Albany County Post - The Altamont Enterprise

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Albany County Post - The Altamont Enterprise
$1.00
The AlTAmonT
Enterprise
& Albany County Post
No. 15 Thursday, ocTober 31, 2013
For 129 years Albany County’s independent newspaper
From GOP and Dems
Accusations mount
Democrat Kenneth Runion and
By Anne Hayden Harwood
GUILDERLAND – One week Republican Mark Grimm, and the
before the town election, the two four candidates for town board,
major political parties are getting Democrats Patricia Slavick and
aggressive with their campaign- Paul Pastore, and Republicans Lee
ing, each slinging accusations at Carman and Mark Livingston.
Lettau said she also contacted
the other.
the chairman
A candidates’
of the Guilderforum, sched land Republiuled for Oct. 28,
can Commitwas cancelled,
tee, Matt Neland both sides
ligan, but did
are making ac“They have a history
not contact the
cusations about
of refusing to debate.” chairman of the
the other’s ads
town’s Demoand campaign
cratic Commitcontributions. In
tee, David Bosthe past year, the
worth, because
town’s Republishe could not
can committee
has raised four times as much as find a proper e-mail address.
The invitations went out in late
the Democrats’ committee, while
campaign contributions to the September, she said, and by Oct. 4,
Democratic incumbent supervi- all three Republicans had commitsor are about half of those for the ted to the debate. The Democrats,
she said, did not respond at all,
Republican challenger.
The League of Women Voters of until Oct. 23, when current counAlbany County extended invita- cilwoman and candidate for town
tions to six candidates from both board, Slavick, notified the league
parties to participate in a debate, that the date of the debate would
tentatively scheduled for Oct. 28, not work for them.
“We really had no choice but to
at the Guilderland Public Library,
according to Mary Anne Lettau, cancel,” said Lettau.
Supervisor Runion said he had
who assists the league with voter
barely even been aware of the
services.
The invitations were sent by e- proposed debate.
“They sent invitations out
mail, she said, based on addresses
that were found online, to the two through e-mail, but there was
candidates for town supervisor,
(Continued on page 10)
GCSD presents details
on $18M proposed upgrades
The Enterprise — Michael Koff
With whiskers quite straight and a bowtie in red, this cat wears a tall hat on top of her head. Dr.
Seuss came to life as she marched in his name, at the Halloween party of Voorheesville fame. Look
inside for more pictures — of Little Bo Peep, of Nemo; what mothers sewed, we all reap.
The final frontier of the mind
Chess in ‘the Box’: Inmates play for stamps
By Peter Henner
Alexis de Toqueville is best known for his classic
work, Democracy in America, which was published
in 1835 after his two-year tour of the United States.
Toqueville had persuaded the French government to
send him to the United States on the pretext that he
was going to study American methods of handling
convicted criminals. He is reported to have said
that the measurement of a society is the nature of
its prisons.
It would be interesting to see what Toqueville
would say about the Special Housing Units of New
York State correctional facilities. About 5,000 inmates
InsIde
Opinion Page 2
are locked in cells approximately 100 square feet, 23
hours a day, and are allowed out only for “recreation”
in a small pen.
Although the inmates can communicate with
other inmates by yelling across the cellblock, they
are not permitted to participate in any programs,
and access to the outside world is severely limited.
Some of the inmates are sent to SHU for months, if
not years; many of them have serious mental health
problems, or develop them as a result of the stress
of the solitary confinement.
Nevertheless, some inmates in SHU, known as “the
(Continued on page 27)
News Page 6
better light the football field.
By Melissa Hale-Spencer
If the public approves both
GUILDERLAND — On Tuesday,
more school leaders than district propositions, by a simple majorresidents showed up for a forum ity, a Guilderland resident living in a home
where detailed
with a median
information was
assessment of
presented on a
$246,500 would
proposed $18.2
pay an estimatmillion upgrade
ed $68 annually
to Guilderland
“If it doesn’t pass,
in taxes for the
schools.
then what?”
project over the
“ We ’ r e n o t
15 years of the
sure why it’s so
bond — $65 for
sparse,” Superthe first proposiintendent Marie
tion and $3 for
Wiles said afthe second.
ter the meeting.
The second project, for the high
Seven people had signed up to
school auditorium and football
attend, she reported.
“We’ve talked about this a lot,” field lights, will be undertaken
Wiles said, noting teams had gone only if both propositions pass.
The total cost, with interest,
to PTA meetings at the district’s
for both projects is about $23.7
schools.
“Not much in this project could million. State aid will cover 56
be considered controversial,” Wiles percent, or $13.3 million, leaving
concluded. “These are all items we 44 percent or $10.4 million to be
paid by local taxes.
have to do.”
As enrollment declines at GuilSchool-district residents will go
to the polls on Thursday, Nov. 14, derland, the district has hired
a consultant to study building
to vote on two propositions:
— A $17.3 million project to capacity at all seven schools.
update Guilderland’s seven school Wiles said she hopes to have the
buildings and improve security consultant’s report, with six or
seven recommendations, by this
and teaching technology; and
— An $846,300 plan to renovate winter or early spring. Formal
the high school auditorium and
(Continued on page 19)
Community Calendar Page 14 Classifieds Page 35
Sports Page 37
2
The Altamont Enterprise – Thursday, October 31, 2013
Editorial
Context matters
Just before Election Day, mailboxes are filled with flyers from
candidates, and our newspaper pages carry their ads. The more
information the voters have, the better.
Candidates like to get their faces before the voting public, extol
their accomplishments, and criticize their foes. So far, so good.
Problems arise, though, when false accusations are made or words
are taken out of context. One flyer, for example, being circulated
without attribution, proclaims in bright yellow, capital letters
against a black bar: Secret deals — Deception — Quid pro quo.
Under the headline “Board appoints political boss to planning
board,” with a picture of Paul Caputo, Guilderland Planning board
member and chairman of the Albany County Independence party,
is an excerpt from a Sept. 12 Altamont Enterprise editorial.
It correctly quotes this from our online editorial: “Would it be wise
for someone who chairs a local political party to resign from government boards to avoid the appearance of conflict? Of course.”
What it doesn’t do is give the context.
We wrote the editorial, titled “Integrity matters,” because, just
before the primary election, the Republican candidate for receiver
of taxes, Bryan Best, sent a letter to Independence Party members,
saying that Caputo had “recently been embroiled in a scandal when
it came to light in a recent article in The Altamont Enterprise that
he received $30,000 as a member of the Guilderland Planning
Board, in exchange for endorsing candidates.”
We wrote no such article. The editorial recapped what we had
actually written and posed the question above, followed by this:
“But does this mean Caputo is ‘embroiled in a scandal?’ No.
Does it mean he was paid ‘in exchange for endorsing candidates?’
Certainly not.
“And did The Altamont Enterprise write an article that said
these things? We did not. We dislike our good name being misused
in this way.
“There is no evidence that the Independence Party endorsements
are tied to Caputo’s planning board salary. When we asked Bryan
Best if he had such evidence, he said, ‘I have absolutely no evidence
that he did that; I think the facts speak for themselves.’
“We believe our readers and Guilderland voters are able to read
the facts and decide for themselves.”
We have no problem with words from our opinion pages being
quoted in campaign literature — they’ve been quoted on both sides
in the current Guilderland elections — but we do have a problem
with cherry picking so that our words appear to be the opposite
of what was written.
We also have a problem with the flyer because, while it purports
to condemn secrecy — complete with a cartoon featuring a large
black cape labeled “Cloak of Secrecy” — it has no clear origin
identified. The flyer, though, encourage residents to “Vote Row
G.” Row G is for the Stop Corruption Party, and, according to the
Albany County Board of Elections, all of the Republican candidates
in Guilderland are running on that line as well.
Voters need to be skeptical when they look at political propaganda.
We urge our readers to look at the profiles we’ve printed — all available online at www.AltamontEnterprise.com — based on interviews
with each candidate running in town elections in Guilderland, New
Scotland, Berne, Knox, Westerlo, and Rensselaerville.
We’ve highlighted the important issues in each town and asked
the candidates the tough questions. We’ve also run news stories,
based on facts, that put the issues in context.
Be an informed voter. Cut through the spin to get to the truth.
Published continuously since July 26, 1884
“We seek the truth and print it”
JAMES E. GARDNER
Publisher
MELISSA HALE-SPENCER
([email protected])
Editor
NEWS OFFICE — 861-5005 or 861-5008..................BUSINESS OFFICE — 861-6641
Staff Writers......................................................... Jo E. Prout, JORDAN J. MICHAEL
ANNE HAYDEN Harwood, TYLER MURPHY, MARCELLO IAIA
Illustrators..................................................................FOREST BYRD, CAROL COOGAN
Advertising Director...............CHERIE LUSSIER ([email protected]) — 861-8179
Advertising Representative....JACQUELINE THORP ([email protected]) — 861-5893
Office Manager.................................................................................. WANDA GARDNER
Photographer..........................................................................................MICHAEL KOFF
Production................................ JAMES E. GARDNER JR., BARBARA DEGAETANO,
ELLEN SCHREIBSTEIN, CHRISTINE EKSTROM, GEORGE PLANTE
The Enterprise is the newspaper of record for Guilderland, New Scotland, Berne, Knox,
Westerlo, and Rensselaerville. Our mission is to find the truth, report it fairly, and provide
a forum for the open exchange of ideas on issues important to our community.
PUBLISHED THURSDAYS at 123 Maple Ave., Altamont, NY 12009. Periodical postage paid at Altamont, NY. Postmaster: Send address changes to
The Altamont Enterprise, PO Box 654, Altamont, NY 12009. USPS 692-580,
ISSN 0890-6025.
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CORRECTIONS: The Enterprise will correct errors and clarify misunderstandings in news stories when brought to the attention of the editor, phone
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VIEWPOINTS expressed by staff members, contributing writers, and correspondents do not necessarily reflect those of the ownership of The Enterprise.
To the editor
Dismissing Coach Wright
Our decision was not made exclusively
on student playing time, unhappy parents, or surveys
To the Editor:
We would like to thank the
Berne-Knox-Westerlo Central
School District community for
its valuable input regarding our
2002-2012 varsity basketball
coach, Andy Wright, and the
future of our varsity basketball
program.
Please accept our apologies for
not properly thanking the community members for their important
and impassioned comments on
the subject of basketball during
our Oct. 21, 2013 meeting. We
carefully considered all of the
comments and concerns of those
who attended, and continue to
take community input into consideration on every subject that
concerns BKW and its students.
Unfortunately, the Oct. 21 meeting ended with some inappropriate
comments that bordered on bullying, setting a poor example for the
young people in our community.
That’s the kind of thing we would
rather not see repeated if for no
other reason than our students
deserve better.
Many of the comments at the
Oct. 21 meeting and other comments made by community members who contacted us by e-mail
and telephone indicated concerns
Coach Andy Wright had not been
given reasons for not being reappointed for the 2013-14 basketball
season.
From the onset, Mr. Wright was
informed that he had an opportunity and the right to request an
executive session with the school
board to discuss those concerns
and to receive a thorough explanation of the issues. Until recently,
he chose not to exercise that right
but he has since requested a meeting and an executive session was
scheduled for Mr. Wright with the
board on Oct. 30, 2013.
Contrary to the allegations of
some in our community, our decision was not made exclusively on
the issue of student playing time,
unhappy parents, or surveys. As
noted in the memo, Mr. Wright
released to the Enterprise last
week, BKW’s expectations for its
coaches, including Mr. Wright,
include, but are not limited to:
— All coaches must behave in a
manner that exemplifies a mature,
composed leader.
— Outbursts, and unprofessional displays of anger and
frustration will not be tolerated.
That includes verbal and physical
displays of anger and frustration
on and off the court and in the
locker room.
— All interactions with parents,
students, and community members are to be professional and
proactive.
In accordance with the New
York Personal Privacy Protection Law, the board has a longstanding practice of not discussing
personnel matters in public. The
reappointment of Mr. Wright is
no different from countless other
personnel issues involving district
employees, none of which have
been discussed in public.
Mr. Wright has great potential
to help our students succeed academically. We thank him for the
countless hours he has invested in
our students and our community
as a teacher and a coach. We
anticipate Mr. Wright will put his
energies and talent here at BKW
into maximizing the academic
success of the students in his
classroom.
The B-K-W Board
of Education
and Interim Superintendent
Lonnie Palmer
Editor’s note: For past coverage,
go online to www.AltamontEnterprise.com.
GCSD projects will protect long-term investment
To the Editor:
On Thursday, Nov. 14, Guilderland Central School District residents are asked to cast their vote
on two proposed building projects
totaling $18.2 million. If approved
by voters, the projects will address
various essential internal and
external building improvements
districtwide.
Proposition 1, in the amount of
$17,324,650, calls for upgrades
to aging infrastructure in the
district’s seven school buildings
and improvements for safety,
security, and technology systems
districtwide. Items identified
for attention focus primarily on
protecting the health and safety
of students, staff, and visitors;
addressing products, systems,
or equipment that are at or near
the end of life expectancy; and
replacing failing or deteriorating
building components.
Proposition 2, in the amount
of $846,300, includes renovations and upgrades to the high
school auditorium and calls for
the replacement of wooden light
tower poles on the high school
football field/track. These items
address the need for the district
to continue to provide for quality
learning experiences beyond the
classroom.
We believe that the projects going before voters will enable Guilderland Central School District to
provide safe and well-maintained
facilities to support student learning and achievement, and will
address many of the district’s
long-range needs.
Equally important, we also
believe that the projects up for
consideration will protect the community’s long-term investment in
its schools. Many of the upgrades
proposed will also improve the
district’s energy efficiency, resulting in cost savings for the district
down the road.
Other items are directly related
to health and safety concerns
(ventilation, flooring, traffic pat-
terns, etc.), or through their failure (heating systems and roofs in
need of replacement, upgrades to
electrical systems, etc.), have the
potential to disrupt the educational process.
We take seriously our responsibility to be good stewards of
our community’s investment in
our school district’s facilities. We
believe that the proposals up for
public vote address our most essential building needs.
Please take a few minutes on
vote day to cast your ballot regarding our capital improvement
projects. Polls will be open at all
elementary school buildings from
7 a.m. to 9 p.m. For more information on the upcoming building
project referendum, please visit
www.guilderlandschools.org.
Marie Wiles
Superintendent of Schools
Guilderland
Editor’s note: See related story
on page 1.
Celebrate the history and future of Albany County
To the Editor:
I am so proud to be the fourth
Albany County Executive to represent our great county. Looking
back at our history on our 330th
anniversary, I am honored to call
this diverse place my home.
With 19 municipalities and over
533 square miles of land, Albany
County has so much to offer. The
county sprawls from urban to suburban to rural areas and embodies
everything from high tech at the
College of Nanoscale Science and
Engineering to the innovation of
Ecovative in Green Island to the
farms in our Hilltowns.
All of us, as a community, built
this county and it will continue to
be community members who will
help us to grow and to improve.
In honor of our unique and rich
history, I want to invite all of
you to celebrate this momentous
occasion.
While the actual anniversary is
Nov. 1, I encourage you to visit the
Albany County Hall of Records on
Tivoli Street in Albany to see some
of our rich history, including the
Dongan law, chapter 4 creating
New York’s counties.
The cornerstone of Albany
County is its local businesses
and products. I continue to
work with our local chambers
of commerce and business improvement districts to showcase
the importance of buying local.
From Hannay Reels in Westerlo
to Phillips Hardware in multiple
locations throughout the county
to Troy Belting in Watervliet, it’s
our family businesses that lay the
foundation for our communities
and drive our economy.
Buying local and taking pride in
our community was the focus of a
campaign called “Grow Menands”
this summer. It is a template for
other municipalities to follow to
beautify our towns and support
our local businesses.
Celebrating 330 years would not
be possible without our servicemen
and servicewomen. As an active
member of the National Guard, I
understand the importance of recognizing those who have protected
not only our county but our nation.
I will honor five local veterans for
their service. These veterans have
dedicated their lives to service and
we will proudly honor them for
their heroism on Friday, Nov. 8th
at 10 a.m. in the Cahill Room at
112 State Street.
Maybe you’d like to celebrate
with us at the men’s and women’s
home-opener basketball games
between the University at Albany
and Siena at the Times Union
Center on Nov. 8. M & T Bank has
provided tickets for some Albany
County kids who might otherwise
not have been able to see this great
rivalry. They’ll be wearing special
T-shirts with a “Happy Birthday,
Albany County” message.
This is an exciting time for
Albany County. Being one of the
oldest counties in New York State,
we have been able to grow into a
unique and inviting home for a
variety of people and businesses.
Each resident has something
special to offer this county and we
hope you will celebrate our history
and future.
Daniel P. McCoy, executive
Albany County
3
The Altamont Enterprise – Thursday, October 31, 2013
Editorial
Trust can tumble like dominoes
“The best way to find out if you can trust
somebody is to trust them.”
— Ernest Hemmingway
Everyone agrees that schools should be safe.
The question is: Safe from what? Do students
need to be protected from the harm that may come
from outside their schools or from within?
We ask this question because, on Nov. 6, the
Guilderland School Board, during
its televised meeting, will consider
having a German shepherd, trained
to detect drugs and handled by a
Guilderland police officer, become
part of the high school scene.
The police dog named Rocky and
his handler, Donald Jones, may be
stationed in the school’s parking lot
at dismissal “so folks get to understand this is a
resource, that it’s not to scare anyone,” Superintendent Marie Wiles told us.
Kids who are now in high school once
marched as younger students in honor of Niko,
a German shepherd handled by Jones, that died
of cancer in 2007. Jones worked with Niko for
nine years and called the dog his partner.
On one of his many visits to the school,
Jones showed the kids a picture of the new
puppy, not yet named, which he would train.
That puppy grew to be a fine police dog; Rocky
has made many trips to school and town events
where he is a popular attraction.
Many of us, including no doubt kids at Guilderland High School, love dogs — but it is not
the dog per se that scares us. Police dogs are
trained and deployed for specific purposes; some
are trained to attack on command, others are
trained to detect drugs or weapons.
The Guilderland Police once had a T-shirt that
featured their “K-9 unit” and said, “You can run,
but you can’t hide.” The idea was the dog would
be able to sniff out the bad guys. Who are the
bad guys at Guilderland High School?
“It’s all about prevention,” the superintendent
says. “We’re not doing this to catch students.”
Why, then, have a dog on school grounds?
The idea was first broached two years ago
when a new principal came to the high school.
“Every school I’ve been in has done it,” Thomas
Lutsic said at the time. “It communicates to the
community that the school is conscious of keeping kids safe.”
The school board members who strenuously
disagreed at that time have since retired.
Guilderland hasn’t had a problem with drugs
being found in school. The superintendent said
it was “very rare” — typically pot or prescription
drugs discovered through “tips from students.”
A review of the arrest records from the Guil-
members had an “a-ha moment” when they were
told, “No student would be taken out in handcuffs
or traumatized.”
But what about the vast majority of students
without drugs in their lockers? How will they
feel?
We believe they will feel violated, as
they should.
The Fourth Amendment guarantees
“the right of the people to be secure
in their persons, houses, papers,
and effects, against unreasonable
searches and seizures.”
Schools, by law, are
sanctuaries, not citadels,” praising the board
and superintendent’s approach — as many districts rushed to beef up security, installing metal
detectors and surveillance cameras and hiring
armed officers — to instead stress the need for
“the development of a caring community, one in
which we look after each other.”
Many school shootings later, in 2002, we
read with interest the United States Secret
Service’s Threat assessment in schools:
A guide to managing threatening
situations and creating safe school
climates, which reported that many
of the shooters told investigators
that alienation or persecution drove
them to violence.
In the wake of the shooting at the
Sandy Hook Elementary School in
Littletown, Conn., we wrote about the report,
“Tending Our Youth,”
endorsed by more
than 100 organizations representing over
four million
professionals, including teachers, principals,
psychologists,
allowed to maintain safe learning environments.
A 1985 Supreme Court case helped define how far
the constitutional guarantee went. The court held
that a warrant was not needed for an assistant
principal in a New Jersey High School to search
the purse of a 14-year-old girl seen by a teacher
smoking in the restroom. A reduced standard
of “reasonable suspicion” rather than “probable
cause” now governs school searches.
A number of cases since have debated and
helped define what that means. School officials
are allowed to conduct random or blanket
searches — for instance, using metal detectors
— as a preventative measure. Drug-sniffing dogs
in schools are the most controversial of these
random searches but most courts have ruled that
the practice is not a search if the dogs don’t sniff
students or their belongings but, rather, sniff the
air around their property.
But it is not a clear-cut, across-the-board allowable practice. In a 1999 federal case, B.C. v.
Plumas Unified School District, the court ruled
a dog sniffing a student requires individualized,
reasonable suspicion, not justified by the prevention of drug abuse. That rings true for us.
Why should Guilderland seek to jeopardize
Fourth Amendment rights?
We’ve been heartened over the years by the
school district’s treatment of students with great
respect. In 1999, the week of the school killings
at Columbine High School in Littleton, Colo.,
we wrote an editorial, “Our schools should be
social workers, and mental-health workers.
“Inclination to intensify security in schools
should be reconsidered,” the professionals write.
The report details several successful programs.
Trust is an underlying tenet. “Building relationships within and around the school community can help keep school violence from happening
while fostering academic success,” the report
states. “For students, trusting relationships with
adults are critical to learning.”
We believe having a police dog patrolling the
school hallways will undermine that trust that
is so essential for learning. We also believe another measure under discussion — having “the
Guilderland Police Department tap into our
camera system…so they can see what we see in
real time,” as the superintendent put it — will
undermine trust.
In a recent contract agreement with the
Guilderland Employees’ Association, the district
agreed the cameras, which, according to one of
the negotiators, are “all over the place,” would
not be used to watch employees and then discipline them.
They should not be used to watch students,
either.
The harm that will be done may be subtle
— scars on the psyche, wounds to the heart,
wherever you believe trust resides — but it will
be painfully real.
derland Police over the last year, which we
print weekly, showed no drug arrests at the
high school.
Could it be that Guilderland isn’t like “every
school” and that what it has in place is far more
powerful than the threat of being found out by
a trained police dog?
It’s called trust.
The superintendent said the current board
“For students, trusting relationships
with adults are critical to learning.”
4
The Altamont Enterprise – Thursday, October 31, 2013
The Old Men of the Mountain
Opinion
Some OFs know how to relax,
others eschew the rocking chair
under the Earth before the Earth
By John R. Williams
On Tuesday, Oct. 22, the starts collapsing on itself.
As one OF mentioned, “The
OMOTM met at the Hilltown Café
in Rensselaerville, with another crust becomes so thin that the
ride through the autumn colors of magma breaks through and crethe Hilltowns. As many OFs put ates volcanoes and mountains
it, there is no need to ram all over where cities once were.”
Nature abhors a vacuum, so,
the Northeast to see spectacular
displays of fall colors splayed out when all the oil is pumped out,
against the hillsides. All it takes what fills the space? When all the
is a short ride into the hills that coal is mined, what fills the space?
Does water rush in,
form the Hudson and
and from where?
Mohawk valleys, and
One OF mentioned
all the color of nature
all these sink holes
is spread like a quilt
that are cropping up.
“Why am I
before the eyes of the
What made the hole
traveler.
supposed to
that they are sinking
Although one OF
believe some
into?
said that heading
One other OF said
for Vermont or New
snot-nosed kid
he thought these
Hampshire to captelling me how
sink holes have been
ture the views is a
evolving forever, only,
to live long?”
good reason to travel
with real-time comsomeplace. It gives
munications and the
an excuse just to get
ability to report hapaway and visit some
penings from just
gift shop to pay 50
bucks for something that is avail- about anyplace on the globe, we
able at Wal-Mart for a couple of are now hearing about them
more.
bucks, but it is fun to escape.
“Yeah, but,” one more OG alThat is one of the many reasons
the OFs escape to the Hilltown leged, “that is not what the probCafé, just to get away and have a lem is because, years ago, no one
was taking the stuff from under
great breakfast doing it.
To follow that same train of the ground; the wheel hadn’t even
thought, the OFs talked about been invented yet.”
To which the other OF rerelaxing. That is a frequent occurrence with the OFs; relaxing is not sponded, “Maybe not when you
were around, but the wheel was
a problem with them.
One thing they know is how to around when I was.”
“That’s right,” a third OF joined
relax. Some are so relaxed that,
when found in their chair doing in, “but the wheel when you were
just that, the finder is ready to around didn’t have a hole in it
call Digger Odell, but occasionally yet.”
One OF mentioned all these
the chest of the OF heaves up and
down and the finder realizes that offshore oilrigs. He exclaimed, “I
hope they are pumping water back
the OF is just relaxed.
Then there are the few OFs who in where the oil was because, if
said they have trouble relaxing that hole caves in and the ocean
because they are so wound up with rushes in and meets the molten
what to do next, and sometimes magna, man! That will be some
family problems are so pressing display of nature gone berserk.”
Still working at 80
that relaxing seems to be out of
Generally, the OFs meet on
the question.
Some OFs maintain that the Tuesday morning at the next
rocking chair will do them in. They restaurant in line; however, this
have to be doing something, and week, many of the OFs met
not just anything, but something twice. The OMOTM met again on
with value. Some still work, many Wednesday at Mrs. K’s in Middlevolunteer, and some have hobbies burgh to help celebrate Loretta’s
that require lots of concentration (the proprietor of Mrs. K’s restauand are not completed in a day rant) 80th birthday.
Not only were the OMOTM
or so.
Others are stress free. These there but half the county as well.
OFs seem to be in a constant state (This scribe has maybe let the
of relaxation. The outcome of both cat out of the bag, maybe Loretta
of these conditions — wound tight does not want everyone to know
or stress free — is that both (as far she is 80. Oh well, there were so
as the OFs go) have contributed to many people there, it definitely is
not a secret.)
pretty darn good long lives.
Many OMOTM showed up to
As one OF said, “Why am I supposed to believe some snot-nosed help Loretta celebrate. Loretta
kid telling me how to live long? For was a high school classmate of
crying out loud,” the OF continued, some of the guests and some of
“I am 87 and still going strong, the OFs. When asked when she
and this specialist who is still in was going to retire, she replied
diapers is so worried about me liv- she is not going to retire — she
ing long that he will be standing in enjoys the work and the people.
line when he is only 50 years old As long as she can do the work,
with all the other ‘tell them how she will be at the restaurant.
to live’ 50-year-old people, at the Congratulations.
Those OFs who we able to make
pearly gates waiting for them to
it to the breakfast at the Hilltown
open in the morning.”
The OF raved on about how this Café in Rensselaerville and gratesame 50-something at the pearly ful that none of the restaurants
gates will be looking down at us have thrown us out, yet, were:
OFs below. While his grave is be- Ken Hughes, Lou Schenck, Mace
ing dug by some retired OF who Porter, Gary Porter, Bill Keal, Rohas had fried eggs, bacon, hash bie Osterman, George Washburn,
browns with gravy, toast and black Frank Pauli, John Rossmann,
coffee for breakfast, the 50- year- Harold Guest, Glenn Patterson,
old at the gates just had half a Jim Heiser, Bill Krause, Roger
grapefruit, a glass of water, and Chapman, Miner Stevens, Andy
dry toast for breakfast, and died Tinney, Bill Rice, Henry Whipple,
Elwood Vanderbilt, Gill Zadle,
on his morning run.
Ted Willsey, Jim Rissacher, Mike
“Nature gone berserk”
The OFs were wondering how Willsey, Harold Grippen, Gerry
much more we can take from Chartier, and me.
ELECTION LETTERS
Election Day is Nov. 5. No letters related to elections are being
printed this week. This is in keeping with the newspaper’s longstanding policy of cutting off letters the week before an election
to allow for corrections, at the editor’s discretion.
The Enterprise — Michael Koff
In concert: Emilio Genzano, founder and coordinator of the Friends of Guilderland Athletics, right,
presents checks Monday from the $12,000 raised by the Guilderland Shows It Cares concert held at
Tawasentha Park. Half of the money went to the Rodinos, a Guilderland family stricken with Huntington’s disease, and the other half went to pay a share of freshman sports for Guilderland students.
Accepting the funds are Regan Johnson, left, the district’s athletic director, and Marie Wiles, center,
Guilderland’s school superintendent. Half of the cost of freshman sports — $37,650 this year — is being funded by the community. Fund-raising is ongoing by FOGA.
Guilderland Showed it Cared at fund-raiser
To the Editor:
On a beautiful afternoon at Tawasentha Park, the Guilderland
community gathered with friends,
colleagues, and family to support the Friends of Guilderland
Athletics concert fund-raiser for
freshman sports and the Rodino
Family.
FOGA is in its fourth year of
providing an alternative funding source to maintain freshman
sports that would otherwise be
eliminated due to school budget
cuts. Thanks in part to FOGA,
over 400 boys and girls have been
able to continue participation in
freshman sports.
This year, student athletes from
football, baseball, basketball, boys’
and girls’ soccer, and girls’ softball
joined the effort by collecting ticket sales and 50/50 drawing sales.
It was a pleasure watching them
at work, explaining how freshman
sports impacted their lives, and
how important it is for incoming
students to have extracurricular
activities.
Music is a universal language
and it certainly proved true that
afternoon. Concert-goers were
wowed by the opening act, Jesse
Cohen-Greenberg, a Farnsworth
Middle School student, play-
ing three fabulous songs on his
ukulele.
He was followed by “Emeralds
of July,” a six-piece high school
band (with Guilderland, Niskayuna, Bethlehem, and Columbia
students) playing a mixture of
country, rock, and original tunes.
Jackie’s Country Line Dancers
entertained the crowd with their
synchronized country movements
while also providing a very generous contribution.
The night concluded with the
Capital District’s #1 modern Country band, “Skeeter Creek,” filling
the air with country music.
Recovery Sports Grill provided
great food and beverages for the
crowd and also provided a very
generous donation for our event.
Our goal for this event was to
raise $10,000. Through the efforts
of the students; the FOGA committee; school district administrators,
principals, teachers, and staff;
coaches; the chamber of commerce;
local businesses,; town of Guilderland departments and officials;
parents; booster clubs; musicians;
local churches; and firehouses, we
raised $12,000.
The funds will be shared evenly
with the Rodino family to financially support them as they
continue to fight Huntington’s
disease.
The FOGA committee was
instrumental in the success of
this event. We want to thank
all that made it possible with
special thanks to: John Palmeri,
Recovery Room Sports Grille;
Kristie Becker, soccer; Jeff Cohen,
soccer; Ed Glenning, Communications/Paypal; Reagan Johnson,
Guilderland High School athletic
director; Tom Libertucci, ticket
sales; Dan Wheeler, treasurer;
Christine Hayes, Guilderland
School Board representative;
Terry Seery, softball; Jack Collett,
baseball; Jen Cornell, the Rodino
family; Deb Simeone, basketball;
Marie Wiles, Guilderland Central
School District superintendent;
and C.J. Gallup, football.
We are very fortunate to have
individuals and businesses that
are dedicated to the future of
our community. Please visit our
website, http://www.friendsofguilderlandathletics.org, for information, to support our sponsors, and
see how you can continue to help
our effort!
Emilio P. Genzano
FOGA Coordinator
Guilderland
What happened to manners and politeness?
To the Editor:
Have you ever met an ugly
person? I’m not talking about
physical beauty. I’m talking about
the kind of person who lies, lacks
integrity, is pompous, displays arrogance, and is corrupt, selfish, or
basically evil.
It has come to my attention that
many people display these unattractive qualities in our society.
What happened to manners and
politeness?
We should have evolved from
primitive man to a specimen of
a higher concern for our fellow
man.
We should have also attained a
sense of emotional intelligence.
I’ll define emotional intelligence
as being an ability to exhibit common sense in life situations and
a general feeling of empathy for
individuals with whom we come in
contact. Kindness, thoughtfulness,
and basic caring for each other
have given way to greed, ugly
behavior, and a lack of patience
with each other.
Instead, we have nasty people
all around us. Just visit your local grocery store with a smile on
your face and see how many people
respond in kind. Most people will
turn away and have a scowl on
their faces; they will then continue
their entire shopping experience
wearing that ugly face through
the store.
This response is what so many
individuals have ingrained into
their everyday behavior. Everyone
is myopic in his vision. It’s all
about them and their needs and
wants. As soon as they feel threatened, even by a simple smile, anger
leaks out of their pores and they
display wickedness.
Niceness has become obsolete in
our society. My grandmother used
to say, “It doesn’t cost any money
to be nice.”
Unfortunately, we have several
generations of rude, insolent, fasttalking, young adults who could
care less about their parents,
grandparents, brothers, or sisters
much less be kind or just considerate to a stranger or a prospective
client.
We may have all the new
technology in our lives, but our
humanistic qualities have suffered
immensely and the real tragedy
is that no one wants or has the
time to sit down and talk about
these issues.
They’re always too busy connecting to the next device and they
don’t want to get involved with
these “feeling” issues; it makes
them feel too uncomfortable. Individuals need to take personal
responsibility for their feelings
and behavior and stop blaming
everyone else for their obnoxious
personality.
The vicious circle will continue
and ugly people will persist spreading their evil ways unless parents
start to instill old-fashioned values
within their offspring.
If “ugly” people are not encouraged to rid themselves of ugly
behavior, this corrupt infiltration
will destroy whatever good feelings are still left to be shared.
Only then can we hope that future
generations will have less greed,
anger, and selfishness in their
hearts.
Remember: Behavior defines
reality! It may be time to start
redefining yours!
Bernadene Marie
Guilderland
5
The Altamont Enterprise – Thursday, October 31, 2013
To the editor
Pets enliven our halls
and led us to donate
sales, and other creative fundTo the Editor:
If you’ve been to our assisted raisers, the Atria Guilderland
living community, you would prob- community was able to raise just
ably notice the dogs that roam the about $600. The money was spent
hallways, greeting guests and resi- on items which appear on the
society’s website
dents. While we
as being “in need”;
have our live-in
including staples
dog, Buddy, there
like canned cat
are also several
In
addition
to
dogs,
and dog food, pastaff members
our residents are also per towels, and
who bring their
cat litter, but also
pups to work on a
able to bring other
less-thought-of
regular basis.
pets along with them. items such as
In addition to
Frontline and
dogs, our resipeanut butter.
dents are also able
In September,
to bring other pets
along with them, including cats several of our management staff
and birds. It is because of our and furry friends took the commupet-friendly nature that Atria nity bus down to the shelter and
Guilderland Assisted Living Com- dropped off the goods. We want to
munity had chosen the Mohawk thank everyone who helped raise
Hudson Humane Society as its money for this great cause.
fund-raising focus for the first Heather Lawton
Executive Director
half of 2013.
Through staff auctions, bake Atria Guilderland
Helping four-footed friends: Staff members and their pets pose with goods the Atria Guilderland
Assisted Living Community donated to the Mohawk Hudson Humane society.
TOWN TAXES ARE NOT
GOING DOWN...
34.1%
THEY’RE UP
*From your 2011 Town tax bill and the proposed 2014 budget
BUDGET YEAR
TOWN TAX LINE
PENSION TAX
TOTAL TOWN TAX*
INCREASE
2011
$775,520
Did Not Exist
$775,520
2014
$750,878
$289,047
$1,039,925
Up 34.1% from
2011 to 2014
The Runion-Slavick-Pastore team added a new pension tax in 2012 and
then raised it 111% in the 2013 budget. When the pension tax is combined
with the general town tax, you get a 34.1 % increase, and NOT A DECREASE.
THANK YOU
I want to thank my family and
friends for their speedy recovery
wishes, flowers, and visits after
my knee replacement surgery. A
special thank you to Deb for caring for me and L’il Bear after the
surgery. I am grateful for all my
wonderful family and friends.
Sincerely,
Pat Lightbody
END THE DECEPTION IN TOWN HALL
Send a message to Runion, Slavick and Pastore to
STOP PLAYING POLITICS WITH OUR BUDGET.
Oct 26 – Dec 14
10:00 am - 4:00 pm
(CLOSED SUNDAYS)
VOTE FOR THE TEAM THAT PUTS PEOPLE FIRST
Gift Shop &
75 Crafters
ON NOVEMBER 5TH
Shaker Site
VOTE ROW B REPUBLICAN!
Paid
Paidfor
for by
by the
the Guilderland Republican Committee
off heritage Lane,
albany, NY
near Albany Airport
6
The Altamont Enterprise – Thursday, October 31, 2013
Hadden says
At GCSD, many special-needs students ‘connect and stay friends for life’
By Melissa Hale-Spencer
GUILDERLAND — The school
board meeting on Oct. 22 ended
with Scoutmaster Sam Dikeman
explaining why Troop 50 — with
many of the boys wearing uniforms — had decided to attend.
“We went to two different town
board meetings and they agreed
with each other all the way
through,” Dikeman said, noting
that part of learning about democracy was seeing disagreements.
The school board meeting had
opened with Kerry Dineen, a music teacher at Pine Bush Elementary School and the building’s
president, describing the “angst
and anxiety” at the school. She
focused on “a small issue I think
you can fix,” urging the board,
which had been deeply divided on
the issue, to restore the cut pay for
substitute teachers.
“We’re the last place they’ll say
‘yes’ to,” said Dineen, stating it
was embarrassing for the district,
which has the longest school day,
to pay less, and it’s hard to find
substitutes.
The heart of the meeting was
devoted to a report presented
by Stephen Hadden, the administrator for special programs,
on special-education classes.
The district has 736 school-aged
students with disabilities — 89
of them, or 12 percent, are supported through self-contained
special classes, where students
are grouped together because of a
similarity of needs. Seven of them
have teaching assistants.
Additionally, Guilderland supports 66 students in special-class
programs, provided through the
Board of Cooperative Educational
Services and at private schools,
with needs that cannot be met in
the district’s programs.
Altogether, Guilderland has 11
special classes. Three classes, with
students from throughout the district, meet at Lynnwood Elementary, two at Altamont Elementary,
three at the middle school, and
three at the high school.
Summarizing outcomes in his
report, Hadden said, students
rarely reach proficiency in the
state-required English and math
tests. “Curriculum is modified to
teach the basic skills and knowledge needed to perform well on
assessments although often,”
Hadden said, “they are being
instructed at a level below their
chronological grade level. When
assessed, they must be administered the test that matches their
chronological grade level.”
The few students eligible for
the state’s alternate assessment
— those with severe cognitive
disability and deficits in communication and adaptive behavior
— are tested in ways that are
individualized and connected to
their abilities, Hadden said.
“A second and reliable indicator
of success is analyzing the mastery
of goals created for individual
students,” he said. Each student
with a disability has an Individual
Education Program (IEP) with
annual goals measured quarterly.
“Success is achieved when a student masters their goals,” Hadden
said. “On that measure, our students perform very well.”
From kindergarten through
eighth grade, school programs
parallel the general-education
curriculum and provide communication skills.
In high school, students in special classes choose a Skills and
Achievement Commencement
The Enterprise — Melissa Hale-Spencer
Stephen Hadden, Guilderland’s administrator for special programs, tells the school board about programs for the 89 students
in self-contained classrooms, grouped together with similar needs.
Superintendent Marie Wiles said his report was one of a series to
look at academic programs to answer the question: What are the
goals and are we meeting them?
Stephen
FOR GUILDERLAND TOWN JUDGE
Credential (SACC) or a Career
Development and Occupational
Studies (CDOS) Commencement
Credential.
Starting in June, the SACC will
replace the IEP diploma and must
include hours in career preparation, and, instead of Regents exams, students will take alternate
assessments.
