English EEO Law Poster

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English EEO Law Poster
Ohio Department of Job and Family Services
CIVIL RIGHTS POSTERS FOR EMPLOYERS
JFS 02745 (Rev. 3/2008)
Package contains one copy of the following:
EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY IS THE LAW
(English and Spanish)
YOUR RIGHTS UNDER THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT – FEDERAL
MINIMUM WAGE
YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO A SAFE AND HEALTHFUL WORKPLACE.
IT’S THE LAW
(English and Spanish)
NOTICE EMPLOYEE POLYGRAPH PROTECTION ACT
(English and Spanish, two pages)
YOUR RIGHTS UNDER THE FAMILY AND MEDICAL LEAVE ACT OF 1993
(English and Spanish)
YOUR RIGHTS UNDER USERRA
OHIO FAIR EMPLOYMENT PRACTICE LAW
STATE OF OHIO MINIMUM WAGE
STATE OF OHIO MINOR LABOR LAWS
NOTICE TO EMPLOYEES
This employer provides Unemployment
Compensation Coverage for Employees JFS 55341 (Rev. 1/2007)
(This poster is not required to be posted)
NO SMOKING
Equal Employment Opportunity is
THE LAW
Employers
Holding Federal
Contracts or
Subcontracts
Private Employment,
State and Local
Governments,
Educational Institutions
Programs or
Activities Receiving
Federal Financial
Assistance
Applicants to and employees of
companies with a Federal government contract or subcontract are
protected under the following
Federal authorities:
Applicants to and employees of most private employers, state
and local governments, educational institutions, employment
agencies and labor organizations are protected under the following
Federal laws:
RACE, COLOR, RELIGION,
NATIONAL ORIGIN, SEX
RACE, COLOR, RELIGION,
SEX, NATIONAL ORIGIN
Executive Order 11246, as amended,
prohibits job discrimination on the
basis of race, color, religion, sex or
national origin, and requires affirmative action to ensure equality of
opportunity in all aspects of
employment.
INDIVIDUALS WITH
DISABILITIES
Section 503 of the Rehabilitation Act
of 1973, as amended, prohibits job
discrimination because of disability
and requires affirmative action to
employ and advance in employment
qualified individuals with disabilities
who, with reasonable accommodation,
can perform the essential functions
of a job.
VIETNAM ERA, SPECIAL
DISABLED, RECENTLY
SEPARATED, AND OTHER
PROTECTED VETERANS
38 U.S.C. 4212 of the Vietnam Era
Veterans’ Readjustment Assistance Act
of 1974, as amended, prohibits job
discrimination and requires affirmative
action to employ and advance in
employment qualified Vietnam era
veterans, qualified special disabled
veterans, recently separated veterans,
and other protected veterans.
Any person who believes a contractor
has violated its nondiscrimination or
affirmative action obligations under
the authorities above should contact
immediately:
The Office of Federal Contract
Compliance Programs (OFCCP),
Employment Standards Administration,
U.S. Department of Labor,
200 Constitution Avenue, N.W.,
Washington, D.C. 20210 or call
(202) 693-0101, or an OFCCP
regional or district office, listed in
most telephone directories under U.S.
Government, Department of Labor.
RACE, COLOR, RELIGION, SEX, NATIONAL
ORIGIN
Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended, prohibits
discrimination in hiring, promotion, discharge, pay, fringe benefits,
job training, classification, referral, and other aspects of employment,
on the basis of race, color, religion, sex or national origin.
DISABILITY
The Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, as amended, protects
qualified applicants and employees with disabilities from discrimination in hiring, promotion, discharge, pay, job training, fringe
benefits, classification, referral, and other aspects of employment on
the basis of disability. The law also requires that covered entities
provide qualified applicants and employees with disabilities with
reasonable accommodations that do not impose undue hardship.
AGE
The Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967, as amended,
protects applicants and employees 40 years of age or older from
discrimination on the basis of age in hiring, promotion, discharge,
compensation, terms, conditions or privileges of employment.
SEX (WAGES)
In addition to sex discrimination prohibited by Title VII of the Civil
Rights Act of 1964, as amended (see above), the Equal Pay Act of
1963, as amended, prohibits sex discrimination in payment of wages
to women and men performing substantially equal work in the same
establishment.
Retaliation against a person who files a charge of discrimination,
participates in an investigation, or opposes an unlawful employment
practice is prohibited by all of these Federal laws.
If you believe that you have been discriminated against under any of
the above laws, you should contact immediately:
The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC),
1801 L Street, N.W., Washington, D.C. 20507 or an EEOC field
office by calling toll free (800) 669-4000. For individuals with
hearing impairments, EEOC’s toll free TDD number is (800) 669-6820.
In addition to the protection of Title
VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as
amended, Title VI of the Civil Rights
Act prohibits discrimination on the
basis of race, color or national origin
in programs or activities receiving
Federal financial assistance. Employment discrimination is covered by
Title VI if the primary objective of the
financial assistance is provision of
employment, or where employment
discrimination causes or may cause
discrimination in providing services
under such programs. Title IX of the
Education Amendments of 1972
prohibits employment discrimination
on the basis of sex in educational
programs or activities which receive
Federal assistance.
INDIVIDUALS WITH
DISABILITIES
Sections 501, 504 and 505 of the
Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as
amended, prohibits employment
discrimination on the basis of disability in any program or activity which
receives Federal financial assistance in
the federal government. Discrimination is prohibited in all aspects of
employment against persons with
disabilities who, with reasonable
accommodation, can perform the
essential functions
of a job.
