978f.
Schottky, M.: Tigranes [3], DNP 12,2, 2002, 567.
Asdourian, Pascal: Die politischen Beziehungen zwischen Armenien und Rom von 190 v.Chr. bis 428 n.Chr. Ein
Abriß der armenischen Geschichte in dieser Periode, Diss. Freiburg (CH), Venedig 1911.
Chaumont, Marie-Louise: Tigrane le Jeune, fils de Tigrane le Grand: Révolte contre son père et captivité à
Rome, REArm 28, 2001/2, 225-247.
Kerouzian, Yessai Ohannes: Armênia e Roma. Relações políticas nos anos de 190-A.C.–387-D.C. (Universidade
de São Paulo, Fac. de Filosofia, Letras e Ciências Humanas, N.S 8; Departamento de Linguística e Línguas
Orientais, 1; Curso de Armenio, 1), São Paulo 1977.
Sherwin-White, Adrian N.: Roman Foreign Policy in the East 168 B.C. to A.D. 1, London 1984.
Sullivan, Richard D.: Near Eastern Royalty and Rome, 100-30 B.C., Toronto 1990, 281f.; 307.
HP/31.07.08–r/31.07.08
Tiridates I. Philorhomaios, Usurpator im Partherreich
0. Onomastisches / Namenvarianten / Homonyme
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
336
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
In lateinischen und griechischen Quellen heißt er Tiridates. Auf Münzen (Sellwood 1980, Typ
S55, 7-9) erscheint der dynastische Name Arsakes: Basileos Basileōn / Arsaku Euergetu /
Autokrator(os) / Epiphanus Philhellēnos / Philorhōmaiu.
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
Parthischer König bzw. Usurpator vom Ende 30er bis zum zweiten Drittel der 20er Jahre
v.Chr. Vermutlich Angehöriger der Arsakidenfamilie.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Zwischen 34 und Sommer 31 v.Chr. von einer parthischen Gruppierung zum König erhoben,
die zuvor König Phraates IV. wegen verübter Grausamkeiten vertrieben hatte (Cass. Dio
51,18,2; Iust. 42,5,4-6). Er bemühte sich bereits vor September 31 v.Chr. um ein Bündnis mit
Octavian, der aber neutral blieb (Cass. Dio 51,18,1f.). Zeitweilig mag es Tiridates gelungen
sein, Gebiete im iranischen Hochland zu kontrollieren und in Medien (Rhagae) Münzen zu
prägen (Sellwood 1995-1996, 80, Typ 5 [Abb. Taf. 12 Nr. 11]).
Nachdem Phraates – vielleicht dank der Unterstützung verbündeter Skythen (Iust. 42,5,5) – 30
v.Chr. den Thron zurückgewonnen hatte und Tiridates nach Syrien geflüchtet war, trat
Octavian (Winter 30/29 v.Chr.) in freundschaftliche Beziehungen zu Phraates, gestattete
jedoch Tiridates, in Syrien zu bleiben (Cass. Dio 51,18,3). Bis zum Winter 27/26 v.Chr.
befand dieser sich im römischen Exil, versuchte dann aber, Phraates erneut zu verdrängen –
sicher mit römischer Unterstützung, denn Augustus unternahm zeitgleich Anstrengungen, den
parthischen Einfluß auf der arabischen Halbinsel zu untergraben (vgl. Marek 1993; Luther
1999). Isidor. Charac. mans. Parth. 1 (FGrH 781 F 1) berichtet von seiner Rückkehr aus der
Verbannung, die so plötzlich erfolgte, daß Phraates überstürzt seinen eigenen Harem
ermorden ließ (um ihn nicht seinem Gegner in die Hände fallen zu lassen); wenn sich dies –
wie Isidor suggeriert – auf einer Euphratinsel zwischen Belesi Biblada und Anatho
(Anatha/al-‛Āna) zutrug, wo Phraates seinen Staatsschatz verwahrte, dürfte Tiridates vom
benachbarten röm. Syrien aus über das Euphrattal in parthisches Gebiet eingedrungen sein.
