Campeche: Caminando Hacia un Turismo Sustentable y Competitivo

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Campeche: Caminando Hacia un Turismo Sustentable y Competitivo
Campeche: Caminando Hacia un
Turismo Sustentable y Competitivo
The George Washington
University
Instituto Campechano
May–July 2013
Table of Contents
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ........................................................................................................................................ 5
THE PROJECT ................................................................................................................................................ 5
FINDINGS AND RECOMMENDATIONS ................................................................................................................. 5
CONSULTANT TEAM ........................................................................................................................................... 8
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS ......................................................................................................................................... 9
ACRONYMS .................................................................................................................................................... 10
FIGURES ......................................................................................................................................................... 11
1 INTRODUCTION/PURPOSE ......................................................................................................................... 12
1.1
SCOPE OF WORK ............................................................................................................................. 12
1.2
STRATEGIC FOCUS............................................................................................................................ 12
1.2.1
PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT AND MARKETING ................................................................................. 12
1.2.2
TOURISM AWARENESS AND VISITOR SATISFACTION ....................................................................... 12
1.2.3
MICE MARKET ENHANCEMENT AND DESTINATION MANAGEMENT ................................................. 13
1.3
METHODOLOGY .............................................................................................................................. 13
1.4
CONSULTING TIMELINE ..................................................................................................................... 14
2 STRATEGIC ASSESSMENT ........................................................................................................................... 15
2.1
SITUATION ANALYSIS ........................................................................................................................ 15
2.1.1
TOURISM IN MEXICO................................................................................................................ 15
2.1.2
MEXICO TOURISM COMPETITIVENESS ......................................................................................... 16
2.1.3
TOURISM IN THE STATE OF CAMPECHE ........................................................................................ 16
2.1.4
TOURISM IN THE CITY OF CAMPECHE .......................................................................................... 17
2.2
VISIONING WORKSHOP..................................................................................................................... 18
2.2.1
ACTIVITY 1: STRENGTHS & CHALLENGES...................................................................................... 18
2.2.2
ACTIVITY 2: IDEAL FUTURE OF CAMPECHE ................................................................................... 18
2.2.3
ACTIVITY 3: TOPICAL PRIORITIES & ACTIONS ................................................................................ 19
2.3
RESIDENT SURVEY RESULTS ............................................................................................................... 19
2.4
VISITOR SURVEY RESULTS.................................................................................................................. 22
2.4.1
DEMOGRAPHICS CHARACTERISTICS ............................................................................................. 22
2.4.2
TRIP ATTRIBUTES AND VISITOR MOTIVATION ............................................................................... 22
2.4.3
SATISFACTION GAP ANALYSIS .................................................................................................... 22
2.4.4
IMPORTANCE-PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS ...................................................................................... 23
2.4.5
INFORMATION DELIVERY ANALYSIS ............................................................................................. 24
3 MARKETING............................................................................................................................................ 25
3.1
MARKETING PREVIEW ...................................................................................................................... 25
3.2
BUILDING A BRAND .......................................................................................................................... 25
3.3
DEVELOPING MESSAGING TO PROMOTE THE BRAND ............................................................................. 27
3.4
TARGET MARKETING ........................................................................................................................ 29
3.4.1
MEDIA OUTLETS...................................................................................................................... 29
3.4.2
TRADESHOWS ......................................................................................................................... 30
3.4.3
GROUPS AND ALLIANCES........................................................................................................... 30
3.4.4
TRAVEL AGENTS AND TOUR OPERATORS ..................................................................................... 30
3.5
ONLINE MARKETING ........................................................................................................................ 30
3.5.1
CONTENT ............................................................................................................................... 31
3.5.2
SEARCH ENGINE OPTIMIZATION (SEO) ....................................................................................... 31
3.5.3
SOCIAL MEDIA ........................................................................................................................ 32