If you believe you have been
discriminated against in a program
of any institution which receives
Federal assistance, you should contact
immediately the Federal agency
providing such assistance.
La Igualdad De Oportunidades De Empleo Es
LA LEY
Empleadores con
Contratos o
Subcontratos
Federales
Empleadores Privados,
Gobiernos Estatales y
Locales, Instituciones
de Enseñanza
Programas o
Actividades que
Reciben Subsidios
Federales
Solicitantes de empleo y empleados
de compañías privadas que tienen un
contrato o subcontrato federal son
protegidos por las siguientes autoridades federales:
Las siguientes leyes federales protegen solicitantes de empleo y
empleados de la mayoria de los empleadores privados, gobier
-nos estatales y locales, instituciones de enseñanza, agencias de
empleo y organizaciones laborales:
RAZA, COLOR, ORIGEN
NACIONAL, SEXO
RAZA, COLOR, RELIGION,
SEXO, ORIGEN NACIONAL
La Orden del Poder Ejecutivo 11246,
según enmendada, prohibe la discriminación en el empleo por razón de
raza, color, religión, sexo u origen
nacional, y requiere programas de
acción afirmativa para asegurar la
igualdad de oportunidades en todos
los aspectos de empleo.
INDIV1DUOS CON
IMPEDIMENTOS
La Sección 503 de la Ley de
Rehabilitación cle 1973, según enmendada, prohibe la discriminación en el
empleo por razón de impedimento y
requiere programas de acción afirmativa en la contratación y ascenso de
personas calificadas con impedimentos que, con comodidad razonable,
pueden desempeñar las funciones
esenciales del empleo.
VETERANOS DE LA ERA DE
VIETNAM , VETERANOS CON
IMPEDIMENTOS ESPECIALES,
Y OTROS VETERANOS
PROTEGIDOS
38 U.S.C. 4212 de la Ley de
Asistencia para la Readaptación de los
Veteranos de Vietnam prohibe la discriminación en el empleo y exige programas de acción afirmativa en la
contratación y ascenso de veteranos
calificados de Vietnam y de veteranos
calificados con impedimentos especiales.
Cualquier persona que crea que un
contratista no ha cumplido con sus
obligaciones referentes a la no discriminación o los programas de
acción afirmativa bajo las leyes anteriormente mencionadas debe comunicarse de inmediato con:
The Office of Federal Contract
Compliance Programs (OFCCP),
Employment Standards
Administration, U.S. Department of
Labor, 200 Constitution Avenue,
N.W., Washington, D.C. 202 10 o llamar al(202)693-0101, 0 una oficina
regional o de distrito del OFCCR
listado bajo el titulo U.S. Government,
Department of Labor.
RAZA, COLOR, RELIGION,
SEXO, ORIGEN NACIONAL
El Titulo V11 de la Ley de Derechos Civiles de 1964, según
enmendada, prohibe la discriminación en el empleo por razón
de raza, color, religión, sexo u origen nacional en la contratación, promoción, despido, pago, beneficios suplementarios,
programas de adiestramiento, clasificación de empleo, reclutarniento y bajo cualquier otro término y condición de empleo.
IMPEDIMENTO
La Ley para Personas con Impedimentos de 1990, según
enmendada, protege solicitantes de empleados y emptea dos con
impedimentos contra la discriminación en la contratación, promoción, despido, pago, programas de adiestramiento, beneficios suplementarios, clasificación, asignación, y otros aspectos
de empleo por razón de impedimento. La ley también exige
que toda entidad comprendida proporcione a solicitantes de
empleo y empleados calificados con impedimentos comodidad
razonable al menos que esto cause dificultad excesiva.
EDAD
La Ley Contra la Discriminación en el Empleo por Razón de
Edad de 1967, según enmendada, protege solicitantes de
empleo y empleados de 40 años de edad o más de la discriminación en el empleo por razón de edad en la contratación,
promoción, despido, pago, y bajo cualquier otro término,
condición o privilegio de empleo.
SEXO (PAGO)
Ademas del Titulo V11 de la Ley de Derechos Civiles de 1964
(anteriormente descrita), la Ley de lgualdad en el Pago de
1963, según enmendada, prohibe la discriminación por razón
de sexo en el pago de salario a mujeres y hombres que realizan
trabajos sustancialmente iguales en el mismo lugar de trabajo.
Tomar represalia contra una persona que haya presentado una
denuncia de discriminación, participe en una investigación, o se
oponga a una práctica ilegal de empleo es prohibido por todas
estas leyes federales.
Si usted cree que ha sido discriminado bajo cualquiera de las
leyes descritas, debe comunicarse de inmediato con:
La Comisión de Igualclad cle Oportuniclades de Empleo
(EEOC), 1801 L Street, N.W., Washington, D.C. 20507 o con
una oficina local de la Comisión Harnando gratuitamente al
(800) 669-4000. Para personas con impedimentos auditivos, el
número sin cargo de la Comisión por el sisterna TDD es
(800) 669-6820.
Además del amparo que brinda el
Titulo VII cle la Ley de Derechos
Civiles de 1964, el Titulo VI de la ley
prohibe la discriminación por razón
de raza, color, u origen nacional en
programas o actividades que reciben
subsidios federales. Discriminación
en el empleo está comprendida bajo
el Titulo VI si el objetivo primordial
del subsidio es proporcionar empleos
y en los casos en que la discriminación en el empleo causa o podría
causar discriminación en la prestación
de servicios de esos programas. El
Titulo IX de las Enmiendas de
Educación de 1972 prohibe la discriminación en el empleo por razón de
sexo en programas o actividades
educacionales que reciben subsidios
federales.