Im Frühjahr und Sommer 26 v.Chr. prägte er Tetradrachmen in der Reichsmünzstätte von
Seleukeia am Tigris, auf denen er sich offen als philorhōmaios bezeichnete. Vgl. Sellwood
1980, vgl. Typ S55,7. S55,7 var. S55,9 var.; nach de Callataÿ 1994 sind indes nur die
Münztypen S55,7-9 dem Tiridates zuzuordnen. Im Laufe des Jahres 25 gewann Phraates
erneut die Oberhand; vgl. den Reflex in Hor. c. 1,26,5f. und der parthischen Münzprägung:
Sellwood 1995-1996, Typ 6. Spätestens im Winter 25/24 floh Tiridates zum zweiten Mal zu
Augustus, der in dieser Zeit in Spanien Krieg gegen die Cantabrer führte. Er brachte ihm
einen Sohn des Phraates als Geisel mit, ersuchte um Hilfe und bot als Gegenleistung an, die
röm. Oberherrschaft über das Partherreich anzuerkennen (Iust. 42,5,5ff.: iuris Romanorum
futuram Parthiam adfirmans).
Wenig später, wohl in der ersten Jahreshälfte 23 (Luther 2003, 19), kam es zu einem
Kompromiß zwischen Augustus und Phraates, wonach Tiridates im Exil in Rom bleiben,
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
337
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Phraates aber seinen Sohn unter der Bedingung zurückerhalten sollte, daß die röm.
Feldzeichen und Gefangenen der gescheiterten Feldzüge des Crassus (53 v.Chr.) und M.
Antonius (vor 34 v.Chr.) an Rom überstellt würden (Cass. Dio 53,33,2; Iust. 42,5,9). Die
Herrschaft des Phraates war somit von Augustus anerkannt (vgl. Hor. c. 2,2,17 redditum Cyri
solio Phraaten).
Über das weitere Schicksal des Tiridates ist nichts bekannt. Nicht in Betracht kommt die von
F. Cumont angeregte und etwa von Debevoise 1938, 135f. übernommene Identifikation mit
einer gleichnamigen Person, die in einer Inschrift ca. 8 v.Chr. in Susa erwähnt wird:
Merkelbach/Stauber 2005, 81 (Nr. 406).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Geyer, F.: Tiridates [4] II., RE 6A,2, 1937, 1439f.
Schottky, M.: Tiridates [3], Parthischer Usurpator, DNP 12,1, 2002, 611f.
de Callataÿ, F.: Les tétradrachmes d’Orodès II et de Phraate IV. Etude du rythme de leur production monétaire à
la lumière d’une grande trouvaille (Studia Iranica 14), Paris 1994.
Debevoise, N.C.: A political history of Parthia, Chicago 1938, bes. 135ff.
Hopkins, Edward C.D.: Tiridates I. On the Website: Parthia.com, 1998-2010.
URL: http://www.parthia.com/tiridates1.htm [19.02.2010].
Luther, A.: Medo nectis catenas? Die Expedition des Aelius Gallus im Rahmen der augusteischen Partherpolitik,
Orbis Terrarum 5, 1999, 157-182.
Luther, A.: Zur Regulus-Ode (Horaz, c. 3,5), RhM 146, 2003, 10-22.
Marek, Ch.: Die Expedition des Aelius Gallus nach Arabien im Jahre 25 v.Chr., Chiron 23, 1993, 121-156.
Merkelbach, R./Stauber, J.: Jenseits des Euphrat. Griechische Inschriften. München 2005.
Sellwood, D.: An Introduction to the Coinage of Parthia, London ²1980.
Sellwood, D.: The ‘Victory’ Drachms of Phraates IV, American Journal of Numismatics (ser. 2) 7-8, 1995-1996,
75-81.