2
3.6
INTERNAL MARKETING ..................................................................................................................... 34
3.6.1
TOURISM AWARENESS WEEK .................................................................................................... 35
3.7
MARKETING SUMMARY .................................................................................................................... 37
4 VISITOR EXPERIENCE ................................................................................................................................ 38
4.1
VISITOR EXPERIENCE PREVIEW ........................................................................................................... 38
4.2
SELLING CAMPECHE IN THE DESTINATION ............................................................................................ 39
4.2.1
COMPREHENSIVE VISITOR GUIDE ............................................................................................... 39
4.2.2
COMMUNITY EVENT BOARD ...................................................................................................... 40
4.2.3
BUSINESS LINKAGES ................................................................................................................. 41
4.3
SIGN INTERPRETATION ...................................................................................................................... 42
4.3.1
SINGULARLY ACADEMIC INTERPRETATION .................................................................................... 42
4.3.2
SIGN GRAPHICS ....................................................................................................................... 43
4.4
ASSESSMENT AND RECOMMENDATIONS FOR CALAKMUL ........................................................................ 45
4.4.1
THE CITY OF CAMPECHE AS A GATEWAY ...................................................................................... 45
4.4.2
SITE LOGISTICS ........................................................................................................................ 45
4.4.3
COMMUNITY CONNECTIONS...................................................................................................... 46
4.5
SAN FRANCISCO DE CAMPECHE, A WORLD HERITAGE CITY ..................................................................... 47
4.5.1
FIELDWORK FINDINGS ON WORLD HERITAGE SITE......................................................................... 47
4.5.2
CHALLENGES FACING CAMPECHE’S HERITAGE .............................................................................. 48
4.5.3
PRESERVING WORLD HERITAGE ................................................................................................. 48
4.6
SUSTAINABILITY ............................................................................................................................... 50
4.6.1
REDUCING THE ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT OF HOTELS .................................................................... 51
4.6.2
CONSERVING MARINE RESOURCES AND BIODIVERSITY ................................................................... 51
4.7
VISITOR EXPERIENCE SUMMARY ......................................................................................................... 52
5 PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT.......................................................................................................................... 53
5.1
PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT PREVIEW .................................................................................................... 53
5.2
CREATING CIRCUITS ......................................................................................................................... 53
5.2.1
IDENTIFY COMPLEMENTARY PRODUCTS ....................................................................................... 54
5.2.2
DEVELOP ITINERARIES............................................................................................................... 54
5.2.3
CREATE MAPS AND TOURS ........................................................................................................ 54
5.2.4
BRAND THE CIRCUIT ................................................................................................................. 54
5.2.5
PROMOTE THE CIRCUIT............................................................................................................. 54
5.3
NEW TOURISM PRODUCTS IN THE CITY................................................................................................ 55
5.3.1
COOKING LESSONS................................................................................................................... 55
5.3.2
MALECÓN BIKE TOUR .............................................................................................................. 55
5.3.3
ART AND PHOTOGRAPHY CLASSES .............................................................................................. 55
5.3.4
PIRATE LEGENDS TOUR ............................................................................................................. 56
5.4
SAVE TOURISM .............................................................................................................................. 56
5.4.1
ARCHAEOLOGY ........................................................................................................................ 57
5.4.2
BIRDING ................................................................................................................................. 59
5.5
PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT SUMMARY .................................................................................................. 61
6 TRAINING AND PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT.............................................................................................. 62
6.1
TRAINING AND PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT PREVIEW ........................................................................ 62
6.2
PARTICIPANT MOTIVATION ............................................................................................................... 62
6.2.1
EMPOWERING MANAGERS TO MOTIVATE EMPLOYEES................................................................... 63
6.3
ASSESSING TRAINING SUCCESS ........................................................................................................... 64
6.3.1
TRAINING ACCOUNTABILITY....................................................................................................... 65
6.4
