Sfoglini Pasta Shop was born from the vision of Chef

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Sfoglini Pasta Shop was born from the vision of Chef
Sfoglini Pasta Shop was born from the vision of Chef Steve Gonzalez
who has been a part of some of the most formidable pasta programs
in New York City: Insieme, Hearth, Roberta’s, and Frankies Sputino,
and former creative director Scott Ketchum who both talked for years
about bringing a superior, locally produced pasta to NYC. Their
vision became a reality in July 2012 when they opened their doors in
the old Pfizer building in Williamsburg, now home to several small
food manufacturers.
Sfoglini specializes in making freshly extruded pastas using
traditional bronze dies that create a textured, porous surface that
makes it easier for sauce to cling to rather than slip to the bottom of
the bowl. The pasta is then air dried at low temperatures to preserve
nutrition and lock in more flavor.
Sfoglini’s traditional offerings include fifteen organic semolina and
organic whole-wheat pastas. In addition to their signature pastas,
Sfoglini also produces a line of seasonal pastas made with fresh, local
ingredients from NYC green markets and urban farms (Brooklyn
Grange, Riverpark, Eagle Street Farms, New Amsterdam Market).
Sfoglini also experiments with other unique ingredients and partners
to make innovative, original pastas including a tomato leaf pasta
collaboration with Riverpark and a beer pasta using milled grain from
the Bronx Brewery.
CONTACTS:
RELATED LINKS:
SCOTT KETCHUM
SFOGLINI
917.450.9314
[email protected]
sfoglini.com
STEVE GONZALEZ
646.872.1035
[email protected]
SFOGLINI
917.338.5955
630 Flushing Ave., 8th Floor
Brooklyn, NY 11206
WHAT SETS SFOGLINI PASTAS APART
IS THE QUALITY OF INGREDIENTS WE
USE COMBINED WITH THE TRADITION
AND INGENUITY WE DEVOTE TO
MAKING OUR PASTA.
Sfoglini pastas are available fresh or dried and are being served at
revered New York restaurants such as Tom Colicchio’s Riverpark,
Danny Meyer’s North End Grill and the Mandarin Oriental Hotel.
Sfoglini’s partners can be found selling at the Down to Earth Market
in Park Slope, Brooklyn and their pasta is also sold at retail outlets in
Brooklyn, Manhattan and throughout the U.S.. Individual pastas and
Pasta of the Month Club subscriptions featuring seasonal pastas and
recipes can be ordered online at sfoglini.com.
PFIZER BUILDING
ediblebrooklyn.com/department/edibleinfrastructure/entrepreneurial-incubators
DOWN TO EARTH MARKETS
downtoearthmarkets.com
NEW AMSTERDAM MARKET
newamsterdammarket.com
BRONX BREWERY
thebronxbrewery.com
BROOKLYN GRANGE
brooklyngrangefarm.com
EAGLE STREET FARMS
rooftopfarms.org
SFOGLINI’S FOUNDERS
STEVE GONZALEZ
Steve Gonzalez earned a Degree in Culinary
Arts from the Art Institute of Colorado and
has been a chef for 14 years. He began his
career working at Vetri in Philadelphia, his
first introduction to the art of hand made
pasta, and at the Locust Tree in Westchester,
where under the guidance and direction of
Chef Alberto Vanoli, he began to hone his
craft. In order to further refine his skills,
Steve traveled to Europe and first worked at
El Raco de Can Fabes, a Three Star Michelin
Restaurant in Sant Celoni, Spain where
his experience was evident and he was
quickly put in charge of the pasta making
operations. Steve gained deeper experience
in Italy working at Frosio in Villa d’ Alme,
Sapposenta in Cagliari, Sardegna and
Trattoria Majda in Friuli.
Since his return to America, Steve opened
his own restaurant, Zavino, in Philadelphia,
and has worked at some of New York’s most
revered restaurants including Insieme,
Company, Hearth, Roberta’s and Frankies
Spuntino. At Insieme, acclaimed chef Marco
Canora recognized Steve’s expertise and
had him develop the pasta tasting menus.
At Roberta’s in Bushwick, Steve supervised
the pizza kitchen and ran the mobile pizza
oven operations for large-scale events. Most
recently, Steve managed the pasta operations
for the Frankies Spuntino franchise in
Brooklyn and Manhattan.
With his vast experience abroad, in New York
and in opening his own restaurant, Steve
decided to branch out with his own company
and started Sfoglini with Scott. Steve currently
oversees Sfoglini’s pasta making operations.
SCOTT KETCHUM
Scott Ketchum has served as a Creative
Director/Graphic Designer for 18 years
in both San Francisco and New York
specializing in brand development, web
design and sustainable packaging and
design. A decade of living in NYC opened
Scott’s eyes to the creative parallels between
design and the culinary arts and prompted
him to study brewing and management at
the Siebel Institute in Chicago as well as
travel to Italy, Paris and Belgium to further
explore their food and beverage culture.
With the movement for locally made
products exploding in New York City and
the absence of an artisanal pasta maker
servicing area restaurants, Scott decided
to marry his profession and his passion
and start Sfoglini with his friend Steve,
Sfoglini’s chef and co-owner. Scott currently
oversees the company’s brand development,
marketing and operations.
SIGNATURE ORGANIC PASTAS
RADIATORE (4 OR 6 PRONG)
REGINETTI
ZUCCA
MACARONI (FRESH ONLY)
Traditionally called Radiatore,
the ruffled edges capture every
bit of your sauce and offer a
superb bite every time. Great for
thicker tomato sauces, ragus and
mac ’n cheese.
This ribbon shaped pasta is
commonly served with more
delicate sauces, but we love it
with everything from a spiced
meat ragu to baked casseroles.
Shaped like the end of a zucchini
or an open pumpkin, zucca pairs
perfectly with any red or creamy
sauce that will fill up the pasta
pocket to deliver the perfect bite.
Our macaroni are slightly larger
than average, providing an ideal
alternative to penne or ziti. This
versatile pasta works in any dish,
but is perfect in a casserole and
of course in mac ’n cheese.
SPACCATELLI
SMALL SHELLS
FUSILLI
TRUMPETS
This two inch strand of pasta
resembles a rolled up scroll. A great
substitute for ziti or macaroni and
superb with a chunky meat sauce
that will get wrapped in the folds.
Small Conchiglie are ideal in
mac ‘n cheese, Italian wedding
soups, or as an alternative pasta
in a baked dish.