Timpe, D.: Zur augusteischen Partherpolitik zwischen 30 und 20 v.Chr., WJA N.F. 1, 1975, 155-169.
Ziegler, K.-H.: Die Beziehungen zwischen Rom und dem Partherreich, Wiesbaden 1964.
AL/08.12.08–r/03.03.10
Titius (I.) aus Hispanien = L. Titius [Var. L. Titius Hispanus]
0. Onomastisches
Die hispanische Herkunft der Titii basiert auf Bell. Afr. 28,2: duo Titii Hispani adulescentes,
tribuni legionis V, quorum Caesar in senatum legerat. Cichorius 1922, 250f. und Castillo
1982, 514 interpretieren Hispani als cognomen der Titii, während Münzer 1937, 1556;
Caballos Rufino 1989, 259 und Zeidler 2005, 190 es als ethnische Zuschreibung deuten. Da
der Name Titius in Hispanien nur in Tarraco und Umgebung nachweisbar ist, schließen
Wiegels 1971, Nr. 155 und Caballos Rufino 1989, 259 auf eine Herkunft aus der Hispania
Citerior. González Román 1986-87, 72f. hat derweil auf die Häufigkeit des Namens Titius in
Italien, bes. unter den Magistraten von Capua, sowie auf seine geringe Verbreitung auf der
Iberischen Halbinsel hingewiesen. Zeidler 2005, 190f. bleibt zwischen einer italischen und
keltiberisch-römischen Interpretation unentschieden.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
338
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
Sicher a. 48-46 belegt. Wahrscheinlich Vater des Titius (II.) und des Titius (III.). Tribunus
militum a. 48. Die These einer hispanischen Herkunft wird einerseits durch seine Söhne,
andererseits durch die militärische Führung einer legio vernacula unterstützt.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Kämpfte im Bürgerkrieg auf der Seite von C. Iulius Caesar auf der Iberischen Halbinsel und
war tribunus militum legione vernacula. Während der Meuterei gegen den caesarischen
Statthalter Q. Cassius Longinus a. 48 in Hispanien setzte er diesen von den aufrührerischen
Vorgängen in Kenntnis und schloß sich den treuen Truppen an (Bell. Alex. 57,1).
Erhebung in den Senatorenstand ca. a. 46, die nach Castillo 1982, 514, Caballos Rufino 1989,
260 und Wiegels 1971, Nr. 155 wohl auf Betreiben Caesars geschah. Eine gegenteilige
Meinung vertritt Weinrib 1990, Appendix 1. Nach dem Tod seiner Söhne a. 46
Beileidsbekundung durch M. Tullius Cicero (Cic. fam. 5,16=187 ShB).
Ob die ins Jahr 12 v.Chr. datierten Münzfunde aus der Kolonie Caesaraugusta (Gil Farrés
1959, Nr.1602-1605), auf denen die Namen der Magistrate M. Kaninio und L. Titio zu lesen
sind, auf eine mögliche Lokalmagistratur des vorliegenden L. Titius hindeuten, bleibt offen
(Caballos Rufino 1989, 260).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Münzer, Friedrich: L. Titius, RE 6A,2, 1937, 1556.
Fündling, Jörg: L. Titius (Hispanus?): DNP 12,1, 2002, 630.
Gil Farrés, O.: Historia de la moneda española, Madrid 1959, Nr. 1602-1605.
Caballos Rufino, Antonio: Los senadores de origen hispano durante la república romana, in: Julián González
(Hg.): Estudios sobre Urso Colonia Iulia Genetiva, Sevilla 1989, 233-79, bes. 259f.
Castillo, Carmen: Los senadores béticos. Relaciones familiares y sociales, in: Epigrafia e ordine senatorio, Atti
del colloquio internazionale AIEGL (Tituli 5), Bd. 2, Rom 1982, 465-519, bes. 514.