KNOWLEDGE OF FOREIGN LANGUAGES................................................................................................ 66
3
6.4.1
ESTABLISH A LANGUAGE SCHOOL ............................................................................................... 66
6.5
TRAINING AND PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SUMMARY ...................................................................... 68
7 CONVENTION CENTER .............................................................................................................................. 69
7.1
CONVENTION CENTER PREVIEW ......................................................................................................... 69
7.2
MARKETING PLAN FOR THE CONVENTION CENTER ................................................................................ 69
7.2.1
MARKETING MATERIALS ........................................................................................................... 70
7.2.2
IN-HOUSE MARKETING/SALES MANAGER ................................................................................... 70
7.2.3
TARGETED MARKETING CAMPAIGNS ........................................................................................... 71
7.2.4
STRENGTHEN INTERNET PRESENCE ............................................................................................. 73
7.2.5
MARKETING DATABASE ............................................................................................................ 74
7.3
CHALLENGE: DIVERSIFY REVENUE STREAMS ......................................................................................... 74
7.3.1
“A TASTE OF CAMPECHE”: CULTURAL FOOD STATIONS .................................................................. 75
7.3.2
THE PIRATE FOOD COURT ......................................................................................................... 75
7.3.3
SIGNATURE EVENTS ................................................................................................................. 76
7.3.4
CORPORATE SPONSORSHIPS ...................................................................................................... 76
OPERATIONS ................................................................................................................................... 77
7.4
7.4.1
EMPHASIZE AMBIENCE & CULTURE ............................................................................................ 77
7.4.2
PRACTICE SUSTAINABILITY ......................................................................................................... 79
7.5
DEVELOPING PARTNERSHIPS .............................................................................................................. 80
7.5.1
STUDENT INTERNSHIPS ............................................................................................................. 80
7.5.2
HOTEL PARTNERSHIPS .............................................................................................................. 80
7.5.3
CAMPECHANO AMBASSADOR PROGRAM ..................................................................................... 82
7.5.4
BUILDING COMMUNITY RELATIONS ............................................................................................ 83
7.6
CONVENTION CENTER SUMMARY ....................................................................................................... 84
8 DESTINATION MANAGEMENT STRATEGY ..................................................................................................... 86
8.1
DESTINATION MANAGEMENT STRATEGY PREVIEW ................................................................................ 86
8.2
MANAGING CAMPECHE AS A DESTINATION .......................................................................................... 86
8.3
CREATING A DMO ........................................................................................................................... 87
8.3.1
ESTABLISH A DMO WORKING GROUP ........................................................................................ 87
8.3.2
DMO WORKING GROUP ACTIVITIES ........................................................................................... 87
8.3.3
ESTABLISHING A DMO FOR CAMPECHE ....................................................................................... 89
8.3.4
ANALYSIS OF DESTINATION MANAGEMENT ALTERNATIVES ............................................................. 93
8.3.5
BUDGETING FOR THE CAMPECHE DMO ...................................................................................... 95
8.4
DESTINATION MANAGEMENT STRATEGY SUMMARY .............................................................................. 96
9 CONCLUSION .......................................................................................................................................... 97
4
Executive Summary
The Project
The following report presents the results of the consulting engagement between the George
Washington University (GW) and the Client Group, composed of Fundación Avanza, Consejo Empresarial
Turístico de Campeche (CETUR), Campeche Unido Para El Desarrollo Integral Restaurantero (CUDIR),
Cámaras Nacionales de Comercio, Servicios y Turismo de Campeche (CANACO/SERVYTUR), Consejo
Coordinador Empresarial de Campeche (CCE), Instituto Campechano, Asociación de Hoteles y Moteles
en Campeche (AHC), Secretaría de Turismo del Estado de Campeche (SECTUR-Campeche), and the
Municipality of Campeche. Seventeen (17) GW Master candidates in Tourism Administration and 10
tourism undergraduate students from the Instituto Campechano formed the Consulting Team. Together,
they worked over a three-month period to provide recommendations for improving the competitiveness
and sustainability of tourism in Campeche.
The research and analysis of Campeche’s tourism sector is based on the topics outlined in the Scope of
Work. The Consulting Team conducted extensive research, interviews, a visioning workshop, resident
surveys, visitor surveys, and numerous site visits to attractions throughout the state of Campeche in
preparation for this report. In addition to the tangible findings and implementable solutions presented
in this document, the Team has provided action plans, guidelines, and other resources to assist with the
operationalization of the recommendations.
Findings and Recommendations
The results from the resident and visitor surveys helped identify Campeche’s strengths and weaknesses
as a tourism destination. The resident survey measured local awareness and perceptions of the tourism
sector in Campeche. The results indicate that Campechanos enjoy having visitors in their community and
that tourism provides an opportunity to showcase their renowned Mayan heritage and colonial history.