This corkscrew shaped pasta is one
of our most versatile and popular
shapes. Pair with anything from a
vodka sauce to a ragu, or make it
the base of your next pasta salad.
Campanelle, little bell in Italian, is
shaped like a flower or horn and is
delicious when served with a thick
sauce or casserole and are a lovely
option for pasta salad.
BIGOLI (FRESH ONLY)
LARGE SHELLS (FRESH ONLY)
DITALINI
SPAGHETTI (FRESH ONLY)
Thicker than our spaghetti, Bigoli is
traditionally made with buckwheat
or whole wheat flour and works well
with a ragu or wild game.
Traditionally called Conchiglie,
each shell is about three inches
in length and is ideal for ricotta,
charred spinach, meat or other
delectable fillings.
Known in Italian as ‘little thimbles’
this pasta is a shorter version of
bucatini, approximately 1/4” in
length and is the perfect base for
minestrone soups or pasta fagioli.
These long hearty strands are the
perfect base for the quintessential
red sauce and meatball dish.
CAVATELLI
BUCATINI (FRESH ONLY)
CHITARRA (FRESH ONLY)
Commonly made in Sicily and
southern Italy, Cavatelli’s curved
shape and long rolled edge helps
hold thicker sauces. Pair with a
simple tomato sauce and ricotta,
or sautéed garlic and broccoli.
Similar to spaghetti but with a
hole running through the center,
Bucatini is best prepared with
a thinner sauce that can stream
through the middle and topped off
with pork and pecorino.
Chitarra means guitar in Italian,
but it is also the name for the
pasta-making equipment that
creates the squarish strands of
this spaghetti like pasta.
SEASONAL & SPECIALTY PASTAS
MALLOREDDUS
RAMPS
BEET
MINT
This Sardinian pasta is very similar to
cavatelli, but enhanced with saffron,
adding a splash of yellow-orange
color. A common Sardinian recipe for
this pasta is to serve it with tomato
sauce, fresh mint and pecorino.
Market fresh ramps are blended
with our organic semolina lending
a hint of sweet, garlic notes to our
pasta. Delicious when paired with
a primavera sauce.
We blend fresh beets from NYC
green markets with our organic
semolina, which adds tons of
earthy, beet flavor to the pasta.
Perfect with roasted beets, olive oil
and ricotta solatta.
Fresh mint from the Brooklyn
Grange is puréed and blended
with our organic semolina offering
a cooling rush of mint flavor best
highlighted with a simple sauce.
WHOLE GRAIN BLEND
WHOLE WHEAT BLEND
NETTLES
EVERYTHING BAGEL
Sfoglini’s unique whole grain blend
features an organic, stone milled
hard red flour from the Wild Hive
Farm in Clinton Corners, NY. This
rich, robust pasta offers a nutritional
boost and is availible in all our
pasta shapes.
All of our pasta shapes can be
made with a 50/50 blend of whole
wheat and semolina flour. We use
only the highest quality organic
flours from the Wild Hive Farm in
Clinton Corners, NY to provide
you with the most delectable whole
wheat pasta available.
Nettles are edible flowering plants
with tiny needles—we give them
a quick blanch to neutralize their
sting and puree them. They have
a robust flavor similar to spinach,
but richer and more savory. Mix
with ricotta & olive oil for a quick
but delicious dinner.
The traditional ingredients from
the quintessential NY Everything
bagel (Poppy Seed, Sesame Seed,
Garlic, Onion, Salt) lend a refined
garlic flavor and hearty consistency
that pairs perfectly with butter and
sea salt.
BRONX BREWERY PALE ALE
CHILI PEPPER
SAUVIGNON BLANC
BASIL
Our collaboration pasta with the
Bronx Brewery features spent
grain from their flagship Pale Ale,
which is comprised of five different
barley malts, resulting in a roasted,
almost chocolate like richness,
heavenly with a hearty meat ragu.
A custom blend of Cacho de Cabra,
Cayenne, Ancho, Serrano and Bird’s
Eye Chili peppers enhances the
flavor with a subtle spiciness that
really comes through when paired
with a vodka or tomato sauce.
Our collaboration with the Red
Hook Winery blends their freshly
harvested Sauvignon Blanc grape
skins with our organic semolina,
creating a faint plum flavor and figlike texture. A unique pasta to pair
with anchovies, garlic and parsley.
Fresh basil from the Brooklyn
Grange and Eagle Street Farms is
added to our classic semolina for
a supremely flavorful pasta that’s
easily paired with olive oil, sea salt
and pecorino.
CUTTLEFISH INK
SQUASH
PORCINI MUSHROOM
GARLIC SCAPES
Cuttlefish ink brings a beautiful
slate coloring and sharp briny
flavor that pairs well with seafood.
A blend of fresh squash from NYC
green markets that pairs well with
brown butter and sage.
All natural porcini mushrooms are
puréed and added to our signature
organic semolina for a subtle earthy
flavor that makes a unique pairing
to any dish.
Fresh garlic scapes, the curling
flower stalks grown from hard-neck
garlic plants, provide a mild garlic
flavor and a slight sweetness to our
flowering trumpets.
RECENT PRESS
VILLAGE VOICE
A SMALL-SCALE FOOD REVOLUTION
AT BROOKLYN’S PFIZER PLANT
JUNE 11, 2013
“Should I turn the music down?” People’s Pops founder Joel Horowitz
asks as we embark on a tour of his ice pop manufacturing kitchen in
Brooklyn. As explanation, he adds, “You don’t make a tasty ice pop
without loud music.”
People’s Pops headquarters is located at 630 Flushing Avenue on a
nondescript stretch of road sandwiched between the Marcy projects
(Jay-Z’s provenance), Woodhull Hospital, and the sleepy, southernmost
extension of Hasidic Williamsburg. Originally the Pfizer world
headquarters, the building spans a city block, and it employed over
2,000 people in its heyday. In a corner lab several stories up, a doorman,
somewhat wide-eyed and jabbing his index finger at the ceiling for
emphasis, tells me, “They invented Viagra right up there!”
People’s Pops is on the fourth floor near a big conveyor belt once used to
bottle pills. It’s one of many artisanal food startups that have opened in
the building since Acumen Capital bought it in 2010.