INDIVIDUOS CON
IMPEDIMENTOS
La Sección 504 de la Ley de
Rehabilitación de 1973, según enmendada, prohibe la discriminación en el
empleo por razón de impedimentos
en cualquier programa o actividad que
recibe subsidios del gobierno federal.
Se prohibe la discriminación en todas
las modalidades de empleo contra
personas con impedimentos fisicos y
mentales que, con comodidad
razonable, pueden desempeñar las
funciones esenciales del empleo.
Si usted cree que ha sido discriminado en el empleo en un programa de
cualquier institución que recibe subsidios federales, debe comunicarse de
inmediato con la agencia federal que
otorga el subsidio.
EMPLOYEE
RIGHTS
UNDER THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT
THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION
FEDERAL MINIMUM WAGE
$5.85
PER
HOUR
BEGINNING JULY 24, 2007
$6.55
PER
HOUR
BEGINNING JULY 24, 2008
$7.25
PER
HOUR
BEGINNING JULY 24, 2009
1
OVERTIME PAY
At least 1 /2 times your regular rate of pay for all hours worked over 40 in a workweek.
YOUTH
EMPLOYMENT
An employee must be at least 16 years old to work in most non-farm jobs and at least 18 to work in non-farm
jobs declared hazardous by the Secretary of Labor.
Youths 14 and 15 years old may work outside school hours in various non-manufacturing, non-mining, non-hazardous jobs under the following conditions:
No more than
• 3 hours on a school day or 18 hours in a school week;
• 8 hours on a non-school day or 40 hours in a non-school week.
Also, work may not begin before 7 a.m. or end after 7 p.m., except from June 1 through Labor Day,
when evening hours are extended to 9 p.m. Different rules apply in agricultural employment. For
more information, visit the YouthRules! Web site at www.youthrules.dol.gov.
TIP CREDIT
Employers of “tipped employees” must pay a cash wage of at least $2.13 per hour if they claim a tip credit
against their minimum wage obligation. If an employee's tips combined with the employer's cash wage of at
least $2.13 per hour do not equal the minimum hourly wage, the employer must make up the difference.
Certain other conditions must also be met.
ENFORCEMENT
The Department of Labor may recover back wages either administratively or through court action, for the
employees that have been underpaid in violation of the law. Violations may result in civil or criminal action.
Civil money penalties of up to $11,000 per violation may be assessed against employers who violate the youth
employment provisions of the law and up to $1,100 per violation against employers who willfully or repeatedly
violate the minimum wage or overtime pay provisions. This law prohibits discriminating against or discharging
workers who file a complaint or participate in any proceedings under the Act.
ADDITIONAL
INFORMATION
• Certain occupations and establishments are exempt from the minimum wage and/or overtime pay provisions.
• Special provisions apply to workers in American Samoa and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana
Islands.
• Some state laws provide greater employee protections; employers must comply with both.
• The law requires employers to display this poster where employees can readily see it.
• Employees under 20 years of age may be paid $4.25 per hour during their first 90 consecutive calendar days
of employment with an employer.
• Certain full-time students, student learners, apprentices, and workers with disabilities may be paid less than
the minimum wage under special certificates issued by the Department of Labor.
For additional information:
1-866-4-USWAGE
WWW.WAGEHOUR.DOL.GOV
(1-866-487-9243)
U.S. Department of Labor
TTY: 1-877-889-5627
Employment Standards Administration
Wage and Hour Division
WHD Publication 1088 (Revised June 2007)
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
EMPLOYMENT STANDARDS ADMINISTRATION
Wage and Hour Division
Washington, D.C. 20210
NOTICE
EMPLOYEE POLYGRAPH
PROTECTION ACT
The Employee Polygraph Protection Act prohibits most private employers from using lie detector
tests either for pre-employment screening or during the course of employment.
PROHIBITIONS
Employers are generally prohibited from requiring or requesting any employee or job applicant to
take a lie detector test, and from discharging, disciplining, or discriminating against an employee or
prospective employee for refusing to take a test or for exercising other rights under the Act.
EXEMPTIONS*
Federal, State and local governments are not affected by the law. Also, the law does not apply to
tests given by the Federal Government to certain private individuals engaged in national securityrelated activities.
The Act permits polygraph (a kind of lie detector) tests to be administered in the private sector,
subject to restrictions, to certain prospective employees of security service firms (armored car,
alarm, and guard), and of pharmaceutical manufacturers, distributors and dispensers.
The Act also permits polygraph testing, subject to restrictions, of certain employees of private firms
who are reasonably suspected of involvement in a workplace incident (theft, embezzlement, etc.)
that resulted in economic loss to the employer.
EXAMINEE RIGHTS
Where polygraph tests are permitted, they are subject to numerous strict standards concerning the
conduct and length of the test. Examinees have a number of specific rights, including the right to a
written notice before testing, the right to refuse or discontinue a test, and the right not to have test
results disclosed to unauthorized persons.
ENFORCEMENT
The Secretary of Labor may bring court actions to restrain violations and assess civil penalties up
to $10,000 against violators. Employees or job applicants may also bring their own court actions.
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
Additional information may be obtained, and complaints of violations may be filed, at local offices of
the Wage and Hour Division, which are listed in the telephone directory under U.S. Government,
Department of Labor, Employment Standards Administration.
THE LAW REQUIRES EMPLOYERS TO DISPLAY THIS POSTER WHERE EMPLOYEES AND JOB
APPLICANTS CAN READILY SEE IT.