The resident survey also identified areas for improvement, like increasing the desirability of tourism jobs
and informing locals of tourism benefits and impacts.
In contrast to the resident survey, the visitor questionnaire gathered marketing data and assessed
tourist satisfaction in Campeche. The results indicated that visitors most often learn about Campeche
through word-of-mouth and tend to rely heavily on the recommendations of friends, family, co-workers,
and residents to plan their visit. Most respondents used online travel agencies to book their trip to
Campeche and rarely visited the official website. During their stay, visitors especially enjoy the city’s
friendliness and food. The weakest areas for visitor satisfaction include foreign language skills of service
workers, access to tourism information, and the perception of safety in the historic city. Addressing
these issues would raise visitor satisfaction in Campeche.
The first priority to focus on is marketing. The Consulting Team recommends that SECTUR collaborate
with local stakeholders to define its brand position and develop a consistent, long-term marketing
strategy. By doing so, the new brand would allow SECTUR to craft compelling messages, identify target
markets, and conduct outreach to media outlets, tour operators, and brand-aligned organizations.
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SECTUR can also drive more traffic to the destination’s website by allocating resources to inbound
marketing techniques and social media outreach. Internal marketing is important to improving the
destination ad garnering public support for tourism. With the dual objectives of promoting Campechano
hospitality and improving service to tourists, Campeche should host a Tourism Awareness Week
coinciding with World Tourism Day.
Marketing is critical to attracting visitors to Campeche, but once they arrive, tourism stakeholders are
also responsible for delivering a positive visitor experience. Survey data shows that visitors to
Campeche are generally not informed of the attractions and activities available to them. To bridge this
informational gap, a comprehensive tourism guide should be placed in every hotel room and a
community events board should be displayed in the city center. Another issue currently diminishing the
visitor experience is the limited interpretation and inadequate signage at various attractions throughout
the state. It is recommended that INAH use the guidelines provided to produce new signage with
compelling content and vivid graphics. These recommendations would strengthen visitors’ connection
to the destination by enhancing existing attractions.
The development of new tourism experiences should be undertaken to fill in product gaps, extend
visitor stays, and spread tourism benefits throughout the State. SECTUR should work with private and
civil sector stakeholders to design tourism circuits. Circuits group complementary tourism attractions
and increase their accessibility to visitors with maps and tours. Another way to utilize Campeche’s
remote ecological and cultural attractions is to link to academic and educational markets to Mayan
archeology and bird watching programs. There is also new product potential in the City; activities such
as bike tours and cooking lessons should be developed by local businesses with public sector support.
In the area of training and professional development, the Consulting Team’s research and interviews
uncovered an extensive list of available tourism courses and their shortcomings in terms of attendance
and effectiveness. To improve attendance, SECTUR should develop a leadership course to teach tourism
managers how to motivate their employees. The course would instruct tourism managers on setting
goals, implementing incentives, and recognizing achievements. In addition to this leadership course,
SECTUR should require a final exam after each course. Exams ensure that participants are completing
the intended learning objectives and that SECTUR is only supporting effective training programs.
Furthermore, greater efforts are warranted to improve foreign language abilities. Establishing a private
language institute would address the service quality gap that was identified amongst various service
providers, especially the city’s restaurants.
Increasing the number of national and international meetings, conferences, incentives, and special
events held in the Convention Center would benefit the entire community through the accompanying
demand for hotel rooms, meals, and other local services and activities. The primary issue facing the
Convention Center is a need to revamp and reinvigorate its marketing strategy. The Convention Center
should create an in-house position that is solely dedicated to marketing and sales. This individual would
be responsible for producing new marketing materials that are specific to the Center, crafting targeted
marketing campaigns, strengthening its online presence; and creating a marketing database. In addition
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to updating its marketing strategy, the Convention Center can increase business through diversifying its
revenue streams as well as attracting new and repeat business. Holding a signature event, creating
linkages to Campeche’s culture, and increasing sustainability practices are all methods of achieving
these goals.
A collaboration between the public, private and civil sectors is the most efficient way to address the
challenges and solutions presented in this report, and to achieve common goals going forward.