Parents, Hadden said, have
already expressed concerns that
it will be harder for their children
to get jobs after high school with a
“credential” instead of a diploma
But, Hadden told the board, he
believes the credential will show
the student is employable and has
skills to work at a job.
“Once employers learn that,” he
said, “I think there’ll be more acceptance in the work place.”
Special-needs students may
stay in school until they turn 21,
extending high school from four
to seven years.
Guilderland students generally
attend high school for six or seven
years, Hadden said. Beginning in
their third year, they go into the
community for “job sampling,”
he said, where they visit various
workplaces — such as grocery
stores, restaurants, or animal
clinics — to observe for three
afternoons each week.
In their fourth year, they start
working four afternoons a week,
with the workplace changing three
times each year. Students also
take a weekly class to learn such
skills as how to accept criticism,
and how to interact positively with
co-workers and supervisors.
Hadden reviewed four years of
Guilderland data, from 2004 to
2008, for 47 students who entered
Guilderland High School. Thirty
left with IEP diplomas, eight
Steve DeNigris…
Guilderland resident Since 1998
Graduated Nova University Law Center, 1989 (J.D. degree) and Georgetown University
Law Center, 1991, Master of Law Degree (LL.M)
Decorated 16 year Police Veteran, with 22 years Trial Litigation Experience
in State and Federal Court
Member of the New York, Massachusetts, D.C. and Florida Bar
Admitted to Practice US Supreme Court; US Court of Appeals for the 1st, 2nd,
3rd, 4th 7th, 11th, DC and Federal Circuits; US Court of Veterans Appeals;
All US District Courts in NY, MA, DC and FL; US Court of Federal Claims
Steve’s Plan for Improving
Town Court and Reducing Costs. . .
3 WILL establish daytime Court hours and stagger appearance times to reduce waiting
3 WILL aggressively tackle the present backlog of cases
3 Will hold Court twice as often each month and at more convenient times
at no costs to residents
3 Will NOT accept full-time pension credits for part-time work and Will REFUSE
to accept a pay raise during his term in office
Steve’s Endorsements. . .
3 The Police Benevolent Association of the New York State Troopers
3 The Law Enforcement Officers Union, Counsel 82, AFSCME
3 The New York State Police Investigators Association (BCI)
3 The Police Conference of New York
3 The Fraternal Order of Police First Federal Lodge
3 Police Benevolent Association of New York State Law Enforcement
On November 5th, VOTE for Needed and Positive Change
Vote for Steve DeNigris for Town Justice
ROWS B & G (Stop Corruption) Polls Open 6am -9pm
www.DeNigrisforJudge.com
Paid for by the Committee to Elect Stephen G. DeNigris
7
The Altamont Enterprise – Thursday, October 31, 2013
...School board deals with audit, tax rolls, need for retreat and participation
moved to other districts, four are
still in the program, two withdrew,
one was placed out of the district,
and two died. None of them moved
out of a special class.
Hadden also surveyed 27 parents, and got eight responses, a
number he found disappointing.
Two said their children were
employed; one was living independently, one was living in a
supported apartment; six were
receiving adult services, and five
were living at home.
Among the successes in the program, Haden said, “The piece you
really can’t put your finger on…
They resist it,” he said of being put
in a self-contained classroom. “Six
months later, they feel very comfortable…They don’t feel alone…A
lot of these students connect and
stay friends for life. It’s wonderful
to watch.”
Listing parts of the program
that need attention, Hadden
said, speech services should be
imbedded, specialized training is
needed for teaching assistants,
requirements to teach Common
Core Standards must be balanced
with activities of daily living, there
should be a better student-to-staff
ratio, and there is a lack of electives for high school students.
Hadden noted that the graduation rate for students with disabilities for the 2011 Guilderland
cohort was 72.5 percent, which
exceeded the state standard of 53
percent. The remaining percentage would include students who
withdrew from school or had been
granted an IEP diploma.
Hadden concluded that Guilderland, with 14.2 percent of students
with disabilities in special classes,
is consistently under the state-set
threshold of 24.3 percent. He also
noted that a high number complete high school and meet their
individual goals, and that their
parents are generally satisfied
with the program.
“The Guilderland Central School
District has a long tradition of
meeting the needs of all students
with disabilities with supports and
programs that are truly individualized for each learner,” Hadden
concludes his report. “With recent
Hadden praised the “veteran
staff.” He said, “They’ve seen it all.
I’m very proud of them.”
Other business
In other business, the board:
— Heard praise from Superintendent Marie Wiles for performing “the very difficult task
of governing” the district. “I don’t
believe people truly understand,”
she said. In honor of School Board
Recognition Week, each of the nine
“We all need to be committed to doing the work.
We need to be there for each other to make it work…
Otherwise, we’ll be working against each other.”
financial challenges, our teachers and related service providers
continue to be dedicated to this
belief and continue to find ways
to assist our most needy students
meet with success.”
Board President Barbara Fraterrigo praised the self-contained
classes she had observed at Lynnwood Elementary with what she
described as a “diverse group of
students” with a variety of emotional and physical needs.
board members was presented
with a book selected in their
name to reflect their interests to
be donated to one of the district’s
school libraries;
— Heard from Assistant Superintendent for Curriculum
Demian Singleton that Guilderland alumna Liz Zunon won a
Gelett Burgess award for her
first children’s book, My Hands
Sings the Blues, Romare Bearden’s
Childhood Journey;
— Reviewed materials on a
new way elementary students are
learning about words, combining
phonics, vocabulary, and spelling,
called “Words Their Way”;
— Heard congratulations for
Farnsworth Middle School student
Conor Quinn who won a Student
Research Award for Nyet: How
One Word was a Turning Point
in History;
— Heard from Assistant Superintendent for Business Neil
Sanders that on Nov. 6, districts
residents may tell the board their
views on the development of the
2014-15 school budget;
— Received a state-required
annual update on risk assessment, noting “some areas where
the district could improve the
internal control structure.” The
audit was conducted by Questar
III (the Rensselaer-ColumbiaGreene) BOCES;
— Heard from Wiles that district enrollment is at 4,925. “All
in all, we’re relatively flat,” she
said;
— Corrected the 2013 tax roll,
which consisted of a $521 change
for an exemption not being applied
to a piece of residential property,
and $55,337.75 in taxes from CSX
Transportation Inc. The town’s assessor, Karen Van Wagenen, wrote,
in a form, that the additional tax
money from the railroad was because “in error the assessed value
was changed instead of the exemption value.” Sanders said the
money would go into the district’s
fund balance;
— Extended by one year a bid
award to Coyne Textile Services
for uniform, mop, and mat service
at an estimated annual cost of
$20,308.92;
— Accepted a donation of
weight-training equipment from
Christine Kiernan;
— Approved a new high school
club called Invest in Your Future
to be advised by Joan McGrath
for no pay;
— Approved an exchange program with students in Mainz,
Germany for April 2014, overseen
by Hanna Hickey, who teaches
German at Guilderland; and
— Heard doubts from board
member Colleen O’Connell about
whether the board should hold
its annual planned retreat since
only six members had filled out
a questionnaire to allow the retreat’s facilitator to design the
program.
“I am very frustrated by a
number of board members’ lack
of preparation,” she said.
“We have to be responsible for
each other,” agreed board member
Gloria Towle-Hilt. She had served
as the board’s vice president in recent years while O’Connell served
as president. “It’s embarrassing,”
said Towle-Hilt of the lack of
preparation.
“Frustrating, perhaps,” responded the current president,
Fraterrigo, “but that’s the purpose
of the meeting.”
“To be frustrated?” asked
O’Connell.
“We all need to be committed to
doing the work,” said Towle-Hilt.
“We need to be there for each other
to make it work…Otherwise, we’ll
be working against each other.”
“The whole idea is to be a team,”
said Fraterrigo.
“I am a team player,” said
O’Connell. She also said, “People
are abstaining from participation
in negotiations in executive sessions…” and
Met in executive session.
for GUILDERLAND TOWN JUSTICE
This Election Day - November 5
th
Vote for Two Candidates for
GUILDERLAND TOWN JUSTICE
RE-ELECT JUDGE
RANDALL
Sherwood
Denise
ELECT
Dick
A proven record of...
• Service to the Community
• Experience, Integrity, and Honesty
4 Democrat 4 InDepenDence 4 conservatIve
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8
The Altamont Enterprise – Thursday, October 31, 2013
Director of Senior Services retires
Wadach is leaving a job she loves,
but will volunteer to help the elderly
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GUILDERLAND — After more
than 12 years as the town’s coordinator of Senior Services, Cynthia
Wadach is retiring this week. Her
last day is Oct. 31.
“It’s exciting, but daunting,”
said Wadach. “I really do love
my job, but free time would be
nice, too.”
Wadach said she loves her job
so much because she feels like she
is truly helping people.
The Department of Senior Services provides free transportation
to medical appointments, grocery
shopping, mall shopping, and
other appointments. It provides
information on programs available
to seniors outside of the town,
such as Medicare and Medicaid.
It also holds a weekly luncheon,
an exercise program, and a game
of bridge.
Wadach will be replaced by her
assistant, Mary Anne Kelley.
“My very favorite part of the
job is talking to the seniors and
learning about them,” Wadach
said. “It makes me feel good that
I can help someone, and they are
truly thankful.”
When she started the job, in
2001, the department consisted
of three full-time employees and
one part-time employee, but for
financial reasons, it had to be reduced to herself and one part-time
person. Wadach said that, without
skipping a beat, the department
was able to streamline, and still
provide the same services, and she
is proud of that.
It has been during her administration that plans have been made
for a new senior center, housed in
a senior residential development,
slated to open next year, where
the town will be able to provide
even more services.
“We are like The Little Engine
That Could,” she said, of her department.
She is also very proud that she
was appointed as a marriage officer for the town, and presided
over the first same-sex marriage
in Guilderland. She called it a
highlight of her career.
Though she has loved the job,
and made lifelong friends through
The Enterprise — Michael Koff
Cindy Wadach, Guilderland’s coordinator of Senior Services,
helps Trannie Mae Dubose explore the programs the department
will hold in November. Wadach plans to retire this week after more
than a dozen years on the job.
“It makes me feel good that I can help someone,
and they are truly thankful.”
it, Wadach said she is ready to retire – both financially, and because
she has a lot she wants to do.
“I’m leaving a paying job to work
for free,” she joked.
Wadach said she plans to volunteer, particularly with Community Caregivers, as she strongly
believes in its mission to help the
elderly and ailing remain in their
homes.
She also wants to join a book
club, and get more exercise.
“I want to volunteer for my
heart, read for my mind, and exercise for my body,” she said.
“I will miss everyone,” she said.
“This is bittersweet.”
Commitment + Experience = Results
Town Board
Town Board
Patricia Slavick
L
REE
• Town Board Member since 2000
• Business Analysis Supervisor,
Office of NY State Comptroller
• General Electric Tax
Department, 1980-1999
• M.S. in Accounting, University at Albany
• Certified Public Accountant
• Member, St. Madeleine Sophie Church
ECT
Paul Pastore
• Town Board Member since 2006
• Assistant Town Attorney, Planning
Board Attorney, 2000-2005
• B.A., University of Notre Dame
• J.D., Albany Law School
• Admitted to NY and
Massachusetts Bars
• Communicant, Christ the King Church
Pat 
Slavick
Town Board

 Paul
Vote Election Day 
on Tuesday, November 5
REE
LECT
Pastore
Town Board
Polls open from 6:00 A.M. until 9:00 P.M.
Endorsed by Democratic, Independence, and Conservative Parties.
Paid For By Friends of Patricia Slavick and Paul Pastore
9
The Altamont Enterprise – Thursday, October 31, 2013
Hofbrau fund-raiser set for Nov. 9
Ferriero’s friends help her in the fight against cancer
By Melissa Hale-Spencer
ALTAMONT — The nine women
who work at the Re-Nue Spa share
a bond, and, when one of their own
is hurting, they want to help.
Tammy Ferriero, a stylist at the
spa, is battling ovarian cancer.
“It’s hard for everyone to see her
going through this,” said Rhonda
Flansburg who owns the spa with
her husband, Barry Gasparro.
He’s pitching in to help, too, as
are Jill Martin, Wendy Pollard,
and Kelly Hess.
“She would never want anyone
to go through this,” Flansburg
went on, “but her opinion is, she’s
strong and she can handle it.”
Ferriero’s cancer spread from
her ovaries to other organs that
had to be surgically removed,
Flansburg said, and now she faces
18 months of chemotherapy. “She
is a courageous woman…She still
maintains a positive attitude and
loves spending time with her
family,” Flansburg went on. “Her
resilience is amazing.”
Over the years, Flansburg and
her spa have held fund-raisers
for many causes, putting in pink
hair extensions for breast-cancer
awareness or collecting gently
used prom gowns for girls who
otherwise couldn’t afford them.
But the fund-raiser for Ferriero
— on Nov. 9 at The Hofbrau on
Warners Lake — has hit home.
“It’s startling, really,” said
Flansburg. “We work with her
on a regular basis. It touches our
heart very much. When you work
so closely with someone, you want
the best for them; everyone is
gathering together.”
Kevin Demarest has provided
his Hofbrau on Warners Lake
as the venue for the event. The
Bavarian-style restaurant is a
popular Helderberg destination.
The rock-and-roll band Bandboozled has volunteered to entertain.
Donations are being sought for
an auction where bidders will buy
tickets for chances to win items.
Asked what will happen to the
funds that are raised on Nov. 9,
Flansburg said, “The money will
go to whatever she needs. She’ll
endure chemotherapy for 18
months. She has insurance but
there are co-pays.”
Flansburg gave one example of
an unmet need: Ferriero felt nauseous recently and was prescribed
medicine to alleviate it. “It cost
over $300,” said Flansburg. “She
didn’t get it. She felt it was too
expensive.”
The Enterprise
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Tammy and her boys: Tammy Ferriero, center, is surrounded by
her sons — Shane Ferriero, left; Chet Ferriero, right; and Chris
McAuliffe, in front. Ferriero is battling cancer with the support
of her family. A fund-raiser to help cover medical expenses will
be held on Saturday, Nov. 9, from 5 to 8 p.m. at The Hofbrau on
Warners Lake in East Berne.
Flansburg concluded, “Every- Berne, NY 12059.
There will be light fare, soda,
one knows someone affected by
cancer. We work with Tammy so beer, and a cash bar as well as an
it is someone close to us that is auction and a 50-50 drawing. The
band Bandgoing through
boozled will
this….It’s not
provide live
easy for anymusic.
one — the
“We love Tammy and
Ti ck e t s,
person going
which cost
through it or
want the best for her.”
$20, may be
the loved ones
purchased in
standing by,
advance at
watching it
Re-Nue Spa
happen.
“We love Tammy and want the at 119 Maple Ave. in Altamont.
For more information, call Rhonda
best for her.”
Flansburg at 861-5723.
****
Contributions may also be made
A benefit for Tammy Ferriero
will be held on Saturday, Nov. 9, to Tammy Ferriero, Post Office Box
from 5 to 8 p.m. at The Hofbrau, 229, Altamont, NY 12009.
141 Warners Lake Road, East
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10
The Altamont Enterprise – Thursday, October 31, 2013
...Accusations mount from GOP and Dems on debate
(Continued from page 1)
appear before the board, because
never anything formal,” said Run- the situation did not fall under
ion. “Normally, when you get into town jurisdiction.
Grimm said that he visited
these forums, you get contacted
personally, or the party chairmen houses in the neighborhood, in an
attempt to get to the bottom of the
handle it.”
Nelligan said he believed the issue, in October 2011, after which
Democrats had purposely avoided one resident, Stephen Cadalso,
responding to the invitation until wrote a letter to the Enterprise
the last minute, when they knew it editor, stating that Grimm, a
councilman at the time, cared
would be too late to reschedule.
“They have a history of refusing more about the constituents than
the ruling majority board.
to debate,” said Nelligan.
It was this visit, said Grimm,
Grimm, Runion’s opponent,
agreed with his party’s chair- that prompted Runion to schedule
a meeting between himself, the
man.
“It is a shame that the candi- residents of the neighborhood,
dates were unwilling to debate,” the mall manager, and a Pyramid
said Grimm. “We would have been Companies partner, for November.
able to shed light on the trans- As a result of the meeting, the
parency issues and lay out our boards were taken off of the abandoned houses,
ideas for fixing
and crews drivthem.”
ing mall trucks
Runion con“I intervened a lot.
went through
tacted the
I scheduled a meeting
the neighborLeague
of
hood removing
Women Voters
and made complaints
The Enterprise — Michael Koff
debris and doon Oct. 29 and
A mailbox full: Town residents are inundated with mailers, like the ones pictured, leading up to next
to the mall.”
ing landscapsaid he would be
week’s election. Sent and funded by opposing political parties, and individual candidates, the flyers
ing.
willing to schedboth tout records and make accusations.
Runion —
ule a one-on-one
debate with Grimm, but Lettau who, according to the New York
said there was no time before the State Board of Elections financial
disclosures, collected $10,712
Nov. 5 election.
“We’re interested in getting the in contributions over the past
voters to the debate,” she said. “It’s year — told The Enterprise this
+RQ,UHDGKHUHWKDWWKH1<6WDWH&RPSWUROOHUKDVLVVXHVZLWK
not a press event for the candi- week that he hadn’t even known
&RXQW\/HJLVODWRU/HH&DUPDQ,WVHHPV0U&DUPDQILOHGWLPH
dates, and there’s not enough time that Crossgates Mall had made a
VKHHWVLQGLFDWLQJMXVWHLJKWRIKLVOHJLVODWLYHKRXUVORJJHGLQ
to notify residents about a debate campaign contribution, since he
does not receive donation checks
at this point.”
)HEUXDU\LQYROYHGFRXQW\PHHWLQJV2WKHULWHPVZHUHQHZV
All town offices, save for the directly.
FRUUHVSRQGHQFHDQGWKUHHKRXUVIRUDPLQRULW\FDXFXVZKLFKLV
“I don’t pay attention to the indihighway superintendent, are curFRQVLGHUHGDSROLWLFDOFRPPLWPHQWDQGQRWJRYHUQPHQWZRUN
vidual contributors,” he said.
rently held by Democrats.
He also said the implication that
Party enrollment in Guilderland
breaks down this way: 30 percent he received a contribution for not
Democrat, 26 percent Republican, taking action on the matter made
6WXGLGQ¶W0U&DUPDQUHFHQWO\ZULWHWR
and 25 percent unaffiliated. The no sense.
FODLPLQJWKDWSHRSOHDUHDVNLQJIRUFKDQJH$QGWKHQSHMRUDWLYHO\
“I intervened a lot,” said Runion.
remainder are enrolled in small
UHIHUWRDVXSSRUWHURIWKHSUHVHQWDGPLQLVWUDWLRQDV³DQ2SHUDWLYH´
“I scheduled a meeting and made
parties.
complaints to the mall.”
Money Matters
,GRQ¶WOLNHWKDW6WX 7KHUHLVQRURRPIRUQDPHFDOOLQJDQG
He hadn’t scheduled the matNelligan also alleged, this week,
7+$7¶6 ZKDWZHFLWL]HQVZDQWFKDQJHG
that Runion received a campaign ter for a town board meeting, he
contribution, in the amount of said, because the town does not
$1,500, from Crossgates Mall, have control over what the mall
5HPHPEHU)ORDQG\RXWRR6WXWKH'HPRFUDWVDUHUXQQLQJIRXU
in exchange for the supervisor’s does with its property unless it
ZRPHQFDQGLGDWHVDQGWKH5HSXEOLFDQV12721(7KH*XLOGHUODQG
silence on a zoning issue between requires a permit or variance, but
a Westmere neighborhood and the Runion had been able to act as a
5HSXEOLFDQ3DUW\ZRXOGKDYHEHHQRXWRIWRXFKHYHQLQP\KH\GD\
mediator, he said.
mall in 2011.
<RXU*UDQGPDOLVWVKHUUHFRPPHQGDWLRQVEHORZ
Grimm — who collected $20,483
Pyramid Companies, which
owns Crossgates Mall, also owns over the past year, according to the
14 properties in the neighborhood disclosure reports — speculated
fronting the mall, between the that perhaps Crossgates hadn’t
mall and Western Avenue, and contributed to his campaign betwo years ago, it began evicting cause he had been the first person
tenants and boarded up some of to “take them to task” for the
neighborhood problems.
the homes.
“Crossgates is our biggest taxResidents of the neighborhood
7UDLQHGE\-HDQ&DWDOGR
contacted the town about the is- payer and our biggest revenue
sue, by writing a letter to Runion generator,” said Grimm. “I’ve said
and asking to make a presentation that I will support them when
to the town board, but Runion they’re doing something right, but
responded that the group of neigh- I will call them out when they are
bors would not be scheduled to doing something wrong.”
The second-largest mall in Guilderland, Stuyvesant Plaza, made
equal contributions to Runion and
Grimm — $250 each.
Runion, for his part, said he
did not think Grimm should have
accepted contributions from two
members of The Michaels Group,
a home building and developing
company, which received approval
to build a townhouse development
for seniors in Guilderland — Mill
Hill — while Grimm was on the
town board.
Two of the Michaels brothers
donated $1,000 each to Grimm’s
campaign.
Jason’s plan to reform the Office of the Town Clerk
Runion voted against the projBryan’s plan to reform the Office of the Receiver of Taxes
A more efficient and less expensive Clerk’s office
ect, and said Grimm voted for it.
Modernize and Reform the Receiver’s office
• Customer Service: The Office of Town Clerk should be an open door to the
Grimm confirmed that he had
• Create a notification system to alert taxpayers of important reminders such
residents of Guilderland and not another bureaucratic barrier.
voted for the project, but said two
as registering for the STAR property tax exemption.
• Accessible Government: The Clerk’s hours should match yours and you
Democratic board members had
• Overhaul the current office hours in the Receiver of Taxes Department so
should not have to take time off from work to access the Town Clerk’s office.
voted in favor of it, too.
they are more convenient for the residents and taxpayers of the Town of GuilJason will keep the Clerk’s office staffed until 6pm four nights a week,
“The supervisor was the only
derland by extending evening hours and opening on Saturday.
and open from 8am-12pm on Saturday at no cost to taxpayers.
one who voted against it,” said
• Give residents the option to opt-in to a paperless E-mail billing system,
• Modernize the Town Clerk Office: To keep up with the demands of a
Grimm. “He’d be hard-pressed to
which will reduce postage costs so we can lower taxes.
more fast paced society, Jason will move toward providing online access documake that argument stand.”
• Enhance and improve the current online tax payment service offered by the
ments and save residents a trip to Town Hall.
Runion also said there was
town to become cheaper and more user friendly.
• Transparency in Government: As the Town official responsible for freea $5,000 contribution made by
• Maximize efficiency and improve service for the residents and businesses
dom of information (FOIL) requests, Jason will post all town documents and
Verizon to the Guilderland Reof Guilderland.
information, not subject to privacy restrictions, on the Town website.
publican Committee, which was
put into a housekeeping fund. He
said the only connection between
th
the committee and Verizon that he
was aware of was Grimm’s push
ELECT
Jason WRIGHT
and Bryan BEST
for TOWN CLERK and RECEIVER OF TAXES
14 YEARS IS LONG ENOUGH -
IT’S TIME FOR A CHANGE!
Nov. 5 - VOTE for Jason WRIGHT & Bryan BEST
PAID FOR BY THE CAMPAIGN TO ELECT JASON WRIGHT
11
The Altamont Enterprise – Thursday, October 31, 2013
...Ads and finances
to bring Fios, a cable and Internet saying that the general town tax
service owned by Verizon, into had increased, and to attempt to
mislead Guilderland’s taxpayers.
the town.
“That’s a real reach,” responded Runion said he broke the pension
Nelligan. “I’m not aware of any out into a separate tax line in an
other business that Verizon has effort to be more transparent, not
in town, and the supervisor sup- less, and that the town had no
control over the state-required
ported Fios too.”
Nelligan also said he saw noth- pension contributions.
Also in this week’s Enterprise,
ing wrong with donations by large
corporations, as long as they were Gerard Houser, a Democrat who
works in a part-time post for the
properly disclosed.
Grimm said that, if Verizon were town as the coordinator of its
donating money because of his community garden, paid for an
dedication to bringing a new ser- ad in support of the Democratic
slate in which
vice into town,
he makes accuthe company
“I don’t get any
sations about
would have doCarman, a Renated it to him
special-interest money.
publican candirectly, rather
I’m not in a position
didate for Guilthan to the genderland Town
eral committee.
of power.”
Board and a
“I don’t get
current Albany
any special-interest money,” said Grimm. “I’m County legislator.
The ad alleges that the state
not in a position of power.”
He said he “pretty much passed comptroller “has issues” with
the hat” and managed to collect Carman’s time sheets as a county
legislator.
more than $20,000.
“There has never been anything
Grimm said most of his campaign money went to mailers, and filed against me by the New York
State comptroller,” responded
some went to advertising.
Runion said his money also Carman last night. “There was
went to mailing out flyers, adver- never anything stated that I didn’t
spend enough time on legislative
tising, and lawn signs.
duties…I have served my conFalse advertising?
Runion said the Democrats’ stituents.”
Carman went on about Houser,
advertisements and mailers have
focused on the current admin- referring to a letter to the Enistration’s record, highlighting terprise editor Houser had writthings like financial manage- ten about the lack of action on
ment, SmartGrowth, the parks reducing the size of the county
and recreation department, and legislature. “In 2012, through the
Charter Commission, we requesttransparency.
The Republicans, Runion said, ed that the bipartisan commission
focused on their negative percep- consider the downsizing of the
tions of the Democrats, regularly legislature to save the taxpayers’
asserting that the current admin- money while still providing fair
representation,” said Carman.
istration lacks transparency.
Carman concluded of Houser,
An ad in The Altamont Enterprise this week, paid for by the “It’s a smear tactic. He’s twisting
Guilderland Republican Commit- things to smear me.”
“There’s been a lot of money
tee, states that taxes are not going
down in 2014, though that is what spent on both sides,” concluded
Runion has said will happen, ac- Nelligan, of campaign spending.
“I’m glad that we have the ability
cording to the proposed budget.
The ad says that taxes are to compete with the Democrats on
actually up 34.1 percent from the an almost — but not quite — even
2011 budget, based on the town’s level.”
According to the campaign
increased contributions to the
finance disclosure reports, the
state’s pension fund.
It is a point that Grimm has Guilderland Republican Commade in the recent past, both in mittee collected $28,030.94 from
letters to the Enterprise editor October 2012 to the current week,
and in a story about the proposed while the Guilderland Democratic
budget earlier this month. (For the Committee collected $6,545 over
story, go online to www.altamon- the same time period.
tenterprise.com and click on “Back
Editor’s note: Melissa HaleIssues,” page 4, Oct. 10, 2013.)
Grimm alleged that Runion Spencer contributed the comments
broke the pension tax out into from Lee Carman.
a separate line in order to avoid
Vote
A Record of Success.
A Vision For The Future.
Re-elect
Kevin Crosier, our full-time
Town Supervisor, is a retired
professional paramedic
firefighter who has received
numerous awards for saving
lives. He has a proven record
of public service.
Kevin
Crosier
Our Berne Supervisor
“We must leave future generations a legacy of
opportunity so they can live, work, and raise their
families in Berne, and experience all the wonderful
benefits of small town community living that we
enjoy today. Everyone’s voice counts. Working
together, we can make a difference–we already have!”
Leadership
Experience
Tuesday, November 5
Kevin is a lifelong Berne resident,
committed to preserving the unique,
rural nature of our town, while promoting appropriate business opportunities.
As Berne Town Supervisor for eight
years, Kevin created many successful
initiatives for and with our community–and will build on this record of
achievement with new, innovative programs in the future.
Commitment
POLLS OPEN 6 a.m. - 9 p.m.
Paid for by Friends of Kevin Crosier
PAID ADVERTISMENT
A Letter From Supervisor Ken Runion, Election Day, 2013
Dear Guilderland Voters,
As we approach Election Day, I
wanted to take this opportunity to
reach out to Guilderland residents
to share my thoughts on what
our community has accomplished
while I have been your Town Supervisor, and what the real focal
points of this year’s campaign are.
During my time as Town Supervisor, I believe that we have made
a lot of progress in improving the
services we provide to our residents, and in controlling the cost
of delivering those services. I have
had a lot of help with this, both
from the dedicated people who
comprise the Town’s workforce,
and from the Guilderland Town
Board, which has worked with me
to make Guilderland the premier
residential community in the Capital District.
Town government is about providing basic quality-of-life services to residents. I believe that
the services we provide measure
up favorably against those provided anywhere in the region. We
have good Town roads that are
well maintained year around. We
provide outstanding police and
emergency medical services on a
24/7 basis. Our Town parks and
our recreation programs are second to none, and have expanded
in response to community needs.
We provide quality Town water to
our residents, and expanded our
system to bring water to many additional families. We have broadened the range of senior services
we provide, and have encouraged
new and varied housing options
for older residents. We have invested in planning for growth,
consistently involving the public
in the process.
These services cost money, and
one of the things I have emphasized throughout my time in office
is financial management. We have
carefully monitored spending,
and have worked hard to limit all
expenses we have direct control
over. We have avoided workforce
expansion, consolidated positions,
utilized part-time and seasonal positions, worked diligently and creatively to control healthcare costs,
and generally managed Guilderland’s finances as diligently as
I imagine you all manage your
own finances in these challenging
times.
This strong management helped
us weather difficult times following
the 2008 economic turndown, and
as the economy slowly improves,
we can reap the benefits of those
controls. I am pleased to say that
my 2014 Draft Budget calls for a
4% decrease in the Town Tax.
I mentioned that the success we
have shared as a community during my time as Town Supervisor
came about with the help of the
Town workforce and the Town
Board. However, anything I have
accomplished and will accomplish
for Guilderland has been first and
foremost because you, the voters,
have placed your trust in me at the
polls, and I will be forever grateful
for your past and continued support.
I sincerely hope that you will get
out to the polls to vote on Election
Day. Guilderland is the place we
all call home. With your help, I
and my running mates- Pat Slavick and Paul Pastore for Town
Board, Jean Cataldo for Town
Clerk, Lynne Buchanan for Receiver of Taxes, and Denise Randall and Dick Sherwood for Town
Justices- are committed to making
it a home that we can all be proud
of. There isn’t as much “buzz” over
local elections as there is over national and statewide races, but it
is in local elections that every individual vote can make a real difference, and races can be decided
by a single vote. Please make your
vote count on November 5.
Sincerely,
Ken Runion
Town Supervisor
PAID FOR BY FRIENDS OF KEN RUNION
The Enterprise
Mark Grimm
for Guilderland
Supervisor
Lee Carman &
Mark Livingston
for Town Board
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samples
toFloral
chooseDesigns
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createyour
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for your
Jane’s we do it all.
own unique style, sit down
withdream
one ofwedding.
our floralAtdesigners
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party, theneeds.
reception hall, the chapel.
today to discuss
all your wedding
We can even design the real or artificial flowers for the top of your cake.
Let Jane’s Floral Designs create your floral bouquets
With thousands of samples to choose from, or create your
for your dream wedding. At Jane’s we do it all.
own unique style, sit down with one of our floral designers
10001 Main Street • USA
555-5555
The wedding party,
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12
The Altamont Enterprise – Thursday, October 31, 2013
Out & About
Come to Old Songs for simple, joyous dances
The Enterprise — Michael Koff
High fives all around greet this kindergartner as classmates
share in the joy of a race well run during the Pumpkin Fun Run
Saturday, a 25-year tradition at Guilderland Elementary.
By Andy Spence
VOORHEESVILLE — Two of
the area’s leading proponents of
traditional dance, Old Songs Inc.
with underwriting support from
Homespun Occasions, host a new
season of Old Songs Community
Dances, starting Saturday evening, Nov. 2, at 7 p.m.
Admission is $8 per person;
children age 12 and under are
admitted for free.
The first dance will feature
caller Bob Nicholson and music
by Fennig’s All-Stars at the Old
Songs Community Center at 37
South Main Ave. in Voorheesville.
Come early with your own dish
to share and join us for covered
dish supper promptly at 6 p.m.
The season continues on the
following first Saturdays of the
month, through May.
The idea behind the dance series is to create a family-friendly
community dance that was common from the 18th to mid-20th
centuries throughout this country.
Today these dances are more
common in the United Kingdom,
where they are known as “Barn
Dances,” or “Ceilidhs,” and are
geared to older children, teens,
and adults who like a variety of
dance, but prefer simple, easy-
Scouts seek
food for needy
New CD released
Listen to songs of the Anti-Rent Rebellion
ALTAMONT — Boy Scout Troop
264 of Altamont will conduct its
annual food drive in November.
Bags will be delivered to homes
in Altamont on Saturday, Nov.
2. The Scouts will return the
following Saturday, Nov. 9, to
retrieve donations.
Residents are asked to place
food and household items for donation in bags, which are visible from
the road, no later than 10 a.m.
Join Guilderhaven
on shredding Day
The Enterprise — Michael Koff
Little pumpkins: Hailey Altschule, 4, bottom; Annabella Defranza, 5, and Isabella LaFave, also 5, stick their heads through
the eyes and nose of a giant pumpkin decoration after completing
the 25th annual fun run at Guilderland Elementary last Saturday
morning in Guilderland.
GUILDERLAND — Guilderhaven Inc. is happy to announce
our participation in the Town of
Guilderland’s public service event
also known as “Happy Shredding
Day” on Dec. 3 from noon to 3 p.m.
at Guilderland Town Hall.
We will be there along with
Guilderland veterans’ groups and
the Regional Food Bank.
Supplies or monetary donations
are greatly appreciated. Town
passes are required. for more
information, call 861-6861.
By Janet Haseley
RENSSELAERVILLE — The
Rensselaerville Historical Society
announces a new release of a compact disc containing 14 songs and
ballads from the Anti-Rent Rebellion (1839-1889). The rebellion
was a protest against the feudal
system of land ownership under
the Van Rensselaers and what
happened here influenced the
wording of the federal Homestead
Act, which opened up the west to
settlement. Bruce Kennedy of Asheville,
N.C., has made a documentary
of the conflict and the historical
society thought that new interest
among area citizens and history
enthusiasts would lead to interest in the songs that the protestors sang at rallies. Kennedy is
descended from Dr. Smith Azor
Boughton, one of the major leaders
of the Anti-Rent Rebellion. The songs have just been digitized for CD from a live recording
made 16 years ago when Richard
Creamer of Rensselaerville wrote
paced dances.
The series will feature simple,
fun, joyous, dances from the United States and around the world in
circle, square, contra, and other
configurations. It’s a long-standing
tradition to bring people of all ages
together in an evening of simple
joyous dances that anyone of any
age can do, whether you have ever
danced or not.
Further information concerning the Community Dance may
be found at Old Songs’ website,
oldsongs.org, or by calling 7652815.
Editor’s Note: Andy Spence is the
founder of Old Songs Inc.
and directed an original historical
musical about the rebellion. Wellknown musician George Ward arranged the traditional tunes and
composed two of the ballads that
were performed. The musical, …of the People,
was performed in Rensselaerville’s historic Conkling Hall with
a cast of 21 local young people
and adults. The original recording was made by Greg Speck of
Rensselaerville and produced on
audio tapes by the Rensselaerville
Historical Society.
Charles Burgess of Rensselaerville has digitized the music and
the society has produced CDs.
The CDs are available, for $20,
from Rensselaerville Historical
Society, Post Office Box 8, Rensselaerville, NY 12147. Included in
the price is a six-page leaflet with
all the words to all the songs, and
postage.
Editor’s note: Janet Haseley is
a member of the Rensselaerville
Historical Society.
The Enterprise — Michael Koff
Picking the right pumpkin, this Guilderland Elementary School student makes her choice at the school’s 25th annual Fun Run event and then gives it the once-over while
holding the ribbon she got from the run.
13
The Altamont Enterprise – Thursday, October 31, 2013
Albright to speak
Thacher Park, 99 years, a gift to the people
By Marilyn Miles
NEW SCOTLAND — Join us on
Wednesday, Nov. 6, at 7 p.m. for a
historic journey through Thacher
Park from the time of the Native
Americans to current times.
Timothy Albright, Thacher Park
historian and co-author of John
Boyd Thacher State Park and the
Indian Ladder Region, will pres-
ent an informal slide presentation
on the history of the park. He will
highlight points of interest in the
park from over the last 200 or so
years.
Come hear about the ancient
and recent events of this public
treasure that is part of our local
area.
The program is open to the pub-
lic and is held at the Clarksville
Community Church on the Delaware Turnpike in Clarksville.
Refreshments will be served
following the program. For more
information, call 768-2870.
Editor’s note: Marilyn Miles is
a member of the Clarksville Historical Society, which is hosting
the event.
Knox Nursery School celebrates the season
By Cindy Quay
KNOX — The Knox Nursery
School is in full swing. Teachers
Kim Conklin, Season Poole, and
myself were ready when 27 children (14 three-year-olds and 13
four-year-olds) began their school
year on Sept. 9 — one that is guaranteed to be an adventure!
On a picture-perfect autumn day
at the beginning of October, the
3-year-olds visited the Pumpkin
Patch. Their morning was filled
with great story telling; maneuvering through a hay-bale maze;
and, of course, the traditional hayride to pick out a choice pumpkin
and colorful Indian corn.
Fire prevention
As October is Fire Prevention
Month, the 4-year-olds made their
annual trek from the school to
the Knox firehouse. There, they
learned about the special equipment and clothing firefighters
use.
Each student got the opportunity to walk through and sit in one
of the trucks. Before returning to
school, a group picture was taken
of the 13 future firefighters as
they stood next to the fire truck
sporting red firemen hats.
To reinforce the importance of
knowing what to do in the case of
a fire, both classes read books and
engaged in fire (not real) related
activities. Later in the month, the
4-year-olds participated in a fire
drill where they heard the school’s
actual fire alarm go off. The kids
did a great job lining up and moving quickly to evacuate the building in under a minute.
Another high point and most
likely the kids’ favorite of our Fire
Prevention segment was a visit
from Tiger Lily, a yellow lab. Tiger
delighted the children by showing
them how to stop, drop, and roll
in case a piece of their clothing
catches on fire.
She also demonstrated how to
crawl low to the floor to avoid
smoke. We thank Laura Stevens,
Tiger’s owner and trainer, for this
fun and relevant show.
Halloween
October wouldn’t be October
without Halloween projects.
The entrance to our classroom
displays bats flying high over
floating ghosts with multicolored
leaves scattered about. Halloween
parties complete with costumes,
songs, crafts, and treats will wrap
up this busy month.
Terrific Twos
Now in its fourth year, the Terrific Twos program welcomed eight
2-year-olds on Sept. 24. This year,
Loren Doherty joined the nursery
school staff to assist with the program for 2-year-olds.
Slowly but surely, the tots are
becoming comfortable with each
other and the schedule. They
love music, but clean up — not so
much! Already, they have favorite
songs: Animal Action and “Bus,”
also known as “The Wheels on
the Bus.”
The sand table is an attention
keeper until craft time starts,
then eight little pairs of hands are
ready to paint and glue all at the
same time! Our all-seasons tree
is currently filled with “apples”
crafted from red foam complete
with “worms” protruding from
them. A black cat project with
bodies made from little black
handprints was slightly messy but
great fun to make.
There are still openings in each
of our programs. For more information, please call the school at
872-2015.
V
O
T
E
IN ThE
town of berne
VOTE FOR...