*The law does not preempt any provision of any State or local law or any collective bargaining agreement which
is more restrictive with respect to lie detector tests.
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
EMPLOYMENT STANDARDS ADMINISTRATION
Wage and Hour Division
Washington, D.C. 20210
WH Publication 1462
September 1988
Departamento de Trabajo de EE UU
Administración de Normas de Empleo
Sección de Horas y Sueldos
Washington,D.C. 20210
Aviso
Ley Para La Protección del Empleado
contra la Prueba de Polígrafo
La Ley Para La Protección del Empleado contra la Prueba de Polígrafo le prohíbe a la mayoría
de los empleadores del sector privado que utilice pruebas con detectores de mentiras durante
el período de pre empleo o durante el servicio de empleo.
PROHIBICIONES
Generalmente se le prohíbe al empleador que le exija o requiera a un empleado o a un solicitante
a un trabajo que se someta a una prueba con detector de mentiras, y que despida, discipline, o
discrimine de ninguna forma contra un empleado o contra un aspirante a un trabajo por haberse
negado a someterse a la prueba o por haberse acogido a otros derechos establecidos por la Ley.
Exenciones*
Esta Ley no afecta a los empleados de los gobiernos federal, estatales y locales. Tampoco se aplica
a las pruebas que el Gobierno Federal les administra a ciertos individuos del sector privado que
trabajan en actividades relacionadas con la seguridad nacional.
La Ley permite la administración de pruebas de polígrafo (un tipo de detector de mentiras) en el sector
privado, sujeta a ciertas restricciones, a ciertos aspirantes para empleos en compañías de seguridad
(vehículos blindados, sistemas de alarma y guardias). También se les permite el uso de éstas a
compañías que fabrican, distribuyen y dispensan productos farmacéuticos.
La Ley también permite la administración de estas pruebas de polígrafo, sujeta a ciertas restricciones,
a empleados de empresas privadas que estén bajo sospecha razonable de estar involucrados en un
incidente en el sitio de empleo (tal como un robo, desfalco, etc.) que le haya ocasionado daños
económicos al empleador.
DERECHOS DE LOS EXAMINADOS
En casos en que se permitan las pruebas de polígrafo, éstas deben ser administradas bajo una cantidad
de normas estrictas en cuanto a su administración y duración.Los examinados tienen un número de
derechos específicos, incluyendo el derecho de advertencia por escrito antes de someterse a la prueba,
el derecho a negarse a someterse a la prueba o a descontinuarla, al igual que el derecho a negarse a
que los resultados de la prueba estén al alcance de personas no autorizadas.
CUMPLIMIENTO
El/La Secretario(a) de Trabajo puede entablar pleitos contra violadores de la Ley para impedir violaciones
y puede imponer penas pecuniarias civiles de hasta $10,000 contra los violadores.Los empleados o
solicitantes a empleo también tienen derecho a entablar su propio pleito en los tribunales.
INFORMACIÓN ADICIONAL
Se puede obtener información adicional al igual que se pueden presentar quejas de violaciones en las
oficinas locales de la Sección de Horas y Sueldos, las cuales aparecen en la guía telefónica bajo
Gobierno de EE UU, Departamento de Trabajo, Administración de Normas de Empleo.
La Ley exige que los empleadores exhiban este aviso donde los empleados y los
solicitantes de empleo lo puedan ver fácilmente.
* La Ley no substituye ninguna provisión de cualquier otra ley estatal o local ni tampoco a tratos colectivos
que sean más rigurosos con respecto a las pruebas de polígrafo.
Departamento de Trabajo de EE UU
Administración de Normas de Empleo
Sección de Horas y Sueldos
Washington, D.C. 20210
Publicación de "WH" 1462
Septiembre 1988
*U.S. GPO: 2001-483-015/59227
Your Rights
under the
Family and Medical Leave Act of 1993
FMLA requires covered employers to provide up to 12
weeks of unpaid, job-protected leave to ''eligible''
employees for certain family and medical reasons.
Employees are eligible if they have worked for their
employer for at least one year, and for 1,250 hours over
Reasons for Taking Leave:
Unpaid leave must be granted for any of the following
reasons:
• to care for the employee's child after birth, or placement
for adoption or foster care;
• to care for the employee's spouse, son or daughter, or
parent who has a serious health condition; or
• for a serious health condition that makes the employee
unable to perform the employee's job.
At the employee's or employer's option, certain kinds of
paid leave may be substituted for unpaid leave.
Advance Notice and Medical
Certification:
the previous 12 months, and if there are at least 50
employees within 75 miles. The FMLA permits
employees to take leave on an intermittent basis or to
work a reduced schedule under certain circumstances.
• Upon return from FMLA leave, most employees must
be restored to their original or equivalent positions with
equivalent pay, benefits, and other employment terms.
• The use of FMLA leave cannot result in the loss of any
employment benefit that accrued prior to the start of an
employee's leave.
Unlawful Acts by Employers:
FMLA makes it unlawful for any employer to:
• interfere with, restrain, or deny the exercise of any
right provided under FMLA:
• discharge or discriminate against any person for
opposing any practice made unlawful by FMLA or for
involvement in any proceeding under or relating
to FMLA.
Enforcement:
The employee may be required to provide advance leave
notice and medical certification. Taking of leave may be
denied if requirements are not met.
• The employee ordinarily must provide 30 days advance
notice when the leave is ''foreseeable.''
• An employer may require medical certification to
support a request for leave because of a serious health
condition, and may require second or third opinions (at
the employer's expense) and a fitness for duty report to
return to work.
