Exercise for Low income populations

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Exercise for Low income populations
EXERCISE FOR SPECIFIC
POPULATIONS: LOW
INCOME
Marcellina Lu and Megan Bartlett
Overview
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Definition
Prevalence
Health risks
Benefits of Exercise
Barriers to Exercise
Ways to Overcome Barriers
Exercise Guidelines
At home Exercises
Nutritional Considerations
Progress Being Made
Defining Low Income

Low Income Cut Offs (LICO)
 An
income threshold that is below the amount of income
a family uses to purchase food, clothing, shelter and
other necessities
 These
families devote larger amounts of their income than
the average family
 Families
typically spend 20% points over average
families
 Cut offs vary by size:
7
family sizes for 5 different populations of areas of
residence
Defining Low Income

Calculating LICO
Defining Low Income

To be considered as Low Income Status:
A
person’s LICO is compared to the income of person’s
economic family
 If
the economic family income is below cut-off, then all
individuals of that family are considered as low income
http://higheredwatch.newamerica.net/blogs/2007/03/private_loan_borrowing
Prevalence of Low Income in Toronto
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In 2006, Toronto comprised 13% of low income persons
in Canada
35% within Ontario
 62% within GTA
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From 1996-2006, low income increase by 30% within
the GTA
Approximately 605,000 low income status of Toronto
were:
22% Children
 16% Youth
 50% Working Age
 12% Seniors

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greater_Toronto_Area
Health Risks
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3x higher chance of living a sedentary life for
people with a household income under $15 000
compared to people with a household income of at
least $ 50 000
1 out of 4 people with an income under $15 000
are obese
People from the low income category have a higher
risk for more health related issues due to often
living a sedentary life
Benefits of Exercise
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Helps in weight management
Prevents and fights diseases
 Cardiovascular
disease, stroke, diabetes, metabolic
syndrome, depression, certain cancers, arthritis and falls
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Improves mood
Boosts energy
Can result in better sleep
http://www.diabetesmine.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/10/diabetes-treadmill.jpg
Contradictions and Barriers
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Lack of resources:
Gym membership, fitness equipment, support system
Transportation:
May not have access to a car, may not have public
transportation
Type of Neighborhood:
May not be in safe neighborhood
Contradictions and Barriers
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Lack of time:
Exercise may not be a priority
May find hard to balance if have kids or multiple
jobs
Lack self confidence/ motivation:
If fitness isn’t a priority may not be confident in their
abilities
Ways to Overcome Barriers
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Find alternative areas to work out:
 Outside
 Use
park benches, bleachers, soccer posts
 Community
 Look
 At
Center
for drop in sports, or free community events
Home
 Use
household items for workout along with your own body
weight
Ways to Overcome Barriers
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Time Management
 Schedule
and commit to a time most comfortable for
you or your client’s schedule
 Before
work
 While baking or preparing a meal
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Be a good motivator
 Some
 Be
clients may be very self conscious
aware of little details and be able to cater to them
 I.e. Work out at home with them
Ways to Overcome Barriers
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Educate on importance of exercise
 Health/Physiological
 Mental
Benefits
Benefits
General Exercise Guidelines
Cardio:
At least 3 times/week, 25-30 minutes moderate-high
intensity
 Resistance:
2-3 times/week
 Stretching:
After every workout
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** May need to modify this depending on whether
client has any health related issues or not
Benefits of an at Home Workout
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Doesn’t require paying for childcare
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May be more comfortable at home
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Can multitask (ex. Let dinner cook while exercising)
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Transportation isn’t an issue
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Can accommodate their schedule
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Doesn’t cost anything (can use household items)
At Home Exercises- Warm up
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Stairs
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High Knees
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Towel Jump (Towel on ground and jump back and
forth over it)
At Home Exercises- Using Soup Cans
Soup cans can be used instead of free weights
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Bicep Curls
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Tricep Extensions
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Lateral Raises
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Reverse fly
At Home Exercises- Using Bungee
Cords
Bungee cords can be used instead of resistance bands
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Hip adduction and abduction
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Rows
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Overhead tricep extension
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Pull apart
At Home Exercises- Using Books
Books can be used instead of steps and to increase
intensity of workout
 Calf raises
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Step ups
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Push up
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Leg lifts (sitting with book on shins and lifting legs)
Additional At Home Exercises
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Skipping
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Plank
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Mountain Climbers
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Tricep Dips (using a chair)
Nutritional Considerations
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Many times, low income persons may seek to
purchase most convenient or cost effective foods
 However,
may not be the healthiest choices
 i.e. Frozen dinners, fast foods

Promote both good exercise and eating habits
 This
combination provides most well rounded and
beneficial health effects
Nutritional Considerations
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Use Canadian Nutritional Food Guide:
Progress Being Made
Children’s Fitness Tax Credit:
- Created by the Government of Canada
- Way to help promote physical activity and try to
help with costs
- Can claim maximum of $500 for money spent on
child to take part in activities (ex. Golf lessons,
soccer)
- Also includes fees paid for after school programs
Progress Being Made
Leisure Access Program:
- Implemented in Edmonton in 2006
- Trying to make it easier for people from low income
households to access resources for physical activity
- Gives low income families chance to use recreation
buildings for free
- Also have discounts on certain activity programs
and equipment
Progress Being Made
Ontario’s After School Program:
- Created in 2009
- Helps pay for sport related programs meant for
youth from low income areas and these happen
from 3-6pm
- Try to increase activity, promote proper eating, and
improve self esteem levels
Questions
1.
2.
3.
What is the percentage used to determine the
LICO?
Name 1 barrier to exercise for people from the
low income population?
Name 2 household items that you could use to
workout with?
Resources
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www.bms.com/documents/together_on_diabetes/2012-summit-Atlanta/Physical-Activity-for-Low-IncomePopulations-The-Health-Trust.pdf
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www.cra-arc.gc.ca/nwsrm/txtps/2013/tt130225-eng.html
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www.edmontonsocialplanning.ca/content/view/1099/1099
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www.mtc.gov.on.ca/en/sport/afterschool/after_school.shtml
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http://www.diabetes.org/food-and-fitness/food/planning-meals/glycemic-index-anddiabetes.html#What_is_the_glycemic_index
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http://www.diabetes.org/food-and-fitness/food/planning-meals/the-glycemic-index-of-foods.html
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http://www.health.harvard.edu/newsweek/Glycemic_index_and_glycemic_load_for_100_foods.htm
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http://foodforhealth.techno-science.ca/english/FoodForHealth/Health-and-Nutrition/Eating-The-CanadianWay.html
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http://www.webmd.com/sleep-disorders/news/20100917/exercise-helps-you-sleep
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http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/75f0002m/2009002/s2-eng.htm
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http://circ.ahajournals.org/content/107/1/e2.full
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http://www.marilyn.ca/HealthFitness/segments/Daily/March-2011/03_22_2011/SoupcanWorkout

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