Horowitz walks up to a table where Sharlena Powell is cutting fruit: “So
much awesome fresh rhubarb,” he says, glancing at a bucket of stems
waiting for the axe. “This rhubarb was picked like, three days ago.” It
comes from Finger Lakes Farms and is about as fresh as any New Yorker
can reasonably hope for--probably unnecessarily fresh, considering it will
be cooked, frozen, packaged and shipped in an operation that’s every bit
as industrial as it is mom-and-pop.
We approach the stick-stamping station. “All of our sticks are handstamped,” he says, noting the need for eagle-eye quality control, as misstamps happen. “Sometimes they say People’s Poo,” an employee chimes
in, laughing above the music.
“GONZALEZ HAS THE CADENCE AND
DEMEANOR OF A SEASONED COOK; HIS
PASSION LIES SQUARELY IN THE FOOD.”
Across the room, Scott Morgenthaler pulls newly frozen pops from their
molds. Later, they’ll be packaged by a highly efficient but finicky machine
from China that everyone affectionately calls “Xiè Xiè.” (“That’s ‘thank
you,’ in Mandarin,” Horowitz’s partner David Carrell explains. “We do
everything we can to keep her happy.” Packaging the pops by hand is a
nightmare.)
Carrell also noted that the spaces are immaculate and fully washable.
Every room has floor drains from when they were laboratories, and
many were kept sterile for pharmaceutical production, which means the
building is uniquely clean, great for working with food, unlike so many of
Brooklyn’s industrial backwaters.
When the tour is over, the partners feed me an ice pop--strawberry with
Angostura bitters. The Angostura aromatics shine through at the back
of the palate and add a nice complexity to a pop that’s not actually bitter,
which is delightful and kind of fun.
Perhaps because of this, food startups make up a large portion of the new
tenants, and there are benefits to that, too. When the guys at Kelvin test
new flavors in their kitchen, their neighbors at People’s Pops are ideal
tasters. “Whenever we have something new in the [slush] machine, I’ll run
over and grab them, because I trust their palates,” Silverman says.
Next door at Kelvin Slush, Zack Silverman churns out all-natural, artisanal
slushies that are served from a roving truck around the city; they’re mixed
with booze at Madison Square Garden and other locations that allow it.
Silverman’s syrup, which he and partner Alex Rein spent years developing
in Rein’s kitchen, is made off-site and shipped to Brooklyn. At Pfizer, they
add water and put it in machines to cool it to the right consistency.
On summer weekends, Kelvin sends slush to Smorgasburg, where
People’s Pops also sells their treats. “All our employees know each other,”
Silverman says. Saturday mornings for both companies are early affairs
that involve packing, moving, and loading frozen goods into freight
elevators and then into trucks bound for the Williamsburg waterfront.
Those freight elevators and loading docks are key to the building’s appeal,
says Carrell. “It allows us the infrastructure of a multinational corporation.
With four freight elevators and six loading docks. Compared to our last
location, where we had one loading dock-- when it breaks down, it brings
the gauntlet down on everything you do that week.”
Horowitz says they often piggyback orders with other companies: “It’s
awesome to have friends in the building. We order sugar with Steve’s
Ice Cream [another tenant]. We buy a few pallets at a time, and it’s a lot
cheaper to buy it in bulk.”
Heartbeet founders Danniel Swatosh and Maria Margolies.
Upstairs on the eighth floor, Heartbeet Juicery founders Maria Margolies
and Danniel Swatosh agree. “Every question we have we discuss with
everyone [in the building], and we help each other out. Everything from ‘I
need extra fridge space, can I use your fridge?’ to, ‘Are you guys getting a
delivery of produce?’ It’s great to have that instead of being somewhere all
alone by ourselves.”
Heartbeet makes cold-pressed juices and smoothies. The day I visit,
they’ve just finished a fresh batch of new summer varieties. “Do you like
spice?!” Swatosh asks, after deciding that I must take juice home with me.
I do like spice. “This one is a new flavor, pineapple jalapeño. It has kale
VILLAGE VOICE
A SMALL-SCALE FOOD REVOLUTION
AT BROOKLYN’S PFIZER PLANT
JUNE 11, 2013
CONTINUED...
and cucumber, too. We don’t have a label for it yet,” she says. Margolies
adds, “We just hand-wrote it.”
The juice is light green in color with a fruity start and spicy finish that
lingers in more of a vegetable way than a peppery one. It has balanced
flavors of cucumber and kale and is refreshingly bright for something that
packs several servings of roughage into a single 16-ounce bottle. Drinking
the juice feels like doing yourself a favor, and looking at the juice ladies,
who have a radiant, healthy energy about them, I wonder if juice may be
the key to everlasting youth.
Heartbeet shares a wing with Sfoglini Pasta, Milk Truck grilled cheeses,
Delaney Barbecue, McClure’s Pickles, and a handful of bakeries. At
Sfoglini, Steve Gonzalez is prepping a pasta salad for a collaboration with
the New York Historical Society and the New York Times, but he’s more
interested in discussing the pasta itself.
He picks up a piece of radiatore, drying on sheet pans against the wall.
It’s from Sfoglini’s BxB line, which they make using spent grain from
Bronx Brewery. “Beer people really love it,” Gonzalez says. “It has a malty,
chocolaty flavor, a little deeper than whole wheat.”
Sfoglini also sources Hard Red Spring wheat flour from Wild Hive Farms.
“It’s an older grain that they’re trying to bring back, it’s not a modified
wheat,” he says. This is for their New York Blend, which is a shade darker
than traditional semolina pasta but “Not as hearty as whole wheat. ... It’s
whole grain, not whole wheat. The color’s lighter, and it’s certainly milder,”
Gonzalez explains.
Gonzalez has the cadence and demeanor of a seasoned cook; his passion
lies squarely in the food. When I ask about the community in the building,
he says he used to go on the roof for beers with the guys from Brooklyn
Kombucha, but since the building has started to fill up, “there’s security
up there now.” No more beers on the roof.
Even so, Sfoglini hosts weekly pasta lunches for the people in the
building, since the neighborhood is a culinary desert. Nearby restaurants
include a McDonald’s and Burger King, some Halal carts near Woodhull, a
dicey pizza joint, and a couple Chinese places, and these are blocks away.
Down the hall, Delaney Barbecue also hosts a weekly lunch. Delaney uses
an eighth-floor space as a meat locker and prep kitchen for their service
at Brisket Town in Williamsburg, which arguably ousted Fette Sau as the
King of Northside Barbecue when it opened last fall. Delaney’s latest
project, ‘Smoke Line,” a food cart stationed at the High Line in Chelsea,
was an instant hit when it opened this spring.