Therefore, the Consulting Team recommends an overall destination management strategy for the state
of Campeche. The bespoke strategy for Campeche calls for the formation of a DMO Working Group.
The DMO Working Group would bring stakeholders together to begin cooperative efforts and consider
which DMO model would best meet its members’ shared goals for the future. In the final section of this
report, three models are discussed as potential destination management solutions for Campeche.
Marketing
Topics and Challenges
Visitor Experience
•Campeche does not have a consistent and
compelling brand.
•Campeche is not focusing its resources on
attracting target markets.
•Visitors are not using the destination
website.
•Residents are often unaware of tourism
attractions and tourism benefits.
•Tourists are unaware of the products in the
region.
•Attraction signage is too academic.
•Calakmul is not optimized for tourists.
•The signifcance of World Heritage is not
known to all residents in Campeche.
•There are few ecological initiatives
promoting sustainable tourism in Campeche.
Product Development
Training & Professional Development
•Attractions outside the city are not wellknown and difficult to navigate.
•Product gaps exist in the city of Campeche.
•Many of Campeche's finest attractions are in
rural areas of the state.
•There is a lack of motivation to attend
training courses.
•There is no way to assess whether training
courses are effective.
•There are no long-term, inexpensive foreign
language classes.
Convention Center
Destination Management
•There is no defined marketing strategy.
•The Center has low and non-diversified
revenue.
•There are few loyal clients outside
Campeche.
•There is a weak relationship with the
Campeche community.
•Lack of integrated tourism planning and
implementation
•No coordinated and inclusive group to
choose DMO model
•Need of a catalytic event to unite
stakeholders
•Decide on DMO model
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Consultant Team
Seventeen graduate candidates to the Master of Tourism Administration degree in the School of
Business at The George Washington University (GW) in Washington, D.C. and ten undergraduate
students from the Instituto Campecheno, who are studying Tourism Administration, comprised the
Consulting Team. The Consulting Practicum was undertaken under the direction and supervision of the
GW Faculty members, Dr. Kristin Lamoureux and Prof. Juan Luna-Kelser and the support of Professor
Álvaro Santos, from the Instituto Campechano.
GW Consultants
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Aaron Skelly
Anna Barrera
Ariana Luquin Sánchez
Bridgett Krider
Charlene Arrillaga
Chelas Poirier
Constance Wang
Evita Broughton
Jason Kreiselman
Jenee Cannady
Jennifer Burns
José Melenez
Joyce Jue Shi
Linda Githanga
Samantha Hogenson
Seamus Hogg
Shavonne Harding
Instituto Campechano Consultants
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Álvaro Abraham Guerrero Rodríguez
Cecilia Gonzales
Daniel Domingo Medina Olivares
Heyder Vicente Cruz Huicab
Jorge Cruz Salazar
Karen Paredes Pérez
Melvi Arely Kantún
Ninive del Carmen
Ricardo Pinzón
Victor Aaron May Alonso
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Acknowledgments
The GW students would like to extend their heartfelt gratitude to the Instituto Campechano, Canaco
Servytur Campeche, Consejo Empresarial Turístico de Campeche (CETUR), Asociación de Hoteles y
Moteles en Campeche A. C. (AHC), Fundación Avanza Campeche AC, Consejo Coordinador Empresarial
de Campeche (CCE), Campeche Unido Para El Desarrollo Integral Restaurantero A.C. (CUDIR), Gobierno
Municipal de Campeche and the Secretaría de Turismo del Estado de Campeche.
In addition, the team is appreciative of the following organizations and stakeholders for their insight,
assistance and hospitality. The information and services provided were instrumental in the completion
of this project.