R
O
W
Experience
Commitment
A
•
C
•
E
Leadership
“We must leave future generations a legacy of opportunity so
they can live, work, and raise their families in Berne, and experience all the wonderful benefits of small town community
living that we enjoy today. Everyone’s voice counts. Working
together, we can make a difference–we already have!”
A Record of Success.
A Vision For The Future.
ELECTION DAY
Tuesday, Nov. 5
POLLS OPEN 6 a.m. - 9 p.m.
Paid for by the Berne Democratic Committee
The Enterprise — Michael Koff
Finding Nemo: Gavin Kito, 2, becomes his favorite Disney movie
character at Sunday’s Halloween party held at the Voorheesville
Elementary School, hosted by the Kiwanis.
Kevin Crosier
for Supervisor
wayne emory
for Town Council
Joseph Golden
for Town Council
Anita Clayton
for Town Clerk
Al raymond
for Town Justice
Alan Zuk
for Town Justice
Scott Duncan
for Highway Super
Gerald o’Malley
for Tax Collector
Melanie bunzey
for Assessor
14
The Altamont Enterprise –Thursday, October 31, 2013
Community Calendar
Fall Supper at the New Scotland Presbyterian Church, in the
Fellowship Hall, from 4:30 to 7
p.m. The menu consists of roast
turkey with all the fixings, and
homemade pie for dessert. The
cost is $10 for adults and $5 for
children. Seating is first-come,
first-served, and no reservations
are taken. Take-outs are available. Call 439-6454 for more
information.
Thursday, October 31
Halloween Parade sponsored
by the Altamont Fire Department
and Ladies Auxiliary, starting at
6 p.m. at the Altamont Firehouse
and ending at Orsini Park at the
gazebo. Meet Mac ‘n Tosh the
clown and collect your goodies and
safety glow sticks!
Halloween Howl Prowl: Join
us for a howling good time at the
Discovery Center! Our annual
Howl Prowl will begin inside the
center with hands-on exploration
of Halloween topics including
skulls, bats, spiders, nighttime
sounds, and more. We’ll continue
outside for a half-mile hike to
discover the Pine Bush at night
and conclude the evening with
seasonal sweets of cider and donuts. All ages are welcome! Meet
at the Albany Pine Bush Discovery
Center, 195 New Karner Road,
at 4:30 or 6:30 p.m. The fee is $3
per person or $5 per family, and
registration is required; call 4560655 to register.
Angus Inn
Bed & Breakfast
OPEN HOUSE
Saturday, November 9th
12:00 - 4:00 pm
Refreshments will be served.
5684 Route 30, Schoharie
“Parm Night”
Wednesday Nights
Visit our website to learn more,
www.angusinnbedandbreakfast.webs.com
Chicken Parmesan
$8.95
Eggplant Parmesan
$8.95
Chicken
“Parm Sorrento
Night”
$10.95
Wednesday
Includes: Soup orNights
Salad
and Choice of Sides
“Parm Night”
“ParmParmesan
Night”
“Pasta
Night”
Chicken
Wednesday
Nights
Tuesday
Nights!
$8.95
Wednesday
Nights
Eggplant
CreateParmesan
your
Create
your
Chicken
Parmesan
own pasta
dish!
$8.95
Chicken
Parmesan
$8.95
own pasta
dish!
Choice of
Pasta,
Chicken
Sorrento
Eggplant
Parmesan
$8.95
Choice of
Sauce,
Choice
of
Pasta,
$8.95
Eggplant
Parmesan
$10.95
with soup
or salad
Choice
of
Sauce,
$8.95
Includes:
forSoup
$10or Salad
Chicken
Sorrento
“Parm
Night”
with
soup
or
and
Choice
of Sides
$10.95
Chicken
Sorrento
“Parm
Night”
Wednesday
Nights
Includes:
Soup
or
Salad
salad
for
$10
$10.95
and Choice
Sides
Includes:
Soupofor
or
Salad
Includes:
Soup
Salad
Wednesday
Nights
and
Choice
of
Sides
and Monthly
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of Specials!
Sides
“Pasta
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Chicken
Parmesan
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Menu
Tuesday
Nights!
$8.95
Chicken
Parmesan
“Pasta
Night”
Tuesday
Nights!
EAT IN - TAKEOUT
Eggplant
Parmesan
$8.95
Tuesday
Nights!
Create
your
$8.95
Eggplant
Parmesan
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your
1412
Township
Road
Chicken
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$8.95
own
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dish!
Create
your
Knox,
NY 12009
own
pasta
dish!
$10.95
Chicken
Sorrento
own
pasta
dish!
518-872-2100
Includes:
Soup or Salad
$10.95
Choice
of
Pasta,
and Choice
of Sides
Proprietor
Paul
A. Centi
Includes: Soup
or Salad
Choice
of- Sauce,
Pasta,
Choice
of
Renée
Quay
Exec.
and Choice
Sides Chef
Choice
of ofSauce,
“Pizza
with soup
or
Choice
ofNight”
Sauce,
“Pasta
Night”
with
soup
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Thursday
Nights
with
soup
or
salad for $10
“Pasta
Night”
Large
Pizza for
w/
2$10
toppings
salad
for
$10
Tuesday
Nights!
salad
&
20
Wings
$21.95
Nights!
...Tuesday
Also Monthly
Specials!
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Songs of the British Isles: John Roberts and Tony Barrand will give an Old Songs concert on Friday,
Nov. 1, at 8 p.m. at 37 South Main St. in Voorheesville. Tickets are $20 for adults and $5 for children
12 and under and may be purchased at oldsongs.org or by calling Old Songs at 765-2815.
Halloween at the Medusa
General Store, featuring tarot
card readings, entertainment,
and refreshments will be available
starting at 5 p.m.
Trunk or Treat: Enjoy a
holiday-themed community tailgate party, with bouncy castles,
prize giveaways, and candy. Rain
or shine, there will be plenty of
activities for kids and families
inside and outside. And it’s free!
The event will take place from 6
to 8 p.m. at 183 Schoolhouse Road,
Albany.
Halloween Party at the McKownville Fire Department,
featuring ice cream sundaes, a magician, face painting, games with
prizes, animal balloons, apples,
and candy. The event will take
place at the firehouse on Western
Avenue from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.
Crossgates Malloween: Join
us for a safe and easy alternative
to trick-or-treating at a family
fun event from 3 to 6 p.m. Prizes
will be handed out for the most
original, the cutest, and the scariest costume in each age group.
Candy will be distributed at over
100 different locations throughout
the mall.
Friday, November 1
First Friday Hike — Wild
Turkeys: Take a break from your
day and spend 45 minutes on the
trail with us discovering the life
of wild turkeys in the Pine Bush.
We will learn about turkey sounds
and flight and look for signs of
turkeys in their habitat. Please
remember to dress for the weather.
Feel free to stay after the program
to explore the Discovery Center.
All ages are welcome. Meet at
the Albany Pine Bush Discovery
Center, 195 New Karner Road,
at noon. No registration fee; call
456-0655 to register.
Albany County Turns 330: On
Friday, Albany County kicks off
its 330th anniversary celebration
in the Cahill Room at the Albany
County Office Building at 112
State Street between 9 a.m. and
2 p.m., with an exhibit of Albany
County’s history up close and
personal. On Sunday, at the Times
Union Center, from 11 a.m. to 4p
p.m., the county will host Live Life
Local, a celebration highlighting
small businesses owned and operated in Albany County. Taste and
purchase products from vendors
who represent the diversity that
Albany County has to offer in the
areas of the food and the arts.
There will be no cost to the public
to attend and parking is free.
Mainstream Level Western
Square Dance sponsored by
the Schoharie Valley Hayshakers
at 7:30 p.m. in the Middleburgh
Elementary School cafeteria. The
dance theme is “chocolate night.”
The caller is Peter Weidman and
the cuer is Carl Trudo. Please wear
soft sole shoes.
John Roberts and Tony Barrand present songs of the British
Isles, at 8 p.m. at the Old Songs
building, 37 South Main St.,
Voorheesville. Tickets are $20; call
765-2815 for more information or
to purchase tickets.
Saturday, November 2
“Mitten Mania” Class: Turn
an old sweater into a warm and
beautiful pair of mittens! Participants will learn how to sew
mittens from two easy patterns.
Some sewing experience is helpful.
Appropriate for ages 12 and up,
or younger children with sewing
experience. Participants should
bring one or two old sweaters, scissors, a needle, heavy thread, and
fleece, if available. The program
will take place at the Thacher Nature Center, from 10 a.m. to noon.
Call 872-1237 to register.
Knox Volunteer Fire Company
TURKEY DINNER
All You Can Eat
SUNDAY, Nov. 3, 2013
Serving 1 - 5 p.m.
Knox Firehouse
Route 156, Village of Knox
INFO CALL 872-1676
Adults - $10.00 • Children 6-12 - $5 • Under 6 - Free
Take outs available
Trash Alternatives and Composting Program at Five Rivers: A family-oriented program on
how to reuse objects and compost
will be conducted at 456 Game
Farm Road, Delmar, at 2 p.m.
What else can you do with trash
besides send it to a landfill? We’ll
learn some interesting techniques
for reusing everyday items and
reducing our waste, and we’ll
take a special look at composting. You’ll find out how it can be
done anywhere. Using less and
reducing waste helps save money
and energy, so come learn more.
Savvy tips to help you build and
maintain a healthy and productive
compost bin will also be provided.
This program is open to the public
free of charge; call 475-0291 for
more information.
Map and Compass Clinic
at Five Rivers: A hands-on
workshop on how to use a map
and compass will be conducted
at 56 Game Farm Road, Delmar,
at 10 a.m. Knowing how to use
a map and compass is essential
for finding your way safely in
the woods. At this indoor/outdoor
clinic, New York State Department
of Environmental Conservation
Forest Ranger Karen Glesmann
will demonstrate how to read
and understand a map and use
a compass for direction, distance,
scale and detail. Participants will
then practice way-finding skills
outdoors along gentle center trails.
This program is open to the public
free of charge, but space is limited;
call 475-0291 to register.
2nd Annual Button Bonanza
hosted by the Half Moon and Mohawk Valley button clubs, from
9 a.m. to 4 p.m., at the Saratoga
Knights of Columbus, 50 Pine
Road, Saratoga. Vendors will
be selling antique, vintage and
modern buttons, and crafts with
buttons. There will also be button
displays and a Make and Take
table for children.
Wild and Wiley Turkeys:
It’s that time of year when our
thoughts turn to turkeys. Come
discover the life of wild turkeys
in the Pine Bush and learn about
turkey sounds, flight, habitat, and
the bird that almost became our
national symbol. We will start
indoors for a brief introduction and
then continue outside with a hike
to search for signs of wild turkey
in their habitat. We will be walking one mile over rolling terrain.
At the end of the program, each
participant will have the chance to
make a turkey call to take home.
Please remember to dress for the
weather. Meet at the Albany Pine
Bush Discovery Center, 195 New
Karner Road, at 11 a.m. The fee
is $3 per person or $5 per family,
and registration is required; call
456-0655 to register.
Noah Lodge Public Roast
Beef Dinner from 4:30 to 7 p.m.
at 138 Main St., Altamont. The
menu includes roast beef, mashed
potatoes and gravy, green beans,
fresh squash, rolls and butter,
coffee, tea, milk, and a choice of
pie for dessert. The cost is $11 for
adults, $10 for seniors, and $6 for
children. Call 847-6261 for more
information.
RCS/VFW Auxiliary Holiday
Bazaar at the Ravena-CoeymansSelkirk Middle School, Route 9W,
from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. There will
be over 40 vendors and crafters
opened for holiday shopping, with
drawings and door prizes. It is free
entry with breakfast and lunch for
sale, as well as a bake sale. There
will be card-making and drop-off
donations for the military. The
Coeymans Fire Department with
fire truck and safety tips will be
available. All proceeds will be
donated to the RCS elementary
schools and the military.
Toys for Tots Drive and Regional Food Bank Drive: The
Guilderland Elks Lodge #2480 at
3867 Carman Road is sponsoring a Toys for Tots Drive — new,
unwrapped toys — and a regional
food bank drive, from 9 a.m. to 3
p.m. We are asking for donations
from the community to help the
less fortunate during this holiday
season. We will also be accepting
cash donations.
Champagne Celebration of
New Book Release: Celebrate
the release of Louise Copeland
Marks’ book, To Elevate and Adorn
the Mind, set in 1814 in Albany,
about one woman’s radical quest
to give girls an education. The
reception will be held from 2 to
4 p.m. at the home of Joan and
Charlie Benson, 9 Indian Maiden
Pass, Altamont.
96th Annual
Election Day Dinner
Knox Reformed Church, Rte. 156
Tuesday, November 5, 2013
Settings at: 4:30, 5:30, 6:30
Adults $10.00 • Child 6-12 $5.00 • Under 5 fRee
Take-outs available $11.00
Reservations Required
872-2199
15
The Altamont Enterprise – Thursday, October 31, 2013
RADIAL GAGE ENTERTAINMENT
PRESENTS...
ra ise r Sh ow !
5t h An nu al Co me dy Fu nd
The Brew Ha-Ha
Co me dy Sh ow ca se
HOSTED BY
Greg Aidala
FEATURING
Joe Devito
(as seen on The Late Show
with Craig Ferguson,
NBC’s Last Comic Standing
and Comedy Central)
Saturday November 9th
Altamont Fire Department
115 Main St. Altamont, New York
Showtime: 8 p.m.
Admission: $25 *Includes show, beer, wine, soda and finger foods
Tickets may be purchased at the door OR reserved tickets may be purchased in
advance by contacting Mark Wertman at the Altamont Fire Department 861-5758
Also at Village Hall, Kelly Best at 861-8554 ext. 13
Pet Adoption Clinic
Living off the Land, Season IV: The Autumn Harvest — Join ethnobotanist Justin Wexler on
Saturday, Nov. 2, from 10 a.m. to noon, for walk at the Huyck Preserve to learn about the final harvest
of wild fruits for winter, the plants used for hunting and trapping, and how the Indians prepared for
the snowy season. This will be a two-hour walk, and participants should come prepared with comfortable shoes and water. The group will meeting at the Eldridge Research Center at 284 Pond Hill Rd. in
Rensselaerville. Hikers of all ages are welcome at the free event.
Saturday, November 2
Sunday, November 3
Old Songs Community Dance
at 7 p.m. in the Old Songs building,
37 South Main St., Voorheesville.
A potluck dinner will take place
before the dance, at 6 p.m. The
dances will be fun and simple, for
all ages and abilities. Live music
will be provided by Fennig’s AllStars, and the caller will be Bob
Nicholson. No partner needed.
Clean, soft-soled shoes required.
The cost of admission is $8; call
765-2815 for more information.
Annual Turkey Dinner sponsored by the Knox Volunteer Fire
Company, at the firehouse, Route
156, from 1 to 5 p.m. All-you-can
eat for the cost of $10 for adults
and $5 for children. Call 872-1676
for more information.
Bamboo Fly Rod Repair
Workshop with Doug Moody.
Master Fly Rod Maker Moody will
be conducting a two-day workshop
showing participants how to repair their old bamboo fly rods. This
workshop will cover identification,
repair, restoration, and history of
the bamboo fly rod. Participants
will learn how to repair cracks in
the rod, replace and wrap guides,
and eyelets, rejuvenate grips, and
much more. Bring your fly rod and
a lunch. This two-day workshop
will be held at the Schoharie River
Center from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on
Friday and Saturday.
“Shop ‘Til You Drop” St.
Thomas School Craft and
Scholastic Book Fair from 10
a.m. to 4 p.m. We will have a
large variety of handmade crafts,
a bucket auction, book fair, and
lunch and refreshment items for
sale. There is no admission fee, so
come and join us for a wonderful
day at St. Thomas the Apostle
School, 42 Adams Place, Delmar.
2nd Annual Holiday Bazaar
and Craft Fair at the Guilderland Elks at 3867 Carman Road,
from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Coping with Life’s Necessaries — The Down and Dirty
of Life Without Plumbing, a
program presented by the New
Scotland Historical Association,
from 2 to 4 p.m. at the Wyman
Osterhout Community Center in
New Salem. Come and remember
the “good old days” — how did
people manage without indoor
plumbing and electricity? The
program is free and open to the
public. Call 765-4212 for more
information.
Wild and Wiley Turkeys:
It’s that time of year when our
thoughts turn to turkeys. Come
discover the life of wild turkeys
in the Pine Bush and learn about
turkey sounds, flight, habitat, and
the bird that almost became our
national symbol. We will start
indoors for a brief introduction and
then continue outside with a hike
to search for signs of wild turkey
in their habitat. We will be walking one mile over rolling terrain.
At the end of the program, each
participant will have the chance to
make a turkey call to take home.
Please remember to dress for the
weather. Meet at the Albany Pine
Bush Discovery Center, 195 New
Karner Road, at 11 a.m. The fee
is $3 per person or $5 per family,
and registration is required; call
456-0655 to register.
Altamont Elementary School
PTA Craft/Vendor Fair from 11
a.m. to 3 p.m. at 117 Grand Street,
Altamont. Free admission.
The Dutch Settlers Society
of Albany will hold their Annual
Membership Tea from 1 to 3 p.m.
at the Ten Broeck Mansion, 9 Ten
Broeck Place, Albany. The event
will begin with a formal welcome
by the 2013 Albany Tulip Queen
and Court. The speaker will be
Mr. Justin Divirgilio of Hartgen
Archaeological Associates, who
will deliver a presentation on the
“Quackenbush Distillery.” Mr.
Matthew Jager, co-owner of the
Albany Distilling Company, will
do a tasting of the spirits being
created not far from the site of
the 18th Century distillery. Light
refreshments will be served. Call
861-5087 for more information.
Saturday, November 2nd
9:00 a.m. to Noon
at Guilderland
Animal Hospital
Rescued Rabbits from
The House Rabbits Society
Adopt a pet through this clinic
and get a $25 gift certificate to Guilderland Animal Hospital
Call 518-355-0260 for more information
or visit www.gahvets.com
Serving the community since 1955.
Maria’s
Tailgate Tavern
Tuesday, November 5
Election Day Bake Sale and
Drawing starting at 9 a.m. at the
East Berne Firehouse, sponsored
by the East Berne Fire Company
Auxiliary.
Newly expaNded
Election Day Lunch and
Dinner at the Trinity United
Methodist Church, Route 143,
Coeymans Hollow, from 11 a.m. to
7 p.m. The lunch menu includes
homemade clam chowder, and the
dinner menu includes a chicken
and biscuit dinner with homemade
pie/ The cost is $10 for adults and
$5 for children, and take-outs are
available. Call 756-2091 for more
information.
on Thursday 10/31-
Knox Historical Society
Meeting at Beebe Farm, 66 Beebe
Road, at 7 p.m. New members are
always welcome. Refreshments
will be served. Call 872-2082 for
more information.
Come to our
$100 gift certificate awarded
for best costume... Drink specials, food
specials and other prizes to be awarded...
don’t forget it’s ladies night from 7-10pm!!
live Music this Saturday 11/2
Louie Baldanza, acoustic guitarist,
is back with classic rock and much more!!
2563 western avenue,
Guilderland (in the Park Plaza)
Monday - Saturday 11:30 a.m. - 11 p.m.??
Sunday 4 p.m. - 11 p.m.??
Annual Soup and Sandwich
Luncheon at the Berne Reformed
Church, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.
A variety of homemade soups,
sandwiches, and cookies will be
available. Eat in or take out.
PIZZA VILLA
PIZZA • PASTA
SUPER GIANT SUBS
We Deliver To:
Altamont, Voorheesville, Guilderland Ctr., Knox, Princetown
Main Street - Altamont
ƒ
Berne Fire Co. Auxiliary
861-6002
6th ANNUAL
CrAft fAir
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Refreshments and
Lunch available
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1HZ6DWXUGD\6WHZ)HVW%XIIHW
6DWXUGD\'LQQHU
Nov. 9th • 9 am to 3 pm
Berne fire House
Canaday Hill Rd.
For info, call 872-0355
&[email protected]@QD&[email protected]
[email protected]@O5TM
[email protected]@[email protected]@RSSGDGHFGRBGNNK
8 CUT CHEESE PIZZA 12 CUT CHEESE PIZZA 24 CUT CHEESE PIZZA
& 10 WINGS
& 30 WINGS
& 20 WINGS
18.50
$
+Tax
Offer expires
11/15/13
24.50
$
+Tax
Offer expires
11/15/13
37.50
$
+Tax
Offer expires
11/15/13
Valid Saturday thru Thursday (coupon is not valid on Friday). Not Valid with any other offer.
O P E N 7 D AY S • 1 1 A . M .
16
The Altamont Enterprise –Thursday, October 31, 2013
Community Calendar
Wednesday, November 6
Benefit for Tammy Ferriero: Tammy Ferriero has ovarian cancer that spread to other
organs that had to be surgically
removed, and she will undergo
18 months of chemotherapy. She
still maintains a positive attitude
and loves spending time with her
family. Her resilience is amazing.
Attend a benefit for Tammy at
the Hofbrau, 141Warners Lake
Road, East Berne, from 5 to 8
p.m. Tickets are $20, and will
include light fare, soda, a keg of
beer, a cash bar, a drawing, and a
Chinese auction. Advance tickets
are available at the Re-Nue Spa,
119 Maple Avenue, Altamont. Call
861-5723.
“Thacher Park, 99 Years, a
Gift to the People”: The Clarksville Historical Society will present
a program by Timothy Albright,
the Thacher Park historian, which
will be a slide presentation on the
history of the park from Native
American times to present day.
The program will be held at the
Clarksville Community Church
at 7 p.m. Call 768-2870 for more
information.
Thursday, November 7
American Shakespeare Center Production of “Othello” to
be staged at the University at
Albany, at 7:30 p.m., in the Main
Theatre of the Performing Arts
Center on the uptown campus.
The event is sponsored by the Performing Arts Center and the New
York State Writers Institute. Call
442-3997 to purchase tickets.
Afterschool Adventurer: Hey
kids! Want to get some exercise
and have fun outdoors? Well
bring an adult and join us for
our bi-monthly after school hiking adventure club. We will meet
on the first and third Thursday
of each month, with the opportunity to explore many different
trails and habitats. You can come
once or every time. We will walk
approximately one mile. Meet at
the Albany Pine Bush Discovery
Center, 195 New Karner Road,
at 3:30 p.m. The program is free,
but registration is required; call
456-0655.
Sunday, November 10
— Photo by Robert Corwin
Work O’ the Weavers will give an Eighth Step concert recreating the spirit, sound, and heart of the
Weavers, the folk group of the 1950s and 1960s that included Pete Seeger, Ronnie Gilbert, Fred Hellerman, and Lee Hays, at 7:30 p.m. on Friday, Nov. 1, at Proctors GE Theatre. The group includes David
Bernz (vocals, guitar, banjo), James Durst (vocals and guitar), Mark Murphy (bass and guitar), and
Martha Sandefer (vocals and percussion). Tickets are $24 in advance and $35 for the best front center
seats, available through The Eighth Step at 434-1703; also through Proctors Box Office at 346-6204,
and at The Book House of Stuyvesant Plaza in Guilderland.
Saturday, November 9
Annual Turkey Supper:
The United Methodist Church of
Greenville/Norton Hill is having
its annual turkey supper from 4 to
7 p.m. Eat-in or take-out. The cost
is $12.50 for adults, $6 for children
6 to 12, and $3 for children under
5. Tickets are available at GNH
Lumber in Greenville or by calling
966-4280.
Guided Trail Walk at Five
Rivers: A naturalist’s tour of the
Vlomankill Trail will be conducted
at 56 Game Farm Road, Delmar,
at 2 p.m. Join us for a fall hike
on the Vlomankill Trail, one of
Five Rivers’ well-trodden paths.
On this outdoor foray, which will
also include the Big Pine, North
Loop, and Old Field trails, center
naturalists will explore the geology and species found in stream
and forest habitats. Call 475-0291
for more information.
Friday, November 8
PB&J — Pine Bush and Jammies: It’s story time at the Albany
Pine Bush Discovery Center. Join
us for a reading of nature stories
before you head to bed. Kids are
welcome to come dressed in their
pajamas and bring along their favorite stuffed animal and pillows.
Appropriate for ages 4 to 7. Meet
at the Albany Pine Bush Discovery
Center, 195 New Karner Road, at
6:30 p.m. The fee is $3 per person
or $5 per family and registration
is required; call 456-0655.
From D’burg to Jerusalem
— The Unlikely Rise and Awful
Fall of a Small-Town Newsman:
Carl Strock retired last year from
the Daily Gazette after 25 years
of writing the column “The View
From Here.” He chronicled his
journalistic adventures from the
trivial to the far-reaching, including religious national journalism
in Jerusalem, police corruption,
teachers’ unions, sexual abuse of
children, and more. He might also
touch on the circumstances that
prompted him to leave the Gazette.
Presented by The Capital District
Humanist Society, at 1:15 p.m., in
Room 22 of the Campus Center at
the Sage Colleges Albany Campus.
Admission is free.
Oh Deer! Would you like to
learn more about white tail deer in
the Albany Pine Bush? Come and
join us for an exciting program on
the largest mammal in the Pine
Bush. We will start with a short
introduction to deer anatomy
and behavior and then continue
outside for a one-mile hike looking
for signs of deer in their habitat.
All ages are welcome. Meet at
the Albany Pine Bush Discovery
Center, 195 New Karner Road, at
1 p.m. The fee is $3 per person or
$5 per family, and registration is
required; call 456-0655.
Inherit the Wind, presented by the Classic Theatre Guild,
opens Nov. 1 at Proctors Fenimore Gallery at 432 State Street in
Schenectady, and plays for two weekends. General admission is
$18.50 with a three-dollar discount for seniors and students. For
more information, call the box office at 346-6204.
Toad the Wet Sprocket will play in concert at The College of Saint Rose with Lee DeWyze on Sunday,
Nov. 3, at 7:30 p.m. in the Kathleen McManus Picotte Recital Hall, Massry Center for the Arts, 1002
Madison Ave., Albany. Tickets are $30 for the concert or $75 for concert and a pre-performance reception. Tickets may be purchased online at www.massrycenter.org. For concert and ticket information,
contact Sal Prizio at 337-4871 or [email protected]
Tret Fure, a singer, songwriter, and guitarist, will give an Eighth
Step concert, introducing her newest CD, A Piece of the Sky, at 7:30
p.m. on Saturday, Nov. 2, at Proctors, 432 State Street, Schenectady.
Doors open 7 p.m. General admission is $26; center seats in the
four front rows cost $35. Tickets are available in advance by Visa/
MC/Discover/AmEx charge at 434-1703, online at www.8thstep.
org, or at The Book House of Stuyvesant Plaza in Guilderland.
17
The Altamont Enterprise – Thursday, October 31, 2013
Library Notes
Altamont
By David Warner
Election Day is coming. Responsible citizens will help to
decide the directions to be taken
by our political groups and communities.
Responsible citizens with a favorite dessert recipe will have a
different, equally vital opportunity
to help raise needed funds for the
Altamont Free Library.
The library’s annual Election
Day bake sale is always a major
funding source — we’ve come to
depend on it. If you’ve contributed before, please be aware of
our appreciation, and please help
us again. If you’d like to make a
first time offering, we will be most
grateful.
Election Day is Tuesday, Nov.
5. Please bring your cake, pie,
maple bars, treats, cookies, éclairs,
mom’s famous, cupcakes, surprise,
doughnuts, to the village community room by 8 a.m. Or call the
library at 861-7239 to coordinate
a pickup.
And, of course, if baking is
just not your thing, you can always help the cause by buying
something. A win-win, yum-yum
situation.
Book club selections
The following are the book selections to be enjoyed:
— The Woman Upstairs, by
Claire Messud on Nov. 4, at
noon;
— The Three Weissmanns of
Westport, by Cathleen Schine, on
Nov. 18t, at 7 p.m., and
— Life After Life, by Kate Atkinson, on Dec. 2, at noon.
To a T
The second Pinterest adult craft
night will be held at the library on
Monday, Nov. 4,, starting at 7 p.m.
We’ll be making braided rugs from
old T-shirts. Some preliminary
mock-up models have been made.
They look good.
You know you don’t really want
to throw your old shirts away —
too many memories, too many
vibes. And you know you’re really
not likely to wear them again.
Once again, the vibe thing. We’ve
got a solution. It could be fun.
Bring the shirts with you.
Middleburgh
By Anne LaMont
On Thursday, Nov. 7, at 7 p.m.
at the Middleburgh Library the
ladies (men are welcome, but we
have not seen any yet!) of the Knitting Circle knit and crochet, embroider and quilt, and more. You
can learn a new skill here, share
your own special talents with others, or just craft in the company
of friends. Drop in anytime. No
registration is required.
Board meets
On Monday, Nov. 11, at 7 p.m.,
the library board of trustees will
meet. This meeting is open to the
public.
For more information, see our
website at www.middleburghlibrary.info.
Berne
By Judy Petrosillo
Hats off to the volunteers,
Friends of the Library, the town
of Berne, the library trustees, the
library staff, and those who contributed toward making the new
Berne Public Library a reality. To
celebrate the opening at our new
location at 1763 Helderberg Trail,
there is a ribbon cutting ceremony
planned for Sunday, Nov. 17, at 2
p.m. All community members are
invited to attend.
Board vacancies
The library trustees wear many
hats including financial managers, policy developers, and library
promoters. There will be two vacancies on the library board as of
January 1, 2014. Residents of the
town of Berne interested in serving
on the board should contact Mary
Kinnaird at [email protected]
or Pat Favreau at [email protected]
gmail.com by Nov. 18. Consider
throwing your hat into this ring
of committed volunteers.
Teen group
The staff would be talking
through their hats if they said they
knew exactly what teens want at
the library. The TAG (teen action
group) was established to find out
what teens really think and then
to act on these ideas. These TAG
happenings occur on the first Friday of the month. Interested teens
should plan to meet with Kathy on
Nov. 1, at 6:30 p.m. Book club
The book club for adults is Sunday, Nov. 3, at 7 p.m. The group
will be discussing The Forgotten
Garden by Kate Morgan. I’ll eat
my hat if the conversation about
this novel is not stimulating. New
members are always welcome even
if you have not read the book.
Story time
Hang on to your hat! Story time
this week is featuring the letter
H. Preschool children and their
caregivers are invited to wear
their favorite hats on Tuesday,
Nov. 5. Join Kathy at 11 a.m. for
stories, activities, and a craft. Perhaps you will see her pull a rabbit
out of a hat!
Friends meet
The Friends of the Berne
Library have been known to
lend assistance at the drop of a
hat. Their monthly meeting is in
the community room of the new
library on Wednesday, Nov. 6. The
meeting begins at 7:30 p.m. The
main topics this month include
the ribbon cutting ceremony on
Nov. 17 and a book sale tentatively
scheduled for Nov. 23.
Movie night
Family Movie Night at the library takes place on Friday, Nov.
8, at 7 p.m. We will be showing a
newly released movie on DVD that
is rated PG. The title is being kept
under my hat but you can contact
the library at 872-1246 for more
information. Refreshments will
be served.
If you know additional idioms
about hats, e-mail them to [email protected] Just
be sure they are not old hat.
Re-Nue makes wishes come true
ALTAMONT — Re-Nue Spa
at 119 Maple Ave. is collecting
unwrapped toys and donations
for the Rolphie Fund, a Cobleskillbased charity for youth.
“All donations and monies raised
will directly benefit children with
economic needs in Schoharie and
surrounding counties,” according to Rhonda Flansburg, who
owns the Re-Nue Spa with her
husband.
A Vendors and Benefit Bake
Sale will be held at the spa on
Sunday, Dec. 15, from 12:30 to
5:30 p.m.
Vendors at the event include
photographer Jim Miller, DogGone
Stylish with accessories and treats
for dogs, Pink Zebra candles and
home fragrance, and Angelwood
Gifts, featuring custom glass
painting.
The Enterprise — Michael Koff
Brisk run: This tyke looks determined as he completes the 25th annual Pumpkin Fun Run at Guilderland Elementary on Saturday where each child received a ribbon and a pumpkin.
Library Notes
Guilderland
By Mark Curiale
Put the voices of Nicolas Cage,
Ryan Reynolds, Emma Stone,
and Cloris Leachman behind the
animated antics of the prehistoric
comedy that’s showing at the Guilderland Public Library on Friday,
Nov. 1, at 7 p.m., and you have a
movie that kids are going to love
and cause adults to howl.
The plot is simple: After the cave
that the world’s first family, the
Croods called home is destroyed,
the family must undertake the
journey of a lifetime. Here’s where
the fun begins, the family travels
over a spectacular landscape with
the aid of an inventive boy. Their
outlook is changed forever.
The film is 98 minutes long; it’s
rated PG because there’s a bit of
scary action. There’s free popcorn,
so the scary bits shouldn’t be a
problem. In case you’re wondering, our Public Performance Site
License prevents us from using the
actual name of the movie in promotions, that is why we headlined
this with a homophone.
Science enrichment
Tweens are encouraged to sign
up for the Adventures in Earth
Science program being held at the
library on Tuesday, Nov. 5, at 2:30
p.m. There’s no school that day, so
come on down!
Students will practice science
skills such as predicting, measuring, and observing with hands-on
activities.
Register by calling 456-2400 x 4,
or online at bit.ly/TweenScience.
Voting
Tuesday, November 5, is Election Day, to determine where you
are supposed to vote, go to the
Albany County Board of Elections’ website at http://access.
albanycounty.com/voterinfo or call
487.5060. The library’s Helderberg
Room will be open from 6 a.m. to
9 p.m. for general election voting
for Districts 6, 14, and 16.
Voorheesville
By Lynn Kohler
On Wednesday, Nov. 13, and Friday, Nov. 15, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.,
Healthy Capital District Initiative
will be holding private meetings
with patrons at the Voorheesville
Public Library to discuss health
care options. This will include
the Healthcare Marketplace, as
well as other options that may
be available. The representatives
from HCDI are trained navigators
for the Affordable Healthcare Act
and will be able to help you fill
out whatever paperwork or online
forms needed to register for this
new state-based health insurance
exchange.
Due to high demand, we are asking that you call ahead to register.
Please call the library at 765-2791
to schedule an appointment.
Musical story time
Join us on Saturday, Nov. 9 at 10
a.m. for a musical story time. This
popular program includes music,
movement, stories, rhymes and
fun activities. Toddlers through
kindergarteners with an adult
will thoroughly enjoy this age
appropriate morning song and
dance time.
November
artist of the month
The library is delighted to welcome local favorite Nancy Gardner.
Gardner’s work can be pre-viewed
at floppypoppy.com. Please drop
by the library and stroll through
the gallery, so you can enjoy her
photographs in person!
NYC bus trip
Saturday, Dec. 7 is the date for
the Friends of the Library bus
trip to New York City. The bus
will leave from the Voorheesville
Elementary School parking lot
at 7 a.m. and arrive at Bryant
Park in NYC at 10 a.m. For the
return trip, we will be leaving
NYC at 7 p.m. and arrive back
in Voorheesville at 10 p.m. The
price is $35 FOL members or $40
non- members. Paid reservations
will be accepted at the circulation
desk at the library.
Mother-daughter
book discussion
On Thursday, Nov. 14, at 6:30
p.m., author Kate Messner will
join us via Skype for a motherdaughter book discussion of her
novel The Brilliant Fall of Gianna
Z. Messner will start with a quick
introduction and overview of her
books as well as a little about the
writing process for The Brilliant
Fall of Gianna Z with some show
and tell of revised pages. Then
Messner will open it up to questions. Please prepare one or two
questions for the author before the
program. This program is recommended for girls in grades 5 to 7
and their mothers. Please register
for this program and pick up a
copy of the book. Space is limited,
so register early.
Bethlehem
By Louise Grieco
On Tuesday, Nov. 5, at 7 p.m.
, come to the library for bedtime
stories and fun; for children up to
age 6 and their families.
Teen advisory group
On Wednesday, Nov. 6, at 3:30
p.m., is the monthly TAG meeting
at the library to talk about teen
programs and activities. For kids
in grade 6 through 12.
Blood Drive
On Thursday, Nov. 7, from 1 to
6 p.m., the Bethlehem Public Library will have an American Red
Cross blood drive. Call 1-800-REDCROSS or go to www.redcrossblood.org for more information and
to schedule an appointment.
Origami Club
On Thursday, Nov. 7, at 7 p.m.
come to the library and learn basic
techniques and get help with a
special project. This program is
for kids in kindergarten through
grade 12.
Alzheimer Series
On Friday, Nov. 8, at 1 p.m.,
the library’s Alzheimer Series
presents Recognizing Caregiver
Stress. This program is presented
by the Alzheimer’s Association and
Community Caregivers.
18
The Altamont Enterprise –Thursday, October 31, 2013
One Happy Family
Water system leak found outside
unoccupied home, and stopped
By Marcello Iaia
RENSSELAERVILLE — A water leak for a seasonal home was
identified and shut off earlier
this month, stabilizing a demand
on the Rensselaerville hamlet
water system that outpaced its
filter.
“All the water was being filtered, including the water that
was leaking away. It was about
50 percent more than anticipated,” said Thomas Delp, the water
and sewer committee chairman.
“So it was a big leak.”
About 80 homes and businesses are served by the system
in the hamlet, which, Delp noted,
has no consumer meters.
Douglas Story, the system’s
operator, noticed the demand on
the system and said at the September town board meeting that
he suspected it could be caused
by a leak in the storage tank.
The water to the house has
since been shut off at the curb,
Delp said, and no other significant leaks have been found.
Repair of the leak is the responsibility of the customer, said Jack
Long, a committee member.
“It was isolated by closing
valves, and then we realized in
what zone it was in,” said Delp.
“And the final detection of where
the leak was was done with a
listening device.”
Ethics case based on assessor
processing parents’ exemptions
By Marcello Iaia
RENSSELAERVILLE — The
town’s head assessor, Donna
Kropp, was the subject of an ethics complaint last year, brought by
former head assessor Jeffry Pine,
for having assessed her parents’
property with tax exemptions.
“I believe it was correct, but I
was just learning the procedures,”
said Kropp when first asked about
the issue. “It’s possible an error
was made. It’s possible an error
can be [made] at anytime.”
She added yesterday, “I did
process the exemptions. If a mistake was made, it was not made
intentionally or deliberately. My
work was to be reviewed by the
other assessors.”
The ethics board, hearing
office needed to confirm whether
or not the income used for the lowincome senior exemption was low
enough to qualify.
Weber, also running in the
upcoming election on the Democratic line, applied for a change
of enrollment from Republican to
Democrat. He had won his current
four-year term on the Republican
line. Pine was the contractor for
Weber’s home.
Kropp suggested Pine, once
the head assessor, confronted her
because he lost the 2011 election,
and wanted to be appointed after her resignation. Pine denies
this and said he wanted Kropp
to pay the town around $2,600
exempted from her parents’
property. He said he discovered
“If a mistake was made, it was not
made intentionally or deliberately.”
Greener pastures: Ray, Erin, and Rena Bradt opened up their Helder-Herdwyck Farm in East
Berne to 20 farmers and agency staff for an all-day grazing workshop entitled “Manage Your Livestock So They Work for You.” The Bradts demonstrated how they took a weedy pasture and scrubby
hedgerows and made them into vibrant ecosystems using animal impact and portable flex-netting
while feeding the soil manure and trampled forage. The Albany County Soil and Water Conservation
District helped sponsor the event. Albany County residents who are interested in learning more about
grazing management for their own operations may contact the Conservation District at 765-7923
or e-mail [email protected]
its first-ever case, determined
the complaint was unfounded.