Downstairs, Delaney has a shipping container in the Pfizer parking lot.
Inside is a smoker shipped in from Texas. Philip Powers, Delaney’s pit
boss and kitchen manager, leads me to the trailer, where firewood is
stacked outside, tarped against the soaking summer rain. It looks like
something you’d see in the rural Dirty South, and I say so. “That’s the
inspiration,” Powers replies, “It’s all inspired by the guys down in Texas,
whose operation pretty much looks like this--there’ll be a smoker, and a
couple picnic tables outside, and they’ll serve the brisket right there.”
Back inside, Kelsey Torstvet, market sales manager at Brooklyn
Kombucha (whose fifth-floor space offers a building-wide happy hour
once a month with DJs and snacks) remembers a crawfish boil Delaney
hosted awhile back, just outside the smoker-trailer: “Daniel Delaney was
just there cooking for everyone. It was really fun and cool. Only working
here would I have such a random and great experience.”
It’s a striking image: a Southern-style crawfish boil in front of a
Texas-style smoker in a shipping container at the base of a massive
pharmaceutical factory in Bed-Stuy with young entrepreneurs and their
young workers enjoying hand-made, natural, locally sourced food. Will
slow food change the world, and is it good for our communities? There
seems to be something happening here that suggests so.
By Hannah Palmer Egan
RECENT PRESS
MARTHA STEWART
PASTA PERFECT
MAY 1, 2013
“It’s a truth universally acknowledged that all moms love pasta, mine
included,” says Jennifer Anderson, digital food editor. If you live nearby,
you could make dinner for her on Mother’s Day, but if you don’t, send
Mom regular deliveries of artisanal pasta and make sure she has a lovely
new pot and colander to cook them in. She’s on her own for the sauce!
Sfoglini Pasta of the Month Club, 6 months for $140, sfoglini.com
“IF YOU LIVE NEARBY, YOU COULD MAKE
DINNER FOR HER ON MOTHER’S DAY,
BUT IF YOU DON’T, SEND MOM REGULAR
DELIVERIES OF ARTISANAL PASTA.”
RECENT PRESS
SIMPLY GOURMET
EVERYTHING BAGEL FUSILLI WITH CREAM CHEESE SAUCE
APRIL 30, 2013
I am so excited to share this really cool pasta with you!
It comes from Sfoglini Pasta Shop in Brooklyn, NY. I hadn’t heard of them
but as soon as I went on to their website I knew I was going to be a fan.
All of their pastas are made in small batches, from the finest semolina
flour, and air dried at low temperatures.
Besides just using high quality ingredients to make their pastas, the team
at Sfoglini uses their creativity to come up with really fun and different
pasta flavors. The one I am going to share today is their Everything
Fusilli which is one of their Seasonal Pastas. Other flavors in this category
include Basil Reginette, Beet Fusilli, Chili Pepper Fusilli, Sauvignon
Black Reginetti, and BxB Radiators (yes this is pasta made with beer!).
Flavors change regularly and depend on the season so I will definitely be
checking back often to see what is currently in stock.
If plain, semolina flour pasta is your thing check out their Organic Pastas.
These are more typical pasta shapes and includes a whole wheat option. I
have tried their organic fusilli and it blows boxed pasta from the grocery
store out of the water!
The traditional everything bagel has a seasoning of poppy seeds, sesame
seeds, garlic, onion and salt and all of these flavors can be found mixed
right into the Everything Bagel Fusilli dough. As soon as I saw this pasta I
knew immediately that I wanted to do a recipe that played on a bagel and
cream cheese.
While it was very tasty the sauce was a little too heavy for my liking so
next time I will try to thin it out with reserved pasta water. The Sfoglini
websites suggests serving this pasta with a butter and sea salt sauce
which would be a nice light match for this hearty pasta.
You can purchase Sfoglini pasta from their website but if you are looking
for it in the Boston area check out these two locations:
Central Bottle in Cambridge
196 Massachusetts Ave
Boston, MA 02139
617.225.0040
West Elm Fenway
160 Brookline Avenue
(Btwn. Kilmarnock Street And Park Drive)
Boston, MA 02215
617.450.9500
“BESIDES JUST USING HIGH QUALITY
INGREDIENTS TO MAKE THEIR PASTAS,
THE TEAM AT SFOGLINI USES THEIR
CREATIVITY TO COME UP WITH REALLY
FUN AND DIFFERENT PASTA FLAVORS.”
RECENT PRESS
CRAVINGS
PASTA OF THE MONTH
APRIL 25, 2013
Sfoglini produces innovative fresh and dried pastas in distinctive
textures and flavors. The Williamsburg-based pasta producer makes both
traditional (organic semolina or 50/50 whole wheat and semolina) and
seasonal lines. The seasonal pastas are made with ingredients from local
green markets and urban farms, so there’s always something fun and
interesting like nettle radiators, basil reginetti and beet fusilli. The pastas’
textured and porous surfaces are designed to soak up sauce. My personal
favorite is the pumpkin-shaped zucca (middle left), because sauce not
only clings to the outside ridges, but also pools inside. And Sfoglini’s
whimsical everything bagel-inspired “everything fusilli” (bottom right)
has a hearty consistency and that great flavor combination of salt, onion,
poppy seed and sesame. A membership to Sfoglini’s Pasta of the Month
Club (two bags of pasta per month, one signature and one seasonal)
would be a great gift for Mom or any pasta lover in your life. And if you
happen to share a household, you may reap the benefits too — now that’s
a win-win!
“THE SEASONAL PASTAS ARE MADE
WITH INGREDIENTS FROM LOCAL GREEN
MARKETS AND URBAN FARMS, SO
THERE’S ALWAYS SOMETHING FUN AND
INTERESTING LIKE NETTLE RADIATORS,
BASIL REGINETTI AND BEET FUSILLI.”
RECENT PRESS
NEW YORK HISTORICAL SOCIETY
TASTE OF NEW-YORK HISTORY: INTERVIEW
WITH SCOTT KETCHUM OF SFOGLINI PASTA
APRIL 18, 2013
New York has long been a food capital, from the upscale kitchens of our
finest restaurants to the bagels and sausages on the street corners. But as
anyone whose walked around Brooklyn has figured out, the next chapter of
New York’s food history has everything to do with the local, “artisanal” food
scene that is making its mark on the city. From the rise of greenmarkets and
food fairs to the focus on seasonal ingredients, these products embody a
DIY ethos that New York City has had from the very beginning.