Alfredo González
Alonso Soriana de la
Mora
o Ana Santamaría
Vadillo
o Beatriz Balmes
o Carlos A. Vidal
Angles
o Delio R. Carillo Pérez
o Doriberth Veliz
Rivero
o Eduardo Aguilar
o Eduardo Valdez
o Esperanza Ortega
o Erick Herrera
o Francis Drake
o Horacio Gallegos
o Holiday Inn
o Hortencia Hernández
o Hotel Baluartes
o Roberto Ortega
o Vanessa Arceo
o Vania Kelleher Hernández
o Vicente Vega Pavón
o Wilberth Alejandro Salas Pech
o Zubieta Escalante
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o
o
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Hotel Castelmar
Hotel de Paseo
Hotel del Mar
Hotel El Navegante
Hotel H177
Hotel Ocean View
Hotel Socaire
Hotel Uxulkah
Restaurante La Pigua
Restaurante La
Parroquia
Irazú Acevedo
Ivonne Erosa Serrano
Jose Selem
Jorge Antonio
Ortegon Rodríguez
Jorge Escalante Bolio
Jorge Manos
Esparragoza
José G. Buenfil
o
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o
o
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Juan Manuel
Jomenee
Juan Salazar
Judith Guillén Pérez
Julio Sánchez Chávez
Julio Peña
Linda Schramm
Lirio Guadalupe
Suárez Améndola
Luisa Díaz Rivas
Luz Angélica De la
Mora Reyes
Mario Cisneros
Cisneros
Mario Pavón
Marissa Moreno
Plaza Colonial
Raúl Castañeda
Ricardo Rodríguez
Dives
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Acronyms
AHC - Asociación de Hoteles y Moteles en Campeche
ANCMPM - Asociación Nacional de Ciudades Mexicanas Patrimonio Mundial
CANACO/SERVYTUR - Cámaras Nacionales de Comercio, Servicios y Turismo de Campeche
CCE - Consejo Coordinador Empresarial de Campeche
CCT - Consejo Consultivo Turístico
CETUR - Consejo Empresarial Turístico de Campeche
CIC – Convention Industry Council
CMM – Certificate in Meeting Management
CMP – Certified Meeting Professional
CSEP – Certified Special Event Professional
CSPI – Convention Sales Professionals International
CTC - Campeche Tourism Council
CUDIR - Campeche Unido Para El Desarrollo Integral Restaurantero
DMAP – Destination Marketing Accreditation Program
DMO - Destination Management Organization
FAM Tour – Familiarization Tour
GSC - Geotourism Stewardship Council
GW – The George Washington University
IACC – International Association of Conference Centers
INAH - Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia
IP address – Internet Protocol address, a unique string of numbers that identifies each computer
connected to the internet
IPA – Importance-Performance Analysis
ISES – International Special Events Society
MICE – Meetings, Incentives, Conferences and Events
MPI – Meeting Professional International
NGO - Non-Governmental Organization
NGS - National Geographic Society
OCV- Office of Conventions and Visitors
OWHC - Organization of World Heritage Cities
SECTUR - Secretaría de Turismo del Estado de Campeche
UNESCO - United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organizations
URL – Uniform resource locator, the address of a World Wide Web page
WHC - World Heritage Convention
10
Figures
Figure 1: Mexico - Total Tourism Receipts…………………………………………………………….…………
Page 15
Figure 2: 2011 International Tourist Arrivals by Nationality............................................
Page 16
Figure 3: State of Campeche Hotel Room Nights........................................................... …..
Page 18
Figure 4: City of Campeche Hotel Room Nights……………………………………………………………….
Page 18
Figure 5: Residents Enjoy Having Tourists in Campeche………………………………………………….
Page 20
Figure 6: Tourism Jobs Are Highly Desirable……………………..……………………………………………..
Page 20
Figure 7: Cost of Living vs. Quality of Life………………………………………………………………………….
Page 21
Figure 8: Tourism Benefits Outweigh its Negative Consequences……………………………………
Page 21
Figure 9: Product, Service & Hospitality Satisfaction…………………………………………………………
Page 23
Figure 10: Importance-Performance Analysis…………………………………………………………………..