Weinrib, Joseph E.: The Spaniards in Rome. From Marius to Domitian, New York 1990, 59.
Wiegels, Rainer: Die römischen Senatoren und Ritter aus den hispanischen Provinzen bis Diokletian, Diss.
Solingen 1971, Nr. 155.
Zeidler, Jürgen: Onomastic Studies on Some Roman Amici in Hispania, in: Altay Coskun (Hg.): Roms
auswärtige Freunde in der späten Republik und im frühen Prinzipat, Göttingen 2005, 175-200, 189-91.
JL/29.09.04–r/29.09.04/28.06.07
Titius (II.) aus Hispanien
0. Onomastisches
S. Titius (I.).
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
339
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
Nur im Bellum Africanum zum Jahr 46 belegt. Höchstwahrscheinlich Sohn des L. Titius (I.)
und Bruder des Titius (III.). Tribunus legionis V 46.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom/ Römern und Familienverhältnisse
Unterstützte C. Iulius Caesar während seines afrikanischen Feldzugs als tribunus legionis V.
Dieser erhob ihn a. 46 in den Senatorenstand. Wurde von C. Vergilius praet. 46 und
Befehlshaber in Thapsus gefangen genommen und an Q. Caecilius Metellus Pius Scipio
ausgeliefert, der ihn daraufhin zusammen mit seinem Bruder töten ließ (Bell. Afr. 28,2). M.
Tullius Cicero bekundete seinem Vater L. Titius in einem Brief vom Sommer/ Herbst 46 sein
Beileid (Cic. fam. 5,16=187 ShB).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Münzer, Friedrich: Titius, RE 6A,2, 1937, 1556.
DNP –.
Caballos Rufino, Antonio: Los senadores de origen hispano durante la república romana, in: Julián González
(Hg.): Estudios sobre Urso Colonia Iulia Genetiva, Sevilla 1989, 233-79, bes. 259f.
Castillo, Carmen: Los senadores béticos. Relaciones familiares y sociales, in: Epigrafia e ordine senatorio, Atti
del colloquio internazionale AIEGL (Tituli 5), Bd. 2, Rom 1982, 465-519, bes. 514.
Cichorius, C.: Römische Studien, 1922, Nd. Darmstadt 1961, 250f.
Wiegels, Rainer: Die römischen Senatoren und Ritter aus den hispanischen Provinzen bis Diokletian, Diss.
Solingen 1971, Nr. 330.
Zeidler, Jürgen: Onomastic Studies on Some Roman Amici in Hispania, in: Altay Coskun (Hg.): Roms
auswärtige Freunde in der späten Republik und im frühen Prinzipat, Göttingen 2005, 175-200, 189-91.
JL/29.09.04–r/28.06.07
Titius (III.) aus Hispanien
0. Onomastisches
S. Titius (I.).
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
Nur im Bellum Africanum zum Jahr 46 belegt. Höchstwahrscheinlich Sohn des L. Titius (I.)
und Bruder des Titius (II.). Tribunus legionis V 46.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom/ Römern und Familienverhältnisse
Unterstützte C. Iulius Caesar während seines afrikanischen Feldzugs als tribunus legionis V.
Dieser erhob ihn a. 46 in den Senatorenstand. Wurde von C. Vergilius praet. 46 und
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
340
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Befehlshaber in Thapsus gefangen genommen und an Q. Caecilius Metellus Pius Scipio
ausgeliefert, der ihn daraufhin zusammen mit seinem Bruder ermorden ließ (Bell. Afr. 28,2).
M. Tullius Cicero bekundete seinem Vater L. Titius in einem Brief vom Sommer/ Herbst 46
sein Beileid (Cic. fam. 5,16=187 ShB).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Münzer, Friedrich: Titius, RE 6A,2, 1937, 1556.
DNP –.
Caballos Rufino, Antonio: Los senadores de origen hispano durante la república romana, in: Julián González
(Hg.): Estudios sobre Urso Colonia Iulia Genetiva, Sevilla 1989, 233-79, bes. 259f.