• The U.S. Department of Labor is authorized to
investigate and resolve complaints of violations.
• An eligible employee may bring a civil action against
an employer for violations.
FMLA does not affect any Federal or State law
prohibiting discrimination, or supersede any State or
local law or collective bargaining agreement which
provides greater family or medical leave rights.
Job Benefits and Protection:
For Additional Information:
• For the duration of FMLA leave, the employer must
maintain the employee's health coverage under any
''group health plan.''
U.S. Department of Labor
Employment Standards Administration
Wage and Hour Division
Washington, D.C. 20210
If you have access to the Internet visit our FMLA
website: http://www.dol.gov/esa/whd/fmla. To
locate your nearest Wage-Hour Office, telephone our
Wage-Hour toll-free information and help line at 1-8664USWAGE (1-866-487-9243): a customer service
representative is available to assist you with referral
information from 8am to 5pm in your time zone; or log
onto our Home Page at http://www.wagehour.dol.gov.
WH Publication 1420
Revised August 2001
*U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 2001-476-344/49051
Sus Derechos
bajo
La Ley de Ausencia Familiar y Médica de 1993
La Ley de Ausencia Familiar y Médica de 1993 (LAFM)
requiere que patrones sujetos a la ley provean a sus empleados
12 semanas de ausencia del trabajo sin paga por ciertas razones
familiares médicas, con protección del empleo a empleados
Razones para Solicitar
Ausencia:
Tiene derecho un empleado de tomar ausencia del trabajo sin
paga por cualquiera de las siguientes razones:
• para cuidar a un niño recién nacido, o llevar a cabo una
adopción o crianza, de un niño del empleado;
• para cuidar a un cónyuge (esposo/a), hijo/a, o cualquiera de
los padres, quien padezca de un estado de salud grave, o;
• por un estado de salud grave que le impide a un empleado
desempeñar su trabajo.
Se puede elegir por parte del empleado o el patrón substituir
una ausencia sin paga por una ausencia pagada si el empleado
tiene el tiempo pagado acumulado.
Notificación por Adelantado y
Certificado Médico:
Se le puede exigir a un empleado que notifique por adelantado
la necesidad de estar ausente, y además exigirle que provea
certificado médico. Se puede negar el permiso si el empleado
no cumple con estos requisitos.
• Por lo general se requiere que el empleado notifique al
patrón con 30 dias por adelantado cuando la ausencia es
"anticipada."
• El patrón puede exigirle un certificado médico al empleado
que pide tomar ausencia por motivo de un estado de salud
grave, y puede exigir una segunda o tercera opinión médica
(a cuenta del patrón), y además puede exigir un certificado
médico de la salud, estado fisico y capacidad del empleado
para regresar al trabajo.
Beneficios y Protección del
Empleo:
Durante una ausencia, el patrón tendrá que mantener en vigor
el seguro de salud del empleado bajo cualquier "plan de salud
de grupo" en existencia.
US Department of Labor
Employment Standards Administration
Wage and Hour Division
Washington, D.C. 20210
"elegibles." Se consideran elegibles a los empleados de dicho
patrón quienes hayan trabajado un año, y trabajado 1,250 horas o
más en los últimos 12 meses, y trabajan dentro de un área de 75
millas donde se ocupan a 50 empleados o más del mismo patrón.
• Al regresar de una ausencia los empleados tienen el derecho
a su trabajo original o a un trabajo equivalente con sueldo,
beneficios, y otras condiciones de empleo equivalentes.
• Una ausencia no puede resultar en la pérdida de ningún
beneficio acumulado antes de que el empleado comenzara la
ausencia del trabajo.
Actos Ilegales Por Parte del
Patrón:
La LAFM le prohibe al patrón lo siguiente:
• que interfiera, restrinja, o niegue que se ejercite cualquier
derecho estipulado por la LAFM;
• que se despida o se discrimine en contra de cualquier
persona que se oponga a una práctica prohibida por la
LAFM, o se involucre en cualquier procedimiento
relacionado a esta ley.
Ejecución:
• El "Department of Labor" tiene la autoridad de investigar y
resolver quejas de infracciones de la LAFM.
• El empleado elegible puede demandar a un patrón por medio
de acción civil por infracciones de la LAFM.
La LAFM no afecta ninguna ley federal o estatal que prohiba
la discriminación, ni reemplaza ninguna ley estatal o local, o
convenio sindical que provea más amplios derechos de
ausencia familiar o médica.
Para Más Información:
Si tiene acceso al internet, visite la pagina de la LAFM:
http://www.dol.gov/esa/whd/fmla. Para localizar la oficina
de horarios y salarios más cercana, llame a nuestra linea gratis
de información y ayuda al 1-866-4USWAGE (1-866-4879243). Representantes estan disponibles para asistir con
información desde 8am a 5pm en su zona horaria; o visite
nuestra pagina de internet http://www.wagehour.dol.gov.
WH Publication 1420SP
Revised August 2001
*U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 2001-476-344/49051
FOR USE BY PRIVATE SECTOR AND STATE GOVERNMENT EMPLOYERS
★★
★
★
YOUR RIGHTS UNDER USERRA
THE UNIFORMED SERVICES EMPLOYMENT
AND REEMPLOYMENT RIGHTS ACT
USERRA protects the job rights of individuals who voluntarily or involuntarily leave employment positions to undertake
military service or certain types of service in the National Disaster Medical System. USERRA also prohibits employers
from discriminating against past and present members of the uniformed services, and applicants to the uniformed services.