Page 23
Figure 11: Examples of Advertisements……………………………………………………………………………
Page 28
Figure 12: Components of Inbound Marketing…………………………………………………………………
Page 31
Figure 13: Plataforma de los Cuchillos Sign………………………………………………………………………
Page 42
Figure 14: Effective Use of Sign Graphics…………………………………………………………………….……
Page 43
Figure 15: Overly Detailed INAH Map………………………………………………………………………………
Page 44
Figure 16: INAH vs. NPS Signage………………………………………………………………………………………
Page 44
Figure 17: UNESCO Patrimonito Logo…………………………………………………………………………….…
Page 49
Figure 18: Dunham Institute, Chiapas, Mexico…………………………………………………………………
Page 67
Figure 19: Sample Follow-up Postcard (Front) …………………………………………………………………
Page 70
Figure 20: Sample Brochure for Premium Meeting Packages….………………………………………
Page 73
Figure 21: Example of Re-Designed Banner………………………………………………………………………
Page 77
Figure 22: Example of Mural-sized Photo or Artwork………………………………………………………
Page 78
Figure 23: DMO Working Group Goals and Activities……………………………………………………….
Page 87
Figure 24: Suggested Organizational Structure…………………………………………………………………
Page 92
Figure 25: DMO Scoring Criteria…………………………………………………………….…………………………
Page 93
Figure 26: DMO Scoring Matrix……………………………………………………………………………..…………
Page 94
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1 Introduction/Purpose
1.1
Scope of Work
Campeche is a tourism destination with enormous potential given its rich cultural heritage and pristine
natural areas. Tourism is one of the region’s most significant economic sectors, and provides an
opportunity to drive Campeche’s overall sustainable development efforts. In compliance with the Scope
of Work, key tourism development recommendations have been developed to enhance the social,
cultural, environmental and economic benefits of tourism and to further the competitiveness and
sustainability of Campeche (please refer to Appendix 1 for the complete Scope of Work in both Spanish
and English).
The project is intended to address the following areas:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
1.2
Tourism awareness
Increase integration of tourism services based on existing tourism products
Improve the destination positioning of Campeche
Improve the visitation experience in the City of Campeche based on the visitors’ perspective
Revitalizing the Convention Center in the City of Campeche
Creating a Destination Management Organization (DMO) for the city/destination
Strategic Focus
Based on the statement of purpose, three strategic focus areas have been determined. For each area,
specific goals and tasks have been identified, that when fulfilled, will support and sustain Campeche’s
tourism efforts.
1. Product Development and Marketing
2. Tourism Awareness and Visitor Satisfaction
3. MICE Market Enhancement and Destination Management
1.2.1 Product Development and Marketing
The development and marketing of high-quality attractions is critical for drawing tourists to a
destination. Improving and diversifying attractions would help Campeche distribute economic benefits
across the city, enhance its tourism competitiveness, and encourage visitors to stay longer at the
destination. Furthermore, improving marketing efforts would allow Campeche to attract more tourists
and advance the city’s reputation domestically and internationally.
1.2.2 Tourism Awareness and Visitor Satisfaction
In order for Campeche to thrive long-term as a tourist destination, key stakeholders, particularly
residents and service-oriented businesses, must understand and support the role of tourism in
developing the city’s economy and the responsibilities associated with the World Heritage designation.
In addition, it is important to assess and monitor Campeche from the visitors’ perspective to identify and
close the gaps between their expectations and experiences.
12
1.2.3 MICE Market Enhancement and Destination Management
Attracting multi-day, high-quality visitors is crucial to the viability of Campeche as a sustainable tourism
destination. Utilizing the convention center to the fullest potential and having a unified organization to
act on tourism goals are two ways this can be accomplished. A DMO can play a critical role in bringing
together stakeholders to work for the common good of the destination. DMO’s often encourage
dialogue, facilitate tourism awareness, monitor visitor satisfaction, promote product development, and
market the destination as a whole to both the MICE markets and leisure travelers.
1.3
Methodology
On May 9th, 2013, the Consulting Team met as a group to begin preliminary work on the project
Campeche: Caminando Hacia un Turismo Sustentable y Competitivo. Professor Juan Luna had already
visited Campeche and met with the Client Group to determine a 6-point Scope of Work for the
Consulting Team to focus on. The Team then spent a month in Washington, D.C., conducting extensive
background research related to the Scope of Work, with an emphasis on global, domestic, and local
tourism trends.
On June 10th, the Consulting Team presented a summary of their research findings and a strategic
fieldwork plan in Campeche. After receiving feedback from the Client Group, the Secretary of Tourism,
and other stakeholders in attendance, the Consulting Team made the necessary adjustments for
conducting fieldwork over the following two weeks.