Castillo, Carmen: Los senadores béticos. Relaciones familiares y sociales, in: Epigrafia e ordine senatorio, Atti
del colloquio internazionale AIEGL (Tituli 5), Bd. 2, Rom 1982, 465-519, bes. 514.
Cichorius, C.: Römische Studien, 1922, Nd. Darmstadt 1961, 250f.
Wiegels, Rainer: Die römischen Senatoren und Ritter aus den hispanischen Provinzen bis Diokletian, Diss.
Solingen 1971, Nr. 331.
Zeidler, Jürgen: Onomastic Studies on Some Roman Amici in Hispania, in: Altay Coskun (Hg.): Roms
auswärtige Freunde in der späten Republik und im frühen Prinzipat, Göttingen 2005, 175-200, 189-91.
JL/29.09.04–r/28.06.07
A. Trebellius aus Hasta/Hispania Ulterior
0. Onomastisches
Schulze 1904, 246 und Wiegels 1971, Nr. 333 vermuten, daß es sich bei Trebellius um eine
etruskische Namensform handle und die Trebellii damit italischer Herkunft seien. Zur
Möglichkeit eines keltisch-römischen Interferenznamens vgl. dagegen Zeidler 2005, 191.
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
Belegt a. 45. Römischer Ritter.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Kämpfte zunächst auf der Seite des jungen Cn. Pompeius Magnus in Hispanien, ging dann
aber a. 45 zusammen mit A. Baebius und C. Flavius zu C. Iulius Caesar über (Bell. Hisp.
26,2).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Münzer, Friedrich: A. Trebellius, RE 6A,2, 1937, 2262.
DNP –.
Caballos Rufino, Antonio: Los senadores de origen hispano durante la república romana, in: Julián González
(Hg.): Estudios sobre Urso Colonia Iulia Genetiva, Sevilla 1989, 233-79, bes. 266.
Schulze, W.: Zur Geschichte der lateinischen Eignnamen, Göttingen 1904, 246.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
341
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
Wiegels, Rainer: Die römischen Senatoren und Ritter aus den hispanischen Provinzen bis Diokletian, Diss.
Solingen 1971, Nr. 333.
Zeidler, Jürgen: Onomastic Studies on Some Roman Amici in Hispania, in: Altay Coskun (Hg.): Roms
auswärtige Freunde in der späten Republik und im frühen Prinzipat, Göttingen 2005, 175-200, 191.
JL/29.09.04–r/30.06.07
Ti. Tullius
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
Belegt a. 45. Seine hispanische Herkunft ist nicht eindeutig nachweisbar.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Führte a. 45 während der Belagerung von Ategua durch C. Iulius Caesar eine Gesandschaft
zu diesem an, um über die Kapitulationsbedingungen zu verhandeln. Nach einer
merkwürdigen Begebenheit bei der Rückkehr der Gesandtschaft nach Ategua (Vgl. Klotz
1927, 75f.) floh er in Caesars Lager zurück (Bell. Hisp. 17,1-3; 18,1-2).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Münzer, Friedrich: Ti. Tullius, RE 7A,1, 1937, 821.
DNP –.
Klotz, Alfred: Kommentar zum Bellum Hispaniense, Leipzig 1927, 75f.
JL/29.09.04–r/28.06.07
Turrinus aus Baetica = Clodius Turrinus
0. Onomastisches
Zeidler 2005, 177f. erläutert eine gallische Etymologisierung von Clodius neben der
lateinischen sowie eine tartessische oder keltiberische von Turrinus neben einer römischetruskischen.
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
Belegt für die Zeit des Augustus. Vater von Anonymus JL 003; Sohn von Anonymus JL 002;
Enkel von Anonymus JL 001. Wahrscheinlich römischer Ritter.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Tätigkeit als Rhetor in Rom. Freundschaft zu L. Annaeus Seneca (dem Älteren), der ihn als
et pecuniam [...] et dignitatem quam primam in provincia Hispania habuit bezeichnet (Sen.