Kropp’s father, Robert Lansing,
a Republican, was a former supervisor of Rensselaerville who
died in September, 2010.
Pine — a Democrat ousted in the
last election, now running against
Republican Kropp to be assessor
in the upcoming election — claims
the exemptions for 35 to 50 percent
of property taxes were calculated
in error over three years they
were both in office. Exemptions
are given — according to state-set
parameters adopted locally — on
a sliding scale for low-income
households.
The town board in September
2012 adopted the recommendation
to take no action against Kropp
who, during the period of the exemptions, worked with Pine.
“We were missing information
within the law to help us make a
decision,” Georgette Koenig, cochair of the board of ethics told
The Enterprise in March.
Pine said he made copies of the
documents, showing low-income
senior tax exemptions for Kropp’s
parents from 2008 to 2010, that
the board of ethics couldn’t obtain
because they were missing from
the assessors’ office. He, Kropp,
and assessor Michael Weber
maintain that they did not take
the documents from the assessors’
The original Since 1974
the erroneous exemptions in the
spring of 2011.
“When I didn’t get elected, I
said, ‘Well, no one’s going to be
there to check her,’ and that’s
when I decided to bring it forward,” said Pine this week.
“No matter what way he did it,
it would be looked at as wrong,”
said Weber. “In other words, if he
did it before the election, it was
to win the election; if he did it
after the election, it was because
of sour grapes.”
Kropp said procedures in the
office have been changed where
assessors now do not work on their
family members’ properties.
“We’ve instituted that all of us
have to review all of the exemptions and paperwork for preparation of the assessment roll,” said
Kropp of procedural changes that
“weren’t necessarily the result of
the ethics situation.”
During Pine’s time in the position, he said, assessors were allowed to evaluate family members’
properties.
“It would have been fine if she
did it right, but she didn’t do it
right,” said Pine. He later added,
“If you want to do another family
member’s assessment, at least
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and sign off.”
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19
The Altamont Enterprise – Thursday, October 31, 2013
www.AltamontGeneralDentistry.com
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Adam A. Edwards,
ANESTHESIA FOR DENTISTRY
The Enterprise — Melissa Hale-Spencer
Ready to answer questions: At the dais for Tuesday’s informational session on a proposed $18.2 million
upgrade to Guilderland schools are, from left, Superintendent Marie Wiles; Assistant Superintendent
for Business Neil Sanders; Daniel Woodside, the managing principal with CSArch Architecture, which
is handling the project; Clifford Nooney, the district’s director of physical plant management; Alicia
Rizzo, Lynnwood Elementary School principal; Michael Laster, Farnsworth Middle School principal;
and Thomas Lutsic, Guilderland High school principal. Michael Andrews, project architect, was also
on the panel. Amy McGeady, who handles public relations for the district, is at the podium behind
them, soliciting questions from the sparse audience. Projected on the screen in back is a picture of what
Sanders described as “alligatored” pavement in need of replacement.
...Details given on $18M props
(Continued from page 1)
biggest changes at Guilderland
focus groups will then be held to Elementary and the high school,
determine which recommendation so that there are double sets of
doors. Visitors will enter a door
is the most viable.
Wiles noted it would be ideal to into a vestibule, where staff can
have had the capacity study com- see them, before they open a secpleted before voting on the capital ond door into the school.
The security portion of the plan
project, but went on, “We will have
options before we bid any work.” also includes $393,900 for office
She also said many items have to and classroom locksets that can
be quickly locked from the inside;
be done “no matter what.”
If the propositions pass, Wiles $259,000 to add more surveillance
said, approval by the State Edu- cameras; $177,500 for electronic
cation Department is expected by swipe card systems; $31,300 for
the end of 2014, and bids would computer server upgrades for the
be awarded between January and more “robust” safety system; and
March of 2015. The first phase of $28,300 for visitor management
construction would take place in tracking software, Sanders said.
The software system, he exthe summer of 2015 and the secplained, will scan a visitor’s
ond phase the following year.
“If it doesn’t pass, then what?” driver’s license and let staff know,
asked district
resident and
parent, Karen
Covert-Jones.
“We couldn’t
“We don’t want to be caught
handle this
in an emergency situation
magnitude of
work in an
…This district has been good
annual operaabout being proactive.”
tional budget,”
answered Clifford Nooney,
the district’s director of physical plant management, suggesting for example, if the visitor is a
convicted sex offender. It would
there could be another vote.
Daniel Woodside, the managing be possible, too, during after-hours
principal with CSArch Architec- use of the schools to code a group’s
ture, which is handling the project, cards — say, basketball players
answered, “We don’t want to be at Westmere Elementary — for
caught in an emergency situa- a particular time and day of the
tion…This district has been good week, ensuring they were admitted only then.
about being proactive.”
Finally, $1.8 million of the first
The bulk of the first proposition,
about $14 million, is to renovate proposition is for technology infrathe electrical, heating and ventila- structure and program upgrades
tion, roofing, plumbing, and site “preparing students to be able to
systems at the district’s schools. compete and act in a technically
“That’s the heart of the project,” savvy world,” said Wiles.
She stressed that it was not
said Wiles. “We want to be prepared,” she went on, noting that “gadgetry,” but rather “the power
emergency repairs would inter- behind gadgetry.”
The largest portion of this —
rupt schooling.
Assistant Superintendent for $618,800 — will go for “mobile
Business Neil Sanders went labs,” Sanders said, describing 30
over the repairs or replacement laptop computers that are wheeled
planned for mechanical, electrical, to classrooms on a cart.
Joseph Reilly, the district’s
and plumbing systems at various
schools as well as outdoor and director of technology, said that,
indoor upgrades. The scope of the if the maintenance department
work and related costs are detailed is considered the backbone of a
at the district’s website, www. school district, technology is its
circulation system.
guilderlandschools.org.
“Sending our kids out into the
Sanders noted that some of the
upgrades, such as boiler replace- world well prepared is provided for
ment, would increase energy ef- in this proposition,” he said.
The second proposition includes
ficiency, saving the district money
$553,800 to renovate the audiin the long run.
The second largest expense — torium and $292,500 to replace
$1.5 million — is for safety and wooden light poles with steel poles
and better lights at the football
security improvements.
This includes $593,000 to re- field.
Regan Johnson, the district’s
structure school lobbies, with the
athletic director, said wind blows
constantly on the field.
“When the wind blows, I always
know where I’m standing, just in
case,” he said to gales of laughter
from the score of listeners Tuesday night.
The wood poles, which, he said,
attract insects, were installed in
1986.
Lori Hershenhart, Guilderland’s
music director, said the auditorium
is used two out of four periods.
“Should I say it’s fought over?”
she asked.
The high school principal,
Thomas Lutsic, replied that was
a “good word” to describe it.
As an example of its overuse, Hershenhart said, with the
high school play in two weeks,
the orchestra
was pushed
to rehearse in
the band room,
which pushed
the band into the
chorus room.
She also said
the lighting is so
poor a child can’t
read from an audience seat, and
that the sound
system, last added to in 2001, is “rolled in and
out,” for example to the gym for
concerts.
Wiles said that the facilities
committee — made up of district
staff, community members, and
school board members — came
up with the second proposition
as a compromise. “The guts” of
the upgrades, she said, are the
infrastructure improvements and
there was worry the auditorium
and field lighting might be deemed
“frivolous,” she said.
The vote on both propositions
will take place on Nov. 14 from
7 a.m. to 9 p.m. Residents vote
in one of five elementary schools,
whichever district they live in.
Any United States citizen, 18
or older, who has lived in the
school district for at least 30 days
before Nov. 14 is eligible to vote.
Residents who are not registered
to vote may do so on Nov. 1, from
8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. at any of the
elementary schools or from 8:30
a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at the district
office at 8 School Road in Guilderland Center, or through the Albany
County Board of Elections.
Applications for absentee ballots, for residents who will be out of
town on Nov. 14 or who are unable
to vote because of illness or a disability, are available through the
district website or by calling the
district clerk, Linda Livingston, at
456-2000, ext. 3125.
“Anesthesia,” meaning loss of sensation,
is classified as either local or general. For
the vast majority of dental procedures
performed in a general dental practice, “local
anesthesia” is sufficient to prevent any
discomfort during treatment. Depending
on the particular tooth involved, a small
amount of anesthetic solution is injected
into a specific area of the mouth, which will
then cause a numbness and loss of feeling
in the tooth and surrounding tissue. The
required procedure can then be performed
as painlessly as possible, with the return
of normal sensation within a few hours.
The anesthetic solutions used by dentists
today are extremely safe and predictable,
and are quite effective in achieving a good
level of anesthesia.
“General anesthesia” is an option for
patients who need to undergo a procedure
(usually surgical) where numbness alone
will not be effective in keeping the individual
comfortable. In these cases, a dentist with
advanced training in general anesthesia
technique will introduce a state of altered
D.D.S.
consciousness, causing the patient to “go
to sleep.” The necessary dental procedure
is then performed, and the patient is woken
up. General anesthesia in dentistry is also
indicated for those special cases where
the patient’s ability to undergo a procedure
with local anesthesia may be compromised
due to behavioral problems or management
difficulties. Your dentist will be able to
discuss the different types of anesthesia
with you before beginning treatment.
For more interesting reading and
information about a variety of dental
topics, please visit our website, www.
altamontgeneraldentistry.com
Presented As A Public
Service By The Offices of:
STUART F. FASS, D.D.S.
and
ADAM A. EDWARDS, D.D.S.
103 Main St., Altamont.
Phone: 861-5136
Weekly Crossword
By Ed Canty ([email protected]
The Cat’s Pajamas
Across
1. Historic Newcastle
resource
5. City destroyed in
Genesis
10. Lion King villain
14. Former home of the
Atlanta Hawks
15. Bypass the altar
16. Tortoise's race
opponent
17. Sneaky thief
19. Slanty font (Abbr.)
20. Type of rug
21. Lock sites
23. Some TV's
24. ___ Eat Cake
(Gershwin musical)
25. Decorative stickers
28. Not extreme
31. Put in high spirits
32. Romper Room
character
33. Memorable
sportswriter Smith
34. Itty-bitty bug
35. Destinies
36. Called on the phone
37. La la preceder
38. Some sacrificial
offerings
39. One of five faculties,
six for some
40. Flight attendants
42. Thickets
43. Pitcher McLain
44. Prefix for chute or
legal
45. Actress Wright or
singer Brewer
47. Didn't make a move
51. Many a Kuwaiti
52. Hospital equipment
54. Bagel source, often
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
17
23
32
49
50
36
38
39
42
41
43
44
46
47
48
51
52
54
55
56
57
58
59
re
CompaRate
Our
30
33
35
34
55. Meathead's motherin-law
56. O'Hara estate
57. Office aide (Abbr.)
58. Mister's product
59. Hotel visit
Down
1. Comic actor James of
"Wholly Moses!"
2. D-Day's General
Bradley
3. Beginning to freeze?
4. Free
5. Some mattresses
6. Gymnast Korbut and
namesakes
7. Mattel offering
8. Wartime agency.
9. Pricey car
10. Punch souvenir
29
22
28
31
40
13
24
27
37
12
19
21
26
11
16
18
20
45
10
15
14
25
9
53
11. Two-hulled vessels
12. Central Asian sea
13. Mom and pop, e.g.
18. Vanya or Sam
22. To -- (perfectly)
24. Earring anchors
25. Autos for testdriving
26. "The Untouchables"
character Ness
27. St. Patrick's and
Notre Dame, e.g.
28. Big name in fruit
juice
29. Like fans in a close
game
30. Rims
32. Hunky-dory
35. Heat sources
36. Puts on a new coat
38. Doesn't allow
39. Kinda partner
41. Tad
42. Hard to get out of
your head, as a song
44. Noodles in Roma
45. Cry before applause
46. Start of an Andy
Capp toast
47. Mix, in the kitchen
48. Flying pest
49. Give ___ great big
hand.
50. Cafeteria need
53. Big inits. in check
processing
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20
The Altamont Enterprise – Thursday, October 31, 2013
Dutch rise again, wrest victory from the Raiders
P
arting the Red Sea: Guilderland football players — Bradley
Johnston, right, at top, and Julian Christiano — spring from the
field into a stand of cheering spectators after beating Colonie,
38-35, on Andrew Sentz’s 27-yard, game-winning field goal last Friday
night.
Frank Gallo, left, Guilderland’s quarterback, escapes two would-be
Garnet Raiders tacklers during the second quarter. Gallo threw for 221
yards with 16 completions on 23 attempts, throwing for three passing
touchdowns (two of them to Jacob Smith who had 93 receiving yards
on six catches) and one rushing touchdown. Guilderland’s running back
Joseph Cornell, below, also had a great game, rushing for 116 yards on
15 carries, and gaining 74 receiving yards on two catches. Guilderland
had 516 yards of total offense.
Slowing down Colonie’s wide receiver Chris West, center, is Guilderland’s D’Angelo Livingston, left, as Michael Lia and Joshua Lamb tackle
West. Guilderland advances to play Christian Brothers Academy Friday
night at 7 p.m. at Christian Brothers Academy in Colonie for the Class
AA semi-final game.
Photographs by Michael Koff
21
The Altamont Enterprise – Thursday, October 31, 2013
Dutch sail to semis
The Enterprise –– Michael Koff
The Enterprise –– Michael Koff
B
oth Guilderland soccer teams — boys above, girls below — advanced to the Class AA semifinals this week.
The girls (16-1-0), the defending sectional champions and number-one seed in 2013, will play Saratoga on Friday
night in Schuylerville after beating Colonie, 5 to 1, on Monday. The boys (13-4-0) play Shaker at 5 p.m. today in
Colonie after beating Niskayuna, 3 to 0, on Saturday. Top left, Chris Czekay kicks the ball; top right, Kledis Cappollari
flies through the air; bottom left, Brittany Pulliam maintains possession; and bottom right, Karly Meacham (#14) heads
the ball despite being kicked by Colonie’s Clare Reilly.
The Enterprise –– Jordan J. Michael
The Enterprise –– Jordan J. Michael
22
The Altamont Enterprise – Thursday, October 31, 2013
Knox elections: Views vary on
zoning, master plan, appointments
By Marcello Iaia
KNOX — As the town’s comprehensive plan is being updated,
and the public’s opinion is being
surveyed on Knox’s future, two
Republican candidates want to
take the now all-Democratic town
board in a different direction.
Longtime Democratic Supervisor Michael Hammond is being
challenged by Pamela Fenoff, an
Independence Party member, for
a new two-year term. While Hammond is running on his record,
Fenoff is advocating for change
to the town’s service and accessibility.
Fenoff petitioned for and won
a primary in September after the
county Independence Party committee had backed Hammond.
In Knox, enrollment breaks
down this way: 39 percent of
registered voters are Democrats,
22 percent are Republicans, three
percent are Conservatives, six
percent are Independence Party
members, 27 percent are not affiliated with a party, and 13 voters
are enrolled in smaller parties.
Hammond was unopposed in
2009 and has been supervisor,
the town’s chief fiscal officer, for
40 years.
Amanda Gullestad, as the town’s
clerk. Both are new to town elections. The current clerk, Republican Kimberly Swain, said she is
not seeking another term in order
to spend more time with her children. The part-time position has
a $12,600 salary.
For tax collector, Democrat
Diane Champion is running unopposed for another two-year term.
The part-time position pays $5,000
per year.
The Enterprise asked the supervisor and town board candidates
about these issues:
— Business districts: Two areas
in town have been proposed for
business districts, anticipated in
the town’s comprehensive plan
and zoning law. After a public
hearing, the town board sent the
first proposal, in the hamlet, back
to the planning board to consider
expanding its size. The second
recommendation was voted down
at the planning board’s October
meeting. Its boundaries covered
an area along Route 146 near
Lewis Road, and would have accommodated a towing business
there that is otherwise illegal.
Candidates were asked what the
ideal outcome would be for busi-
“Until it is revoked or changed, the board
should follow what the resolution says.”
The part-time supervisor post
pays $16,700 per year.
Fenoff and Robert Altieri, both
backed by the Republican Party,
are political newcomers who were
outspoken during a town meeting
when a resolution was passed
condemning the process by which
the Secure Ammunition and Firearms Enforcement (SAFE) Act
was passed.
Fenoff questioned the board
when it voted to fill the position
of a transfer-station alternate
worker without advertising the
position. A resolution was adopted in 2011 to post any vacant
positions.
Town attorney John Dorfman told The Enterprise he will
suggest at the November board
meeting that such a position as
the alternate worker ought to
be posted.
“Until it is revoked or changed,
the board should follow what the
resolution says,” said Dorfman of
any resolution.
The board was questioned by
a resident again when the town’s
assessor was re-appointed to a sixyear term. The assessor’s position
was not vacant as the current assessor had no plans to retire, and
Dorfman said the resolution in
question wouldn’t apply.
Altieri, a Republican, is running
on the Conservative and GOP lines
for a four-year term on the town
board. Two positions are up for
election this November, with the
two Democratic incumbents, Nicholas Viscio and Amy Lauterbach
Pokorny, running for re-election.
The part-time position pays $3,825
per year in the part-time post.
For town judge, incumbent Jean
Gagnon, a Democrat, is running
unopposed for another four-year
term. She makes $10,143 per
year.
The town’s highway superintendent, Republican Gary Salisbury,
is unopposed, as well, for another
two-years. The salary for the fulltime job is around $55,400.
Democrat Tara Murphy is
running against Conservative
ness districts in the town.
— Appointments: At its October meeting, the town board was
questioned by residents when it
voted to re-appoint the incumbent
assessor for another six-year term
without posting for the open position. The town board adopted a
resolution in 2011 to post any
vacant positions. Candidates were
asked whether or not the town
board should follow the resolution
on posting for vacant positions.
— Comprehensive plan: The
town’s comprehensive plan was
first suggested for review as the
issue of hydraulic fracturing
was considered. Last updated in
1996, the town’s guiding land-use
document is being given a broader
review and is in need of residents’
input, which will determine its
content. Input has so far been
gathered, from only a fraction
of residents who responded to a
survey. Candidates were asked
whether the current plan is sufficient, and if input can be gathered
by any other means.
— SAFE Act: Like other Hilltowns, Knox passed a resolution in
response to the state’s gun-control
legislation; Knox, like Berne, requested more public input while
Westerlo’s resolution called for
repeal of the SAFE Act. At meetings, Knox residents turned out in
force, and some of the candidates
this year were outspoken on the
issue. Candidates were asked
whether Knox should take any
further action than the resolution
that passed.
— Zoning and enforcement: The
town board has been confronted
by a resident claiming its zoning
regulations have not been properly
enforced, and a business owner
whose request prompted a review
of the business district proposal
for Route 146 said she moved her
towing business from Altamont to
Knox because of the town’s more
relaxed zoning enforcement. Candidates were asked what, if any,
change to the town’s zoning law
or its enforcement is necessary to
balance these interests.
For Knox Supervisor
Pamela Fenoff
By Marcello Iaia
specifically to reward Hitman’s
KNOX — Currently the planTowing.
ning board’s secretary, Indepen“I know what I’d like to do and
dence Party member Pamela
that is just make them a business
Fenoff wants to unseat incumdistrict,” Fenoff said of the area
bent supervisor Michael Hamaround Hitman’s Towing. “And,
mond. She says he has been in
from now on, anyone coming in
the job for too long.
needs to play by the rules, but
With Independence Party,
you can’t do that over the whole
Conservative, and Republican
entire town.” She suggested a
endorsements, Fenoff said she
townwide assessment of zoning
first wanted to run for a council
compliance.
seat, then for supervisor when
If elected, Fenoff said, she
she learned Hammond was
would want the town to follow
approaching four decades in
the resolution of posting any
office.
vacant positions.
Pamela Fenoff
Fenoff, 49, works part-time as
“I’d have to look at each ciran office manager for Krieger Socumstance, but there’s no job in
lutions, a social consulting firm,
the town of Knox that I think
and has held jobs as a dispatcher
“I don’t want to see anything would require terribly expedifor an electric utility, a sales- that doesn’t fit with the aesthetic ent turn around,” said Fenoff.
woman, and an administrative value, the rural character that “There’s nothing that urgent goassistant at a pharmaceutical everyone is talking about,” said ing on in the town that we can’t
company. She was formerly an ad Fenoff.
wait a couple weeks to get the
representative for The Altamont
A business in the business opportunity out there.”
Enterprise.
Fenoff believes the
She has negotiatSecure Ammunition
ed contracts workand Firearms Enforceing for a trucking
ment (SAFE) Act is un“I know what I’d like to do and that
company in Misconstitutional, but the
is just make them a business district.”
souri, she said,
issue of gun-control
and written grant
did not motivate her
applications for
candidacy, she said,
Schenectady Comalthough the town
munity Action Program.
district that had been proposed board’s process did.
“I’m also 20 years older than for Route 146, Hitman’s Towing,
“I have no plans to do anything
Mike was when he took the job,” is operating illegally in an area with that at this point,” said
said Fenoff, who says the town zoned for residential use, Fenoff Fenoff. “But that was definitely
board lacks “customer service.”
noted. But she thinks the town part of confirming the fact that
Fenoff said she encourages the has not enforced the zoning law we need change in Knox governcurrent direction taken with the as much as it should. She would ment, because they were preexpanded business district in the like the town board to consider pared with that resolution before
hamlet.
the second business district, not they even had that meeting.”
Michael Hammond
help re-write the comprehensive
By Marcello Iaia
plan.
KNOX — Now in his 40 th
Of the town’s resolution on
year as the town’s supervisor,
the Secure Ammunition and
Democrat Michael Hammond is
Firearms Enforcement (SAFE)
running again because he likes
Act, Hammond said, “At this
the job.
time, I don’t feel further action is
“I take noted concern when age
required at the town board level,
is a factor,” Hammond said. “I do
but the concern is certainly going
know that, all the years I have
to be with the state legislature
been serving in this, each year
and the governor.”
has refined my skills in serving
Hammond declined to talk
the people much better than
about
zoning enforcement.
when I came on the job.”
“At this time, I have no reHammond, 70, has Democratic
sponse to that because I don’t
endorsement.
know the details of what’s going
Originally from the Champlain
on in that particular area right
Valley, Hammond came to Knox
there,” said Hammond. “I think
in 1963. He has retired from a
we’d have to go to the building
career as a high school technoland zoning administrator to go
ogy teacher and owns Mountain
further with that line of quesWoodshop, a carpentry business
Michael Hammond
tions.”
on his property since 1969. He is
To stay under the state-set cap
a member of the Kiwanis Club
of the Helderbergs.
ago,” Hammond said of the reso- on tax levies, Hammond said, the
Hammond said the planning lution requiring vacant positions town has offset rising insurance
and town boards should be in the town to be posted. “I don’t and materials costs with sharedfocused on the first proposed see that resolution as being cast services agreements and revenue
from a cell tower. He
business district in
described shared serthe hamlet and hopes
vices among nearby
it will be a multimunicipalities for amuse district, allowbulance coverage and
ing currently existing
“A business district in Knox
highway equipment,
residential uses to
and accommodating businesses
and for use of a county
continue.
salt shed.
“A business district
is certainly nothing new.”
“We do have a writin Knox and accomten
document outlining
modating businesses
what the expectation
is certainly nothing
is supposed to be for
new,” said Hammond.
“We established a multi-use busi- in stone for not only the current those participants in that agreeness district over in the western sitting boards but the future sit- ment,” said Hammond.
Of the criticism that the town
end of town.”
ting boards. I think those boards
is
unwelcoming and inefficient
Hammond said the town board are going to have to develop their
in its service to residents, Hamlooks for diverse candidates for own policies.”
appointed posts, by advertising
Hammond said each resident mond said the town board tries to
and seeking out specific candi- would get survey questions in accommodate people quickly.
“We don’t try to let the people
dates.
the mail, and the town would
“That was a resolution of a follow the process of public hear- who come before our board sit for
board that sat a couple years ings and seeking volunteers to several hours,” said Hammond.
Election Day is November 5. Be an informed voter.
23
The Altamont Enterprise – Thursday, October 31, 2013
For Town Board
Amy Lauterbach Pokorny
By Marcello Iaia
KNOX — In addition to serving
on the town board, Amy Lauterbach Pokorny attends many
meetings each month for community groups. The incumbent
Democrat is running for her first
full term on the town board.
Pokorny, 61, is president of
the Kiwanis Club of the Helderbergs, having been its treasurer
for the past decade, and she is
secretary for the Helderberg
Hilltowns Association. In 2012,
was first appointed to a town
board seat, having served on the
zoning board of appeals. Town
board member Travis Stevens,
a Republican, had resigned his
seat after winning a term as an
Albany County legislator.
Pokorny has Democratic and
Independence Party endorsement this election. In 2012, when
she ran to fill the last year of
Stevens’s term, Pokorny also ran
on the No-Fracking Party line.
She spent most of her career
working for the New York State
Department of Social Services
and is now retired.
Pokorny and her husband,
Knox Assessor Russell Pokorny,
are involved in the Helderberg
Community Energy Group and
own the Octagon Barn, a venue
for music, dances, and community events in Knox.
The Pokornys owned the Knox
Country Store in the hamlet,
which has since closed, that was
originally at the center of the
proposed business district for the
hamlet. The Pokornys owned the
store, from 1997 to 2002, when
they had jam sessions and Mr.
Pokorny gave piano lessons.
“Sometimes, people would
dance, literally in the aisles, in
the grocery aisles,” said Pokorny.
The success of the rural store,
Pokorny said, was in the variety
of its products, like deli meats,
Lottery tickets, and playing
cards. Since then, Pokorny said,
the viability of a business in
the hamlet isn’t much different
and it needs only creativity and
commitment.
Pokorny said she would like
the uses for the new business district to include residential uses
currently in effect. The planning
board is currently drafting the
language to define the business
district.
“If they had not addressed
those inconsistencies, then all
those houses in the hamlet would
become non-conforming, and it
wouldn’t make a lot of sense,”
Pokorny said of the planning
board modifying the schedule
of uses for multiple uses in the
district.
Given that the three town
board members who passed the
resolution on posting vacant
positions are no longer on the
board, Pokorny said, future
boards aren’t bound by a previous board’s policy.
“I think it would impose some
restrictions on our ability to
expedite replacements to where
they are needed,” Pokorny said
Amy Pokorny
of following the 2011 resolution.
“We are elected to represent the
public in filling these positions,
and I think we’ve done a good
job.” Pokorny recused herself in
the most recent re-appointment
of her husband as the town’s
assessor, which raised questions
from the gallery.
Pokorny is leading the process of updating the town’s
comprehensive plan, following a
suggested path set out by professional planner Nan Stolzenberg.
So far, a general survey of three
questions has had about 45
responses, Pokorny said, and,
additionally, about half of 30
surveys specific to agricultural
properties were sent back. The
surveys are still being collected,
but results have been classified
by topic to form a more specific
questionnaire that will be mailed
to each house in Knox.
“It was recommended by Nan
Stolzenberg, and I think it’s
carefully thought out to solicit
the topics from the public first,
rather than suggesting them,”
Pokorny said of the process of
gathering public input.
Pokorny doesn’t see a need for
any more action on the state’s
gun-control legislation.
“I haven’t heard anyone ask
for further action, and I’m not
sure what else we would be able
to provide beyond what we did
with the resolution we passed,”
said Pokorny.
Any needed changes to the
town’s zoning ordinance, Pokorny
said, would likely play out in the
comprehensive plan update.
“As far as enforcing the zoning
ordinance, I think that’s kind of
a separate topic,” said Pokorny,
adding that modifications to
the comprehensive plan coming
from public input could affect
the shape of how the town treats
different business uses.
Pokorny said she is happy with
the town’s recycling at the transfer station. She is involved with
the Capital Region Recycling
Partnership, where she learned
of St. Pauly Textile Inc., which
now has a shed at the transfer
station for residents to bring unwanted clothing and fabrics that
then go to charities and produce
revenue for the town.
Turn the page
to read more Knox profiles.
Robert Altieri
By Marcello Iaia
KNOX — Republican town
council candidate Robert Altieri
wants to preserve Knox’s rural
nature and residents’ individual liberties. He is running on
Republican and Conservative
lines.
Altieri, 27, is a project manager
for C. D. Perry & Sons Inc., a
heavy construction company specializing in marine construction,
including projects on locks and
dams of the Erie and Champlain
canal systems.
Altieri grew up in East Berne
and moved to Knox four years
ago, around the time he became
interested in politics as the 2008
presidential campaign was underway. On a local level, Altieri
said he takes issue with a town
board “telling people what they
can and cannot do.”
When the gallery was full for
the April town board meeting
when a resolution about the Secure Ammunition and Firearms
Enforcement (SAFE) Act was
adopted, Altieri spoke out, asking the town board to consider
other resolutions, like one passed
in Westerlo calling for a repeal
of the state’s gun-control law.
The one the Knox board passed
condemned the quick passage of
the law and encouraged more
public input.
Altieri said he began to consider a run for town council at
that time.
“I think, at this point, unless something else came up,
I don’t think it would have to
be revisited,” Altieri said of the
resolution. “I think there’s more
important things at this point the
town could be focused on, unless
more legislation was passed, or if
there was a public outcry.”
In general, Altieri wants the
town government to be more open
Robert Altieri
and welcoming. With supervisor
candidate Pamela Fenoff, Altieri
said he has discussed using email lists for a newsletter, or
recording videos of town meetings to go online for residents
to access town information more
easily. He also supports advertising for all vacant positions.
“Especially today, in an age
with social media, if they can
really reach out to the people
in the town and get them to
interact…I think it’s their job
to do that,” said Altieri. “You’re
elected to represent these people,
so you need their feedback, and
once you have their feedback, you
can pass ordinances that reflect
what the people want.”
“When you have an open position for the town, for whatever
the job may be, you want the
best person available. It’s just
like running a business,” said
Altieri.
Altieri believes both the hamlet and the area of Route 146 near
Lewis Road should be designated
business districts, using roads as
boundaries. The zoning change
made in September to allow for
senior housing, a residential use,
he said, is related to business
uses for basic amenities.
“I think the town board and
planning board could outline
what types of businesses could
be there,” said Altieri of a business district. “They could dictate
that we’re not going to see a bigbox store, we’re not going to see
this, we’re not going to see that.”
Describing this as “government
dictation,” he said he is more opposed to its impact on personal
lives. He noted other towns have
similar regulations, which could
be based on public opinion with
surveys.
Altieri was critical of the broad
questions of the initial survey,
which was not mailed but advertised and available in various
locations and online.
“Why wouldn’t you just research what other towns have
done and ask all the questions
in one shot? Like I said, people
are busy,” said Altieri.
In addition to the survey to be
mailed to each house in Knox,
Altieri suggested advertising and
contacting the church in town to
raise awareness.
Altieri hasn’t had business
before the Knox zoning or planning boards, but he said residents
have told him discouraging stories of how their requests have
been declined.
“If you make the town more
cooperative and easier for people
to deal with, I don’t think people
would be as apprehensive to
approach the town board,” said
Altieri. “I think, once you know
what’s going on and what people
are planning to do, then it can be
worked out as far as how you’re
going to enforce it.”
Nicholas Viscio
By Marcello Iaia
KNOX — The town board’s
deputy supervisor and former
liaison for the comprehensive
plan, Democrat Nicholas Viscio,
is seeking a sixth four-year term.
He is running on Democratic and
Independence Party lines.
“This past year has been an interesting year,” said Viscio. “I’ve
been on the board for almost 20
years. I guess I enjoy the ability
to contribute to the community
through the position, for the most
part. I’m very passionate about
our town.”
Viscio, 57, was first attracted
to run for town board in 1991,
concerned that Knox properties weren’t being treated fairly
without townwide revaluation.
He hadn’t been affiliated with a
party until then. Viscio says he
is still driven by inequality and
notes that he led the idea of having Knox residents participate in
a Section 8 housing assistance
program, a federal program for
low-income, elderly, or disabled
residents.
For about 12 years before he
first ran for office, Viscio had
served on the town’s conservation
advisory council and its cable
television committee.
In 2011, Viscio retired from a
job at Guilderland High School
as a producer and director of
media services, where he taught
classes and created videos for the
district. He owned a business
designing aircraft and powered
parachutes with his son, an
engineer. Viscio is still an active filmmaker and pilot, flying
to visit his grandchildren and
co-piloting flights for medical
patients and veterans.
“I love to talk politics, don’t
get me wrong, but politics don’t
belong at the board table,” said
Nicholas Viscio
Viscio, who said he makes a
point of stopping hot-button issues from distracting the board.
He defended the town board’s
resolution, which focused on the
process the state legislature used
to pass its gun-control law, when
a man suggested from the gallery during a board meeting that
members’ votes could jeopardize
their re-election.
“I’m also passionate about
keeping town business at the
town table. We’re not the Supreme Court,” said Viscio.
Viscio, a gun owner, said he
is opposed to the SAFE Act, but
doesn’t expect the town board will
address the issue any more.
“It’s not really a position, it’s
a fill-in issue,” Viscio said of the
transfer-station alternate worker, appointed earlier this year
without advertisement. He called
criticisms over the appointment
“fodder” for the election.
On town appointments, Viscio
said the resolution for posting
any vacant positions should be
followed.
“By state law, town boards are
empowered to make appointments in the town,” said Viscio.
“There’s a referendum on those
appointments that happens every two to four years; it’s called
an election. People put us in
those positions for being responsible for putting people in those
positions.”
Drawing a line between businesses that impact neighbors
and those that are conducted
discretely in homes, Viscio said
Knox is flexible in its treatment of commercial activity
and agreed with other board
members that the first business
district proposal was “limited.”
He said enforcement is always a
challenge and is up to the zoning
enforcement officer.
“If somebody has a business
and they have a vehicle that
has something to do with that
and they park it at their home
or something like that, so what,
no big deal,” said Viscio. “If it
becomes something that impacts
the neighborhood…the town has
to react to that, you can’t just not
react to that.”
Any changes needed to balance zoning interests, Viscio
said, should be requested in the
comprehensive plan surveys, the
basis for the zoning ordinance.
Zoning laws must be passed by
the town board.
“The kinds of inquiries and
input to the plan so far have
been much broader than what
was done back in ’96,” said Viscio,
who, with a committee of around
40 people helped form the last
comprehensive plan based on
one survey. So far, three different surveys are being used in the
update to the document.
24
The Altamont Enterprise – Thursday, October 31, 2013
Knox Elections
Town Clerk
Amanda Gullestad
By Marcello Iaia
KNOX — Amanda Gullestad,
a Conservative Party member,
said she has become known in the
past eight years of living in Knox
through her jobs managing local
convenience stores, as a cook, and
as a store clerk. She is running
on the Republican line for the
part-time job of town clerk.
Gullestad, 30, grew up in
Middleburgh and graduated
from Middleburgh High School
before coming to Knox. She said
she would like to see change in
Knox, noting there are currently
no stores in the hamlet.
Asked what changes in the
town she could make as town
clerk, Gullestad said, “I can’t, but
I have a voice to where I can tell
the board, and try to get them
to listen.”
Gullestad is currently a stayat-home mother with three children and said she would like to
pursue the town-clerk position
for multiple terms.
If elected, Gullestad said she
would like to have more resources and forms on the town’s
website.
“So when I’m not available,
or there’s certain times people
need something, that they can
do it right online and, after-
Amanda Gullestad
wards, I can do the rest,” said
Gullestad.
Gullestad said she would make
her self available for residents to
make appointments and would
be accommodating with her office
hours, including weekends.
“I just hope to make the best of
it,” said Gullestad. “Just keeping
myself available for anything.”
Tara Murphy
By Marcello Iaia
KNOX — Democrat Tara Murphy, new to town elections, is running for town clerk to meet more
people and use her background
in communications.
“I just really like meeting
people and hearing their stories
and talking with them,” said
Murphy. She is running for the
part-time, two-year position on
Democratic and Independence
Party lines.
Greeting hikers around their
property on the Wolf Creek Preserve, Murphy and her husband,
Nathan Giordano, are stewards
of the preserve and volunteers
with the Mohawk Hudson Land
Conservancy. They have lived in
Knox since 2008.
Murphy, 36, grew up in the
village of Castleton-on-Hudson
in Rensselaer County and graduated from The College of Saint
Rose with a bachelor of science
degree in public communications.
She handled graphic design and
communications for the School
Administrators Association of
New York State before working
as a director of admissions and
communications for The Center
for Natural Wellness School of
Massage in Albany.
“As director of admissions, it
was really dealing more with the
public, a more customer servicebased job,” Murphy said. “I was
the first person that anyone
met wanting to come into the
school.”
Since 2010, when her son was
born, Murphy has worked for
the school part-time from home,
a job she said she could work
around her position, if elected,
as town clerk.
Murphy said she would like
Tara Murphy
to have hours in the clerk’s office that accommodate weekend,
morning, afternoon, and evening
times on different days.
As she has with her previous
employers, Murphy said she
would like to update the town’s
website, making more forms and
documents available over the Internet, and digitizing the town’s
paper records, for which grants
could be pursued. That way,
Murphy said, filling requests for
records is more efficient.
“It would be a nice way to bring
in the younger residents of the
town,” Murphy said of a Facebook
page for Knox.
Murphy said she would like
to be in the clerk’s position for
multiple terms.
“I’d have to see how it fits, but
it seems like a natural fit for me,
and I could see myself doing it
for a while, if the town residents
approved of that,” said Murphy.
Incumbent Tax Collector
By Marcello Iaia
KNOX — Democrat Diane
Champion, 65, is running for
a second two-year term as the
town’s tax collector, a continuation of her career and desire for
working with people. She has
Democratic and Independence
Party endorsement.
“I would look at an income-tax
return and see if the tax was correct, or, if it was incorrect, I would
make adjustments to it and correspond back and forth with the
taxpayers,” Champion said of her
31 years as an auditor with the
New York State Department of
Taxation and Finance.
Prior to her work with the
state, Champion operated wire
transfers of money for National
Commercial Bank and Trust, now
KeyBank. She said she looks forward to learning more about the
job of a tax collector, to answer
residents’ questions.
“A lot of people feel that I deal
with school taxes and I lead them
to the correct school districts
they could go to and give them
information from there,” said
Diane Champion
Champion. She went on about
the state’s School TAx Relief program, “With the STAR program,
people call me and ask me how
does it affect them.”
After the first week in January, Champion holds office hours
from 5 to 8 p.m. every Thursday
of the month and from 9:30 a.m.
to 3:30 p.m. every Saturday of
the month. Champion said she
would like to hold office hours
on the last day of January, from
5 to 8 p.m., for people to avoid
penalties.
“All you have to do is call me
and I will meet you at the town
hall and I will make arrangements to meet you to help you
out with the taxes to be paid,”
said Champion.
Originally from Averill Park
in Rensselaer County, Champion
moved to Knox 43 years ago
when she married her husband,
Donald Champion. She was a
local election inspector until she
won her first term as tax collector in 2011.
Champion graduated from the
Albany Business College with a
degree in accounting and has
been treasurer for the Ladies’
Auxiliary of the fire department
in Knox for more than 20 years.
She is a member of the New York
State Association of Tax Receivers and Collectors.
Incumbent Judge
By Marcello Iaia
KNOX — Seeking a third fouryear term, Judge Jean Gagnon,
a Democrat, wanted to be more
involved in the community when
she first sought her post, one of
two town justices. She is running unopposed on Conservative,
Democratic, and Independence
Party lines.
Gagnon, a member of the Knox
Youth Council, said presiding in
town court is rewarding because
she gets to work with young
people and see them improve.