REEMPLOYMENT RIGHTS
HEALTH INSURANCE PROTECTION
You have the right to be reemployed in your civilian job if you leave that
job to perform service in the uniformed service and:
✩
If you leave your job to perform military service, you have the right
to elect to continue your existing employer-based health plan
coverage for you and your dependents for up to 24 months while in
the military.
✩
Even if you don't elect to continue coverage during your military
service, you have the right to be reinstated in your employer's
health plan when you are reemployed, generally without any waiting
periods or exclusions (e.g., pre-existing condition exclusions) except
for service-connected illnesses or injuries.
✩
✩
✩
✩
you ensure that your employer receives advance written or verbal
notice of your service;
you have five years or less of cumulative service in the uniformed
services while with that particular employer;
you return to work or apply for reemployment in a timely manner
after conclusion of service; and
you have not been separated from service with a disqualifying
discharge or under other than honorable conditions.
If you are eligible to be reemployed, you must be restored to the job and
benefits you would have attained if you had not been absent due to
military service or, in some cases, a comparable job.
ENFORCEMENT
✩
The U.S. Department of Labor, Veterans Employment and Training
Service (VETS) is authorized to investigate and resolve complaints
of USERRA violations.
✩
For assistance in filing a complaint, or for any other information on
USERRA, contact VETS at 1-866-4-USA-DOL or visit its website at
http://www.dol.gov/vets. An interactive online USERRA Advisor can
be viewed at http://www.dol.gov/elaws/userra.htm.
✩
If you file a complaint with VETS and VETS is unable to resolve it,
you may request that your case be referred to the Department of
Justice for representation.
✩
You may also bypass the VETS process and bring a civil action
against an employer for violations of USERRA.
RIGHT TO BE FREE FROM DISCRIMINATION AND RETALIATION
If you:
✩
✩
✩
are a past or present member of the uniformed service;
have applied for membership in the uniformed service; or
are obligated to serve in the uniformed service;
then an employer may not deny you:
✩
✩
✩
✩
✩
initial employment;
reemployment;
retention in employment;
promotion; or
any benefit of employment
because of this status.
In addition, an employer may not retaliate against anyone assisting in
the enforcement of USERRA rights, including testifying or making a
statement in connection with a proceeding under USERRA, even if that
person has no service connection.
The rights listed here may vary depending on the circumstances. This notice was prepared by VETS, and may be viewed on the internet at this address:
http://www.dol.gov/vets/programs/userra/poster.htm. Federal law requires employers to notify employees of their rights under USERRA, and employers
may meet this requirement by displaying this notice where they customarily place notices for employees.
U.S. Department of Justice
U.S. Department of Labor
1-866-487-2365
1-800-336-4590
Publication Date—January 2006
Governor Ted Strickland
Know Your Rights
G. Michael Payton
Executive Director
Jeanine P. Donaldson
Chair
Summary Provisions of the
OHIO FAIR EMPLOYMENT PRACTICES LAW
(For complete text see sections 4112.01 to 4112.11 and Section 4112.99 of the Ohio Revised Code)
IT IS UNLAWFUL:
For EMPLOYERS to deny equal
opportunity in hiring, tenure, terms,
conditions or privileges of employment;
For additional information, please contact your closest
regional office of The Ohio Civil
Rights Commission.
For LABOR UNIONS to deny
admission, limit or classify members;
For EMPLOYMENT AGENCIES to
refuse or fail to accept, register, classify
properly or refer for employment;
...on the basis of race, color,
religion, sex, national origin,
disability, ancestry or age.
FURTHER, it is an unlawful discriminatory
practice, prior to employment or admission
to union membership, to request any
information or keep records, print or
publish notices or advertisement which
indicate a person’s race, color, religion,
sex, national origin, disability, ancestry or
age.
THIS LAW APPLIES TO:
Employers of four or more persons,
including the State or any political
subdivision thereof;
Employment agencies operating with or
without compensation;
All employers, labor organizations or
joint labor management committees
controlling apprentice training programs;
Any person who obstructs or hinders
compliance with this act.
Any person or person claiming to be
aggrieved or having knowledge of
alleged discrimination or the Ohio Civil
Rights Commission on its own initiative
may utilize this law by filing a charge
affidavit.
Akron Regional Office
Akron Government Center
Suite 205
161 S. High Street
Akron, Ohio 44308
330-643-3100 (voice/TTY)
Columbus Regional Office
1111 E. Broad Street,
Suite 301
Columbus, Ohio 43205
614-466-5928 (Voice/TTY)
Cincinnati Regional Office
Corporate Tower
7162 Reading Road,
Suite 1001
Cincinnati, Ohio 45237
513-852-3344 (Voice/TTY)
Dayton Regional Office
40 W. 4th Center,
Suite 1900
Dayton, Ohio 43202-1831
937-285-6500 (Voice/TTY)
Cleveland Regional Office
Frank J. Lausche Building
Suite 885
615 West Superior Avenue
Cleveland, Ohio 44113
216-787-3150 (Voice/ TTY)
Toledo Regional Office
Room 936
One Government Center
Jackson and Erie Streets
Toledo, Ohio 43604
419-245-2900 (Voice/TTY)
The Ohio Civil Rights Commission (OCRC receives and
investigates charges of discrimination in employment,
housing, public accommodation, credit and disability in higher
education on the bases of race, color, religion, sex, national
origin, disability, age, ancestry or familial status.