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
342
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
contr. 10, pr. 16). Gehörte somit wahrscheinlich dem Ritterstand an. Sein Sohn Anonymus JL
003 setzte die freundschaftlichen Beziehungen zur Familie der Annae Senecae später fort
(Sen. contr. 10, pr. 14-16).
Seine Vorfahren hatten bereits in gastfreundschaftlichem Verhältnis zu C. Iulius Caesar
gestanden: patre splendidissimo, avo divi Iuli hospite. (Sen. contr. 10, pr. 14-16). In den
Wirren des Bürgerkrieges hatten sie ihr Vermögen jedoch eingebüßt, was Weinrib 1990, 60
auf die Aktivitäten des Sex. Pompeius in Hispanien zurückgeführt hat. In der Folgezeit
gelang es Clodius Turrinus offensichtlich, den einstigen Familienbesitz wieder
zurückzugwinnen.
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Brzoska: Clodius Turrinus, RE 4,1, 1900, 103f.
DNP –.
Caballos Rufino, Antonio: Los caballeros romanos originarios de la provincia Hispania Ulterior Bética. Catálogo
prosopográfico, Kolaios 4, 1995, 289-343, bes. 292f.
Weinrib, Joseph E.: The Spaniards in Rome. From Marius to Domitian, New York 1990, 59f.
Wiegels, Rainer: Die römischen Senatoren und Ritter aus den hispanischen Provinzen bis Diokletian, Diss.
Solingen 1971, Nr. 243.
Zeidler, Jürgen: Onomastic Studies on Some Roman Amici in Hispania, in: Altay Coskun (Hg.): Roms
auswärtige Freunde in der späten Republik und im frühen Prinzipat, Göttingen 2005, 175-200, 177f.
JL/29.09.04–r/30.06.07/17.04.10
Tusculus = Manilius Tusculus
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
Belegt a. 48. Seine hispanische Herkunft ist nicht eindeutig nachweisbar.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
War an der Verschwörung gegen den Statthalter der Hispania Ulterior Q. Cassius Longinus
a. 48 beteiligt (Bell. Alex. 53,2).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Münzer, Friedrich: Manilius Tusculus, RE 14,1, 1928, 1142.
DNP –.
Castillo García, Carmen: Städte und Personen der Baetica, ANRW 3,2, 1975, 601-53, bes. 647.
JL/29.09.04–r/28.06.07
A. Valgius
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
343
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
A. 45 als Sohn eines Senators bezeugt (Bell. Hisp. 13,2). Wahrscheinlich römischer Ritter.
Seine hispanische Herkunft ist nicht eindeutig belegt.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Unterstützte erst C. Iulius Caesar bei seinem zweiten Feldzug in Hispanien, bevor er a. 45 zu
seinem Bruder ins Lager der Pompejaner wechselte (Bell. Hisp. 13,2).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Hanslik, Rudolf: A. Valgius, RE 2,15, 1955, 271.
DNP –.
Caballos Rufino, Antonio: Los senadores de origen hispano durante la república romana, in: Julián González
(Hg.): Estudios sobre Urso Colonia Iulia Genetiva, Sevilla 1989, 233-79, bes. 266.
JL/29.09.04–r/28.06.07
T. Vasius aus Italica
0. Onomastisches
Zeidler 2005, 191f. erwägt eine gallische oder keltiberische Etymologie von Vasius. Zu Titus
verweist er auf die hispanischen Titii.
1. Zentrale Lebensdaten und Familienverhältnisse
Belegt a. 48.
2. Verhältnis zu Rom bzw. Römern und Karriereverlauf
Beteiligte sich a. 48 an der Verschwörung gegen den caesarischen Statthalter Q. Cassius
Longinus in Hispanien (Bell. Alex. 51,4).