There are times, though, when
she is called in for arraignments
at odd hours.
“When I first came on, the
town of Knox did not have the
best reputation for coming out
in the middle of the night, which
means an adjacent town has to
cover you,” said Gagnon.
Gagnon, 57, manages a travel and tourism agency, Plaza
Travel, in Latham and used to
teach students about the travel
industry at Syracuse University
and Schenectady County Community College. She grew up on
Long Island, moved to Syracuse
when she was 16, and then to
Knox 16 years ago.
In the next four years, Gagnon
said, she will continue to learn
about changing laws, as required,
and hopes a request for grant
money from the state’s Office
of Court Administration will
help with paying for a copier in
Judge Jean Gagnon
the court, smoothing workflow,
and, as previous grants have, to
reimburse the town’s costs for a
new courtroom when the town
hall was expanded.
The previous courtroom was
12 by 10 feet, she said, and had
three chairs for visitors.
“A court is supposed to be open
to the public and this technically wasn’t,” said Gagnon. “It
wasn’t very good but it was all
we had.”
In the past year, Gagnon
said, the Knox court has invited
students from the Berne-KnoxWesterlo school into the court.
“The kids come and we talk to
them about the consequences of
certain actions — what happens
if you get a ticket and stick it in
your glove compartment for three
months,” said Gagnon, adding
that they also talk about legal
consequences of behavior on
social media.
With a plea bargain or a conviction, a judge can use court
supervision to have a defendant
update the court monthly on
his or her status. Larger courts
handle many more defendants.
Gagnon said she learned in taking courses that court supervision is more effective in holding
someone accountable than other
programs, like anger management.
“It’s something that I think is
really beneficial,” said Gagnon.
“Sometimes, some of these young
people don’t have any kind of
mentors, or somebody who hasn’t
expressed an interest in seeing
them do well.”
There are precautions in a
small-town court, as well, where
the judge might be too close to a
defendant.
“We use it as, ‘Have I been to
their house for dinner or have
they been to my house for dinner?’ That’s a close enough friend
that I can’t handle that,” said
Gagnon; such cases are referred
to the other judge.
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25
The Altamont Enterprise – Thursday, October 31, 2013
Knox Elections
Clean and Green
Highway Superintendent
By Marcello Iaia
KNOX — With streambank
restoration projects behind him,
Republican Gary Salisbury is
hoping to keep the town’s highway department on track. Salisbury, 49, is running unopposed on
Conservative and Independence
Party lines for another term as
the Knox highway superintendent, a full-time job.
“We’re just going to keep doing what we’re doing. We’re just
going to try to improve what
we can,” said Salisbury, who,
since 2003, has instituted strict
record-keeping and scheduling
for the highway department.
The biggest challenge Salisbury foresees is financial, with
costs rising against revenues. He
is now working through forms
for federal and state funding to
reimburse the town’s expenses
on repair projects needed after
Tropical Storm Irene in 2011.
“Looking back, it was so much
cheaper back then,” Salisbury
said of materials needed for rebuilding the base layers of roads
in past years.
“What I’m trying to do now is
all of our paved roads; I’m trying to keep up to date on sealing
those roads,” said Salisbury. “A
lot of our roads are chip sealed,
so they should be done every
five years or so,” he said. He
said an increase in state money
this year will allow him to get to
more roads.
A Knox native, Salisbury
worked as a mechanic at East
Berne Auto after graduating
from Berne-Knox-Westerlo High
School, then for the Knox highway department before being
elected as its superintendent.
“I was there for 16 years and
just felt I could move the department forward,” said Salisbury.
Gary Salisury
The roads have been prioritized by traffic flow and the
town’s trucks are replaced and
maintained on a schedule to
avoid extra maintenance costs,
he said.
“I would say we’ve pretty much
covered all of them,” Salisbury
said of the base reconstruction of
town roads. “Right now, we don’t
have roads that I would consider
in rough shape.”
Salisbury has had problems
with the radios used by the Knox
Highway Department where
other Hilltown highway departments’ transmissions interfered
with Knox radios, especially
during the winter.
“This summer, we’ve had some
other issues with the radio as
far as interference, that type
of thing,” said Salisbury. “But
they said that they were working on putting up a new tower
of some sort, a repeater, I guess
is what you call it…From what I
can tell, it seems like it’s better
right now.”
Standing strong against litter: These New Scotland Kiwanis Club members cleaned up Route 85A in
Voorheesville on Oct. 12; from left are Lew Schedlbauer, Chrissie Retta, Shane Stuart, Melissa Faustel,
Ken Connolly, Jim Hladun, and John Follos. Not pictured: Janna Shillinglaw, Jim Tunney, Dick Ramsey,
and Matt Ramsey. Anyone interested in joining the club may call Melissa Faustal at 813-7442.
Senior News
Hilltowns
By Charlotte Fuss
Can you believe it’s almost
turkey time? Our Thanksgiving
party will be on Saturday, Nov. 9,
at the Berne Reformed Church.
The cost is $6. Please let Shirley
Slingerland know if you will be
coming, if you have not already
signed up. Also, please bring a
food item for the food pantries
and a small gift for the Christmas
baskets for seniors.
There will be a sign up for the
Christmas party at the Thanksgiving party. The cost will also be $6.
The Christmas party will be held
at the Hilltowns Senior Center
on Saturday, Dec. 14. It will be a
catered affair.
Shopping trips
Our shopping van will be available on Wednesday, Nov. 13, for
stops at Wal-Mart and Crossgates
and on Wednesday, Nov. 27 with
stops at Wal-Mart and Colonie
Center. Think Christmas gifts!
Christmas show
On Tuesday, Nov. 26, we will be
going to the Troy Hilton for a great
Christmas show and dinner. The
price of $50 includes everything.
The van can only hold 14 people,
but you can follow the van if you
are taking your own car. We will
be leaving from the Seniors Center at 10:30 a.m. I will need your
money at the Thanksgiving party
or you can mail it to me. Please
remember that once reservations
are made you must pay. So far
11 people have signed up for the
van. Call me at 861-8960 if you
have any questions or to make a
reservation.
Please remember to get out and
vote on Nov. 5.
Thanks for all of your support
Seniors! A Happy Thanksgiving
and a Happy Hanukkah to all.
Editor’s note: Charlotte Fuss
is the president of the Hilltowns
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Making the autumn views even prettier, the Kiwanis Club of the Helderbergs, including Zenie Gladieux, picked up refuse along Route 156, the Berne-Altamont Road in Knox, on Oct. 12. New hands are
always welcome to provide community services. For more information, call Gladieux at 894-8589.
26
The Altamont Enterprise –Thursday, October 31, 2013
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CONFIDENTIAL DOCUMENT
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of residency. If you have any questions contact the Transfer Station at
861-6776.
In an effort to make this event run as efficient as possible, we ask that
you limit your confidential material to three (3) standard paper boxes.
Although this is a free event for Guilderland Residents, we ask that you
consider making a donation to one of the following charities. They will
be on site that day to answer any questions you may have.
•Guilderhaven (dog food, cat food, treats, blankets)
•LocalVeteransOrganizations (any monetary donation would be appreciated)
•RegionalFoodBankofNortheasternNY (canned goods, dry goods,
non perishables)
Ken runion
Town Supervisor
Gregory J. Wier
Transfer Station Superintendent
Do you have a mom or dad who is reluctant to
get dental treatment? Call 452-2579
to speak directly to a dentist who will
give you some options. No charge.
Geoffrey B. Edmunds, DDS
2010 Western Ave. Guilderland
452-2579
****
27
The Altamont Enterprise – Thursday, October 31, 2013
...Chess in ‘the Box’
(Continued from page 1)
aggressive chess is not unusual
Box,” play chess, usually for post- for prison chess — sometimes, as
age stamps as they are not permit- here, it actually works. If 20.. Kc8,
ted access to money. Although few, 21 N:f7 Rf8 22. Q:e6+ Kb8, White
if any, inmates have ever played in is down a Rook for a pawn and
formally recognized tournaments, could resign, but Mr. Foots played
the quality of play can be surpris- 20..Ke8. and lost after 21. N:f7
ingly strong. Some players demon- Rf8? (Kd7 or Ke7 would have kept
strate a keen sense of tactics, even the game going) 22. Q:e6+ Be7
though, at times, their knowledge 23. Nd6+ Kd8 24. R:f8+ B:f8 25
N:b7+ Resigns.
of theory may be weak.
Focus won 10 stamps, and
Some years ago, I played a
correspondence game against an the satisfaction of shutting up
inmate whom I was advising on someone he described as “full of
legal matters. Although he was bombastic b.s.”
Club championships
not very good, he did persuade me
The three largest local chess
to play a game against another
inmate, Damian Coppedge, who clubs — Albany, Schenectady,
goes by the name of Focus, who and Saratoga — have all comis a particularly interesting man menced their championship tournaments.
and a very good player.
Thirteen players are competing
Focus was convicted of manslaughter in 1998, at the age in Schenectady, which will be directed by Phil Sells,
of 21, and he is
including former
presently serving
champions Carl
19 to 22 years. In
Adamec and John
prison, he has beHyper-agressive
Phillips. Two of the
come a committed
participants from
Buddhist and an acchess is not
last year, Carlos
complished writer
unusual
in
prison.
Varela and Zachand poet.
ary Calderon, are
Over the last two
now established
years, we have been
Class A players,
playing four games:
Although I have won two of them, and are legitimate contenders,
and will almost certainly win a along with Jon Leisner, Mike
third, all of the games have been Mockler, and myself.
Albany, like Schenectady, has
hard-fought, and Focus has demonstrated a thorough knowledge adopted a round-robin format for
of the openings, imaginative and its 16-player tournament. The
creative play, and a good fighting highest rated player is 2012 chamspirit. The fourth game, which pion Dean Howard, an Expert
is now in its 31st move, is an who will be challenged by seven
extremely complicated tactical A players: last year’s co-champion
game, and it is by no means clear Mockler, Gordon Magat, John
Jones, Tim Wright, John Lack,
who is winning.
Focus was sent to the SHU in new member Jeremy Berman, and
the Southport Correctional Facil- myself, as well tournament direcity as the result of a fight with tor Glen Perry, whose rating is now
another inmate, which he felt he just below the Class A threshold
could not avoid. Southport is one at 1782. The Albany tournament
of New York State’s two “super also features two new unrated
max” facilities; all of the inmates players, Mahmoud Ramadan and
Will Stephenson.
are in SHU.
The Saratoga championship will
Apparently, despite the disparateness of the inmate’s situa- be a double round-robin tournations, there is still an active chess ment with seven players, including
culture. Focus sent me two games defending Champion Jonathan
that he played against another Feinberg, last year, Schenectady
inmate — one that he won and Champion David Finnerman (who
one that he lost — and a third could not play in the Schenectady
game, against an inmate named championship this year due to
Foots, who introduced himself by scheduling conflicts), Gary Farrell,
asking, “Do you know anything Glen Gausewitz, Bill Little, Josh
about chess?” This was followed Kuperman, and David Connors.
This week’s problem
by a boast that he would “crush”
Wilhelm (later William) Steinitz
Focus in any book games.
Mr. Foots claimed to have been (1836 -1900) was the first undisa very successful player in New puted world champion, winning
York City’s Washington Square the title either in 1866 against
Park and to have memorized the Adolph Anderssen or in 1886
standard reference work, Modern against Johannes Zuckertort, before losing it to Emmanuel Lasker
Chess Openings.
in 1894.
Focus – Foots,
He took breaks from competiSouthport C.F.
tive chess, and his career as a
October 6, 2013
1.e4 c6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 de 4. chess journalist was sometimes
N:e4 Nd7 5. Bd3 Ngf6 6. Ng5 marked by controversy due to his
e6 7. N1f3 Bd6 8. Qe2 h6 9. bluntness, but he made a modest
Ne4 N:e4 10. Q:e4 Nf6 11.Qe2 living as a chess professional, both
c5 12. dc B:c5 13. Bd2 Qb6 14. before and after he moved to the
United States in 1883.
O-O-O.
He played two matches for the
All of the moves up to now have
been played by strong players, and World Championship against the
the game is still within Houdini’s Russian Mikhail Chigorin in Habook lines: somewhat remarkable vana, in 1889 and again in 1892.
for a game played between two One of the more famous games of
inmates without formal chess the second match is the 4th game,
where Steinitz has an obvious
training.
Now Houdini indicates at least forced mate after a hard to find
four master games with 14.. Bd7 first move.
15. Ne5, and White has a small
advantage. However, Mr. Foots
wisecracked, “Let me gobble up
this pawn you don’t want,” and
played 14..B:f2?. This is a mistake. 15 Rhf1 Bc5. White’s lead
in development and open lines now
give him a significant advantage,
even a pawn behind.
16. Bb5+? and Focus gives it
away. 16 Ne5 would have maintained White’s advantage 16.. Bd7
17. B:d7 N:d7.
Houdini says the position is
equal, but now Focus tries an
Steinitz - Chigorin
Havana
unsound sacrifice, which should
have lost. 18 Ba5? Q:a5 19. R:d7 1892 White to move and mate in
K:d7 20 N:e5+. This kind of hyper- 6 moves. Solution on page 28
Business Corner
New venture: Joyce and Matthew Zacharewicz, at center, the owners of Short and Stout Tea Company, at 1736A Western Ave. in Guilderland, along with their family and staff cut the ribbon to
signify the shop’s opening. Also on hand, from the Guilderland Chamber of Commerce, were Kathy
Burbank, its president, and Jenni Bliven, who chairs the board. The company offers premium tea
and fusion tea blends.
Green Thumbs Are Golden
— Photo by Cyd DeMichele
2013 Golden Trowel Award Winners are, from left: Claudia Walker, Susan Walter, and Crystie
Pratt representing Thomas H. Pratt, Jr. & Associates; Peter Applebee of Applebee Funeral Home;
Lisa Chenette of TwisT Ice Cream; Sherri West from Day Dreams of Delmar Day Spa; and Tom
Hoffman of Hoffman Car Wash. Mike Fallon, representing the Glenmont Plaza, is also a winner.
“So, you’re walking down the sidewalk, not paying much attention to the concrete beneath
your feet, the store facades blend together, maybe you notice an old metal sign-post whose sign
is long gone — and then you’re pleasantly surprised by some beautiful greenery. Plants, shrubs
and flowers!” wrote Louise Kavanaugh, president of the Bethlehem Garden Club, which recently
honored six businesses with the annual Golden Trowel Award. “Someone has taken the time and
effort to turn the entrance of their business into a welcome oasis from all the concrete.” She added
of the winners, “Yes, they do receive a golden trowel, along with a customized certificate of appreciation.” One of those trowels went to Mike Fallon for the landscaping, pictured above, in the
Glenmont Plaza parking lot.
28
The Altamont Enterprise – Thursday, October 31, 2013
Correspondents
Altamont
By
Rosemary
Caruso
330-2855
Wow! What a ride! If you go to
see the movie Gravity I hope you
enjoy it as much as my husband,
Jim, and I did. The special effects
team certainly outdid themselves
with creative ways to fool the eye
and mind into thinking that the
scenes were in fact real.
We found the movie so terribly
exciting that time flew by. Sorry
pun intended. It really was very
gripping.
When Jim was president of the
New York State Conference of
Mayors he had the good fortune
to introduce the guest speaker
at one of their meetings. I was
invited to join them for lunch; I
considered this a distinct privilege
because the speaker was Alan
Bean. Bean had been the lunar
module pilot on Apollo 12, the
second lunar landing along with
Pete Conrad. They landed in the
Moon’s Ocean of Storms after a
flight of 250,000 miles. Can you
imagine riding around the moon
in a tricked out ATV?
During dinner and during Alan
Bean’s speech, he talked about
NASA, the space program, his
painting and much more, but
very little about how he felt about
being in space or walking on the
moon. Gravity gave us a little bit
more of the feeling you might get
when your spacecraft gets hit or
disabled.
In 1969, just 36 seconds after the
launch their craft was struck with
lightning. Bean was the astronaut
who executed the instructions to
restore telemetry that salvaged
the mission.
While exploring the lunar
surface, they left several lunar
experiments and installed the first
nuclear power generator station
on the moon.
In the movie, the portrayal of
zero gravity seemed absolutely
real. I have seen videos of some
weightless space flights where
they fly to a certain height and
then go into a steep dive giving
everyone a few seconds of weightlessness. I have also seen those
forced air tunnels where you are
lifted into the air and get that
same feeling.. Seeing someone
moving around the spacecraft the
way Sandra Bullock and George
Clooney did was amazing.
The items floating in the air
and bumping into things was very
much like seeing actual space
flights when NASA treats the
public to conversations between
Mission Control and the real life
astronauts.
During Apollo 12 mission, Bean
became the fourth person to walk
on the moon. He made his second
and final flight into space on the
Skylab 3 mission in 1973, the second manned mission to the Skylab
space station.
After retiring from the United
States Navy in 1975 and NASA in
1981, Bean pursued his interest in
painting, depicting various spacerelated scenes and documenting
his own experiences in space as
well as that of his fellow Apollo
program astronauts.
Have you ever stopped to think
about how much the moon enters
our life and influences us in so
many different ways? Not too long
ago I saw an advertisement in the
business section of the newspaper.
I laughed at the ad, but I wonder
how many people think to the
future and feel that the ad was
an opportunity. It read, Buy acreage on the Moon, a great gift for
friends and family or for a future
investment opportunity. This is
the real thing — not fake! Really?
I guess my vision of travel is much
lower – I have not set my sights
on the moon yet.
Anyone who watches television
at Christmas time is bound to have
seen the classic It’s a Wonderful
Life. One notable scene is when
George exclaims to Mary, “What
do you want Mary? You want the
moon? Just say the word and I’ll
throw a lasso around it and pull
it down. Hey, that’s a pretty good
idea. I’ll give you the moon…”
“Lasso the Moon” is also a song
written by Steve Dorff and Milton
Brown, and recorded by American
country music artist Gary Morris. It was released in 1985 as
the first new single from his hits
album. The song reached 9 on the
Billboard Hot Country Singles &
Tracks chart.
Other popular songs from the
past include, “Shine On, Harvest
Moon” (from Ziegfeld Follies
of 1931), “Blue Moon” a classic
popular song written by Richard
Rodgers and Lorenz Hart in 1934.
This song has become a standard
ballad. The song has been sung
as a released single by artists
such as Mel Torme, Elvis Presley,
and Frank Sinatra. “Moon River”
is a song that was composed by
The Enterprise — Michael Koff
Henry Mancini with lyrics written
Leapin’ Leopard: On a cold and blustery Saturday morning at
by Johnny Mercer. It received an
Guilderland Elementary School, this little girl runs in a fetching
Academy Award for Best Original
hat as she looks ahead to collecting her ribbon and picking out a
Song for its first performance
pumpkin to carve for Halloween.
by Audrey Hepburn in the 1961
movie Breakfast at Tiffany’s.
“Blue Moon” became the theme
song for Andy Williams, who first affects the tides, is important The astronauts are in a very
recorded it in 1961 and performed in the practice of astrology and precarious position of losing all
it at the Academy Awards ceremo- many ancient peoples regarded of the advances they have made
nies in 1962. In 1941 the moon rose the Moon as important to their in space.
The movie Gravity was a thriller
over Hollywood as a Technicolor religion. The Assyrians and the
musical film called Moon Over Chaldeans referred to the time of for me just as having lunch with
Miami. Betty Grable and Don the Moon-god as the oldest period someone who had walked on the
Ameche had the leading roles co- in the memory of the people: be- moon was a thrill for me. I know
starring Robert Cummings, Carole fore other planetary gods came to that I will never go to the moon
Landis, Jack Haley, and Charlotte dominate the world ages, the Moon and I will read about the advances
in the space program as they are
was the supreme deity.
Greenwood.
Considering all of the ways art- released.
Television viewers over a certain
As a reminder of the movie and
age (yes, over 39) will remember ists, composers, writers and poets
look at and de- the lunch with an astronaut I can
The Honeymoonscribe the moon sit in my house and look at a print
ers. It is a classic
it is not surpris- of a painting by Alan Bean with
American sitcom
ing that Alan his autograph and the recomon the CBS netBean, who is a mendation, “Jim, always reach for
work’s The Jackie
“Shine on,
painter, decided the moon”.
Gleason Show.
Harvest Moon”
Thank you
to show people
The HoneymoonAppreciation is extended to
what he saw on
ers was one of
the moon. Many all who supported the chicken’n
the first U.S. teleof his paintings biscuit dinner Saturday evening
vision shows to
hang on the walls at the VFW Post sponsored by the
portray workingclass married couples in a less of space enthusiasts. He said his Ladies Auxiliary. Halloween parade
than ideal manner in a run-down decision was based on the fact
Parents and children are rethat, in his 18 years as an astroBrooklyn apartment complex.
The cast was made up of Ralph naut, he was fortunate enough minded that the children should be
Kramden played by Jackie Glea- to visit the moon and see sights at the Altamont Fire Department
son—a bus driver for the fictional no artist’s eye, past or present, prior to 6 p.m. tonight in order to
Gotham Bus Company. Ralph is has ever viewed firsthand and he participate in the parade. The Halloween parade, led by
very short tempered, frequently hoped to express these experiences
resorting to bellowing insults and through the medium of art. He is the Fire Department, will begin at
hollow threats. Alice Kramden pursuing this dream at his home 6 p.m., and will proceed up Main
Street where the children will be
played by Audrey Meadows. She and studio in Houston.
As a painter, Bean wanted to met at Orsini Park by the Ladies
often finds herself bearing the
brunt of Ralph’s insults, which add color to the Moon. “I had to Auxiliary. The ladies will hand
she returns with biting sarcasm. figure out a way to add color to out glow sticks and goody bags. She has grown accustomed to his the Moon without ruining it,” he It has been said that the children
empty threats: “BANG, ZOOM! remarked. In his paintings, the lu- will also be greeted by Mac ‘N”
nar landscape is not a monotonous Tosh, the clown.
Straight to the moon.”
The parade is sponsored by
Coming back down to earth we gray, but shades of various colors.
note that each month of the year “If I were a scientist painting the the 1st National Bank of Scotia
has a different name for the full moon, I would paint it gray. I’m and the Albany County District
moon: January is Wolf Moon; Feb- an artist, so I can add colors to Attorney’s Office.
Property taxes
ruary is Ice Moon; March, Storm the moon”, said Bean.
Altamont homeowners are
With all of the countries that
Moon; April, Growing Moon; May,
Hare Moon; June, Mead Moon; currently have space modules, and reminded that village property
July, Hay Moon; August, Corn with the International Space Sta- taxes must be paid by the end
Moon; September, Harvest Moon; tion waiting for shuttles to dock of the business day on October
October, Blood; November, Snow and more astronauts to board, it 31. Unpaid taxes will be re-levied
Moon; December Cold Moon. A makes the movie, Gravity more to Albany County Department of
second full moon in a month is realistic. There really are haz- Finance on Nov. 1.
Roast beef dinner
ards in space, especially during
called a Blue Moon.
Noah Lodge 754 in Altamont
We also know that the moon activities outside the spacecraft.
will hold its annual roast beef
dinner on Saturday, Nov. 2, from
4:30 to 7 p.m. The menu will
consist of roast beef, mashed potatoes, gravy, green beans, rolls
and butter, coffee, tea and or milk
and your choice of pies for dessert. Tickets are $11 for adults,
$10 for seniors and $6 for children
under 12. Take-out service will be
available.
The Masonic Hall is located on
Maple Ave. in Altamont next door
to the Lutheran Church.
FMS
Students and parents are reminded that if you are ordering
FMS clothing such as, shorts,
T-shirts, sweatshirts, orders with
payment are due in the main
office. Checks should be made payable
to the FMS PTA. And thank you
for your continued support.
At home
Nancy Johnson of Castleton,
an active member of the Order of
Eastern Star in Rensselaer and
Cyrene Temple, Daughters of the
Nile in Latham is now at home
following a recent confinement in
the hospital. School banking
Students at the Altamont Elementary School are reminded
that school banking is done on
Fridays at lunchtime. Volunteers
are available to assist the students
with making deposits. Questions
can be directed to Mary Beth Mulligan, AES Banking Coordinator. Her number is 861-8565 or she
can be reached at [email protected]
sefcu.com.
Grand officers
Members of the Order of the
Eastern Star have been invited
to Meet and Greet with the 201314 Grand Officers of the Albany,
Rensselaer, Schenectady District
on Friday, Nov. 1. Patricia McAllister is the district grand matron
and Edward W. Mosso is the
district grand lecturer. A wine
and cheese tasting will be held
at the Turf Tavern, 40 Mohawk
Ave. in Scotia from 6 to 7:30 p.m. Reservations need to be made by
Oct. 29, with V. Rae Forster at
346-0683.
Leaf collection The village of Altamont will continue to vacuum leaves on Tuesdays and Fridays now until Nov.
29, weather permitting. Leaves
bagged must be in biodegradable bags, closed and sealed. Anniversaries
Happy-anniversary wishes are
extended to:
— Jackie and Jeff Genovese
who will celebrate their special
day on Oct. 26; and
— Doris and Albert Parshall
on Oct. 31.
— Carol ad John Vincent who
will celebrate their special day
on Nov.; and
— Irene and Russ Peck on
Nov. 5.
Birthdays
Happy-birthday wishes are
extended to:
— Mike Crupe on Nov. 1;
— Andrew Whitney on Nov. 2;
— Elaina Rose Brown, Matt
Elario, Richard Heinze III, and
Christopher Nowak on Nov. 3;
— Grace Elizabeth Sinkins on
Nov. 4;
— Lance Bradt and Stephen
Caruso on Nov. 5;
— Kevin Aylward, Joe Dover,
and Ashley Gifford on Nov. 6 and
— Angela Bates and Kathleen
Fink on Nov. 7.
Solution
24. R:h7+ K:h7 25. Qh1+
Kg7 26. Bh6+ Kf6 27. Qh4+
Ke5 28. Q:d4+ Kf5 29. Qf4
mate
29
The Altamont Enterprise – Thursday, October 31, 2013
Correspondents
Thompsons Lake
By
Lora
Ricketts
872-1691
Monday, Oct. 14, was Columbus Day. Danielle had to work
and I had Zoey. Brandon picked
up Samson and Nichole for the
day. This gave me the perfect opportunity to have Brandon take
pictures of me with my three
great-grandchildren, Samson,
Nichole and Zoey.
Then Brandon, Samson and Nichole rode their bikes to Thacher
Park and hiked the Indian Ladder
Trail. When they came back, Nichole and Samson baked cupcakes
for Jenn Smith’s birthday and
Nichole frosted them.
Jenn Smith and Iain came over
and we had a party.
Tuesday, Oct. 15, was Jenn’s
actual birthday. Brandon and I
joined Jenn and Iain at Martel’s in
Albany with Jenn’s grandparents,
Connie and Bob Hughes, for dinner to celebrate Jenn’s birthday.
Wednesday, Oct. 16, Zoey slept
until 9:30 a.m. She gets here at
7:30 a.m. Zoey is cutting teeth and
sometimes is uncomfortable.
My sister, Pat Sykala, came to
baby-sit while I had a doctor’s
appointment. Joey enjoyed having
Aunt Pat, as she really pampers
her.
On Oct. 17, Zoey turned 4
months old.
Brandon brought home fresh
Brussels sprouts from Kleinke’s
farm market. I cooked them and
also prepared a cheese sauce.
My grandson, Miles Pangburn,
stopped in earlier and visited with
my granddaughter, Kyra Swan
and me.
A pleasant surprise
On Friday, Oct. 18, I went with
Brandon to Schoharie to pick up
Samson and Nichole. We came
home to a pleasant surprise; Joe
Bennett of Ravena came and cut
the hay in the field by my living
room. I had hoped I could get
someone to cut it since the tractor
we mow with is still broken.
Joe Bennett is one of our extra
special friends.
Saturday, Oct. 19, came and I
had a surprise. A yellow caterpillar was on my doorstep and came
right in my back room. Yellow was
Dan’s favorite color.
Brandon, Samson, Nichole,
Jenn, Iain, Marcia, Kyra and
I all participated in helping at
the annual turkey supper at the
Thompson’s Lake Church.
After church on Sunday, Brandon, Samson, Nichole and I visited
Marcia and Kyra and then we
went to visit Sheila Stempel. We
are so happy she is home now
and feeling better. We all enjoyed
spending time with our favorite
organist.
After lunch, Brandon and
Samson played video games and
Nichole and I played house.
After the children left for their
mother’s my daughter, Kathy and
her husband, Neal Carnevale
invited me for dinner. Her main
dish of homemade macaroni and
cheese was delicious.
Bake sale
The Ladies Auxiliary of the
East Berne Fire Company will be
having a bake sale starting at 9
a.m. at the firehouse on Election
Day, Nov. 5.
Bible reading
Because of Tim Van Heest’s
absence the final two sessions of
the class Bible Reading for Busy
Believers have been rescheduled
for Wednesday nights, Nov. 6 and
13. The class is open to all adults
and will meet at the church hall at
the Knox Reformed Church from 7
to 8:15 p.m. both evenings.
Bible study
The bible study for adults led
by the Rev. Bob Hoffman will
meet next on Thursday, Nov. 7, at
7 p.m., in the church hall at the
Knox Reformed Church. Come and
learn more about God and how we
disciples should live out our faith
in the world.
Congregational meeting
The annual congregational
meeting of the Thompson’s Lake
Reformed Church is Sunday, Nov.
10. It is at this meeting that we
vote on the 2014 budget and the
Consistory members for the coming year.
Time to apply for farm funding
The Environmental Quality InNov. 15 is the extended application cutoff date for the En- centives Program offers financial
vironmental Quality Incentives assistance for practices which adProgram and Wildlife Habitat dress soil erosion, water quality,
Incentives Program for fiscal and habitat degradation. Practices implemented through EQIP
year 2014.
Applications accepted after Nov. include strip cropping, grassed
15 may be considered for funding waterways, and manure-storage
if additional application rounds facilities. Focus areas within the
are announced or for potential EQIP program include soil health,
livestock waste,
consideration in
habitat, forest2015. All appliry, and grazcations are comNov. 15 is the extended
petitive and are
ing. application
cutoff
date
ranked based on
The Wildlife
national, state,
Habitat Incenand locally identified resource tives Program helps participants
priorities and the overall benefit restore and protect fish and
to the environment, according wildlife habitat in grassland and
to a release from the New York shrubland areas.
Natural Resources Conservation
Those interested in applying
Service.
for a conservation program may
Although a new Farm Bill has go online to http://www.ny.nrcs.
yet to be approved, applicants may usda.gov/programs/general_inforstill apply for funding through the mation/how_to_apply.html or visit
same programs offered through the local NRCS field office, which
the 2008 Farm Bill. At the time can be located using the web site:
of application, applicants must http://offices.sc.egov.usda.gov/
specify the resource concerns locator/app?state=NY. For Albany
that they intend to address. Once County and Rensselaer County,
further guidance on the 2013 the NRCS Office is located at the
Farm Bill is provided, NRCS will USDA Service Center, 61 State
work with applicants to transfer Street, Troy, NY 12180. You may
applications to the appropriate also call the Albany County SWCD
conservation program.
Office at 765-7923.
Music In the Air
— Photo from Russ Pokorny
The (Knox) Traditional Strings played at Altamont Orchards Sunday at noon as customers were
shopping for pumpkins, cider, cider doughnuts, apples, and other fall offerings. Altamont Orchards
closes for the season after Thanksgiving. From left to right are Barbara Mullin, Al Raymond, Susie
Saint-Amour, Russ Pokorny, Nathan Giordano, Gerry Irwin, and in the front row, Dan Driscoll and
Nancy Frueh.
Keepers of the Cleanup
— Photo from Dave Gannon
Happy to help: Members of the Voorheesville Volunteer Fire Department enjoyed a brisk fall morning
on Oct. 26 while performing their Adopt-a-Highway cleanup.
At the Top of Their Game
Winsome winners: The Under-14 boys’ team of the New Scotland Soccer Club completed a 7-0-3
spring season and won its division. The team plays in the Capital District Youth Soccer League. The
boys scored 23 goals and allowed 10. The team includes forwards Miles Defranco and Ian Hoult; midfielders Daniel Monaghan, Cormac Brennan, Liam Hanley, Calvin Koenitzer, Liam Giombetti, Brian
Hotopp, Mike Losee, Luke Gillenwalters, Zach Tomlin, and Niaz Goodbee; defensive players Mark Weber,
Spencer Kranz, Earl Barcomb, Jared Calabrese, and Lucas Fisher; and goalkeeper Jimmy Connolly.
Registration is ongoing through the club’s website.
30
The Altamont Enterprise – Thursday, October 31, 2013
Wedding
Obituaries
Ruth O. Serafini
ALTAMONT — Long-time Altamont resident, Ogsbury, who was an owner of the newspaper. Ms.
Ruth O. Serafini, who was proud of her heritage Serafini went on to work at General Electric and
and had deep roots in Altamont died peacefully then spent many years working at The New York
on Wednesday, Oct. 30, 2013.
State Conference of Mayors,
She was 91.
where she was in charge of the
She was the only daughter of
organization’s logistical planMilton J. Ogsbury and Bertha
ning. Kilian Ogsbury.
Though she loved all animals,
“She was a very, very strong,
Ms. Serafini had a special fondindependent lady,” said her only
ness for cats and often volundaughter, Joann Serafini-Ross
teered to work with shelters
of Saint Helena, Calif. “She was
to help stray and abandoned
very funny. She had a dry and
felines.
sharp wit.”
Ms. Serafini was a skilled
Ms. Serafini was particularly
piano player, taking lessons for
proud of her heritage and its
14 years. She enjoyed traveling,
roots in Altamont’s local hisespecially to places with warm
tory, where her family is well
weather and a beach, such as
known under her maiden name
Cape Cod, MA, and to visit her
of Ogsbury, said her daughter.
daughter in California, said Mrs.
As a hobby, Ms. Serafini enjoyed
Serafini-Ross.
tracking the family’s genealogy.
She also enjoyed knitting, bakAs a member of the Heldering, chocolate, and fashion.
berg Chapter of the Daughters
“She always looked and was
of the American Revolution, Ms.
very put together,” said her
Ruth O. Serafini
Serafini could trace her linage
daughter.
back eight generations, to some
****
of the first European settlers to arrive in America.
Family and friends are invited to calling hours at
She held many positions in the organization and the Fredendall Funeral Home, at 199 Main Street,
truly enjoyed being a part of it, said Mrs. Serafini- in Altamont on Tuesday, Nov. 5, form 11 a.m. to 1
Ross.
p.m. with a service begininning at 1 p.m. Interment
Ms. Serafini had a long-time relationship with will be at the Fairview Cemetery.
her loving fiancé, Rufus Burlingame, and had
Memorial donations may be made to Just Cats,
many wonderful friends surrounding her up until 2073 Western Ave, Guilderland, NY 12084 or The
Mohawk and Hudson Humane Society, 3 Oakland
her death. She graduated from Altamont High School, Ave. Menands, NY 12204 . Online condolences may
working at The Altamont Enterprise when she was be made at www.fredendallfuneralhome.com.
a young woman and helping her uncle, Howard
— Tyler Murphy
Christopher Thissen and Karen Paczkowski
Paczkowski, Thissen marry
GUILDERLAND — Richard and Margaret Ann Paczkowski of
Guilderland proudly announce the marriage of their daughter Karen
Paczkowski to Christopher Thissen, son of Steven and Deborah Thissen of Glencoe, Minn. The couple married June 1, 2013 at Saint Thomas More Chapel at Yale
University in New Haven, Conn. Rev. Robert Beloin officiated and the
marriage received an Apostolic Papal Blessing from Pope Francis. The couple met at Yale University, where the bride received a Ph.D.
in geophysics and a master of science degree in mechanical engineering,
and the groom received a master of philosophy degree in geophysics
and is currently pursuing his Ph.D. in geophysics. The bride, who kept her birth name, is a 2006 graduate of Boston
University where she graduated magna cum laude with a bachelor
of science degree in engineering and a minor in mathematics. The
groom is a 2008 graduate of the University of Notre Dame where he
graduated summa cum laude with a bachelor of science degree in
environmental geoscience.
During the ceremony, each set of parents relit the bride’s and groom’s
baptism candles to symbolize the Christian life of their son or daughter
prior to marriage. Later in the Mass, the baptism candles were used
to light the Unity candle to symbolize the joining of their lives together
in a new Christian life as husband and wife.
A reception followed at the Water’s Edge Resort, overlooking the
ocean. The couple left shortly after for their honeymoon in Scotland
and France. They currently reside in Connecticut.
T h e H il ltowns Pl ay ers
are pleased to present their
2013 musical adaptation of Dicken’s Classic
— Photo from the Guilderland School District
Top 10: These Guilderland High School students were recently selected to perform in the Area All-State
Music Festival, to be held Nov. 22 and 23 at Saratoga Springs High School.
Ten GHS students to perform at All-State Music Festival
GUILDERLAND —Ten Guilderland High School students
were selected to perform in the
Area All-State Music Festival, to
be held Nov. 22 and 23 at Saratoga
Springs High School. The ensembles consist of students chosen from a nine-county
area, including Albany, Fulton,
Hamilton, Montgomery, Rensselaer, Saratoga, Schenectady,
Warren, and Washington counties.
Competitive selection to these
groups is based upon the score
received by the students’ during
the previous spring at the New
York State School Music Association solo evaluation festival. The Concert Band, under the
direction of Dan Fabricius, will
include: Allegra Wu on flute,
Angelo Amore and William Wang
on clarinet, Andrew Dame on
trumpet; and Joel Anthony on
trombone.
Elise Burby, Hannah Hernandez, and Courtland Ingraham
will sing in the chorus under the
direction of Amy Story.
Therese Giordano will play the
French horn in the Symphony
Orchestra under the direction of
Jim Rabinowitz.
Trombonist Joe Giordano was
selected by audition to perform
with the Jazz Band, led by Larry
Balestra.
The students were taught by
Kathleen Ehlinger, Lee Russo, and
Rae Jean Teeter.
The concert will be held on
Saturday, Nov. 23, beginning at 2
p.m. in the Saratoga High School
auditorium. The concert is open to
the public and tickets are $8 for
adults, $3 for students, and $5 for
senior citizens. Local students graduate from Binghamton University
Book by Rebecca Ryland
Music and Lyrics by Bill Francoeur
November 15th & 16th
at 7:30 p.m.
November 17th
at 3:00 p.m.
Berne-Knox-Westerlo
High School Auditorium
Route 443, Berne, NY
For Information: Call
872-2257
Tickets:
$10 Adults
$7 Senior Citizens,
Veterans, Military,
and Children
* Pre-Sale tickets are
available for $1 off
Produced by special arrangement with Pioneer Drama Services, Englewood, Colorado
These local students were
recently awarded a degree from
Binghamton University:
— Jeffrey P. Petrosillo from
East Berne, was awarded a master
in business administration degree
in executive masters in business
administration from the School of
Management;
— Kelly Irwin from Altamont,
was awarded a master. of science
degree in family nursing NP and
CERT degree in forensic health
from the Decker School of Nursing;
— Casey A. Becerra from Altamont, was awarded a bachelor
of arts degree in political science
from the Harpur College of Arts
and Sciences;
— Zachary Adam Elkind from
Slingerlands, was awarded a bachelor of arts degree in philosophy
politics and law from the Harpur
College of Arts and Sciences;
— Lawrence Joseph Jasenski from Schenectady, was
awarded a bachelor of arts degree
in English from the Harpur College of Arts and Sciences;
— Jesse Abraham Hoffman
from Slingerlands, was awarded
a bachelor of science degree in
management marketing from the
School of Management;
— Kaleigh Renee O’Hanlon
from Schenectady, was awarded a
bachelor of science degree in computer science from the Thomas J.