The New-York Historical Society’s Museum store is introducing it’s Taste
of New-York History collection of specialty foods that can only be found in
New York City and State, including jams, cheeses, and chocolates. The store
will also be hosting a series of Friday Night Bites events, where local vendors
will provide demonstrations and tastings. One of our vendors, Sfoglini Pasta,
will be here on June 7. Based in Brooklyn, Sfoglini Pasta focuses on making
freshly extruded pastas from local grains and ingredients, experimenting
with new flavors like beet, nettle, and even everything bagel! We spoke to
Sfoglini co-owner Scott Ketchum about making pasta, New York’s food scene,
and how best to cook their bagel pastas.
You and [co-owner and chef Steve Gonzalez] have lived and worked
all over the country. What about New York made you want to start this
business here?
I came to New York about 12 years ago, and really, it had always been a
dream of mine to move here. I grew up in the MTV generation and seeing
everything that happened here—it was just so different from where I grew
up. I had that desire from young age. I moved to San Francisco for a while,
but I still knew I wanted to come to New York. As for Steve, the restaurant
business brought him here. This is where all the chefs want to be.
Given your culinary backgrounds, why did you choose to open a pasta
business instead of a pasta restaurant?
That really was our original concept, to have a restaurant with wholesale
business on the site, and we worked on that for a long time. But with
times being tough, financing, it wasn’t happening as quickly as we had
hoped. So we saved up some money, and thought we’d have enough to do
the wholesale business. And there seemed to be a hole in the marketplace;
no one was doing pasta the way we wanted to. We want to share pasta
making with people, show people how it’s done. A Sfoglini is a type of
pasta maker in Italy, so it’s about sharing tradition. Our space doesn’t
have room for classes right now, but eventually we want to expand into
that. It’s a nice thing to share with people.
Do you have any tips for making pasta at home?
I think using great ingredients and taking the time to do everything right
makes a difference. We like to experiment with a lot of new grains, and
we’re hoping to bring that more to the market, and show people how to
use local grains.
What gave you the idea for the more inventive pasta flavors?
Steve really loves to go to the markets and local farmers, where we see
what there is available to use. Just using whatever is local and fresh at the
time is what we try to focus on. We know there are certain things we try
to repeat, but you never know. The beet pasta we did in February was very
popular, the nettle pasta turned out magnificent. Not everything always
works, but we try.
“MY WIFE LOVES EVERYTHING BAGEL
CRUMBS, AND SPRINKLES THE CRUMBS
ON EVERYTHING. WE WERE JOKING
AROUND THAT WE SHOULD TRY TO
MAKE A PASTA OUT OF THAT...”
The everything bagel pasta has gotten you a lot of press recently,
mainly I think because it combines these two New York food cultures in
a really new way. What gave you the idea for that?
That grew out of Hurricane Sandy. Steve was in the East Village, and lost
power for that week and came to stay with me on the Upper West Side. My
wife went to get bagels one morning, and she loves the everything bagel
crumbs, and sprinkles the crumbs on everything. We were joking around
that we should try to make a pasta out of that, and it just grew. But it all
started over bagels for breakfast.
New York has a long history of food culture. How do you think what you
guys do, and the larger artisanal food movement happening right now,
is a part of that?
I think the food culture disappeared for a while in New York and people
wanted to bring that back, especially when things became so processed
with artificial ingredients in everything. Everyone just wanted to eat fresh
again. It’s not necessarily why we started this. It just started happening
and we were in it. Steve has had this passion for a long time. Italian
cooking is all about finding local, fresh ingredients.
What’s your favorite way to serve the everything bagel pasta?
We’re doing it in our pasta of the month box this month, but we think
people should treat it like is is a bagel, so the recipe here includes cream
cheese and smoked salmon and onions. But I really like a lot of our
seasonal pastas because they have so much flavor on their own, so you
can’t go wrong with cooking them with some brown butter or olive oil and
a little bit of cheese.
RECENT PRESS
NEW YORK MAGAZINE
EVERYTHING “EVERYTHING”
APRIL 15, 2013
RECENT PRESS
GRUB STREET
WHAT THE ICONIC NEW YORK EVERYTHING BAGEL
HAS WROUGHT
APRIL 7, 2013
If you were to identify one taste that best represents New York, you could
do worse than the everything bagel, with its frenetic coating of poppy,
caraway, and sesame seeds, plus salt, garlic, and onion. An everything
bagel, like the city itself, is not shy. It’s brash, aggressive, over-the-top,
and utterly polyglot, both an emblem of New York’s immigrant past
and a vehicle for its culinary future. To some, it’s the only bagel. “It has
depth and complexity … It’s the thinking-man’s bagel,” says wd-50 chef
Wylie Dufresne, who broke ground a while back with his innovative
interpretation, an “everything bagel” of savory ice cream with smokedsalmon threads. Since then, the versatile spice mix has strong-armed its
way into everything from more haute tasting menus to a hot-dog bun.
But here’s the thing: Although the everything bagel seems as historical
as the Waldorf salad, it was only invented sometime around 1980. (A New
Yorker article credits David Gussin, a teenage sweeper-upper in a Howard
Beach shop at the time, for collecting the oven’s burned-seed detritus after
a day’s bake and undergoing an everything-bagel epiphany.) What does
Gussin, now a middle-aged Wantagh, Long Island, businessman think
about the current crossover craze? “It makes me smile,” he says. “Although
I should be getting royalties.”
Torrisi Italian Specialties’ bagel chips with smoked sturgeon, cream
cheese, and everything-bagel spices
Mario Carbone and Rich Torrisi’s nod to the Lower East Side’s legacy. It’s
known among the cognoscenti as crostini alla Russ & Daughters, and is a
rotating dish on the restaurant’s $75 seven-course menu. 250 Mulberry St.,
nr. Prince St.; 212-965-0955.
Smith Canteen’s turkey on everything croissant
Buttermilk-brined turkey, sage mayo, and good bacon on an “everything”
croissant. Believe it or not, chef Rob Newton, the brains behind this
excellent idea, grew up in the bagel-bereft state of Arkansas. $9; 343 Smith
St., at Carroll St., Carroll Gardens; 347-294-0292.
Iconic Hand Rolls’ New York roll
It’s smoked salmon, cream cheese, red onion, and rice wrapped in a sheet
of nori and looking not unlike a savory ice-cream cone with “everything”
sprinkles. $6; 135 First Ave., nr. St. Marks Pl.; 646-476-3100.