For more information, contact us:
Toll Free 1-888-278-7101
crc.ohio.gov
The Ohio Civil Rights Commission
Central Office
1111 E. Broad Street, 3rd Floor
Columbus, Ohio 43205
614-466-2785 (Voice)
614-466-9353 (TTY)
Publication Date 04-07
STATE OF OHIO
MINIMUM WAGE
TED STRICKLAND
Governor
OHIO DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
DIVISION OF LABOR & WORKER SAFETY
KIMBERLYA. ZURZ
Director
www.com.ohio.gov/
NON-TIPPED EMPLOYEES
A Minimum Wage of
$7.00 per hour (as of January 1, 2008)
"Non-Tipped Employees" includes any employee who does not engage in an occupation in which he/she customarily and regularly receives more than thirty
dollars ($30.00) per month in tips from patrons or others.
“Employers” who gross under $255,000.00 shall pay their employees no less than the current Federal Minimum wage rate.
“Employees” under the age of 16 shall be paid no less than the current federal minimum wage rate.
“Current Federal Minimum Wage” is $5.85 per hour. Effective July 24, 2008, it is $6.55 per hour.
TIPPED EMPLOYEES
A Minimum Wage of
$3.50 per hour PLUS TIPS (as of January 1, 2008)
"Tipped Employees" includes any employee who engages in an occupation in which he/she customarily and regularly receives more than thirty dollars ($30.00)
per month in tips from patrons or others. The tips are proven if indicated by the employee's declaration for the purposes of the federal insurance contribution act.
Including when tips are added to the employee's wage, his/her hourly pay cannot be less than the regular minimum wage of $7.00 prescribed by law.
OVERTIME (ORC 4111.03)
1. An employer shall pay an employee for overtime at a wage rate
of one and one-half times the employee's wage rate for hours in
excess of forty hours in one work week, except for employers
grossing less than $150,000 per year.
HANDICAPPED RATE (ORC 4111.06)
To prevent the curtailment of opportunities for employment and avoid undue
hardship to individuals whose earning capacity is affected or impaired by
physical or mental deficiencies or injuries a sub-minimum wage may be paid,
as provided in the rules and regulations set forth by the Administrator.
2. Hospitals and Nursing Homes are permitted time and one-half in
excess of eighty hours in a two week period and also in excess
of eight hours a day.
INDIVIDUALS EXEMPT FROM MINIMUM WAGE
(ORC 4111.14 (B))
1. Any individual employed by the United States;
2. Any individual employed as a baby-sitter in the employer's home,
or a live-in companion to a sick, convalescing, or elderly person
whose principal duties do not include housekeeping;
3. Any individual employed as an outside salesman compensated
by commissions or in a bona fide executive, administrative, or
professional capacity, or computer professionals.
4. Any individual who volunteers to perform services for a public agency
which is a State, a political subdivision of a State, or an interstate
government agency, if
(i) the individual receives no compensation or is paid expenses,
reasonable benefits, or a nominal fee to perform the services for
which the individual volunteered; and
(ii) such services are not the same type of services which the
individual is employed to perform for such public agency.
5. Any individual who works or provides personal services of a
charitable nature in a hospital or health institution for which
compensation is not sought or contemplated;
6. Any individual in the employ of a camp or recreational area
for children under eighteen years of age and owned and operated
by a non-profit organization or group of organizations.
7. Employees of a solely family owned and operated business who are
family members of an owner.
PERMANENT RECORDS TO BE KEPT BY THE EMPLOYER
(ORC 4111.08 & 4111.14(F))
1. Each employer shall keep permanent records for at least three
years, available for transcription and inspection by a duly
authorized Deputy of the Division, showing the following
facts concerning each employee:
A. Name
B. Address
C. Occupation
D. Rate of Pay
E. Amount paid each pay period
F. Hours worked each day and each work week
2. Determinations of compliance. The records may be opened for
inspection or copying at any reasonable time and no employer
shall hinder or delay authorized Deputies of the Division in
the performance of their duties.
This summary does not include all of the requirements for minimum and overtime wages. Persons should refer to ORC 4111 for specific
requirements applicable to them.
POST IN A CONSPICUOUS PLACE
For further information about minimum wage issues, please contact: The Ohio Department of Commerce, Division of Labor & Worker Safety, 77 South High Street,
22nd Floor, Columbus, Ohio 43215. Phone: (614) 644-2239. TTY/TDD: 1-800-750-0750.
(REV. 10/23/07)
An Equal Opportunity Employer and Service Provider
STATE OF OHIO
MINOR LABOR LAWS
TED STRICKLAND
Governor
OHIO DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
DIVISION OF LABOR & WORKER SAFETY
KIMBERLYA. ZURZ
Director
www.com.state.oh.us
OHIO REVISED CODE CHAPTER 4109*
"MINOR" MEANS ANY PERSON LESS THAN 18 YEARS OF AGE
WORKING PERMITS: Every minor 14 through 17 years of age must have a working permit unless otherwise stated in Chapter 4109.
WAGE AGREEMENT: No employer shall give employment to a minor without agreeing with him/her as to the wages or compensation he/she shall receive for each day, week, month,
year or per piece for work performed.
REST PERIOD: No employer shall employ a minor more than 5 consecutive hours without a rest period of at least 30 minutes.
LIST OF MINORS EMPLOYED: Employer shall keep a list of minors employed at each establishment and a list must be posted in a conspicuous place to which all minor employees
have access.
TIME RECORDS: Every employer shall keep a time book or other written record showing actual starting and stopping time of each work and rest period. These records must be kept
for two (2) years.