Watson School of Engineering;
— Michael John Costello
from Slingerlands, was awarded
a bachelor of science degree in
industrial systems engineering
from the Thomas J. Watson School
of Engineering;
— Erin Catherine Barnes
from Schenectady, was awarded
a bachelor of science degree in
bioengineering from the Thomas
J. Watson School of Engineering;
and
— Kevin D. Quinn from Berne,
was awarded a bachelor of science
degree in computer science from
the Thomas J. Watson School of
Engineering.
31
The Altamont Enterprise – Thursday, October 31, 2013
Obituaries
Marion E. Weiss Klapp
NEW SALEM — An active
community and church volunteer, Marion E. “Skippy”
Weiss Klapp, died peacefully
surrounded by family members
on Thursday, Oct. 24, 2013, at
her home in New Salem. She
was 87.
Born in Albany on July 7,
1926, she was one of four siblings
and the daughter of P. Henry
Weiss and Ella Viola Clother
Weiss.
A devoted mother of four
children, Mrs. Klapp was also
a dedicated volunteer throughout her life, lending a hand at
several not-for-profit community
groups, church programs, and
helping out at the Voorheesville
Central School.
“She had a kind demeanor.
She never had a bad thing to say
about anyone. Always giving, always kind, always helpful,” said
her daughter Robin Burch.
Mrs. Klapp grew up at 269
Sand Creek Road in west Albany.
She graduated from Albany
High School in 1944 and her first
job was working for the General
Electric Company to support the
war effort.
In her youth, Mrs. Klapp
learned to play the piano and
had a love of music all her life.
Growing up Mrs. Burch remembered the family always
had a piano and often sang
together. Her mother made sure
she also took lessons and as an
adult Mrs. Burch still plays and
has a piano in her home. Mrs.
Klapp was also an organist at
St. John’s Chapel.
After the war, she married an
Army veteran, Robert “Robbie”
Klapp. The two were wed on
March 28, 1948 and moved into
a home Mr. Klapp had built for
his bride. The new house was
located in the hamlet of New
Salem, across the street from
the Klapps’ family farm.
The couple would live at the
farm for the rest of their lives,
raising four children — Barbara,
Marion, George and Robin. The
Klapps’ marriage lasted 63
years, until Mr. Klapp died on
Nov. 4, 2011.
In 1963, the family moved
from their home into the farmhouse across the street, taking
over daily operation of the farm,
which had been in the Klapp
family since 1930.
The farm remained active until about 1970. The family kept
a few cows for milking and beef,
a number of chicken and ducks,
about 50 or 60 hogs, and raised
several cash crops, such as cabbage, wheat, and potatoes.
Though the farm declined in
later decades, the family continued to harvest some crops
and hay, said Mrs. Klapp’s son,
George Klapp.
He and his family settled
on the farm, building a home
there and often visited with his
parents.
“One of the reasons we bought
this was so my mom and dad
could sit on their front porch
and watch us make hay,” said Mr.
Klapp. “It’d been in the family
for so long, it was important for
them to see it passed on.”
“My mom loved the country
life,” he said.
While his father’s passion was
tilling the soil, his mother’s was
baking the bread. Mrs. Klapp
was known in the family for
preparing all kinds of delicious
homemade meals, with vegetables pulled from the garden,
livestock taken from the farm, or
game hunted by her husband.
“It was a passion of hers. She
did it to feed us, not necessarily as a hobby. She used to can
peaches, make strawberry jam,
and her own spaghetti sauce —
all the things done on a family
farm. Dad was a hunter and
he’d bring back a rabbit and
she’d make rabbit stew,” said
her son.
“We’d come home from school
or anywhere, and the house always smelled amazing,” recalled
Mrs. Burch. “I remember I tried
to learn from her and she was
making bread. I took the bread
and put it into a cake pan and I
thought it would turn into cake.
I was about 8.”
Despite the youthful oversight,
Mrs. Burch said her mother was
always supportive.
Mr. George Klapp remembered
his mother chasing away his
temptation to smoke cigarettes
with a broom.
When he was about 12 years
old, Mr. Klapp and an older,
“infamous character” would
ride their bikes to a remote
spot where the other boy would
try to teach him how to smoke
cigarettes.
“Mom smelled the smoke on
me and knew who it was. She
came outside with a broom in
hand and chased him off. She
told him to never again go near
‘my little Georgy,’” recalled her
son. Mr. Klapp is not a smoker
and admitted part of the reason
was because he “didn’t dare”
anger his mother again.
Enterprise file photo
Together for 63 years, Robert and Marion Klapp married on
March 28, 1948. Mrs. Klapp died this Wednesday Oct. 24, 2013.
He husband died before her on Nov. 4, 2011.
When Mrs. Klapps’ youngest
child began elementary school,
she got her driver’s license at age
32 so she could start a career.
For 17 years, she worked for
New York State, employed in
several different departments
before retiring early to care for
her aging mother.
The family said Mrs. Klapp
was an exceptionally talented
woman because she was able
to balance her responsibilities
as a farmer’s wife, mother and
active participant in church and
community activities.
She excelled in music, sewing,
needlework, cooking, baking,
and much more, she said. She
shared these talents in many
ways by making clothes for
herself and her children. She
also knitted baby blankets and
Christmas stockings. Mrs. Klapp
prepared food and worked at the
baked-goods booth at the New
Salem Fire Department’s annual
Punkintown Fair, and assisted
with making banners that still
hang in the hall at the First
Lutheran Church in Albany, 50
years later.
One of Mrs. Klapp’s last
projects was to knit each of her
grandchildren and great-grandchildren baby afghans.
“She knit one for each greatgrandchild, even for the one who
isn’t here yet,” said Mrs. Burch,
explaining her daughter is five
months pregnant.
Mrs. Klapp’s faith was an
important part of her life and
she was a longtime member of
St. John’s Lutheran Church in
Albany, where she was a youth
group advisor. She was a Sunday
school teacher and organist at
St. John’s Chapel. She also attended services at St. Paul’s in
Berne and rejoined St. John’s in
the last years of her life.
A warm and loving person,
Mrs. Klapp devoted herself
to family and attended virtually every school assembly, play,
concert, sporting competition,
graduation ceremony, or other
important event. She remembered each family member with
cards on their birthdays, including children, spouses, grandchildren, and great-grandchildren.
Mrs. Klapp was a dedicated
Voorheesville sports fan, going
to great lengths to support her
children and grandchildren in
their activities, even traveling
to Norway with her husband
to watch her grandson play
basketball.
She and her husband were
Visit our NEW site: www.altamontenterprise.com
also avid league bowlers for
many years. She was a member
of the Business and Professional
Women’s Foundation and she
was an election volunteer who
worked local polls for several
years.
Mrs. Klapp and her husband
went on many bus trips over the
years with the New Scotland Senior Citizens, traveling as far away
as Nova Scotia and Michigan. She
was a volunteer room mother at
Voorheesville Elementary School
and a member of the Home Bureau.
“The thing that makes her
unique is she didn’t really have
a hobby for herself,” said her son.
“Her hobby was doing things for
other people. Knitting, crocheting,
it would always be for other people,
the children, grandchildren, and
great-grandchildren. She baked
and cooked for the churches and
things like that — it was always
for everyone else, not for herself.
She just loved spending time with
family.”
****
Mrs. Klapp is survived by her
children, Barbara Ellen Vartanian; Marion Elizabeth Dunk,
and her husband, Howard; George
Edward Klapp, and his wife, Judy;
and Robin Edith Burch, and her
husband, David.
She is also survived by her
grandchildren, David Burch, and
his wife, Jodi; Matthew Weir, and
his wife, Katie; Daniel Burch; Jessica Weir; Melissa Savage, and her
husband, Clay; Andrea Vamvas,
and her husband, Nick; Helen
Lavoie and, her husband, Chris; R.
Nicholas Klapp; and Lila Dunk.
She is survived, too, by her
great-grandchildren, Alexander
Burch; Gabriel Weir; Nellie Burch;
Miles Lavoie; and Makayla Savage; and her siblings, Millicent
Van Zetten; Russell Weiss; and
William Weiss.
Her husband, Robert Klapp,
died before her, as did her parents,
P. Henry Weiss and Ella Viola
Clother Weiss; and her brother,
Robert.
The funeral was Monday Oct 28,
at St. John’s Lutheran Church in
Albany. Burial was at St. John’s
Lutheran Cemetery in Colonie. Arrangements were by the Reilly &
Son Funeral Home of Voorheesville. Memorial contributions can
be made to St. John’s Lutheran
Church, 160 Central Ave., Albany,
NY 12206 or to Community Hospice of Albany at 445 New Karner
Rd., Albany, NY, 12205.
-Tyler Murphy
32
The Altamont Enterprise – Thursday, October 31, 2013
LEGAL NOTICE
LEGAL NOTICE
LEGAL NOTICE
LEGAL NOTICE
LEGAL NOTICE
LEGAL NOTICE
LEGAL NOTICE
34th Street Suites LLC Arts. of
Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY
(SSNY) on 10/3/13. Office in Albany
Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon
whom process against it may be
served. SSNY shall mail process to
PO Box 10873, Albany, NY 12201.
Purpose: General.
(7-13-18)
LEGAL NOTICE
Hatak Servicing LLC Arts. of
Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY
(SSNY) on 3/15/11. Office in Albany
Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon
whom process against it may be
served. SSNY shall mail process
to C/O Allstate Corporate Services
Corp., ONE Commerce Plz, 99
Washington Ave Ste 1008, Albany,
NY 12260. Purpose: General.
(8-13-18)
LEGAL NOTICE
XHT And Group LLC Arts. of
Org. filed with Secy. of State of
NY (SSNY) on 12/14/12. Office in
Albany Co. SSNY desig. agent of
LLC upon whom process against
it may be served. SSNY shall
mail process to Xue Hui Tang, 27
Braintree St., Albany, NY 12205.
Purpose: General.
(9-13-18)
LEGAL NOTICE
Notice of qualification of Otter Creek Shopping Center LLC.
Articles of Org. filed with NY Secretary of State (NS) on 9/24/2013,
office location: Albany County, NS
is designated as agent upon whom
process may be served, NS shall
mail service of process (SOP) to
NW Registered Agent LLC @ 90
State St STE 700 Office 40, NW
Registered Agent LLC is designated
as agent for SOP at 90 State St STE
700 Office 40, purpose is any lawful
purpose.
(11-13-18)
LEGAL NOTICE
Notice of formation of Window
Seat, LLC. Articles of Org. filed
with NY Secretary of State (NS) on
October 8, 2013 office location:
Albany County, NS is designated
as agent upon whom process may
be served, NS shall mail service of
process (SOP) to NW Registered
Agent LLC @ 90 State St STE 700
Office 40, Albany, NY 12207, NW
Registered Agent LLC is designated
as agent for SOP at 90 State St STE
700 Office 40, Albany, NY 12207,
purpose is any lawful purpose.
(12-13-18)
LEGAL NOTICE
Notice of formation of Felidae &
Company New York LLC. Articles
of Organization filed with Secretary
of State of New York (SSNY) on
October 3, 2013. Office Location:
Albany County. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC for service
of process. SSNY shall mail copy
to 2575 Broadway, Suite 265, New
York, NY 10025. Purpose: any lawful purpose.
(13-13-18)
LEGAL NOTICE
Notice of formation of Lucky Titan L.L.C. Articles of Organization
filed with Secretary of State of New
York (SSNY) on October 3, 2013.
Office Location: Albany County.
SSNY is designated as agent of
LLC for service of process. SSNY
shall mail copy to 2575 Broadway,
Suite 265, New York, NY 10025.
Purpose: any lawful purpose.
(14-13-18)
LEGAL NOTICE
Notice of formation of WhiteRoseCollective, LLC. Articles of Org.
filed with NY Secretary of State
(NS) on September 27, 2013, office location: Albany County, NS is
designated as agent upon whom
process may be served, NS shall
mail service of process (SOP) to
NW Registered Agent LLC @ 90
State St STE 700 Office 40, NW
Registered Agent LLC is designated
as agent for SOP at 90 State St STE
700 Office 40, purpose is any lawful
purpose.
(15-13-18)
LEGAL NOTICE
Notice of domestic formation of
39 WMSD, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with NY Secretary of
State (NS) on Sept. 5, 2013 Office
location is Albany County. NS is designated as agent upon whom process (SOP) to Veil Corporate,LLC
@ 911 Central Ave #188, Albany,
N.Y. 12206. Veil Corporate, LLC is
designated as agent for SOP @ 911
Central Ave #188, Albany, purpose
is any lawful purpose.
(20-13-18)
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE OF SALE
SUPREME COURT:
ALBANY COUNTY
Wells Fargo Bank, N.A.;
Plaintiff(s)
vs. JASON MORELAND; et al;
Defendant(s)
Attorney (s) for Plaintiff (s):
ROSICKI, ROSICKI
& ASSOCIATES, P.C.,
2 Summit Court, Suite 301,
Fishkill, New York, 12524,
845.897.1600
Pursuant to judgment of foreclosure and sale granted herein on
or about June 9, 2013, I will sell at
Public Auction to the highest bidder at Albany County Courthouse,
Lodge Street Entrance, Albany, NY
12207. On November 19, 2013 at
9:00 AM Premises known as 40
CHERRY STREET, COLONIE, NY
12205-5236 Section: 53.5 Block:
3 Lot: 26
ALL that lot of land with the
buildings and improvements thereon, erected, situate, lying and being
in the Town of Colonie, County of
Albany and State of New York, on
the westerly side of Cherry Avenue,
between Martin Terrace and Van
Buren Avenue. As more particularly described in the judgment of
foreclosure and sale. Sold subject
to all of the terms and conditions
contained in said judgment and
terms of sale. Approximate amount
of judgment $197,900.44 plus interest and costs.
INDEX NO. 3151-12
Eli Taub, Esq., REFEREE
(17-13-16)
LEGAL NOTICE
Notice of domestic formation of
176 CRD, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with the NY Secretary of
State (NS) on Sept 5th, 2013. Office
location is Albany County. NS is designated as agent upon whom process (SOP) to Veil Corporate,LLC
@ 911 Central Ave #188, Albany,
N.Y. 12206 Veil Corporate,LLC is
designated as agent for SOP @ 911
Central Ave #188, Albany, purpose
is any lawful purpose.
(19-13-18)
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE OF FORMATION OF
LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY.
NAME: RGNY SOLUTIONS LLC.
Articles of Organization were filed
with the Secretary of State of New
York (SSNY) on 8/19/13. Office
location: Albany County. SSNY
has been designated as agent
of the LLC upon whom process
against it may be served. SSNY
shall mail a copy of process to the
LLC, NORTHWEST REGISTERED
AGENT at 90 STATE STREET STE
700 OFFICE 40 ALBANY, NEW
YORK, 12207. Purpose: For any
lawful purpose.
(1-14-19
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE OF FORMATION of
limited liability company (LLC).
Name: 188 MANAGEMENT LLC.
Articles of Organization filed with
Secretary of State of NY (SSNY)
on 8/22/2013. Office location: Albany County. SSNY designated as
agent of LLC upon whom process
against it may be served. SSNY
shall mail copy of process to: THE
LLC 199 LEE AVENUE, SUITE 560,
BROOKLYN, NY 11211. Purpose:
any lawful purpose.
(2-14-19)
LEGAL NOTICE
Notice of Formation DARX, LLC
Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of
State (SSNY) 8/16/2013. Office in
Albany Co. SSNY desig. Agent of
LLC upon whom process may be
served. SSNY shall mail copy of
process to PO Box 8531, Albany,
NY 12208. Purpose: Any lawful
purpose.
(3-14-19)
LEGAL NOTICE
Notice of formation of LUBONY
VH506 LLC. Articles of Org. filed
with NY Secretary of State (NS)
on 9/30/2013, office location:
Albany County, NS is designated
as agent upon whom process may
be served, NS shall mail service of
process (SOP) to NW Registered
Agent LLC @ 90 State St STE 700
Office 40, NW Registered Agent
LLC is designated as agent for SOP
at 90 State St STE 700 Office 40,
purpose is any lawful purpose.
(4-14-19)
LEGAL NOTICE
Notice of formation of LUBONY
W2B LLC. Articles of Org. filed
with NY Secretary of State (NS)
on 9/30/2013, office location:
Albany County, NS is designated
as agent upon whom process may
be served, NS shall mail service of
process (SOP) to NW Registered
Agent LLC @ 90 State St STE 700
Office 40, NW Registered Agent
LLC is designated as agent for SOP
at 90 State St STE 700 Office 40,
purpose is any lawful purpose.
(5-14-19)
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE OF FORMATION OF A
LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY
Retail Group ADL, LLC
Retail Group ADL, LLC, a Delaware limited liability company
(“ADL”) filed its Application of Authority with the Secretary of State of
New York (“SSNY”) on September
26, 2013. ADL’s office location is
Albany County. SSNY has been
designated as agent of the LLC
upon whom process against it may
be served. SSNY shall mail a copy
of process to: c/o Retail Group
ADL, LLC, 3 West 35th Street, Third
Floor, New York, NY 10001. The
general purpose is a retail clothing store.
(6-14-19)
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE OF FORMATION OF
LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY.
NAME: COOPER SQUARE REALTY LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary
of State of New York (SSNY) on
09/06/13. Office location: Albany
County. SSNY has been designated
as agent of the LLC upon whom
process against it may be served.
SSNY shall mail a copy of process
to the LLC, c/o Corporation Service
Company, 80 State Street, Albany,
NY 12207-2543. Purpose: For any
lawful purpose.
(7-14-19)
LEGAL NOTICE
Notice of formation of Fely’s
Hut, LLC. Articles of Org. filed
with NY Secretary of State (NS)
on July 25, 2013, office location:
Albany County, NS is designated
as agent upon whom process may
be served, NS shall mail service
of process (SOP) to Registered
Agents Inc. @ 90 State St STE 700
Office 40, Registered Agents Inc. is
designated as agent for SOP at 90
State St STE 700 Office 40, purpose
is any lawful purpose.
(8-14-19)
LEGAL NOTICE
Notice of formation , domestic,
of GETTING TO LEASE LLC. Articles of Org. filed with NY Secretary
of State (NS) on October 17, 2010,
office location: Albany County, NS
is designated as agent upon whom
process may be served, NS shall
mail service of process (SOP) to
NW Registered Agent LLC @ 90
State St STE 700 Office 40, NW
Registered Agent LLC is designated
as agent for SOP at 90 State St STE
700 Office 40, purpose is any lawful
purpose.
(9-14-19)
LEGAL NOTICE
Taurus Equities DK LLC Arts. of
Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY
(SSNY) on 10/8/13. Office in Albany
Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon
whom process against it may be
served. SSNY shall mail process to
PO Box 10873, Albany, NY 12201.
Purpose: General.
(10-14-19)
LEGAL NOTICE
Notice of qualification of Baleen
Capital Management LLC Certificate of Authority filed with NY
Secretary of State (NS) on August 9,
2013. Office location: Albany county
NS is designated as agent upon
whom process may be served. NS
shall mail service of process (SOP)
to Northwest Registered Agent LLC
@ 90 State St. STE 700 office 40
Northwest Registered Agent LLC is
designated as agent for SOP at 90
State St. STE 700 office 40 Purpose
is any lawful purpose
(12-14-19)
LEGAL NOTICE
Notice of qualification of Baleen
Capital GP LLC Certificate of
Authority filed with NY Secretary
of State (NS) on August 12, 2013.
Office location: Albany County NS
is designated as agent upon whom
process may be served. NS shall
mail service of process (SOP) to
Northwest Registered Agent LLC
@ 90 State St. STE 700 office 40
Northwest Registered Agent LLC is
designated as agent for SOP at 90
State St. STE 700 office 40 Purpose
is any lawful purpose
(13-14-19)
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE OF FORMATION OF A
LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY Billy
Beez USA, LLC, a Delaware limited
liability company (“Billy Beez”) filed
its Application of Authority with
the Secretary of State of New
York (“SSNY”) on July 15, 2013.
Billy Beez’s office location is Albany
County. SSNY has been designated
as agent of the LLC upon whom
process against it may be served.
SSNY shall mail a copy of process
to: c/o Billy Beez USA, LLC, 3 West
35th Street,Third Floor, New York,
NY 10001. The general purpose is
a retail clothing store.
(14-14-19)
LEGAL NOTICE
Notice of formation of LLC-Lilai
LLC has filed an Articles of Organization with the Secretary of State
of New York on 9/9/13. Its office is
located in Albany County. The Secretary of State has been designated
as agent upon whom process may
be served. A copy of any process
shall be mailed to 11 Copenhagen
Ct., Cohoes, NY 12047. Its business is to engage in any lawful
activity for which limited liability
companies may be organized under
Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Act.
(15-14-19)
LEGAL NOTICE
Notice of formation of C’est Beau
LLC Articles of Org. filed with NY
Secretary of State (NS) 10/4/2013,
office location: Albany County, NS
is designated as agent upon whom
process may be served, NS shall
mail service of process (SOP) to NW
Registered Agent LLC @ 90 State
St STE 700 Office 40, Albany, NY
12207, NW Registered Agent LLC
is designated as agent for SOP
at 90 State St STE 700 Office 40,
Albany, NY 12207, purpose is any
lawful purpose.
(16-14-19)
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE OF FORMATION of limited liability company (LLC). Name:
1877 MADISON LLC. Articles of
Organization filed with Secretary of
State of NY (SSNY) on 10/15/2013.
Office location: Albany County.
SSNY designated as agent of LLC
upon whom process against it
may be served. SSNY shall mail
copy of process to: THE LLC 199
Lee Avenue, Suite 138, Brooklyn,
NY 11211. Purpose: any lawful
purpose.
(17-14-19)
LEGAL NOTICE
Notice of formation of Tea & Jam
LLC. Articles of Org. filed with NY
Secretary of State (NS) on September 20, 2013, office location:
Albany County, NS is designated
as agent upon whom process may
be served, NS shall mail service of
process (SOP) to NW Registered
Agent LLC @ 90 State St STE 700
Office 40, NW Registered Agent
LLC is designated as agent for SOP
at 90 State St STE 700 Office 40,
purpose is any lawful purpose.
(18-14-19)
LEGAL NOTICE
Notice of qualification of UNITED
RECEIVABLES GROUP, LLC. Authority filed with the Sect’y of State
of NY (SSNY) on 5/6/2013. Office
in Albany County. Formed in SC
on 2/28/2013. SSNY has been
designated as agent of the LLC
upon whom process against it may
be served. SSNY shall mail process
to the LLC, 572 John Ross Parkway,
Ste 107 #12 Rock Hill, SC 29730.
Purpose: Any lawful purpose
(19-14-19)
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE OF FORMATION OF
LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY.
NAME: TOWER ACQUISITION,
LLC. Articles of Organization were
filed with the Secretary of State of
New York (SSNY) on 8/2/13. Office
location: Albany County. SSNY has
been designated as agent of the
LLC upon whom process against
it may be served. SSNY shall mail
a copy of process to the LLC, c/o
National Corporate Research, 10
East 40th Street, 10th Floor, New
York, NY 10016. Purpose: For any
lawful purpose.
(20-14-19)
LEGAL NOTICE
Universal Healing LLC Arts. of
Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY
(SSNY) on 9/10/13. Office in Albany
Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon
whom process against it may be
served. SSNY shall mail process
to 183 Cross Rd, Berne, NY 12023.
Purpose: General.
(1-15-20)
LEGAL NOTICE
Notice of formation of LITTLE
AUK LLC. Articles of Org. filed
with NY Secretary of State (NS)
on 09/09/2013, office location:
Albany County, NS is designated
as agent upon whom process may
be served, NS shall mail service of
process (SOP) to NW Registered
Agent LLC @ 90 State St STE 700
Office 40, NW Registered Agent
LLC is designated as agent for SOP
at 90 State St STE 700 Office 40,
purpose is any lawful purpose.
(2-15-20)
LEGAL NOTICE
Notice of Domestic of Events
Plus Company, LLC. Articles of
Org. filed with NY Secretary of
State (NS) on 9/4/12, office location:
Albany County, NS is designated
as agent upon whom process may
be served, NS shall mail service of
process (SOP) to NW Registered
Agent LLC @ 90 State St STE 700
Office 40, NW Registered Agent
LLC is designated as agent for SOP
at 90 State St STE 700 Office 40,
purpose is any lawful purpose.
(3-15-20)
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE OF
SPECIAL DISTRICT MEETING
VOORHEESVILLE CENTRAL
SCHOOL DISTRICT,
IN THE COUNTY OF
ALBANY, NEW YORK
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the Board of Education of the Voorheesville Central School District, in
the County of Albany, New York,
has adopted a resolution on October 21, 2013, authorizing a Special
District Meeting of the qualified
voters of said School District to
be held on
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 17,
2013 from 2:00 o’clock P.M. to
9:00 o’clock P.M. (Prevailing Time)
at the Voorheesville Middle School
Foyer, 432 New Salem Road, Voorheesville, New York, for the purpose
of voting upon the following Bond
Proposition:
BOND PROPOSITION
RESOLVED:
(a) That the Board of Education of the Voorheesville Central
School District, in the County of
Albany, New York (the “District”),
is hereby authorized to construct
improvements and alterations to all
district school buildings (the “Project”), substantially as set forth as
“Phase I” items in a plan prepared
by the District entitled “Facilities
Committee Report to the Board of
Education,” dated October 7, 2013
(the “Plan”), which Plan is available
for public inspection at the office
of the District Clerk, such Project
to include (as and where required):
replacement and/or reconstruction
of a roof; technology improvements
and masonry reconstruction; all of
the foregoing to include the original
equipment, machinery, apparatus,
and all ancillary and related site and
other work required in connection
therewith; and to expend therefor,
including preliminary costs and
costs incidental thereto and to the
financing thereof, an amount not
to exceed the estimated total cost
of $2,702,700; provided that the
estimated costs of the components
of the Project as set forth in the
Plan may be reallocated among
such components if the Board of
Education shall determine that such
reallocation is in the best interest of
the District
(b) that the amount of not to
exceed $555,000 from the District’s
“Building Project Reserve Fund,”
heretofore established following
voter approval on May 15, 2012, is
hereby authorized to be expended
to pay a portion of the cost of the
Project; and
(c) that a tax is hereby voted
in the amount of not to exceed
$2,147,700 to pay the balance of
the cost of the Project, such tax to
be levied and collected in installments in such years and in such
amounts as shall be determined by
said Board of Education; and that
in anticipation of said tax, bonds
of the District are hereby authorized to be issued in the aggregate
principal amount of not to exceed
$2,147,700 and a tax is hereby
voted to pay the interest on said
bonds as the same shall become
due and payable.
Said Bond Proposition shall appear on the ballots used for voting
at said Special District Meeting in
substantially the following form:
BOND PROPOSITION
YES NO
RESOLVED:
(a) That the Board of Education
of the Voorheesville Central School
District, in the County of Albany
(the “District”), is hereby authorized
to construct improvements and
alterations to all district school
buildings (the “Project”) and to
expend not to exceed $2,702,700
therefor; (b) that the amount of
not to exceed $555,000 from the
District’s “Building Project Reserve
Fund,” heretofore established following voter approval on May 15,
2012, is hereby authorized to be
expended to pay a portion of the
cost of the Project; and (c) that a
tax is hereby voted in the amount
of not to exceed $2,147,700 to
pay the balance of the cost of the
Project, such tax to be levied and
collected in installments in such
years and in such amounts as shall
be determined by said Board of
Education; and that in anticipation
of said tax, bonds of the District are
hereby authorized to be issued in
the aggregate principal amount of
not to exceed $2,147,700 and a tax
is hereby voted to pay the interest
on said bonds as the same shall
become due and payable.
The voting will be conducted
by ballot on voting machines as
provided in the Education Law
and the polls will remain open from
2:00 o’clock P.M. to 9:00 o’clock
P.M. (Prevailing Time) and as much
longer as may be necessary to enable the voters then present to cast
their ballots.
NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN
that applications for absentee ballots may be applied for at the office
of the District Clerk, Voorheesville
Central School District. 432 New
Salem Road, Voorheesville, New
York, on any weekday, except
holidays, between the hours of 8:30
o’clock A.M. and 3:00 o’clock P.M.
(Prevailing Time). If the ballot is to
be mailed to the voter, the completed application must be received
by the District Clerk no later than
December 10, 2013. If the ballot
is to be delivered personally to the
voter at the office of the District
Clerk, the completed application
must be received by the District
Clerk no later than 3:00 o’clock
P.M. (Prevailing Time) on December
16, 2013.
A list of all persons to whom
absentee ballots shall have been
issued will be available in the office
of the District Clerk during regular
business on each of the five (5)
days prior to the day of the election, except Saturday and Sunday.
Such list will also be posted in a
conspicuous place at the polling
place during the election.
Only qualified voters shall be
permitted to vote at said Special
District meeting.
Dated: October 21, 2013
BY THE ORDER OF THE
BOARD OF EDUCATION
DOROTHEA PFLEIDERER
District Clerk
(6-15-18)
LEGAL NOTICE
Wok 43rd Street LLC Arts. of
Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY
(SSNY) on 10/17/13. Office in Albany Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC
upon whom process against it may
be served. SSNY shall mail process
to 56 Spring St Apt PH7, New York,
NY 10012. Purpose: General.
(7-15-20)
LEGAL NOTICE
Farah Enterprises LLC Arts. of
Org. filed with Secy. of State of
NY (SSNY) on 10/10/13. Office in
Albany Co. SSNY desig. agent of
LLC upon whom process against
it may be served. SSNY shall mail
process to PO Box 10873, Albany,
NY 12201. Purpose: General.
(8-15-20)
LEGAL NOTICE
47 Stanhope LLC Arts. of Org.
filed with Secy. of State of NY
(SSNY) on 8/1/13. Office in Albany
Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon
whom process against it may be
served. SSNY shall mail process to
PO Box 10873, Albany, NY 12201.
Purpose: General.
(9-15-20)
LEGAL NOTICE
Blue Sky Mgmt NY LLC Arts.
of Org. filed with Secy. of State of
NY (SSNY) on 10/16/13. Office in
Albany Co. SSNY desig. agent of
LLC upon whom process against
it may be served. SSNY shall mail
process to PO Box 10873, Albany,
NY 12201. Purpose: General.
(10-15-20)
LEGAL NOTICE
SYM Enterprises, LLC Arts. of
Org. filed with Secy. of State of
NY (SSNY) on 10/21/13. Office in
Albany Co. SSNY desig. agent of
LLC upon whom process against
it may be served. SSNY shall mail
process to PO BOX 10873, Albany,
NY 12201. Purpose: General.
(11-15-20)
LEGAL NOTICE
MZH Housing LLC Arts. of Org.
filed with Secy. of State of NY
(SSNY) on 10/16/13. Office in
Albany Co. SSNY desig. agent of
LLC upon whom process against
it may be served. SSNY shall mail
process to PO Box 10873, Albany,
NY 12201. Purpose: General.
(12-15-20)
LEGAL NOTICE
Notice of Formation of Limited
Liability Company (LLC). Name:
Decisions Hair Studio, LLC – Articles of Organization filed with
Secretary of State of New York
(SSNY) on October 8, 2013. Office
location: Albany County. SSNY
Designated as agent of LLC upon
whom process against it may be
served. SSNY shall mail a copy
of process to: The LLC, c/o Donna
Lustenhouwer, 4477 Hurst Road,
Altamont, New York 12009. Purpose: any lawful purpose.
(14-15-20)
LEGAL NOTICE
Notice of formation of LUBONY
UWS8D LLC. Articles of Org. filed
with NY Secretary of State (NS)
on 9/30/2013, office location:
Albany County, NS is designated
as agent upon whom process may
be served, NS shall mail service of
process (SOP) to NW Registered
Agent LLC @ 90 State St STE 700
Office 40, NW Registered Agent
LLC is designated as agent for SOP
at 90 State St STE 700 Office 40,
purpose is any lawful purpose.
(15-15-20)
LEGAL NOTICE
Notice of formation of LUBONY
D11P LLC. Articles of Org. filed
with NY Secretary of State (NS)
on 9/30/2013, office location:
Albany County, NS is designated
as agent upon whom process may
be served, NS shall mail service of
process (SOP) to NW Registered
Agent LLC @ 90 State St STE
700 Office 40, NW Registered
Agent LLC is designated as agent
for SOP at 90 State St STE 700
Office 40, purpose is any lawful
purpose.
(16-15-20)
LEGAL NOTICE
PUBLIC NOTICE
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that
at the next meeting of the Planning Commission of the Village of
Voorheesville the Board will hold
PUBLIC HEARING on the following
application from:
Shane Gonyea: for a Special
Use Permit to use space at 10 N
Main St, bldg. 3C for vehicle detailing & repair for current used car
business, as well as for business
and personal storage.
This meeting will be held on
Tuesday, November 12, 2013 at
7 PM at the Village Hall, 29 Voorheesville Ave., Voorheesville, NY
12186.
BY ORDER OF
THE PLANNING COMMISSION
Georgia Gray, Chairperson
(18-15)
LEGAL NOTICE
Notice of qualification of Beergram, LLC. Articles of Org. filed
with NY Secretary of State (NS)
on July 30, 2013, office location:
Albany County, NS is designated
as agent upon whom process may
be served, NS shall mail service of
process (SOP) to NW Registered
Agent LLC @ 90 State St STE 700
Office 40, NW Registered Agent
LLC is designated as agent for SOP
at 90 State St STE 700 Office 40,
purpose is any lawful purpose.
(19-15-20)
LEGAL NOTICE
Notice of formation of limited
liability company name: New Scotland Liberty, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with NY Secretary of
State on 9/6/13. Office location
Albany County, New York. SSNY is
designated as agent of LLC whom
process against it may be served.
SSNY shall mail process to 742
Pleasant Valley Rd. Berne, NY
12023. Purpose: general.
(20-15-20)
LEGAL NOTICE
327 Kosciuszko LLC Arts. of
Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY
(SSNY) on 9/13/13. Office in Albany
Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon
whom process against it may be
served. SSNY shall mail process to
PO Box 10873, Albany, NY 12201.
Purpose: General.
(6-10-15)
33
The Altamont Enterprise – Thursday, October 31, 2013
LEGAL NOTICE
LEGAL NOTICE
LEGAL NOTICE
LEGAL NOTICE
TOWN of RENSSELAERVILLE
NOTICE of HEARING UPON PRELIMINARY BUDGET
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Preliminary Budget of the Town
of Rensselaerville for the Fiscal Year beginning January 1, 2014 has been
completed and filed in the office of the Town Clerk, at Town Hall, 87 Barger
Road, Medusa, NY where it is available for inspection by any interested
persons during normal business hours and on the Town’s website at
www.rensselaerville.com.
FURTHER NOTICE IS HEREBY given that the Town Board of the Town
of Rensselaewille will hold a Public Hearing on the Preliminary Budget at
the Rensselaerville Town Hall, 87 Barger Road, Medusa, NY 12120 on the
Special ‘Districts beginning at 7PM and the General Fund and Highway
Fund immediately following the Special District Public Hearing on the
6th day of November, 2013
Pursuant to Section 108 of the Town Law, the proposed Salaries of the
following elected Town Officers are hereby specified as follows:
Supervisor ............................................................... $ 12,500
Justice ofthe Peace (2) . .......................................... $ 9,150 (Each)
Councilman (4) ....................................................... $ 3,000 (Each)
Town Superintendent ............................................ $ 42,300
Town Clerk ............................................................. $ 32,280
Town Assessors (3) ................................................. $18,005
(Total for all 3 assessors)
FURTHER NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Town Board of the
Town of Rensselaerville will hold a Public Hearing on the following Special
Districts in the Town of Rensselaerville. The budget amounts for these
Districts showing the actual budget amount for 2013 and the proposed
budget for the 2014 fiscal year are as follows:
Rensselaerville Hydrant District- from $1020.00 to $2500.00
Rensselaerville Ambulance District- from $28,815.00 to $29,815.00
Medusa Volunteer Fire Company - from $59,889.00 to $61,389.00
Tri-Village Volunteer Fire Company - from $56,888.00 to $58,888.00
Said Public Hearings will be held on November 6, 2013, commencing
at 7PM at the Rensselaerville Town Hall, 87 Barger Road, Medusa, NY
12120. All persons interested in the foregoing may be heard at the time
and place indicated above.
DATED: October 30, 2013
BY ORDER OF THE TOWN BOARD
Kathleen A. Hallenbeck Town Clerk
(23-15)
LEGAL NOTICE
PUBLIC NOTICE
OF HEARING BEFORE
ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS
Notice is hereby given that the
Zoning Board of Appeals of the
Town of Guilderland, New York, will
hold a public hearing pursuant to
Articles IVA & V of the Zoning Law
on the following proposition:
Special Use Permit Request
No. 4416
Request of Joshua Merlis for
a Special Use Permit under the
Zoning Law to permit: the operation of a business office for Albany
Running Exchange as a Home
Occupation I.
Per Articles IVA & V Sections
280-37.3 & 280-52 respectively
For property owned by Joshua
Merlis
Situated as follows: 131 Arcadia
Avenue Albany, NY 12203
Tax Map # 63.08-3-15
Zoned: R10
Plans open for public inspection
at the Building Department during
normal business hours. Said hearing will take place on the 6th of
November, 2013 at the Guilderland
Town Hall beginning at 7:30pm.
Dated: October 2, 2013
Jacqueline M. Siudy
Acting Zoning Administrator
(24-15)
LEGAL NOTICE
PUBLIC NOTICE
OF HEARING BEFORE
ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS
Notice is hereby given that the
Zoning Board of Appeals of the
Town of Guilderland, New York, will
resume a public hearing pursuant to
Articles IV & V of the Zoning Law on
the following proposition:
Variance Request No. 4420
Request of Scott Wallant for a
Variance of the regulations under
the Zoning Law to permit: the
construction of a detached garage
within the 100ft setback from a
watercourse.
Per Articles IV & V Sections 28029 & 280-51 respectively
For property owned by Miranda
L Lia
Situated as follows: 131 Spy
Glass Court Albany, NY 12203
Tax Map #51.16-1-49
Zoned: R040
Plans open for public inspection
at the Building Department during
normal business hours. Said hearing will take place on the 6th of
November, 2013 at the Guilderland
Town Hall beginning at 7:30pm.
Dated: October 28, 2013
Jacqueline M. Siudy
Acting Zoning Administrator
(25-15)
LEGAL NOTICE
PUBLIC NOTICE
OF HEARING BEFORE
ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS
Notice is hereby given that the
Zoning Board of Appeals of the
Town of Guilderland, New York,
will hold a public hearing pursuant
to Articles III & V of the Zoning Law
on the following proposition:
Special Use Permit/Variance
Request No. 4421
Request of John R Marcella for a
Variance of the regulations/Special
Use Permit under the Zoning Law
to permit: the construction of an
addition for an in-law apartment.
Two variances are requested, (1) a
15ft side yard setback is required,
11.5ft is proposed, a 3.5ft variance
is requested and (2) 750sf is the
maximum allowable area of the
apartment, 936sf is proposed, a
186sf variance is requested.
Per Articles III & V Sections 28014, 280-51 & 280-52 respectively
For property owned by John &
Marjorie Marcella
Situated as follows: 3443 E.