Momofuku Milk Bar’s Bacon Bagel Bomb
Outside this billiard-size ball of dough, you’ll find the usual mix of seeds
and spice; inside there lies a stealth bacon-scallion-and-cream-cheese
filling—an everything bagel trapped in the body of a jelly doughnut. $3.50;
multiple locations.
Talde’s Everything Roti
After dabbling in “everything-bagel” spring rolls, Dale Talde has moved
on to unleavened Indian flatbread. $4; 369 Seventh Ave., at 11th St., Park
Slope; 347-916-0031.
Eleven Madison Park’s smoked sturgeon with everything-bagel
crumble, pickles, and caviar
Not to be outdone by Messieurs Torrisi and Carbone, Daniel Humm
makes a spice mixture of his own and calls it an “everything crumble.” It’s
part of his $195 tasting menu. 11 Madison Ave., at 24th St.; 212-889-0905.
“JEWISH APPETIZING MEETS BROOKLYN
ARTISANAL PASTA MAKING. HOW NEW
YORK IS THAT? SO MUCH SO, THE NEWYORK HISTORICAL SOCIETY HAS SEEN
FIT TO SELL THE STUFF AT THEIR
MUSEUM STORE.”
Crif Dogs’ Jon-Jon Deragon
No less an “everything” innovator than Wylie Dufresne is a fan of this
stupendous Crif Dog creation (deep-fried frankfurter, chopped scallion,
“everything” seeds, and a shmear) invented by bitters guru and former
PDT bartender John Deragon. $3.75; 113 Saint Marks Pl., nr. Ave. A; 212614-2728.
Sfoglini’s everything-bagel fusilli
Jewish appetizing meets Brooklyn artisanal pasta making. How New
York is that? So much so, the New-York Historical Society has seen fit to
sell the stuff at their museum store. You’ll also find it at Brooklyn Victory
Garden for $8.99 a sixteen-ounce package; 920 Fulton St., nr. St. James Pl.,
Clinton Hill; 718-398-9100.
By Robin Raisfeld and Rob Patronite
RECENT PRESS
HUNTINGTON POST
EVERYTHING BAGEL PASTA BY SFOGLINI
IS OFFICIALLY ON OUR WISH LIST
MARCH 4, 2013
In oh-my-goodness-we-have-to-have-it news, Brooklyn pasta shop Sfoglini
has invented Everything Bagel Pasta. You read that correctly, these fusilli
are infused with the flavor of your morning everything bagel: poppy
seeds, sesame seeds, garlic, onion and salt.
We have so many ideas for how to use this pasta, but so far, we think New
York Mouth’s suggestion is absolutely the best: “Serve them just like a
bagel, with a sauce made from cream cheese and whole milk, bits of lox,
thinly sliced red onion, chives and chopped tomatoes -– the ultimate New
York meets Italy experience. Fuggedabowdit!”
Our minds are absolutely reeling with flavor combinations. Anything that
would taste good on a bagel will taste good with this pasta. Think capers
and a cheesy sauce. Creme fraiche and caviar! Ham and cheese with
mustard sauce! Sorry, we’ll calm down.
It appears that Everything Bagel Pasta’s popularity has grown so
exponentially that it is currently out of stock. When it returns, you’ll be
able to get it from New York Mouth for $8 a bag. How will you serve it?
Rebecca Orchant
“OUR MINDS ARE ABSOLUTELY REELING
WITH FLAVOR COMBINATIONS. ANYTHING
THAT WOULD TASTE GOOD ON A BAGEL
WILL TASTE GOOD WITH THIS PASTA. ”
RECENT PRESS
URBAN DADDY
THE THING: AN EVERYTHING BAGEL. AS FUSILLI.
MARCH 1, 2013
Notable moments in breakfast.
1963: Horatio Magellan Crunch is promoted to the rank of Cap’n.
1967: the first frosted Pop-Tart is born.
And now, in the 2,013th year of our breakfast lord, pasta just possibly
found a way to the morning table. By way of everything bagels.
We’ll explain.
Meet Everything Bagel Fusilli, essentially the compositional makeup of a
Brooklyn-style everything bagel in fusilli pasta form, available online now.
Okay, we get that this is a pretty confusing food concept, so we’ll take it
slow. First, this stuff hails from Brooklyn. There, a pasta shop decided to
take organic semolina flour and all the makings of a New York everything
bagel (poppy and sesame seeds, onion, garlic, salt) and fuse the two. The
result: everything bagel fusilli.
So if you’re intrigued, you’ll buy a bag or two. Next, you’ll boil it up. Put a
little marinara on it. Have it for dinner.
Then again, you may just want to embrace the bagel properties of this
pasta. You know: cook up a steaming bowl of the stuff in the a.m. and get
all the joys associated with carbo-loading and morning bageling. Add a
side of sliced red onion, capers, maybe even some lox.
This may open the door for gnocchi cereal down the road.
“AND NOW, IN THE 2,013TH YEAR OF OUR
BREAKFAST LORD, PASTA JUST POSSIBLY
FOUND A WAY TO THE MORNING TABLE.
BY WAY OF EVERYTHING BAGELS.”
RECENT PRESS
COOL MATERIAL
EVERYTHING BAGEL PASTA
MARCH 1, 2013
What’s your favorite kind of bagel? Plain? Sesame? Gluten-free
cardboard? If you didn’t answer “Everything,” we’re afraid we’re going
to have to disagree with you. If you are a fan of your bagel covered in a
bit of everything, here is your new favorite pasta. Everything Bagel Fusili
is infused with the flavors of poppy seeds, sesame seeds, garlic, onion,
and salt. Mess around with your sauce to see what works best, or follow
the instructions in the product description to make a topping that really
makes for that New York bagel experience. Frankly, we could just boil it
and eat it straight.
“IF YOU ARE A FAN OF YOUR BAGEL
COVERED IN A BIT OF EVERYTHING,
HERE IS YOUR NEW FAVORITE PASTA.”
RECENT PRESS
OPENSKY
INSIDERS
JANUARY 25, 2013
Tom Colicchio
If you’re a regular on OpenSky, you already know that I’m always on the
lookout for dried pastas done right. Making fresh pasta at home is a great
thing, but it isn’t always a practical option. Store-bought dried pastas
are almost universally so bland and lifeless that a lot of consumers don’t
realize how wonderful they can really be – if you’re willing to pay
a premium for the good stuff.