3. Auswahlbibliographie
Gundel, H.: T. Vasius, RE 2,15, 1955, 453.
DNP –.
Zeidler, Jürgen: Onomastic Studies on Some Roman Amici in Hispania, in: Altay Coskun (Hg.): Roms
auswärtige Freunde in der späten Republik und im frühen Prinzipat, Göttingen 2005, 175-200, 191f.
JL/29.09.04–r/28.06.07
Viriatus, dux of the Lusitani [Var. Viriathus]
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
344
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
0. Onomastic Issues
Viriatus or Viriathus. The name seems to derive from an Indo-European root (*uer *wiro)
related to viria, meaning ‘armband’, ‘bracelet’ or ‘torc’ –‘the man who uses or holds viria’
(Pérez Vilatela 2000, 263-265). It may well correlate with the emblematic necklace of the
heroic statuary iconography of Late Iron Age warrior chiefs, so that the name would express
power and virtue (Ferreira da Silva 2003). The name is also attested with some variations in
Latin inscriptions of the Lusitanian-Galician region and Portuguese Estremadura (CIL II
684.791.2970.5246.5586).
1. Central Biographical dates and Family Relations
Ancient historians usually refer to Viriatus as a man who turned from latro to venator, then
again to latro and finally became the dux of the Lusitanians (e.g. Liv. per. 52; Flor. 1.33.15).
This is a typical example of Graeco-Roman stereotypes of barbarism applied to indigenous
chiefdoms of Celtic Iberia (Sánchez-Moreno 2006).
As a military leader elected by the Lusitanians around 147 BC, Viriatus was the main
opponent to Roman expansion on the Iberian peninsula (App. Iber. 60-75). He was renowned
for his integrity and moral values (Diod. 33.1,7,19,21a; Cass. Dio fr. 73, 75, 77). Our literary
sources seem to be a Stoic scheme derived from Posidonius and transmitted by Diodorus
Siculus. As such, Viriatus has been construed as a paradigm of the ‘noble-savage’ or ‘Stoic
king-hero’ contrasting with the ambition and corruption of Roman aristocrats of the 2 nd
century BC. (Lens 1986; García Moreno 1988; cf. García Quintela 1993; Alvar 1997, 137143). His personality has been transformed into legend since antiquity (Pérez Vilatela 2000,
271-275).
The only biographical detail known to us is that Viriatus married the daughter of a rich proRoman Lusitanian called Astolpas, for at the engagement he reacted with rudeness to
Astolpas’ friendship with the Romans (Diod. 33.7.1-4).
In 139 BC, Viriatus was assassinated by some of his own followers, who had been bribed by
the Roman governor in Hispania Ulterior, Q. Servilius Caepio (App. Iber. 74).
2. Relations with Rome / Romans and Career
Viriatus escaped from Ser. Sulpicius Galba’s massacre of the Lusitanians of western
Hispania Ulterior in 150 BC and became their leader until his death. He was their commander
(dux, imperator) in the so-called Lusitanian (or Viriatan) War against Rome between 147-139
BC (Simon 1962, 121-124; Gundel 1968; Rubinsohn 1981; de Francisco 1989, 65-70; in
general Pastor Muñoz 2004). With multi-ethnic military forces (including the support of Punic
cities of southern Hispania) and the skilful use of terrain and ambush (i.e. ‘guerrilla’ tactics),
Viriatus defeated a series of Roman generals, especially in the Ulterior province. He also
brought about the co-operation of the Celto-Iberian tribes in 143 BC, which arose at the same
© Altay Coskun & the authors, 2004-2012
345
APR 04 (30.04.2012)
time as the Numantine War (143-133 BC) (App. Iber. 66). After several successful combats,
he defeated the praetor Q. Fabius Maximus Servilianus. But instead of destroying the
Roman forces, he secured a favourable peace with Rome. Therefore in 140 BC he was
recognized as amicus populi Romani in a foedus signed by Q. Fabius Maximus Servilianus
and ratified by the senate (App. Iber. 69f.; Diod. 33.1.3). Viriatus was recognised as a Roman
ally with sovereignty over a great part of independent Lusitania (Ciprés 1993, 155f.; García
Riaza 2002, 149-157). This probably meant a promotion of the Lusitanian chief to a so-called
client king (López Melero 1988; Pérez Vilatela 1989). At any rate, his role must have
exceeded that of a ‘shepherd’ converted into a chief bandit (Sánchez-Moreno 2002, 142-152;
2006, 67-69; Salinas 2008; cf. Schulten 1917).