RESTRICTIONS ON WORKING HOURS FOR MINORS 14 and 15 YEARS OF AGE
No person under 16 shall be employed:
1. During school hours except where specifically permitted by Chapter 4109
2. Before 7 a.m. or after 9 p.m. from June 1st to September 1st or during any school holiday of 5 school days or more; or after 7 p.m. at any other time
3. For more than 3 hours a day in any school day
4. For more than 18 hours in any school week
5. For more than 8 hours in any day when school is not in session
6. For more than 40 hours in any week that school is not in session nor during school hours, unless employment is incidental to bona fide programs of vocational cooperative training,
work-study, or other work-oriented programs with the purpose of educating students, and the program meets standards established by the state board of education.
RESTRICTIONS ON WORKING HOURS FOR MINORS 16 and 17 YEARS OF AGE
No person 16 or 17 who is required to attend school shall be employed:
1. Before 7 a.m. on any day that school is in session or 6 a.m. if the person was not employed after 8 p.m. the previous night
2. After 11 p.m. on any night preceding a day that school is in session.
PROHIBITED OCCUPATIONS FOR MINORS UNDER 16 YEARS OF AGE
1. All manufacturing; mining; processing; public messenger service
2. Work in freezers and meat coolers and all preparation of meats for sale (except wrapping, sealing, labeling, weighing, pricing and stocking)
3. Transportation; storage; communications; public utilities; construction; repair
4. Work in boiler or engine rooms; maintenance or repair of machinery
5. Outside window washing from window sills or scaffolding and/or ladders
6. Cooking and baking; operating, setting up, adjusting, cleaning, oiling or repairing power-driven food slicers, grinders, food choppers, cutters, bakery type mixers
7. Loading or unloading goods to and from trucks
8. All warehouse work except office and clerical
9. Work in connection with cars and trucks involving the use of pits, racks or lifting apparatus or involving the inflation of any tire mounted on a rim equipped with a removable retaining ring.
PROHIBITED OCCUPATIONS FOR MINORS 14 through 17 YEARS OF AGE
1. Occupations involving slaughtering, meat-packing, processing or rendering
2. Power-driven bakery machines
3. Occupations involved in the manufacture of brick, tile and kindred products
4. Occupations involved in the manufacture of chemicals
5. Manufacturing or storage occupations involving explosives
6. Occupations involving exposure to radioactive substances and to
ionizing radiations
7. Power-driven paper products machines
8. Power-driven metal forming, punching and shearing machines
9. Occupations involved in the operation of power-driven circular saws,
band saws and guillotine shears
10. Power-driven woodworking machines
11. Coal mines
12. Occupations in connection with mining, other than coal
13. Logging and sawmilling
14. Motor vehicle occupations
15. Maritime and longshoreman occupations
16. Railroads
17. Excavation operations
18. Power-driven and hoisting apparatus
19. Roofing operations
20. Wrecking, demolition, and shipbreaking.
MINORS UNDER 16 YEARS OF AGE MAY NOT ENGAGE IN DOOR-TO-DOOR
EMPLOYMENT UNLESS
The for-profit employer is REGISTERED with the Ohio Department of Commerce. DOOR-TO-DOOR SALES EMPLOYERS SHALL:
1. Be in compliance with all applicable Ohio and Federal laws relating to the employment of minors
2. Provide at least one supervisor who is over the age of eighteen, for each six minor employees
3. Have been and be in compliance with Ohio's Motor Vehicle Financial Responsibility, Workers' Compensation, Unemployment Compensation, and all other applicable laws
4. Require all minors to work at least in pairs
5. Not employ any minor who does not have an appropriate Age and Schooling Certificate
6. Provide each minor employee with a photo identification card
7. Not employ any minor in any door-to-door sales activity during school hours except where specifically permitted
8. Not employ minors under 16 in door-to-door sales activity before 7 a.m. or after 7 p.m.
9. Not employ minors 16 and 17 years of age in door-to-door sales activity before 7 a.m. or after 8 p.m.
*For Exceptions to Coverage See Chapter 4109.06
This is a summary of ORC 4109. This summary does not include all of the requirements for minor labor laws. Persons
should refer to 4109 for specific requirements applicable to them. This information can be accessed through the Ohio
Department of Commerce Web site at www.com.state.oh.us.
POST IN A CONSPICUOUS PLACE
For further information about Minor Labor issues, please contact: The Ohio Department of Commerce, Division of Labor & Worker Safety, 77 S. High Street,
22nd Floor, Columbus, Ohio 43215, phone: (614) 644-2239. TTY/TDD: 1-800-750-0750. An Equal Opportunity Employer and Service Provider
(REV. 01/29/07)
THIS EMPLOYER PROVIDES UNEMPLOYMENT
COMPENSATION COVERAGE FOR EMPLOYEES
Employees who become unemployed (or are working less than full time) may
be eligible for unemployment compensation benefits.
Apply by phone at 1-877-644-6562 (OHIO-JOB) or online at
http://unemployment.ohio.gov
Be prepared to provide the following information when applying:
•
Social Security number
•
Driver license or state ID number
•
Names, social security numbers, and dates of birth of all dependent children
•
Employer’s identification notice (pay stubs or W2 form)
•
Name and address of all other employers for whom work was performed during
the past 18 months
APPLY FOR WORK AT YOUR NEAREST ONESTOP EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING CENTER
Ted Strickland
Governor
Helen E. Jones-Kelley
Director
JFS 55341 (Rev.. 1/2007)
NO
SMOKING
To report violations call
866-559-OHIO (6446)
in accordance with Chapter 3794
of the Ohio Revised Code.