That’s where Sfoglini comes in. The company was co-founded in Brooklyn
by Steve Gonzales, a chef who has been a part of some of the most
formidable pasta programs out there: Vetri, Insieme, Hearth, Roberta’s,
and Frankies Spuntino are just some of the restaurants where he’s
rolled and shaped dough. Steve knows the craft inside and out. He
started Sfoglini in order to bring really great, shelf-stable pasta into
peoples’ homes.
What Sfoglini produces is freshly extruded pastas created from Americanmade organic semolina flour. They use traditional bronze dies, which
result in that textured, porous surface to the pasta that really allows for
sauce to cling and cover, not slip to the bottom of the bowl. This, and the
flavor locked in by slow, low-temperature drying, is what sets Sfoglini
apart from the crowd.
In addition to a series of traditional semolina and whole wheat pastas
(albeit in some unusual shapes like lacy Reginetti and tubular Spaccatelli),
Sfoglini also produces a line of seasonal pastas flavored with fresh, local
ingredients ranging from porcini mushrooms to cuttlefish ink. Get your
hands and some and you’ll be able to the difference from supermarket
brands from the moment you see and touch it.
Cook Often, Eat Well,
“STEVE KNOWS THE CRAFT INSIDE AND
OUT. HE STARTED SFOGLINI IN ORDER
TO BRING REALLY GREAT, SHELF-STABLE
PASTA INTO PEOPLES’ HOMES.”
- TOM COLICCHIO
RECENT PRESS
SERIOUS EATS
FOOD ARTISANS: SFOGLINI PASTA
JANUARY 28, 2013
Scott Ketchum and Steve Gonzalez were trying to raise money to open a
pasta restaurant and market when they realized that few New York-based
companies were making dried pasta for the retail market. So they started
one.
Sfoglini makes dried pasta that’s more or less to order; when a store
or restaurant places an order, Ketchum and Gonzalez make whatever’s
needed then. Skipping out on inventory allows them to both keep costs
down and provide the freshest possible products to their customers.
This also allows them to do short runs of seasonal flavors, or try out
unexpected ingredients. They have a particular interest in working with
“things people are just getting rid of”; among those they’ve incorporated
into pasta are Eagle Street Farm’s late-season basil that’s going to seed,
spent grain from Bronx Brewery, grape skins from Red Hood Winery,* and
Brooklyn Grange’ otherwise compost-bound tomato leaves. The latter are
actually edible, says Gonzalez, despite persistent rumors to the contrary.
“We read a lot of Harold McGee articles about it,” before experimenting
with tomato leaves, he says, “and we ate enough ourselves to prove [the
rumors] wrong.”
* They only got their hands on a small quantity of sauvignon blanc skins before
the winery was severely damaged in Hurricane Sandy, though Ketchum and
Gonzalez are looking forward to working with the skins from red wine grapes
next year.
Any non-flour ingredients get pulverized in a Vitamix blender, then sifted
carefully through a tamis to remove any fibrous bits that could cause
problems for their extruding machine. Once they develop a dough they’re
happy with, they pick the best shape to show off the flavor. It may be a
familiar shape, like fusilli, or one that’s less common, like reginetti or
spaccatelli.
Once the pasta shapes are extruded, they air dry for anywhere from 48
to 96 hours, depending on the air temperature and humidity, and are
packaged in bags that are stamped with the date the contents were made.
It’s all in keeping with their company’s mission; sfoglini, Gonzalez
explains, are generations of “ladies in Bologna who make pasta by hand.”
By naming their company after these women, Gonzalez and Ketchum
hope to make clear their connection to the tradition of handmade pasta,
but they also aim to convey their desire to pay it forward—they hope to
begin teaching pasta-making classes soon. “I didn’t know how to make
pasta when I was born,” Gonzalez says. “Someone had to teach me.” By
mentoring others and passing along their knowledge to people who have
an interest in learning how to make pasta, Sfoglini aims to honor the
sfoglini.
Sfoglini pasta is currently available at shops and restaurants around the
city, as well as at the New Amsterdam Market. They launched a pasta of
the month club around the holidays, though one can join at any time, that
brings one bag each of their organic and specialty pastas along with a
quick recipe for using them. Ketchum and Gonzalez are also excited about
making their pastas available through CSAs this spring and summer.
About the author: Stephanie Klose has more mustard than you. You can
follow her on twitter at @sklose.
“SCOTT KETCHUM AND STEVE GONZALEZ
WERE TRYING TO RAISE MONEY TO OPEN
A PASTA RESTAURANT AND MARKET
WHEN THEY REALIZED THAT FEW NEW
YORK-BASED COMPANIES WERE MAKING
DRIED PASTA FOR THE RETAIL MARKET.
SO THEY STARTED ONE.”
RECENT PRESS
150 ISH - THE LOCAL DISH
WOULD YOU LIKE A LITTLE CHEESE ON THAT?
NOVEMBER 8, 2012
More than macaroni. New world pastas steeped in tradition and
covered in homemade sauce.
How long did you think it would take for Francesca and Marisa to talk
about pasta? When we met Steve Gonzalez and Scott Ketchum, co-owners
and co-everything of Sfoglini: New York Pasta Shop, we were immediately
intrigued—they turn a lot of preconceived notions about pasta on its
orecchietta . . . um, ear. People have a lot of opinions about pasta. Fresh or
dry? If you choose fresh, do you make your own? When it comes to dry, do
you choose imported or domestic? Truth is, most people settle on a brand
and pretty much stick with it for life.
So why should two Italian girls suggest you seek out Sfoglini small batch
pastas, made right here in South Williamsburg? Lots of reasons: first
and foremost, it tastes great. Steve and Scott use traditional bronze dies
to extrude the pasta, resulting in a beautiful rough texture that gives
the sauce something to cling to. And they use only the best organic
ingredients, most of them locally sourced and none of them imported.
Here’s the dish. A chef for more than 13 years, Steve earned a culinary
arts degree in Colorado and began his career at Ventri in Philadelphia. He
moved on to restaurants in Spain and Italy, constantly honing his pastamaking skills—experience that paid off when he moved to New York.
Here he’s worked in such popular kitchens as Insieme, Company, Hearth,
and Roberta’s, as well as Frankies Sputino, where he managed the pasta
operations in Brooklyn and Manhattan.