Lydius Street Schenectady, NY
12303
Tax Map # 28.00-2-1.5
Zoned: R15
Plans open for public inspection
at the Building Department during
normal business hours. Said hearing will take place on the 6th of
November, 2013 at the Guilderland
Town Hall beginning at 7:30pm.
Dated: October 28, 2013
Jacqueline M. Siudy
Acting Zoning Administrator
(26-15)
LEGAL NOTICE
PUBLIC NOTICE
OF HEARING BEFORE
ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS
Notice is hereby given that the
Zoning Board of Appeals of the
Town of Guilderland, New York,
will hold a public hearing pursuant
to Articles IV & V of the Zoning Law
on the following proposition:
Variance Request No. 4422
Request of Anchor Sign, Inc.
for a Variance of the regulations
under the Zoning Law to permit:
the installation of an additional
building mounted sign. Variances
are requested for the following:
1) to permit a total of three signs,
two are permitted and 2) to permit
a total of 87.7sf of signage, 50sf is
permitted.
Per Articles IV & V Sections 28026 & 280-51 respectively
For property owned by Twenty
Twenty Seven Western Avenue
LLC
Situated as follows: 2027 Western Avenue Albany, NY 12203
Tax Map # 51.07-1-1
Zoned: LB
Plans open for public inspection
at the Building Department during
normal business hours. Said hearing will take place on the 6th of
November, 2013 at the Guilderland
Town Hall beginning at 7:30pm.
Dated: October 7, 2013
Jacqueline M. Siudy
Acting Zoning Administrator
(27-15)
LEGAL NOTICE
PUBLIC NOTICE
OF HEARING BEFORE
ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS
Notice is hereby given that the
Zoning Board of Appeals of the
Town of Guilderland, New York,
will hold a public hearing pursuant
to Articles IV & V of the Zoning Law
on the following proposition:
Special Use Permit/Variance
Request No. 4423
LEGAL NOTICE
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
ON THE PRELIMINARY BUDGET OF
THE TOWN OF NEW SCOTLAND
FOR THE YEAR 2014
Notice is hereby given that the Preliminary Budget of the Town of New
Scotland for the fiscal year beginning January 1, 2014, including general
town funds, highway/public works funds, fire protection district funds,
and special district funds, has been completed and filed in the office of
the Town Clerk of the Town of New Scotland, at New Scotland Town Hall,
2029 New Scotland Road, Slingerlands, New York, where it is available
for inspection by any interested persons during office hours.
The Town Board of the Town of New Scotland shall hold a public hearing on said Preliminary Budget on November 6, 2013 at 6:30 pm at Town
of New Scotland, 2029 New Scotland Road, Slingerlands, NY showing
such changes, alterations and revisions as have been made therein by
the Town Board to the Tentative Budget. At such hearing, any person
may be heard in favor of or against the Preliminary Budget as compiled
or for or against any item or items therein contained.
The following are the proposed salaries of certain town officers of the
Town of New Scotland:
Officer............................................................ Proposed Salary
Town Supervisor .......................................... $57,860.55
Council Member............................................. $8,093.44
Town Clerk ................................................... $54,104.88
Town Highway Superintendent ..................... $68,680.00
By order of the Town Board of the Town of New Scotland on October
29, 2013.
Diane R. Deschenes
New Scotland Town Clerk
(34-15)
Request of Independent Towers
Holdings, LLC for a Variance of the
regulations/ Special Use Permit
under the Zoning Law to permit: the
construction of a communications
facility consisting of a 120’ tall tower
and the related equipment shelter
that will be contained by a 6’ high
chain link/barbed wire fence enclosure within the limits of an existing
52 acre cemetery. A use variance
is requested to allow the installation of a communication tower in a
residential district. Area variances
are requested for the following; (1)
to permit the structure within 100ft
of a watercourse and (2) to permit
the structure to be erected beyond
the angle of repose.
Per Articles IV & V Sections
280-29, 280-37, 280-51 & 280-52
respectively
For property owned by Prospect
Hill Cemetery Association
Situated as follows: 2167 Western Avenue Guilderland NY 12084
Tax Map # 40.00-2-11 Zoned:
R15
Plans open for public inspection
at the Building Department during
normal business hours. Said hearing will take place on the 6th of
November, 2013 at the Guilderland
Town Hall beginning at 7:30pm.
Dated: October 25, 2013
Jacqueline M. Siudy
Acting Zoning Administrator
(28-15)
LEGAL NOTICE
Notice of formation of TF Strategic Consulting LLC. Articles of
Org. filed with NY Secretary of State
(NS) on SEPTEMBER 09, 2013, office location: Albany County, NS is
designated as agent upon whom
process may be served, NS shall
mail service of process (SOP) to
NW Registered Agent LLC @ 90
State St STE 700 Office 40, NW
Registered Agent LLC is designated
as agent for SOP at 90 State St STE
700 Office 40, purpose is any lawful
purpose.
(29-15-20)
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that the
Zoning Board of Appeals of the
Village of Voorheesville will hold a
Public Hearing to review the following request from:
Hazel Flansburg: for a 14-foot
side yard setback Area Variance for
a proposed addition to the house
located at 83 North Main Street.
The hearing will be held on
Thursday, November 7, 2013 at
7:00 PM at the Voorheesville Fire
House, 12 Altamont Road, Voorheesville, NY.
Dated: October 22, 2013
BY ORDER OF THE
ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS
(5-15)
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE TO BIDDERS
THE BOARD OF EDUCATION
OF THE GUILDERLAND CENTRAL
SCHOOL DISTRICT, COUNTY OF
ALBANY, GUILDERLAND CENTER, NEW YORK, WILL RECEIVE
SEALED BIDS AT THE ADMINISTRATION OFFICES; PO BOX 18, 8
SCHOOL ROAD, GUILDERLAND
CENTER, NY 12085 UNTIL 12:00
P.M. on November 25, 2013 FOR
81/2 X 11 WHITE DUAL PURPOSE
COPY PAPER.
SPECIFICATIONS MAY BE OBTAINED AT THE ADMINISTRATION
OFFICES, 8 SCHOOL ROAD, P.O.
BOX 18, GUILDERLAND CENTER,
NY 12085. THE BOARD OF EDUCATION RESERVES THE RIGHT
TO REJECT ANY OR ALL BIDS.
NEIL T. SANDERS
ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENT
FOR BUSINESS
(21-15)
LEGAL NOTICE
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Town of Westerlo Town
Board will hold a Public Hearing on
proposed Local Law No. 3 of 2013
which will revlse Sections: 7.80 (A,
-1), 8.40, and 8.50 of Local Law
No. 1 of 1989 (the Town of Westerlo Zoning Law) on Wednesday,
November 6, 2013 at 7:00 PM in
the Westerlo Town Hall located at
933 County Route 401, Westerlo,
NY. A draft of proposed Local Law
#3 of 2013 can be obtained at the
Westerlo Town Clerk’s office and ls
available on the Town of Westerlo
website: www.townofwesterlony.
com.
Said Public Hearing will be
immediately followed by Public
Hearings on the following:
2. 2014 Town of Westerlo Preliminary Budget
3. 2014 proposed Town of Westerlo Volunteer Fire Co. Budget
4. 2014 proposed Westerlo
Rescue Squad Budget
A copy of the 2014 Preliminary
Budget is available at the Westerlo
Town Clerk’s office at the same
address. The regular Town Board
meeting will follow the Public
Hearings.
Dated: Oct. 1, 2013
By Order of
the Westerlo Town Board
Kathleen J. Splnnato
Town Clerk
(4-15)
LEGAL NOTICE
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that
the Town Board has introduced
proposed Local Law No. I of 2013
entitled “A Local Law Overriding
the Real Property Tax Levy Limit
for Fiscal Year 2014” A copy of the
proposed local law is on file in the
office of the Town Clerk. The Town
Board will hold a Public Hearing on
the proposed law on November
12, 2013 at 6:30PM at the Rensselaerville Town Hall, 87 Barger
Road, Medusa, NY 12120, at which
time and place all those wishing to
comment on the proposed Local
Law will have the opportunity to
be heard. Written comments will
also be accepted at that time and
place. The text of the proposed
Local Law is as follows:
BE IT ENACTED by the Town
Board of the Town of Rensselaerville as follows:
Section 1. Legislative Authority
Chapter 97 of the Laws of 2011
of New York State, incorporated
in Section 3-c of the General Municipal Law, established a ‘tax cap’
that generally limits the amount of
a municipality’s real property tax
levy for the upcoming fiscal year
according to a formula set out in
the statute, but the statute also
authorizes local govemments, pursuant to General Municipal Law §
3-c(5), to override the tax levy limit
for the upcoming fiscal year.
Section 2. Override of Tax Levy
Limit for Fiscal Year 2014
The real property tax levy limit
set out in Section 3-c of the General Municipal Law is overridden,
pursuant to New York General Municipal Law § 3-c(5), for Fiscal Year
2014, and the Town may adopt a
budget for Fiscal Year 2014 that
incorporates a real property tax
increase in excess of the otherwise
applicable tax levy limit.
LEGAL NOTICE
LEGAL NOTICE
Section 3. Effective Date
This local law shall take effect
immediately upon filing with the
Secretary ol’State.
A copy of the proposed Local Law is available for review at
the Town Hall and on the Town s
website (http:www.rensselaerville.
com).
The Work Meeting of the Town
Board will follow the Public Hearing.
October 30, 2013
ORDER OF THE TOWN BOARD
Kathleen A. Hallenbcck
Town Clerk
(22-15)
LEGAL NOTICE
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Town of Westerlo Hydrofracking Committee will hold a
meeting on Wednesday, November
13, 2013 at 7:00 PM in the Westerlo
Town Hall located at 933 County
Route 401, Westerlo.
Dated: 10/24/2013
By Order of the
Hydrofracking Committee
Kathleen Splnnato
Town Clerk
(17-15)
LEGAL NOTICE
ARTICLES OF ORGANIZATION
OF DMA Golden Properties LLC
Under section 203 of the Limited
Liability Company Law
FIRST: The name of the limited
liability company is: DMA Golden
Properties LLC
SECOND; The county within
this state in which the office of the
limited liability company is to be
located is: Schenectady
THIRD; The Secretary of State
is designated as agent of the limited liability company upon whom
process against it may be served.
The address within or without
this state to which the Secretary
of State shall mail a copy of any
process against the limited liability company served upon him
or her is:
Diana M Arnold, 35 Arnold
Road, Delanson, NY 12053
(13-15-20)
LEGAL NOTICE
Notice of
Permissive Referendum
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the Board of Fire Commissioners of
the Guilderland Center Fire District
in the Town of Guilderland, Albany
County, New York, at a meeting
held on the 15th of October, 2013,
duly adopted the following Resolution, subject to a permissive
referendum.
RESOLUTION #1
A RESOLUTION AUTHORIZING
THE BOARD OF FIRE COMMISSIONERS OF THE GUILDERLAND
CENTER FIRE DISTRICT, TOWN
OF GUILDERLAND, ALBANY
COUNTY. NEW YORK, TO SELL
OR OTHERWISE DISPOSE OF
PERSONAL PROPERTY OF THE
FIRE DISTRICT CONSISTING OF
A 2003 GMC SIERRA PICKUP
TRUCK, WHICH VEHICLE IS NO
LONGER NECESSARY FOR ANY
OF THE USES OR PURPOSES OF
THE DISTRICT AT SUCH TIME,
AND UPON SUCH TERMS AND
CONDITIONS AS THE BOARD
IN ITS DISCRETION MAY DETERMINE; SAID MONIES REALIZED THEREFROM TO BE USED
TOWARD THE PURCHASE OF A
NEW CHIEF’S VEHICLE.
BE IT RESOLVED, by the Board
of Fire Commissioners of the
Guilderland Center Fire District in
the Town of Guilderland, Albany
County, New York, as follows:
Section 1. The Board of Fire
Commissioners is of the opinion
that the 2003 GMC Sierra Pickup
Truck is no longer necessary for
any of the uses or purposes of the
district and the Fire District is to sell
or otherwise dispose of the 2003
GMC Sierra Pickup Truck.
Section 2. That it is determined
that the monies to be received
from the sale of the 2003 GMC
Sierra Pickup Truck will not exceed
$20,000.00.
Section 3. Any monies or sums
to be realized from the sale of this
2003 GMC Sierra Pickup Truck
shall be paid into the General Fund
Vehicle Account, thereby reducing
the amount of monies necessary
to be allocated to purchase a new
Chief’s Vehicle.
Section 4. This resolution is
adopted subject to a permissive
referendum.
Dated: October 15, 2013
By Order of the
Commissioners of the
Guilderland Center Fire District.
Douglas C. Lawton, Secretary
Guilderland Center Fire District
(31-15)
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE TO BIDDERS
FIRE APPARATUS
Sealed bids for the purchase
by the Westmere Fire District of
a Ladder Truck Fire Apparatus
incorporating other miscellaneous
equipment will be received at the
Westmere Fire District’s Firehouse
located at 1741 Western Avenue
in the Town of Guilderland, County
of Albany, State of New York until
6:00 p.m. on December 2, 2013, at
which time bids for the vehicle and
equipment will be publicly opened
and read aloud.Specifications for
the vehicle and equipment may be
obtained by interested manufacturers free of charge at the Westmere
Fire District Firehouse located at
1741 Western Avenue in the Town
of Guilderland, by calling the Fire
District Office Manager at (518) 4566734 weekdays between the hours
of 9:00 a.m. and 3:00 p.m., or online
at www.westmerefire.org.
A mandatory pre-bid meeting will
be held for all prospective bidders
on November 13, 2013 at 6:00 p.m.
at Westmere Fire District’s Firehouse
located at 1741 Western Avenue in
the Town of Guilderland.
A bid bond or certified check in
the amount of at least ten percent
(10%) of the amount bid must accompany all bids submitted. All
bids must include a non-collusive
bid statement pursuant to Section
103-g of the General Municipal
Law.
The Westmere Fire District reserves the right to reject any and
all bids and to accept the bid best
suited for its specific needs.
Bids will be binding for one hundred twenty (120) days subsequent
to bid opening. Bidding shall be in
accordance with the instructions
to bidders.
Dated: October 28, 2013
Sean M. Maguire, Secretary
Board of Fire Commissioners
Westmere Fire District
(32-15)
LEGAL NOTICE
Notice is hereby given that the
Town of Berne Planning Board
meeting scheduled for November
7 has been changed from 7 PM
to 7:30 PM.
Dated: October 30, 2013
Anita Clayton
Planning Board Secretary
(33-15)
LEGAL NOTICE
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that
the Zoning Board of Appeals for
the Town of Rensselaerville will
hold a Public Hearing on Tuesday,
November 19th, 2013 at 7:00 pm
at the Town Hall, 87 Barger Road,
Medusa, NY on an application for
an area variance proposed by Kevin
and Roger Winn at CR 351 (tax
parcel 149.-1-13). The applicant’s
current subdivision plan creates a
lot that only has 226.79 ft of road
frontage and the requirement is 250
ft. Thus the applicant is seeking a
variance for the 23.21ft of the road
frontage so they can proceed with
their minor subdivision.
All those who are interested in
this proposal will be provided with
the full opportunity to be heard
on the date of the Public Hearing.
Persons wishing to appear at such
hearing may do so in person or
by attorney or other representative. Documents in support of this
proposed variance are available for
inspection at the Rensselaerville
Town Building located at 87 Barger
Road, Medusa, NY.
Communications in writing in
relation thereto may be filed with
the Zoning Board of Appeals or at
such hearing.
DATED: October 29, 2013
BY ORDER OF THE ZONING
BOARD OF APPEALS FOR THE
TOWN OF RENSSELAERVILLE
Mary Carney Secretary
Planning Board
(32-15)
LEGAL NOTICE
327 Kosciuszko LLC Arts. of
Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY
(SSNY) on 9/13/13. Office in Albany
Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon
whom process against it may be
served. SSNY shall mail process to
PO Box 10873, Albany, NY 12201.
Purpose: General.
(6-10-15)
Check out our new website at
www.altamontenterprise.com
The deadline for legal ads
is Wednesday at noon.
34
The Altamont Enterprise – Thursday, October 31, 2013
LEGAL NOTICE
LEGAL NOTICE
LEGAL NOTICE
LEGAL NOTICE
LEGAL NOTICE
LEGAL NOTICE
LEGAL NOTICE
Premier Leads LLC Arts. of
Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY
(SSNY) on 7/30/13. Office in Albany
Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon
whom process against it may be
served. SSNY shall mail process to
PO Box 10873, Albany, NY 12201.
Purpose: General.
(1-10-15)
LEGAL NOTICE
874 Dekalb LLC Arts. of Org.
filed with Secy. of State of NY
(SSNY) on 9/11/13. Office in Albany
Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon
whom process against it may be
served. SSNY shall mail process to
PO Box 10873, Albany, NY 12201.
Purpose: General.
(2-10-15)
LEGAL NOTICE
40 Granite Realty LLC Arts. of
Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY
(SSNY) on 8/23/13. Office in Albany
Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon
whom process against it may be
served. SSNY shall mail process to
PO Box 10873, Albany, NY 12201.
Purpose: General.
(3-10-15)
LEGAL NOTICE
Haim Maimon LLC Arts. of Org.
filed with Secy. of State of NY
(SSNY) on 9/11/13. Office in Albany
Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon
whom process against it may be
served. SSNY shall mail process to
PO Box 10873, Albany, NY 12201.
Purpose: General.
(4-10-15)
LEGAL NOTICE
Nu 4217 LLC Arts. of Org. filed
with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on
5/8/13. Office in Albany Co. SSNY
desig. agent of LLC upon whom
process against it may be served.
SSNY shall mail process to PO Box
10873, Albany, NY 12201. Purpose:
General.
(5-10-15)
LEGAL NOTICE
Lefferts NY LLC Arts. of Org. filed
with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY)
on 9/16/13. Office in Albany Co.
SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon
whom process against it may be
served. SSNY shall mail process to
PO Box 10873, Albany, NY 12201.
Purpose: General.
(7-10-15)
LEGAL NOTICE
Notice of formation of Prims
Marketing LLC. Articles of Org.
filed with NY Secretary of State
(NS) on 9/6/13, office location:
Albany County, NS is designated
as agent upon whom process may
be served, NS shall mail service of
process (SOP) to NW Registered
Agent LLC @ 90 State St STE 700
Office 40, NW Registered Agent
LLC is designated as agent for
SOP at 90 State St STE 700 Office
40, purpose is any lawful purpose.
(8-10-15)
LEGAL NOTICE
Notice of qualification of American Risk Services, LLC. Articles
of Org. filed with NY Secretary of
State (NS) on August 23, 2013,
office location: Albany County, NS
is designated as agent upon whom
process may be served, NS shall
mail service of process (SOP) to NW
Registered Agent LLC @ 90 State
St STE 700 Office 40, Albany, NY
12207, NW Registered Agent LLC
is designated as agent for SOP
at 90 State St STE 700 Office 40,
Albany, NY 12207, purpose is any
lawful purpose.
(9-10-15)
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE OF FORMATION of limited liability company (LLC). Name:
JACKSON514 LLC. Articles of
Organization filed with Secretary of
State of NY (SSNY) on 8/12/2013.
Office location: Albany County.
SSNY designated as agent of LLC
upon whom process against it
may be served. SSNY shall mail
copy of process to: THE LLC 199
Lee Avenue, Suite 308, Brooklyn,
NY 11211. Purpose: any lawful
purpose.
(10-10-15)
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE OF FORMATION of
limited liability company (LLC).
Name: RRH HOLDINGS LLC.
Articles of Organization filed with
Secretary of State of NY (SSNY)
on 9/4/2013.Office location: Albany
County. SSNY designated as agent
of LLC upon whomprocess against
it may be served. SSNY shall mail
copy of process to: THE LLC 15W
47th Street, Suite 704, New York,
NY 10036. Purpose: any lawful
purpose.
(11-10-15)
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE OF FORMATION OF
LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY
NAME: JACKFIT, LLC, Articles of
Organization filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY)
on August 2, 2013. Office Location: Albany County. SSNY has
been designated as agent of the
LLC upon whom process against
it may be served. SSNY shall mail
a copy of process to the LLC c/o
Northwest Registered Agent LLC,
located at 90 State Street Suite 700,
Office 40, Albany, New York 12207.
Purpose: Any lawful activity.
(12-10-15)
LEGAL NOTICE
Rock Developers, LLC Arts. of
Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY
(SSNY) on 10/2/13. Office in Albany
Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon
whom process against it may be
served. SSNY shall mail process to
PO Box 10873, Albany, NY 12201.
Purpose: General.
(4-13-18)
LEGAL NOTICE
Notice of formation of Braver
Associates LLC. Articles of Org.
filed with NY Secretary of State
(NS) on 08/19/13, office location:
Albany County, NS is designated
as agent upon whom process may
be served, NS shall mail service of
process (SOP) to NW Registered
Agent LLC @ 90 State St STE 700
Office 40, NW Registered Agent
LLC is designated as agent for SOP
at 90 State St STE 700 Office 40,
purpose is any lawful purpose.
(13-10-15)
LEGAL NOTICE
Notice of foreign qualification
of Camino del Avion (Delaware),
LLC: App. for Auth. filed with NY
Secretary of State (NS) on 8/28/13.
Office location: Albany County. LLC
formed in Delaware on 4/18/13. Address for service of process (SOP)
in DE: 2711 Centerville Rd STE 400
Wilmington. Cert. of Form. filed with
Sec. of State, 401 Federal Street
STE 4 Dover. NS is designated as
agent for SOP. NS shall mail SOP
to NW Registered Agent LLC @ 90
State St STE 700 Office 40. NW
Registered Agent LLC is designated
as agent for SOP @ 90 State St STE
700 Office 40. Purpose is any lawful
purpose.
(14-10-15)
LEGAL NOTICE
Partush Equities LLC Arts. of
Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY
(SSNY) on 9/24/13. Office in Albany
Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon
whom process against it may be
served. SSNY shall mail process to
PO Box 10873, Albany, NY 12201.
Purpose: General.
(11-12-17)
LEGAL NOTICE
Notice of Formation of CSL
Partners LLC. Arts of org. filed with
New York Secy of State (SSNY) on
8/20/13. Office location: Albany
County. SSNY is designated as
agent of LLC upon whom process
against it may be served. SSNY
shall mail process to: c/o Capucilli Firm, PLLC 175 Varick St., NY
NY 10014. Purpose: any lawful
activity.
(16-10-15)
LEGAL NOTICE
Notice of foreign qualification of
Emport, LLC: App. for Auth. filed
with NY Secretary of State (NS)
on 9/1/13. Office location: Albany
County. LLC formed in Pennsylvania on 2/7/11. Address for service of
process (SOP) in PA: 313 W Liberty
St #232 Lancaster. Cert. of Org.
filed with Dept. of State, 401 North
St RM 206 Harrisburg. NS is designated as agent for SOP. NS shall
mail SOP to NW Registered Agent
LLC @ 90 State St STE 700 Office
40. NW Registered Agent LLC is
designated as agent for SOP at 90
State St STE 700 Office 40. Purpose
is any lawful purpose.
(15-10-15)
LEGAL NOTICE
Notice of Formation of DStar
Holdings LLC. Arts of org. filed with
New York Secy of State (SSNY) on
8/20/13. Office location: Albany
County. SSNY is designated as
agent of LLC upon whom process
against it may be served. SSNY
shall mail process to: c/o Capucilli Firm, PLLC 175 Varick St., NY
NY 10014. Purpose: any lawful
activity.
(17-10-15)
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE OF FORMATION OF
LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY.
NAME: AEA Holdings, LLC. Articles
of Organization were filed with the
Secretary of State of New York
(SSNY) on August 27, 2013. Office
Location: Albany County. SSNY
has been designated as agent
of the LLC upon whom process
against it may be served. SSNY
shall mail a copy of process to the
LLC: 147 Old Stage Road, East
Berne, New York 12059. Purpose:
For any lawful purpose
(18-10-15)
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE OF FORMATION of
limited liability company (LLC).
Name: 1614 PROSPECT LLC.
Articles of Organization filed with
Secretary of State of NY (SSNY) on
8/26/2013. Office location: Albany
County. SSNY designated as agent
of LLC upon whom process against
it may be served. SSNY shall mail
copy of process to: THE LLC 199
Lee Avenue, suite 308, Brooklyn,
NY 11211. Purpose: any lawful
purpose.
(19-10-15)
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE OF FORMATION of
limited liability company (LLC).
Name: NEW REALTIES WEB, LLC.
Articles of Organization filed with
Secretary of State of NY (SSNY) on
7/31/2013. Office location: Albany
County. SSNY designated as agent
of LLC upon whom process against
it may be served. SSNY shall mail
copy of process to: THE LLC 115
West 29th Street 4th Floor, New
York, NY 10001. Purpose: any lawful purpose.
(20-10-15)
LEGAL NOTICE
677 Monroe St. LLC Arts. of
Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY
(SSNY) on 5/21/13. Office in Albany
Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon
whom process against it may be
served. SSNY shall mail process to
PO Box 10873, Albany, NY 12201.
Purpose: General.
(5-13-18)
LEGAL NOTICE
Notice of formation [domestic]
of Graf Capital Management LLC.
Articles of Org. filed with NY Secretary of State (NS) on May 2nd, 2012,
office location: Albany County, NS
is designated as agent upon whom
process may be served, NS shall
mail service of process (SOP) to NW
Registered Agent LLC @ 90 State St
STE 700 Office 40, purpose is any
lawful purpose.
(22-10-15)
LEGAL NOTICE
Notice of Qualification of FOREIGN LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY: Quick Cat, LLC. Certificate
of Authority was filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY)
on 7/22/13. Office location: Albany
County. LLC was formed in MS on
5/17/2006. Principal office address:
145 Planters Grove, Brandon, MS
39047. Art. Of Inc. filed with MS
Secretary of State, 700 North St.,
Jackson, MS 39202. SSNY has
been designated as agent of the
LLC upon whom process against
it may be served. SSNY shall
mail a copy of process to the LLC,
145 Planters Grove, Brandon, MS
39047. Purpose: For any lawful
purpose.
(25-10-15)
LEGAL NOTICE
STONERIDGE FARMS, LLC Notice of Formation of Limited Liability
Company Articles of Organization of
Stoneridge Farms, LLC (the “LLC”)
were filed with the Department of
State of New York (“SSNY”) on
July 1, 2013. Office location: Albany County. SSNY is designated
as agent of the LLC upon whom
process against it may be served.
SSNY shall mail a copy of any
process c/o the LLC, 3711 Western
Turnpike, Altamont, NY 12009. The
LLC does not have a specific date
of dissolution. Purpose: All legal
purposes. Filer: Lavelle & Finn, LLP
29 British American Blvd., Latham,
NY 12110
(29-10-15)
LEGAL NOTICE
Notice of qualification of EARTH
METRIX LLC. Authority filed with
the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on
2/2/2012. Office in Albany County.
Formed in DE on 11/4/2011. SSNY
has been designated as agent
of the LLC upon whom process
against it may be served. SSNY
shall mail process to the LLC, 111
8th Ave New York, NY 10011. Purpose: Any lawful purpose
(1-11-16)
LEGAL NOTICE
Notice of formation [domestic] of
REEL INTENTIONS, LLC. Articles
of Org. filed with NY Secretary of
State (NS) on April 02, 2013 office
location: Albany County, NS is
designated as agent upon whom
process may be served, NS shall
mail service of process (SOP) to
NW Registered Agent LLC @ 90
State St STE 700 Office 40, NW
Registered Agent LLC is designated
as agent for SOP at 90 State St STE
700 Office 40, purpose is any lawful
purpose.
(2-11-16)
LEGAL NOTICE
Notice of qualification of QS2
Financial LLC. Articles of Org. filed
with NY Secretary of State (NS)
on July 9th, 2013, office location:
Albany County, NS is designated
as agent upon whom process may
be served, NS shall mail service
of process (SOP) to Registered
Agents Inc. @ 90 State St STE 700
Office 40, Registered Agents Inc. is
designated as agent for SOP at 90
State St STE 700 Office 40, purpose
is any lawful purpose.
(3-11-16)
LEGAL NOTICE
Notice of domestic qualification
of Wu Di Capital, LLC. Articles of
Org. filed with NY Secretary of State
(NS) on 9/16/2013, office location:
Albany County, NS is designated
as agent upon whom process may
be served, NS shall mail service of
process (SOP) to NW Registered
Agent LLC @ 90 State St STE 700
Office 40, Albany, NY 12207, NW
Registered Agent LLC is designated
as agent for SOP at 90 State St STE
700 Office 40, Albany, NY 12207,
purpose is any lawful purpose.
(4-11-16)
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE OF FORMATION of
ORGANIC CODE LLC, a Limited
Liability Company. Arts. of Org. filed
with Secretary of State of New York
(SSNY) on 09/16/2013. Office loc.:
Albany County. SSNY designated
as agent upon whom process may
be served. SSNY shall mail process
to: c/o Lightman Law Firm LLC,
345 Seventh Avenue, Floor 21,
New York, NY 10001. Purpose: Any
lawful activity.
(5-11-16)
LEGAL NOTICE
Notice of formation of LLC-Jinlee
LLC has filed an Articles of Organization with the Secretary of State of
New York on 3/22/13. Its office is
located in Albany County. The Secretary of State has been designated
as agent upon whom process may
be served. A copy of any process
shall be mailed to 93 Bradford St.,
#4, Albany, NY 12206. Its business
is to engage in any lawful activity
for which limited liability companies
may be organized under Section
203 of the New York Limited Liability
Company Act.
(6-11-16)
LEGAL NOTICE
Notice of formation of Nantucket’s Finest Seafood LLC. Arts. of Org
filed with the New York Secretary of
State (SSNY) on 9/17/2013. Office
Location: Albany County. SSNY is
designated as agent of LLC upon
whom process against it may be
served. SSNY shall mail process to:
Christopher M. Lasky, 10 Brookview
Ave., Delmar, NY 12054. Purpose:
any lawful activity.
(7-11-16)
LEGAL NOTICE
EPNY Developers LLC Arts. of
Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY
(SSNY) on 9/24/13. Office in Albany
Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon
whom process against it may be
served. SSNY shall mail process to
PO Box 10873, Albany, NY 12201.
Purpose: General.
(12-12-17)
LEGAL NOTICE
Notice of formation of
ECHONEVA SOLUTIONS LLC.
Articles of Org. filed with NY Secretary of State (NS) on 9/18/2013,
office location: Albany County, NS
is designated as agent upon whom
process may be served, NS shall
mail service of process (SOP) to NW
Registered Agent LLC @ 90 State
St STE 700 Office 40, Albany, NY
12207, NW Registered Agent LLC
is designated as agent for SOP
at 90 State St STE 700 Office 40,
Albany, NY 12207, purpose is any
lawful purpose.
(8-11-16)
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE OF FORMATION OF
LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY.
NAME: Ohana Farm LLC Articles
of Organization were filed with the
Secretary of State of New York
(SSNY) on upon whom process
against it may be served. SSNY
shall mail a copy of process to the
LLC, P.O. Box 81, East Berne, NY
12059. Purpose: For any lawful
purpose.
(9-11-16)
LEGAL NOTICE
Zabdav LLC Arts. of Org. filed
with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY)
on 7/10/13. Office in Albany Co.
SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon
whom process against it may be
served. SSNY shall mail process to
PO Box 10873, Albany, NY 12201.
Purpose: General.
(15-12-17)
LEGAL NOTICE
Notice of Formation of Sennamachkin LLC Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of
State of New York (SSNY) On July
5, 2013. Office Location: Albany
County SSNY designated as agent
of LLC upon whom Process against
it may be served. SSNY shall mail
process to: The LLC, 47 South
Clement Ave Ravena, NY 12143
Purpose: any lawful activity.
(10-11-16)
LEGAL NOTICE
167 Hart LLC Arts. of Org. filed
with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY)
on 5/24/13. Office in Albany Co.
SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon
whom process against it may be
served. SSNY shall mail process to
PO Box 10873, Albany, NY 12201.
Purpose: General.
(14-12-17)
LEGAL NOTICE
Notice of formation of Limited Liability Company. Name:
Valenti Management LLC. Articles
of organization were filed with the
Secretary of State of New York
(ssny) on 9/18/13. Office location:
Albany County. SSNY is designated
as agent of the LLC upon whom
process against it may be served.
SSNY shall mail a copy of process
to the LLC, 14 Cheshire way Loudonville NY 12211. Purpose: For any
lawful purpose
(4-12-17)
LEGAL NOTICE
Notice of formation of NYC
Urban Foot Tours LLC. Articles of
Org. filed with NY Secretary of State
(NS) on 8/21/13 office location:
Albany County, NS is designated
as agent upon whom process may
be served, NS shall mail service of
process (SOP) to NW Registered
Agent LLC @ 90 State St STE 700
Office 40, Albany, NY 12207, NW
Registered Agent LLC is designated
as agent for SOP at 90 State St STE
700 Office 40, Albany, NY 12207,
purpose is any lawful purpose.
(5-12-17)
LEGAL NOTICE
Notice of formation domestic/
qualification of Shop In Piece LLC.
Articles of Org. filed with NY Secretary of State (NS) on July 22, 2013,
office location: Albany County, NS
is designated as agent upon whom
process may be served, NS shall
mail service of process (SOP) to
NW Registered Agent LLC @ 90
State St STE 700 Office 40, NW
Registered Agent LLC is designated
as agent for SOP at 90 State St STE
700 Office 40, purpose is any lawful
purpose.
(6-12-17)
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE OF FORMATION OF
LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY.
NAME: CAR GARDEN LLC. Articles
of Organization were filed with the
Secretary of State of New York
(SSNY) on 8/15/13. Office location:
Albany County. SSNY has been
designated as agent of the LLC
upon whom process against it may
be served. SSNY shall mail a copy
of process to the LLC, 176 Harvard
Rd, Watervliet, NY 12189. Purpose:
For any lawful purpose.
(25-12-17)
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE OF FORMATION OF
Outdoortising LLC. Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of
State of NY (SSNY) on 09/16/2013.
Office location: Albany County.
SSNY has been designated as
agent upon whom process against
it may be served. The SSNY shall
mail service of process (SOP) to NW
Registered Agent LLC @ 90 State St
STE 700 Office 40, NW Registered
Agent LLC is designated as agent
for SOP at 90 State St STE 700 Office 40. Purpose of LLC: To engage
in any lawful act or activity.
(7-12-17)
LEGAL NOTICE
Name of LLC: F.Y.O.P. (Forge.
Your. Own. Path) Date of filing of
Articles of Organization with the
New York Department of State:
August 5th, 2013. Office of LLC:
10 Pauline Court Rensselaer NY
12144. The New York Secretary
of State has been designated as
the agent upon whom process
may be served. NYSS may mail a
copy of any process to the LLC at:
10 Pauline Court Rensselaer NY
12144. Purpose of LLC: Any Lawful
purpose permitted.
(8-12-17)
LEGAL NOTICE
228 U LLC Arts. of Org. filed with
Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on
9/13/13. Office in Albany Co. SSNY
desig. agent of LLC upon whom
process against it may be served.
SSNY shall mail process to c/o Usacorp Inc., P.O. Box 10873, Albany,
NY 12201. Purpose: General.
(9-12-17)
LEGAL NOTICE
Chargestor, LLC Arts. of Org.
filed with Secy. of State of NY
(SSNY) on 9/18/13. Office in Albany
Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon
whom process against it may be
served. SSNY shall mail process
to Richard Jones, 1436 First St.,
Watervliet, NY 12189. Purpose:
General.
(10-12-17)
LEGAL NOTICE
Links Of New York LLC Arts. of
Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY
(SSNY) on 10/1/13. Office in Albany
Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon
whom process against it may be
served. SSNY shall mail process to
PO Box 10873, Albany, NY 12201.
Purpose: General.
(13-12-17)
LEGAL NOTICE
627 Blake LLC Arts. of Org. filed
with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY)
on 9/18/13. Office in Albany Co.
SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon
whom process against it may be
served. SSNY shall mail process to
PO Box 10873, Albany, NY 12201.
Purpose: General.
(16-12-17)
LEGAL NOTICE
157 Lorimer LLC Arts. of Org.
filed with Secy. of State of NY
(SSNY) on 6/27/13. Office in Albany
Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon
whom process against it may be
served. SSNY shall mail process to
PO Box 10873, Albany, NY 12201.
Purpose: General.
(17-12-17)
LEGAL NOTICE
Lemberg Holdings LLC Arts. of
Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY
(SSNY) on 2/13/13. Office in Albany
Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon
whom process against it may be
served. SSNY shall mail process to
PO Box 10873, Albany, NY 12201.
Purpose: General.
(18-12-17)
LEGAL NOTICE
Notice of Formation of Better
Edge Tutoring LLC. Arts of org. filed
with New York Secy of State (SSNY)
on 9/24/13. Office location: Albany
County. SSNY is designated as
agent of LLC upon whom process
against it may be served. SSNY
shall mail process to: 510 W. 110th
St., 8E, NY, NY 10025. Purpose:
any lawful activity.
(23-12-17)
LEGAL NOTICE
Notice of formation of Terticus
LLC. Articles of Org. filed with
NY Secretary of State (NS) on
9/23/2013, office location: Albany County, NS is designated as
agent upon whom process may be
served, NS shall mail service of process (SOP) to NW Registered Agent
LLC @ 90 State St STE 700 Office
40, NW Registered Agent LLC is
designated as agent for SOP at 90
State St STE 700 Office 40, purpose
is any lawful purpose.
(21-12-17)
LEGAL NOTICE
Notice of formation of PROFESSIONAL LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. Name: ONLY IF
ARCHITECTURE, PLLC. Articles
of Organization were filed with the
Secretary of State of New York
(SSNY) on 09/23/2013. Office location: Albany County. SSNY has
been designated as agent of the
PLLC upon whom process may be
served. SSNY shall mail a copy of
process to the PLLC, 404 West 51st
St. Apt 4B, New York, NY 10019.
Purpose: For any lawful purpose.
(22-12-17)
LEGAL NOTICE
127th St. Properties LLC Arts. of
Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY
(SSNY) on 6/19/13. Office in Albany
Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon
whom process against it may be
served. SSNY shall mail process to
Po Box 10873, Albany, NY 12201.
Purpose: General.
(6-13-18)
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE OF FORMATION OF
LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY.
NAME: SHARK PROPERTY MANAGEMENT LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary
of State of New York (SSNY) on
6/26/13. Office location: Albany
County. SSNY has been designated
as agent of the LLC upon whom
process against it may be served.
SSNY shall mail a copy of process
to the LLC, 176 Harvard Rd, Watervliet, NY 12189. Purpose: For any
lawful purpose.
(24-12-17)
LEGAL NOTICE
Notice of formation of Drakon
Construction LLC. Articles of Org.
filed with NY Secretary of State (NS)
on August, 02, 2013, office location:
Albany County, NS is designated
as agent upon whom process may
be served, NS shall mail service
of process (SOP) to Registered
Agents Inc. @ 90 State St STE 700
Office 40, Registered Agents Inc. is
designated as agent for SOP at 90
State St STE 700 Office 40, purpose
is any lawful purpose.