However, the peace was quickly rejected by Q. Servilius Caepio, the new praetor in
Hispania Ulterior, who finally convinced the senate to abrogate the foedus with Viriatus. Once
the war had been renewed, Viriathus was assassinated by three men from the city of Urso
(modern Osuna, Seville) in 139 BC. They had been instigated by the Romans (App. Iber. 74,
Diod. 33.21). His funeral, including the sacrifice of animals, military parades and gladiatorial
fights around the pyre, as vividly described by ancient historians (App. Iber. 75, Diod.
33.21a), illustrates the extent of prestige and authority achieved by Viriatus.
As paradigm of independence and resistance, the figure of Viriatus has been widely and
competitively appropriated throughout modern history of both Spain and Portugal (Guerra &
Fabiao 1992; 1998; Pastor Muñoz 2009).
3. Select Bibliography
Gundel, Hans Georg: Viriatus, RE 9 A.1, 1961, 203-230.
Rohmann, Dirk: Viriatus, DNP 12/2, 2002, 245.
Cf. Badian, Erst/Konrad, Christoph K.: Viriatus, OCD3 2003, 1607f.
Alvar Ezquerra, Jaime: Héroes ajenos: Aníbal y Viriato, in: Alvar, J. & Blázquez, J.M. (eds.): Héroes y
antihéroes en la Antigüedad clásica, 1997, 137-153.
Ciprés Torres, Pilar: Guerra y sociedad en la Hispania indoeuropea, Vitoria 1993.
de Francisco Martín, Julián: Conquista y romanización de Lusitania, Salamanca 1989.
Ferreira da Silva, Armando Coelho: O nome de Viriato, Portugalia 24, 2003, 45-52.
García Moreno, Luis Agustín: Infancia, juventud y primeras aventuras de Viriato, caudillo lusitano, in: Actas I
Congreso Peninsular de Historia Antigua (Santiago de Compostela, 1986), Santiago de Compostela 1988,
373-382.
García Quintela, Marco Virgilio: Viriato y la ideología trifuncional indoeuropea, Polis 5, 1993, 111-138.
García Riaza, Enrique: Celtíberos y lusitanos frente a Roma: diplomacia y derecho de guerra, Vitoria 2002.
Guerra, Anibal/Fabiâo, Carlos: Viriato: genealogia de um mito, Penélope, fazer e desfazer a História 8, 1992, 923.
Guerra, Anibal & Fabiâo, Carlos: Viriato: em torno da iconografia de um mito, in: Mito e símbolo na História de
Portugal e do Brasil. Actas dos IV Cursos Internacionais de Verâo de Cascais (Julho 1997), Cascais 1998
(vol.3), 33-79.
Gundel, Hans Georg: Viriato, lusitano, caudillo en las luchas contra los romanos. 147-139 a.C., Caesaraugusta
31-32, 1968, 175-198.
Lens Tuero, Jesús: Viriato, héroe y rey cínico, Estudios de Filología Griega 2, 1986, 253-272.
López Melero, Raquel: Viriatus Hispaniae Romulus, ETF II: Historia Antigua 1, 1988, 247-261.
Pastor Muñoz, Mauricio: Viriato. El héroe hispano que luchó por la libertad de su pueblo, Madrid 2004.
© Altay Coskun & the author