Steve’s girlfriend had a good friend whose husband was a graphic
designer. That would be Scott, who had studied brewing at Chicago’s
Siebel Institute and had a growing interest in the artisanal food
movement. Introductions led to long conversations and soon a
partnership and Sfoglini was born. (Sfoglini, by the way, is the Italian
name for the women who traditionally hand-make pasta.)
In a space on the eighth floor of Pfizer Brooklyn, in one of the laboratories
that may have seen the invention of Viagra, the pair produce, on average,
between 100 to 200 pounds of pasta a week, packing up more than a
dozen different types of dried pasta, along with seasonal specialties and
a newly introduced fresh pasta line. In addition to wholesale and retail
sales, they also supply many of the city’s top restaurants.
Sfoglini pasta looks as good as it tastes. “I wanted shapes that are a little
bit different—but in the beginning everyone asked for spaghetti and
rigatoni!” Steve laughs. “So we try to introduce people to shapes that will
work in the same way. The zucca, the little pumpkin shapes, are really
popular. And we make a fresh spaghetti now, too.”
A pasta for every season. We love the idea of seasonal pastas, although
according to Steve, this was not part of the original plan. “I really like
plain pasta,” he says. “But over the summer we made basil pasta—the basil
was from the Eagle Street rooftop farm in Greenpoint. We sold 20 pounds
in the first half hour. That changed my mind about flavored pasta! We also
made chile pepper pasta—when the local farms had too many peppers, we
took the overage off their hands. Now we’re making porcini and squash
pastas for the holidays.”
Maybe it’s because they work in a lab, but we find Steve and Scott
completely open to experiments and happy accidents of the pasta-making
kind. They have made pasta with spent grain from the Bronx Brewery,
and wine pasta using grape skins from Red Hook Winery is coming soon.
There were plans for both a white and red version, “but we only finished
“SO WHY SHOULD TWO ITALIAN GIRLS
SUGGEST YOU SEEK OUT SFOGLINI
SMALL BATCH PASTAS, MADE RIGHT
HERE IN SOUTH WILLIAMSBURG? LOTS
OF REASONS: FIRST AND FOREMOST, IT
TASTES GREAT.”
the white before the storm hit,” Steve lamented. “The winery got hit really
bad and we don’t think we’ll be able to make the red this year.”
Once a week, Steve and Scott open their laboratory doors for lunch. “It
started simply because there’s nowhere to eat around here,” they tell us.
“Now we do a lunch in our space every Thursday. We offer a different
pasta shape and flavor each week—people who work in the building, local
contractors, even people who work on the movie sets filming here come
and taste. It’s $7 for a plate and $5 for take-away and we serve—mostly
vegetarian dishes—from 12:00 to 2:00. Some of the other food companies
here have started to do this on other days, but we pretty much own
Thursday,” he laughs.
Steve and Scott are at the New Amsterdam Market (South Street between
Beekman Street and Peck Slip)
Sundays from 11am to 4pm. Their pasta is also available at Foragers
Market (Manhattan and Dumbo), the newly opened West Elm Market
(Dumbo), Gourmet Guild in Williamsburg, Bedford Cheese Shop,
Brooklyn Victory Garden in Crown Heights, and Pure Mountain Olive Oil
in Tarrytown and Rhinebeck. Check out sfoglini.com for updates.
RECENT PRESS
SEMI SWEETNESS
ALL HAIL SFOGLINI PASTA
JANUARY 28, 2013
Is there anything more perfect than pasta? The answer is no. There is
nothing more perfect than a bowl of fresh pasta just waiting to marry with
rich sauces, roasted veggies, or just a simple splash of beautiful olive oil, a
pinch of sea salt and a quick toss of fresh herbs.
But, poor pasta has really gotten the shaft over the past few years.
Between those of you avoiding gluten and carbs and those like me
avoiding mass-produced, over-processed boxed goods, finding a
legitimately delicious pasta that won’t turn your insides into toxic waste
has proven more difficult than it should be.
But then, the other day, a gorgeous box of Sfoglini Pasta samples popped
up at Artisan Cheese Company and changed the game. Their marketing
alone – an outstanding website and gorgeous packaging – is reason
enough to try these pastas. Couple that with the fact that Tom Colicchio
serves these beauties at his restaurant and store and you definitely have
that extra push to purchase a bag or two.
Tommy C and pretty packaging are all well and good, but the real beauty
behind these pastas are how they are made. Here’s a little backstory from
the Sfoglini site:
“Sfoglini is a Brooklyn based producer of small batch, freshly extruded
pastas made from the finest organic semolina flour produced in America.
We use traditional bronze dies which give our pasta a textured, porous
surface for your sauce to cling to and we air dry at low temperatures to
preserve the most nutrition and flavor.”
It continues: “Sfoglini’s signature offerings include twelve organic
semolina and organic whole-wheat pastas. In addition to these customary
pastas, Sfoglini sources ingredients from New York City based rooftop
farms and green markets to create special seasonal pastas. ” So, what
you’re saying is, these pastas are made with organic ingredients, plus
nutritious veggies from nearby gardens and produced in a way that
preserves the integrity of the ingredients? Yeah, I’m down.
Made by Steve Gonzalez, a chef for the last 14 years who has worked
at revered restaurants all over the Northeast and Europe, including
a Three Star Michelin restaurant in Spain, partnered with Scott Ketchum,
a creative graphic genius, with extensive travels under his belt as well,
to create pastas with organic and seasonal ingredients that are delivered
in sustainable packaging. That, folks, is what you call pretty fucking
awesome.
Now, I only had a couple of samples, but I’m eager to get my hands on
several more. Perhaps I should look into their ‘Pasta Of The Month Club?’
I just died over the Porcini Trumpets, which I mixed with a light cream
sauce full of roasted garlic, caramelized onions and fresh basil. The
texture is slightly different than traditional boxed pastas from the megamart. There’s a bit more chew and their tell-tale porousness is evident in
the way the sauce clings to the pasta.
On top of the already mounting pile of awesomeness listed above, Sfoglini
is cool enough to offer monthly recipes featuring their magnificent pastas
and a few fresh, seasonal ingredients.
Let me know if you get your hands on a bag and how your meal turns out!
“SO, WHAT YOU’RE SAYING IS, THESE
PASTAS ARE MADE WITH ORGANIC
INGREDIENTS, PLUS NUTRITIOUS
VEGGIES FROM NEARBY GARDENS AND
PRODUCED IN A WAY THAT PRESERVES
THE INTEGRITY OF THE INGREDIENTS?
YEAH, I’M DOWN.”

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