(26-14-17)
LEGAL NOTICE
Notice of formation of T and N
Sagar LLC. Articles of Organization filed with NY Secretary of
State June 14, 2013. Office location, Albany County. NY Secretary
of State designated as agent for
service of process. Secretary of
State shall mail Service of Process
to NW Registered Agent LLC,
90 State St., STE 700 Office 40,
Albany, NY 12207. NW Registered
Agent LLC is designated as agent
for Service of Process at 90 State
St., STE 700 Office 40, Albany, NY
12207. Company purpose-any lawful purpose.
(19-12-17)
LEGAL NOTICE
Notice of formation of Path Consulting Group, LLC. Articles of Org.
filed with NY Secretary of State (NS)
on August 21, 2013. office location:
Albany County, NS is designated
as agent upon whom process may
be served, NS shall mail service of
process (SOP) to NW Registered
Agent LLC @ 90 State St STE 700
Office 40, Albany, NY 12207, NW
Registered Agent LLC is designated
as agent for SOP at 90 State St STE
700 Office 40, Albany, NY 12207,
purpose is any lawful purpose.
(20-12-17)
LEGAL NOTICE
886 Jefferson LLC Arts. of Org.
filed with Secy. of State of NY
(SSNY) on 5/8/13. Office in Albany
Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon
whom process against it may be
served. SSNY shall mail process to
PO Box 10873, Albany, NY 12201.
Purpose: General.
(10-13-18)
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE OF FORMATION OF
LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY.
NAME: LESLIE BAKER & ASSOCIATES LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary
of State of New York (SSNY) on
04/15/08. Office location: Albany
County. SSNY has been designated
as agent of the LLC upon whom
process against it may be served.
SSNY shall mail a copy of process
to the LLC 80 Fuller Road Albany
NY 12205. Purpose: For any lawful
purpose.
(18-13-18)
LEGAL NOTICE
Notice of Qualification of Conduit
Constructors, LLC. Authority filed
with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY)
on 09/06/13. Office location: Albany County. LLC formed in North
Carolina (NC) on 08/05/2005. SSNY
designated as agent of LLC upon
whom process against it may be
served. SSNY shall mail process
to: Corporate Service Company, 80
State Street, Albany, NY 12207, also
the registered agent. Address to be
maintained in NC: 11704 Reames
Road, Charlotte, NC 28269. Arts of
Org. filed with the NC Secretary of
State, PO Box 29622, Raleigh, NC
27626-0622. Purpose: any lawful
activities.
(1-13-18)
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE OF FORMATION OF
LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY.
NAME: Child cor LLC. Articles of
Organization were filed with the
Secretary of State of New York
(SSNY) on 06/28/13. Office location: Albany County. SSNY has
been designated as agent of the
LLC upon whom process against
it may be served. SSNY shall mail
a copy of process to the LLC, c/o
Northwest Registered Agent LLC,
90 State Street, Ste 700 Office 40,
Albany, NY 12207. Purpose: For any
lawful purpose.
(2-13-18)
LEGAL NOTICE
Notice of formation of 365Iserve
LLC. Articles of Org. filed with NY
Secretary of State (NS) on 04-042013, office location: Albany County, NS is designated as agent upon
whom process may be served, NS
shall mail service of process (SOP)
to NW Registered Agent LLC @ 90
State St STE 700 Office 40, NW
Registered Agent LLC is designated
as agent for SOP at 90 State St STE
700 Office 40, purpose is any lawful
purpose.
(3-13-18)
35
The Altamont Enterprise – Thursday, October 31, 2013
auctions
Buy or sell at AARauctions.
com. Contents of homes, businesses, vehicles and real estate.
Bid NOW! AARauctions.com
Lights, Camera, Auction. No
longer the best kept secret.
(NYSCAN)
THIS PLUMBER IS
EASY TO GET
Call Howard Brent – anytime
456-2560 Serving all areas
evenings & weekends same price
plumbing & gas heating repairs
gas & electric water heaters
Licensed - 55 years experience
Faucet Repair Special
$99.50 + parts
MC • VISA Accepted
872-9200
Loucks Brothers
General Contracting Company
Since 1993
Additions - Garages - Decks
Windows - Siding - Bathrooms
Kitchens - Concrete Work
Complete Interior Remodeling
Ted Loucks
All Weather
Construction
Driveways - Foundations
Septic Systems - Ponds
Complete Site Work
Excavating
Locally owned and operated
Call
Fully
Today
Insured
Robert Lawyer Jr.
518-872-9136
Countryman
home
improvement
vinyl and Wood
replacement
Windows
Vinyl Siding,
Entry & Storm Doors,
Storm Windows,
Bathroom Remodeling
872-0610
Joe Marks
excavating
Driveways, Septics
Trucking
Stone and Sand
Snowplowing and more.
FULLY INSURED
FREE ESTIMATES
Shale Delivery
376-5765
872-0645
divorce
Help Wanted
DIVORCE $349 - Uncontested
divorce papers prepared. Includes
poor person application/waives
government fees, if approved.
One signature required. Separation agreements available. Make
Divorce Easy - 518-274-0380.
(NYSCAN)
Bartender/FT-days, TuesdayFriday/Saturday, experience prefferred. Stop in at Smith’s Tavern,
Voorheesville or call 765-4163, or
441-4320.
15-2t
building &
remodeling
for rent
SNOW SEASON? Last chance
road and drive improvements,
stone/shale/crusher run avail.;
snowplow openings, sanders/
melt spreader, res. and comm..
Call Ed w/ C&C Contracting at
(518) 872-0288
13-tf
3 bedroom, 2 bath, LV rm, dining/family rm, 1 car garage, no
smoking/pets. Proof of income, Ref.
Westerlo, BKWCSD, avail Dec.
$1,000, 797-3445
15-3t
snoWploWing
Altamont, Voorheesville, and
surrounding areas. Large or small,
reasonable rates,call Dan at 8108681 or 857-6861
15-5t
VOORHEESVILLE, SLINGERLANDS, New Salem area. Signup
before 11/15 & first plow is free.
478-7244
15-1t
Altamont Village, large 2BR,
study, L.R., D.R., 2 baths, yard, off
street parking, H.W. floors, walk
to all. $950, 518-861-6717, leave
message.
14-3t
Spacious 2 bedroom for rent.
Hardwood, 1 ½ baths, stainless,
garage, finished basement w/
office room, private, deck, Voorheesville schools. No utilities
included. Available November-December $1,250/month. Call Craig
669-1166
14-4t
WANTED, APPLE PACKERS
Cornwall, Vermont Area,
6 temporary workers needed
at Sunrise Orchards, Inc.
to pack apples in packing house.
To start approx. 11/15/2013 to 05/15/2014. A great deal of standing
and heavy lifting. Packing hourly wage is $10.91 per hr. Workers
may also perform general orchard tasks including, pruning of apple
trees, fence and bin repair at $10.91 per hr. 1 month experience
required. Work is guaranteed for 3/4 of the contract period. Tools
provided without cost. Housing provided to workers outside of the
commuting distance. Transportation cost reimbursed after 15 days
or 50% of contract period, whichever comes first.
Please contact (877)466 9757 for your nearest
State Workforce Agency office and refer to Job Order 179993.
Vacancies: Teacher of Mathematics (9-12), Teacher of English
(9-12) To apply for positions visit
our website at www.pecps.k12.
va.us and complete the online
application. Selected applicants
will be invited for an interview
Closing: Until filled. (Prince Edward County Public Schools, 35
Eagle Drive, Farmville, Virginia
2391– 434-315-2100 ext. 3533
EOE
(NYSCAN)
ATTENTION HUNTERS!
5acres- CABIN $59,900 60acres
ABUTS STATE LAND - $99,900
Trophy whitetail hunting, less
than 3 hours NY City! Marketable timber! Call: (888)905-8847
or www.NewYorkLandandLakes.
com
(NYSCAN)
BIG HUNTING LODGE: House,
8 acres, hunt adjoining 500 acre
Deer Creek Forest. Bass ponds,
brooks, fruit woods. Was $129,900,
now $99,900. www.LandFirstNY.
com Call 888-683-2626
(NYSCAN)
Waterfront Lots- Virginia’s
Eastern Shore WAS $325K. Now
From $55,000- Community Pool/
Center, Large Lots, Bay & Ocean
Access. Great Fishing & Kayaking,
Spec Home. www.oldemillpointe.
com 757-824-0808
(NYSCAN)
2390 Western Avenue
Guilderland, NY 12084
518-861-7030
R E A L E S TAT E
OPEN HOUSE – SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 3rd
OPEN 11 am - 1 pm
MLS#201325959 • Leanne Royer 265-2203
www.107LarkStreet.com
FIRST OPEN 1 pm - 3 pm
1263 Berne Altamont Rd, Knox ������ NEW PRICE $275,000
PANORAMIC VIEWS!
Exec Ranch on 4Ac w/Views, 12x24 Indoor IG Pool, Op Fl Pln, 3BR, 2.5BA,
2 GAR, 2,500+ SF , Mstr Ste, HWF’s, FDR, WFP, 1st Flr Lndry, FR, Office
Space, Alt Elem/Guild Schools. Newer Boiler, Septic & More!
We are currently taking applications for our one bedroom wait list
for senior citizens 62 or older/disabled regardless of age.
Very affordable, rental assistance available, modern.
MLS# 201224444 • Mark Burlingame 424-5915
www.1263BerneAltamontRoad.com
Belmont Management Co., Inc.
15 Van Evera Drive
Altamont, N.Y. 12009
ALTAMONT OAKS
Pollard Disposal Service, Inc.
(518) 861-6452
Honest, local, family owned business. No gimmicks.
Residential Rates
Weekly trash & Recycling
Sign up for:
1 year - $18.50/mo.
6 months - $19.99/mo.
3 months - $26.85/mo.
950 Altamont Blvd.
1 & 2 BedrOOM ApTS.
FAMILY COMpLeX
Call (518) 861-5396
These are not promotional rates
Modern • Disabled Accessibility
Belmont Management Co., Inc.
950 Altamont Blvd.
Altamont, N.Y. 12009
Complete
maChine Shop
and
Welding ServiCe
equipment repairS
Mfgrs. of Carriages • Wagons • Push Carts • Planters
Restorations & Blacksmithing Service
2100 Western tpk., duanesburg, nY
518-355-6536 • FAX 518-355-6721
AIRLINE CAREERS begin
hereñ Get FAA approved Aviation
Maintenance Technician training. Financial aid for qualified
studentsñ Housing available. Job
placement assistance. Call AIM
866-296-7093
(NYSCAN)
CATSKILLS MINI FARM 35
acres- Farmhouse- $169,900 6
mile to Delhi. Large pond, spring,
barns, great views, pasture. Owner
terms! CALL: (888)-905-8847 or
www.NewYorkLandandLakes.
com
(NYSCAN)
COMPLETELY REMODELED- HEART OF THE VILLAGE
Van Evera Dr., Altamont, N.Y.
Joseph J. Merli MANUFACTUriNG Co. oF NeW YorK
Companion Needed for young
man with special needs. Live-in,
Albany near campus, Good Pay,
Mature, Sensitive, Please. Contact
# 646-509-1614
14-2t
227+ Acres in Northern NY.
2,300 feet of rd front, 2,800+
feet on Barter Creek. Loaded
with wildlife. Open and wooded.
$99,500. LaValleyrealestate.com.
315-268-0800.
(NYSCAN)
3BR, 2.5BA Beautiful NEW Master Suite w/Jacuzzi. NEW Full & 1/2 Baths,
HWF’s Thru-out, Newer Furn & NEW 3 Season Rm All on a Huge Lot! This
home is a must see!
BRANDLE WOODS APTS.
For more information or application, contact
(518) 861-5396 or TDD Relay 711
P/T-F/T – Line cook – Exp only,
PT Waitress, PT busser, PT cleaning person. Apply in person Tues.
– Sat 1:30-4 Township Tavern,
1412 Township Rd., Knox 15-2t
FSBO Altamont/Knox: Beautiful 3 bed/3bath, contemporary log
home on 7 acres with pond and
sep. in-law apt., 4 garages, 2 stone
fireplaces, wood floors, ceramic
tile bathrooms. Too much to list.
Must see. Asking $389,900. Contact 518-466-5097
15-1t
107 Lark St, Altamont ���������������������� NEW PRICE $259,900
ATTENTION SENIOR CITIZENS
For more information or application, contact
(518) 861-8809 or TDD Relay 711
Administrative Assistant for
Lynnwood Reformed Church. Hrs
8:30am – 3pm, Mon-Fri. Reduced
summer hrs. July 1 – Labor Day.
Salary commensurate with skills.
Send resumes to: Lynnwood Reformed Church. Attn: Tom Duncan, 3714 Carman Rd. Sch’dy NY
12303
15-1t
real estate
EPH J. MER L
JOS
ManuFaCturIng CO.
U.S.A.
™�
I
Call for commercial rates.
Choose slate gray or pink cans.
For every pink can we buy,
Pollard gives $5.00
to American Breast
Cancer Society
12 & 30 yd. rolloffs
available for cleanouts
www.PollardDisposal.biz
36
The Altamont Enterprise – Thursday, October 31, 2013
ServiceS AvAilAble
Fall cleanups – leaves removed
from lawns and gardens. Lawn
mowing and other end of the season projects also offered. Reasonable rates. Call Joe 229-8344.
14-2t
VINNICK CONSTRUCTION:
New construction, additions, remodeling, kitchens, bathrooms,
replacement windows, fully insured. FREE ESTIMATES. Call
861-8688.
19-tf
MPR Excavation, LLC – Excavator, bulldozer & environmental
services: dig and repair ponds,
land clearing and site prep, water,
sanitary, and drainage system,
installation and repairs, construction of driveways. Delivery including shale, crusher run & top soil.
(518) 895-5341
43-tf
HAS YOUR BUILDING
SHIFTED OR SETTLED?
Contact Woodford Brothers Inc,
for straightening, leveling, foundation and wood frame repairs
a t 1 -8 0 0 -OLD-B AR N . www.
woodfordbros.com. (NYSCAN)
THE MAINTENANCE DEPT.
expert lawn tractor and snowblower repair. Over 35 years
experience. Full line of new and
used parts. Call Bill 872-0393.
14-tf
MiScellANeouS
SAWMILLS from only $4897.00MAKE & SAVE MONEY with
your own bandmill- Cut lumber
any dimension. In stock ready
to ship. FREE Info/DVD:† www.
NorwoodSawmills.com 1-800-5781363 Ext.300N
(NYSCAN)
fouND
PET BIRD, Oct 23, 2013 in Altamont/Guilderland Center area;
bird has band on leg. Please call
Julie at (518) 861-8086
15-1t
lAWN AND gArDeN
AuToS
Privacy Hedges- FALL Blowout
Sale 6’ Arborvitae (cedar) Regular
$129 Now $59 Beautiful, Nursery
Grown. FREE Installation/FREE
delivery 518-536-1367 www.
lowcosttrees.com Will beat any
offer!
(NYSCAN)
Donate your car to Wheels For
Wishes, benefiting Make-A-Wish.
We offer free towing and your
donation is 100% tax deductible.
Call 518-650-1110 Today!
(NYSCAN)
D.C. BUCKET
• tree trimming & removal
• lot Clearing/Brush Chipping
• Stump grinding/Brush Hogging
• lawn maintenance/Firewood
for SAle
Vacuum Cleaner Sanitare
Professional. Used 3 times in
excellent condition. Adjustable
for all rugs and wood floors. $175,
768-2201
15-1t
6X6X2 ½ rolling, portable scaffold. $150, 518-861-6492 15-1t
WANTeD
WANTED: DEAD OR ALIVE.
Used riding mowers, snow blowers, rototillers. Cash re ward.
872-0393.
32-tf
WANTED: buying all kinds
of toys - Cap Guns, Marbles, GI
Joes, Trucks, Cars, Airplanes,
and kid related items. ONE item
or an Attic Full. $Paying Top Dollar$ Dan 872-0107
tf
CASH for Coins! Buying ALL
Gold & Silver. Also Stamps &
Paper Money, Entire Collections,
Estates. Travel to your home. Call
Marc in NY 1-800-959-3419
(NYSCAN)
fireWooD
Hardwood firewood, cut,
split, delivered, $225 per cord
872-9200
14-2t
Bill Frisbee
P l u m b i n g
In
Since 1986
1986
In Business
Business Since
861-8060
(518) 797-3924
Free Estimates
—
Fully Insured
www.altamontenterprise.com
ONLINE ONLY AUCTION
C. H. Quay, Carver Companies & Rotterdam General Contracting (Albany NY Area)
Bidding Opens: Wed. 10/23/13
Everything Sells To Highest Bidder!
See Web for Terms and Details:
www.collarcityauctions.com
(518) 895-8150 x 103
DONATE YOUR CAR
Wheels For Wishes benefiting
Northeast New York
*Free Vehicle/Boat Pickup ANYWHERE
*We Accept All Vehicles Running or Not
*100% Tax Deductible
WE BUY HOMES FOR CASH!
NEED TO SELL YOUR HOME FAST?
Call Us Today for a Free and
Confidential Consultation
JHI EntErprIsEs
NO FEES • NO REPAIRS • NO CLEAN UP
owner/operator
Quality work at an affoRdable price
Tile/Coping Deck Repairs
Sidewalks/Step Repairs
Pumps/Filters
Acid Wash/Pressure Wash
Openings/Closings
(518) 596-4648
or (518) 872-9763
FULLY INSURED/EXPERIENCED
FREE ESTIMATES
Tree Removal/Trimming,
Stump Grinding, Crane
Work, Brush Hogging,
Hedges, Cleanups,
Gutter Cleaning, Firewood
Fully Insured
(518) 253-1789
www.pridemarktree.com
Robert C. Smith
RobeRt building
& excavation
Construction
Consultant
Driveways New & Resurfaced
Underground Water, Sewer
Shale, Stone, Crusher Run
Land Clearing, Site Development,
Grading, Drainage, Septic Systems,
Ponds, Foundations Dug & Repaired,
Camp & House Leveling.
(518) 857-8571
2605 Delaware Tpk.
Voorheesville, NY 12186
We Buy “AS-IS!”
Excavators, Trenchers,
Trailers, Chippers,
Stumpers; Trucking,
Welding and Landscaping.
Todd Dibble
New Foundations
Under Old Houses
Insured
872-9693
nycourts.crtr - Page 1 - Composite
Learn about
Judicial Candidates
in NY State
Go to: nycourts.gov/vote
a non-partisan website, to learn about
the judicial candidates in your area
We buy & sell
industrial and agricultural
equipment.
(518) 355-1709
2261 Western Turnpike, Duanesburg, NY
Trackside Storage
312 New Scotland So. Rd.
Slingerlands, NY 12159
x
% Ta
100 tible
uc
Ded
Call: (518) 650-1110
WheelsForWishes.org
Rentals and sales
Todd’s Pool Repair
Begins Closing: Wed. 11/6/13 & Thurs. 11/7/13
Approx. 1000 Lots Sell @ Absolute Auction: Job Completion, Downsizing & Surplus Contractor
Related Assets Heavy & Light Construction Equipment, Trucks, Trailers, 300 Ton Track Cranes,
Backhoes, Excavators, Dozers, Vehicles, Jobsite Trailers, Storage Trailers, Service Trucks,
Dumps, Rollers, Tractors, Quarry Equip., Concrete Equip, Forms, Lull Lifts, Farm Equipment,
Port Equipment, Soil Testing Equip, ATV’s, Tools, Support Equipment, Building Materials,
200+- Pallets of Block, Commercial Furnishings & Fixtures & Much More.
All Hardwoods, cut, split and
delivered or log length 925-3731
15-4t
SUNY Certified
Fully Insured
Your local Plumber
DenniS Carl
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37
The Altamont Enterprise – Thursday, October 31, 2013
Class C soccer quarterfinal
BKW loses in double overtime
By Jordan J. Michael
BERNE — After fighting for
the Western Athletic Conference
South title for the entire regular season, rivals Berne-KnoxWesterlo and Schoharie again
ended up in a precarious position.
This time, it was overtime in the
playoffs, and the next goal would
be the end all.
Last Saturday’s intense Class
C soccer quarterfinal burned
for 99 minutes until Schoharie’s
Morgan Henry turned the flame
into fireworks.
BKW, known for its excellent
defensive line — allowing only
15 goals entering Saturday’s
game — left Henry unmarked
as he dribbled towards the Bulldogs’ goal in sudden-death double
overtime. Henry had time to place
his shot.
“You can’t do that,” BKW senior
defender Jimmy McGill said of the
space that Henry was allowed.
“Somebody had to step, and everybody had their mark except on
him. Somebody just didn’t step,
but this is a sectional game.”
Henry ripped a low, hard shot
across his body that curled in,
hitting the side panel a foot inside
the goal post. BKW keeper Trevor
Haack tried to dive for the save,
but it was a shot that was almost
impossible to stop.
That ended the game, giving
Schoharie a 2-to-1 victory over
BKW.
“Basically, it was premeditated,”
Henry said of his game-winning
goal that sent Schoharie to the
semifinals. “It was open, so I went
for it.”
The Bulldogs had won the WAC
South championship by two points
over the Indians. Schoharie had
lost to BKW the last time, on Oct.
2, but the Indians got vengeance
on a huge stage.
BKW Head Coach Jim Gillis didn’t know why none of his
defenders stepped up to Henry.
“The kid hit a great shot, and you
could see it happening,” he said.
“It’s soccer.”
“Trevor [Haack] takes it pretty
hard on himself, but it’s not his
fault,” McGill said of the goalie.
Schoharie was seeded sixth in
Class C, and BKW was seeded
third. Still, the Indians were 112-3 coming into sectionals. “That’s
a good team,” Gillis said.
The Bulldogs brought pressure
on the Indians’ goal from the
start last Saturday, getting three
corner-kick chances early on. Cody
Fisher’s flip throws and Maclin
Norray’s long kicks were once
again setting the tone.
One of Fisher’s acrobatic throws
set up BKW’s first goal, 18 minutes into the game. The ball got
kicked around in the box, finally
landing at Norray’s foot; he shot
the ball into the goal, at the top
right corner.
BKW kept pressing as time
ran down in the first half. A few
close calls went wide of the goal,
including a diving header by Nick
Nagengast.
“I can’t ask my kids to play any
harder,” Gillis said. “We dominated
this game early on, but needed to
jump on them a little more than
we actually did.”
Schoharie started to play better
in the second half, gaining more
possession and going to the ball
with more aggressiveness. Henry
told The Enterprise that the Indians tend to start slow in games,
usually picking up the pace in the
second half.
“You know, that’s how it goes,”
said Henry. “We get pumped up.”
Now, Schoharie was getting
all of the scoring chances. Richie
Martino tied the game, 1 to 1,
with 12 minutes left in regulation
play after his shot deflected off
teammate James Sacket. Haack,
who had a bead on the shot, was
fooled, throwing his hands up in
disbelief.
“They’re [Schoharie] down, so
they’re trying to force the tempo at
that point,” Gillis said. “How long
do you sit back and wait? They had
The Enterprise –– Jordan J. Michael
Air fight: Berne-Knox-Westerlo and Schoharie took its Class C quarterfinal game into double overtime
on Saturday; the Indians won, 2 to 1, on a great shot from Morgan Henry. Here, BKW’s Thomas Payne,
right, gets a head on the ball while Will Vedder knocks into him during overtime. Before the loss, the
Bulldogs were ranked 17th in the state; the team scored 44 goals and gave up only 17 in 2013.
chances, we had chances, and we
didn’t force the issue.”
With sudden-death overtime
looming, tempers were pushed
even further. Nagengast almost
scored on a head ball for the
Bulldogs, and Martino was close
to scoring his second goal, somehow bending a shot in from no
clear angle.
“This team is full of hard workers,” McGill said. “Everyone was
busting their butts at practice, and
everyone gave 100 percent today.
This is hard to take.”
Nearing the end of the first
15-minute overtime period, Schoharie’s Zack Frisbee railed a hot
free kick off the crossbar, which
sounded like a gunshot. This left
the crowd in a tizzy.
For sure, this was a game to be
remembered.
Gillis said that he told his captains to walk the team across field
because his players had nothing to
be ashamed about. “I’m just proud
of how hard they played,” he said.
“I didn’t want them to walk off
without their heads held high.”
Losing in sudden-death overtime stinks for any team, but BKW
(14-3-1, ranked 17th in the state)
will always be the 2013 WAC
South champions.
Did the Bulldogs feel like it was
their Class C title to lose?
“Yes, in a way,” said McGill. “We
left it all on the field.”
The Enterprise –– Jordan J. Michael
Dangerous play: A Schoharie player goes high in the air to get
a touch on the ball while Berne-Knox-Westerlo’s Nick Nagengast
tries to head the same ball during Saturday’s Class C quarterfinal
match in Berne. The two rivals played an edgy double-overtime
game with the Indians’ Morgan Henry notching the game-winner.
The Bulldogs, Western Athletic Conference champions, finished
with a 14-3-1 record.
The Enterprise — Michael Koff
Air battle: Berne-Knox-Westerlo’s Maclin Norray, right, and Galway’s Austin Scheeren try to get their
heads on the ball during the closing minutes of the Class C sectional game last Thursday in Berne,
which BKW won, 2 to 1. Norray scored both goals on free kicks.
38
The Altamont Enterprise – Thursday, October 31, 2013
Season over, but team
showed great improvement
By Jordan J. Michael
Mechanicville, Voss missed an imMECHANICVILLE — Becom- portant chance in a close game.
ing more savvy about scoring
“We were faster; we reacted to
as the season progressed, the the ball much quicker,” Santos
Voorheesville girls’ soccer team said of Friday’s game. “We didn’t
won nine of its last 11 games. The do this in the beginning of the
Blackbirds had a seven-game win- year.”
ning streak in the middle of the
Santos told The Enterprise that
season after starting 2-5.
Voorheesville’s 2-5 start to 2013
Voorheesville’s season is over was due to “standing around and
after a 7-to-1 loss to defending watching too much.” However, the
Class B state champion Hoosick Blackbirds started to perform betFalls (16-2) in the semifinals on ter, beating three teams down the
Monday, but the Birds definitely stretch that it had previously lost
improved. Voorto, including
heesville got by
Mechanicville
Mechanicville
last Friday.
— a team it had
It was Voor“Going to the ball, that’s
lost to before —
heesville’s first
what you have to do.”
on the road last
sectional playFriday in the
off win in three
quarterfinals.
years. The team
The Blackmoved up to
birds had more speed than the Class B this season after years in
Raiders, getting to the ball more Class C. Class B is for schools with
quickly, which paid dividends with more students than Class C.
the time of possession.
“I told the girls that this is the
“Going to the ball, that’s what best skilled team we’ve had in a
you have to do,” said Voorheesville while,” Santos said. “We started
senior Chelsea Duncan after last to turn things around. They let
Friday’s 2-to-1 win. She scored the their skills do the work, instead
first goal, and led the Birds with of running around not knowing
22 on the season. “You take your where they stand, or where to go.
advantages,” she said. “Just take They started having an idea.”
all your opportunities.”
Duncan has a great, hard shot,
Ninth-grader Julia Voss scored and her kicks are long. She can
the game winner for Voorheesville shoot effectively with either foot,
on Friday with 18 minutes left putting last Friday’s goal in with
in regulation play. Mechanicville her left. Duncan said she shoots
tried to even the score, but Voor- with whatever foot the ball comes
heesville was still too fast.
to.
“I think we did great,” said Voss,
Voorheesville was able to turn
who came off the bench. “We have its season around because it
to keep it up.”
stopped waiting for the second
Head Coach Joe Santos said half, Duncan said. “We came out
that Voss got redemption. Earlier strong,” she said. “Starting slow
in the season, during a game at is bad.”
The Enterprise –– Jordan J. Michael
Soaring: The Voorheesville girls’ soccer team beat Mechanicville
in the Class B quarterfinals last Friday before losing to defending
state champion Hoosick Falls on Monday, 7 to 1. Here, Birds’ senior
Rachel Treiber, right, and Mackenzie Bowie fight for the ball last
Friday. Voorheesville finished 11-7-0.
BOWLING
Knox Firemen Mixed
Howard Bishop .............. 227, 179, 246, 652
Tom Govel ...................... 227, 179, 246, 652
Gert Bishop.................... 163, 201, 160, 524
Kim Hempstead ............ 193, 183, 226, 602
Matt Jennings ............................... 177, 160
Pat Sudol ....................... 180, 214, 229, 623
Carol Boyd ............................................. 166
Ed Czuchrey .................................. 179, 184
Dan Decker .................... 204, 190, 210, 604
Carol Tubbs ........................................... 153
Chris Lesher .................. 185, 167, 193, 545
Paul Hempstead ............ 197, 209, 194, 600
Kathy Hempstead ......... 170, 162, 165, 497
Chuck Herchenroder ..... 182, 202, 203, 587
Deb Govel ...................................... 190, 185
Scott Bishop................................... 169, 199
Bill Sudol ....................... 190, 222, 182, 594
Dana Jennings ...................................... 156
Dick Tubbs ..................... 171, 182, 151, 504
Frank Belli .................... 188, 223, 204, 615
Paul Watson ...................163, 211, 150, 524
Tracy Sudol .................... 165, 212, 240, 617
Town ‘N Country Men
Nick Silvano ................................. 278, 763
Dave Sperbeck ............................. 265, 733
Dennis Murphy ........................... 290, 730
Barry Smith ................................. 278, 717
Scott Hawkins ............................. 245, 699
Scott Coleman ............................. 247, 688
John Hensel ................................. 258, 682
Art LeMay .................................... 221, 650
Kris Wahrlich .............................. 255, 643
Matt Childs .................................. 235, 641
Mike Herzog ................................ 255, 631
Clark Thomas .............................. 215, 630
Randy Thomas ............................. 229, 629
Doug Gallager ............................. 244, 627
Tony Silvano ................................ 254, 623
Mike Horan .................................. 215, 622
Dutch Seaburg ............................. 236, 605
Barry Noble ................................. 213, 604
Mike Hamilton .................................... 257
Fran Frantzen ..................................... 241
Chris Slingerland ................................ 222
Lester Willsey ...................................... 222
Rich Gardineer ............................ 214, 201
Greg Davis ........................................... 210
Chris Pagnotti ..................................... 203
Town ‘N Country Senior
John Rohser ........................................... 170
Neil Taber .............................................. 155
Andy Tinning................................. 179, 508
Shirley Herchenroder ........................... 162
Vala Jackson .......................................... 171
Rhea Brown ........................................... 159
Liz Pesta ................................................ 148
Bertha Jackson...................................... 171
Rhea Brown ........................................... 159
Liz Pesta ................................................ 148
Bertha Adamczak .................................. 174
Trish Herchenroder ............................... 147
Cheryl Frederick ........................... 181, 506
Ray Frederick ................................ 227, 596
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The Enterprise — Michael Koff
Ground battle: Voorheesville’s Veda Hensel, front, gets fouled by Hoosick Falls’ Hannah Lilac during
the first half of Voorheesville’s 7-to-1 loss in the Class B semi-final at Lansingburgh High School on
Monday. Hensel had 17 goals and eight assists as a ninth-grader.
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39
The Altamont Enterprise – Thursday, October 31, 2013
End of the line
Birds beat Greenville,
then lose to Ichabod Crane
The Enterprise –– Jordan J. Michael
Faced with the end of his football season, Voorheesville quarterback Robert Denman gets warmed
up on the sidelines in Corinth last Friday night. The Blackbirds struggled in the Class C quarterfinal
game, turning the ball over five times. Corinth won, 39 to 19, rushing for 326 yards; Alex Jenkins had
210 of those yards.
Class C football quarterfinal
Voorheesville drops the ball at Corinth
to the Birds’ 26-yard line. Three Corinth ahead, 24 to 0, with a wide
By Jordan J. Michael
CORINTH — The turnover bug minutes later, Abare was in the sweeping run to the left.
Voorheesville had another promhit Voorheesville during its Class end zone.
“We kind of killed ourselves,” ising drive with 3:30 left in the
C football quarterfinal at Corinth
last Friday. It was bad timing for said Nolan after the game, looking second quarter, but, after Nolan
sad. “We could have put ourselves made a catch, a Corinth defender
such an illness.
speared his helmet right on the
Voorheesville turned the ball in a position to win.”
Voorheesville didn’t turn the ball, forcing a fumble. Bob Millis
over — four fumbles and one
interception — on five of its eight ball over on its fourth possession, recovered for the Tomahawks as
drives in the first half, including but Zen Baudoux sacked Denman painful sighs seeped out from the
its first three possessions of the for a 12-yard loss. Corinth got the Birds’ fans.
Was Voorheesville able to swalgame. The Blackbirds were also ball at the 50-yard line to start the
forced to punt two times in the second half, and Jenkins busted low this rough loss?
“Yes and no, man,” said Nolan.
out a 39-yard run. Later, quarterfirst half.
Corinth scored 18 of its 24 points back Chantz Baudoux completed “It’s our last game, and I may not
in the first half off drives that a touchdown pass to Jenkins, who play anymore. It’s tough, but you
have to keep
started after a
Vo o r h e e s v i l l e
your head up
turnover.
and deal with
No doubt, the
what you’ve
game would have
been dealt.”
played out difEven though
ferently if the
Corinth ini“That’s not the way we’ve played all season,
Blackbirds held
tially went up
but I’m proud of their effort.
onto the ball.
by 24 points,
The Tomahawks
Voorheesville
They played their hearts out to the end.”
advanced to the
outscored the
semifinals with
Tomahawks, 19
a 39-to-19 victo 15, down the
tory on a chilly
stretch. Alex
night.
Minnick had
“It made every
two touchdown
difference in the
catches for the
world, and it’s on us,” Voorhees- was all alone for the catch.
Blackbirds.
Sapienza came into last Friday’s
ville Head Coach Joe Sapienza
“They play with a lot of heart,
said of the turnovers. “It was game knowing that Corinth (6-2) and that’s something we can’t
sloppy play by us. You can never was good, but the Tomahawks teach them to do; it comes from
really tell for sure [what caused were better than he thought, he them,” Sapienza said. “We’re outthe fumbles] without looking at said. For the entire night, the sized in every game we play, but
the film, but we have to execute Corinth crowd was enthusiastic.
we battle. I’m proud of that.”
“That’s not the way we’ve played
better than that. You’re asking
Nolan told The Enterprise that
all season, but I’m proud of their every team gets down, loses drive,
your defense to overcome a lot.”
The Birds got possession at the effort,” Sapienza said of his play- but Voorheesville always came
35-yard line to start the game, but ers. “They played their hearts out back. “Maybe not score-wise, or
running back Matt Feller coughed to the end.”
winning the game, but we’re alThe Blackbirds were finally able ways pushing,” he said. “You got
up the ball after being hit at the
line. Voorheesville’s defense was to get some offense going midway to love it.”
able to prevent the Tomahawks through the second quarter when
At 4-4, Voorheesville beat the
from scoring, but the home team Denman ran for 70 yards. Scott average or below average (Cairogot the ball right back after an- Roney had a powerful run to get Durham, Watervliet, Taconic
Voorheesville close to the end zone, Hills, and Coxsackie-Athens)
other Birds’ fumble.
Anthony Abare and Alex Jen- but Feller fumbled on the next Class C teams this season, but
kins had three great runs for play near the goal line, a Corinth lost to the top talent (Fonda,
Corinth on the ensuing drive; Jen- player recovering in the end zone Chatham, Granville, and Corinth)
for a touchback.
kins scored on a 19-yard carry.
in the league.
“That killed us even more,” said
On the next Voorheesville
In those four losses, the Blackpossession, quarterback Robert Sapienza. “I don’t mean to be a birds were outscored, 183 to 37.
Denman threw a pass that was downer, but we have to do better
“We’re not at the level of the
tipped by his receiver, senior than that.”
very good teams, but we’re a good
Shortly after, Jenkins broke for team,” Sapienza concluded. “We’re
Slater Nolan, getting intercepted
by Jenkins, who ran the ball back 55 yards on the ground. Abare put better than the average.”
The Enterprise –– Jordan J. Michael
Light feet: Freshman Sean Nolan dribbles the ball for Voorheesville during its 1-to-0, Class B, first-round victory over Greenville
last Thursday. Nolan scored the winning goal off a cross from
teammate Luke Gorka in the second half.
The Enterprise –– Jordan J. Michael
Looking like an Amedeo Modigliani portrait, Voorheesville
senior Christian Keenan peers over at the Ichabod Crane bench
just as Monday’s Class B quarterfinal soccer match starts. Keenan
was part of the Birds’ strong defensive line, but the number-one
state-ranked Riders were able to score four times, ending Voorheesville’s season.
40
The Altamont Enterprise – Thursday, October 31, 2013
Come-from-behind win
Yesterday’s victory propels Birds to fourth straight finals
By Jordan J. Michael
ROTTERDAM — The Voorheesville volleyball team bent, but did
not break.
The Blackbirds’ opponent in the
Class C semifinals on Wednesday
night, Galway, was the first team
this season to take an opening
set from Voorheesville. Since the
Birds usually win the first set, it
made things a little difficult for
the defending champions.
“That was nervewracking,”
said senior Caroline Bablin, who
cranked hard hits for Voorheesville all night long. “We came here
wanting to win, but knew we could
lose. I think our want to win was
bigger than that nervousness.”
Galway had an impressive first
set, playing cohesive volleyball.
The opening set was tight almost
the whole way, and Galway won,
25 to 22.
Bablin told The Enterprise that
winning the first set always gives
the Blackbirds added energy
to push through the rest of the
match. Despite an uneasy start,
Voorheesville was still able to
press on, winning the next three
sets (25-19, 25-10, and 25-14) to
seal the match.
The Enterprise — Michael Koff
Birds soar on: On Wednesday evening at Schalmont High School, Tori Hargrave, center, along
with teammates, Nicole Brower, Erin Gannon, Libby Bjork, Caroline Bablin, and Kimmy McQuade,
come together to celebrate after the last point was scored in the Class C semi-final win (22-25,
25-19, 25-10, 25-14) over Galway. Voorheesville moves on to play Broadablin-Perth on Friday at 8
p.m. at Stillwater High School.
The Enterprise — Michael Koff
Intense concentration: Voorheesville’s Erin Gannon makes
a dig on a Galway serve during
the Birds’ Class C semi-final
win on Wednesday evening.
“We came here
wanting to win,
but knew
we could lose.
“I’m so proud of the girls,” said
Bablin. “We really had to focus on
going out to win. We know we can
lose, and we’ve lost sets before.
We really had to focus and put
the ball away.”
That’s exactly what Voorheesville did, murdering the volleyball,
and digging the ball like holes to
China.
Wednesday’s victory put the
Blackbirds in the Class C finals
for the fourth straight year. The
team has won the last three sectional titles, and made the state
competition each year.
Voorheesville plays top-seed
Broadalbin-Perth on Friday in
Stillwater at 8 p.m.
“If we play our best, and bring
all our energy, we can do it,” Bablin
said of defending the championship. “We just play our game.”
Bablin isn’t the only Birds’
player who slams the ball; senior
Tori Hargrave and junior Nicole
Brower had their share of big moments on Wednesday. Senior Libby
Bjork, an expert server and setter,
gave her hitters superb assists.
“We’ve really worked hard on
swinging around the block,” said
Bablin. “We do a great job with
picking sides. I always pick a
corner, that makes it easier.”
Voorheesville moved with a
quick offense against Galway. The
players were constantly circling
around the court.
“We’ve really worked on that,
and when we do that, opponents
are always on their toes, not
knowing what were going to do,
or what’s coming,” Bablin said.
“We work on that a lot.”
The Blackbirds have hopes of a
fourth straight appearance at the
state competition. There’s plenty
of volleyball to be played before
then, especially if the team has
to rally from behind.
“When we start doing things
wrong, we get down on ourselves,”
Bablin concluded. “So, I think we
need to focus on what we’re doing right, instead of what’s going
wrong.”
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