During the course of the project, the Consulting Team:
• Administered 127 visitor surveys and 79 resident surveys
• Conducted 25 stakeholder interviews with government officials, tour operators, hotel managers,
restaurant employees, tourism students, and others
• Assessed more than 20 tourist sites in the state of Campeche including Edzna, Calakmul, Los
Chenes, Camino Real, and Xpicob
• Hosted a visioning workshop for more than 70 members of Campeche’s tourism community
The fieldwork culminated with a final presentation on June 21st, during which the main findings and
recommendations were presented to those in attendance, including the Client Group, the Secretary of
Tourism, and the Governor of Campeche. The information gathered in the field served as the
13
foundation for the recommendations discussed in the final presentation and in this report. The final
stage of the consulting process is implementation, which will rely heavily on the Client Group and the
ability of stakeholders in Campeche to work together. The recommendations in this report serve as an
actionable road map to move the Client Group toward the project’s goals of improving competitiveness
and sustainability of tourism in Campeche.
1.4
Consulting Timeline
May 9, 2013
May 9-June 8, 2013
June 9, 2013
June 10, 2013
June 11-June 20, 2013
June 14, 2013
June 21, 2013
June 22-July 30, 2013
July 31, 2013
Project Commencement
Preliminary Research
Consulting Team’s Arrival in Campeche
Inception Presentation
Fieldwork
Visioning Workshop
Final Presentation
Final Report Preparation
Final Report Submission
14
2 Strategic Assessment
2.1
Situation Analysis
In order to identify the challenges and opportunities Campeche faces, the Consulting Team conducted
an analysis of the tourism macro-environment in Mexico and Campeche.
2.1.1 Tourism in Mexico
According to the World Travel & Tourism Council (WTTC), tourism in Mexico generated $1358.2 MXN in
2012. This represents a real growth of 4.5 percent over 2011 receipts. Tourism receipts are expected to
grow by 3.6 percent in 2013. Domestic tourism accounted for 88% of tourism receipts in the country,
while international tourism accounted for 12 percent of receipts.1 Figure 1 shows the trend of Mexican
tourism receipts from 2007 to 2013 estimates, illustrating a slow return to 2011 receipt levels.
1600
Figure 1
Mexico - Total Tourism Receipts
1400
1200
International
Tourism
Tourism Receipts 1000
(MXNbn, real 2012
800
prices)
600
Domestic
Tourism
400
200
0
2007
Source: WTTC 2013
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
Est.
While international tourism receipts only make up 12 percent of the total market in Mexico, it remains
an important revenue stream. Given its proximity to the popular international destinations of Cancun,
Chichen Itzá, and the Riviera Maya, Campeche is poised to capture some of the international market.
Over 90 percent of the international tourist arrivals in Mexico are from the Americas, with 86 percent
coming from North America and 3 percent coming from South America. Europe is the second largest
source region, representing 6.5 percent of international tourists in Mexico. The United States is the
largest source market for Mexico and comprises 79 percent of international tourist arrivals. Canada is a
1
World Travel & Tourism Council. (2013). Travel & Tourism Economic Impact 2013 - Mexico. London: World Travel & Tourism
Council.
15
distant second representing a mere 7 percent of market for Mexico and comprises 79 percent of
international tourist arrivals. 2
Figure 2 shows the top ten international source markets
for Mexico. South America has been a growth market for
Mexico, nearly doubling in arrivals from 2007 to 2011. The
growth has been driven by increases in arrivals from
Argentina, Brazil, and Colombia. Canada has also been a
growth market for Mexico, increasing by 65 percent from
2007 to 2011. Nevertheless, United States tourists comprise
the overwhelming share of tourist arrivals in Mexico,
growing by a modest 8 percent between 2007 and 2011.
Figure 2
2011 International Tourist Arrivals by
Nationality
2.1.2 Mexico Tourism Competitiveness
United States
18,554,616
Canada
1,563,146
United Kingdom
330,071
Spain
279,530
Argentina
200,687
Brazil
196,266
France
186,778
The World Travel and Tourism Council assess the tourism
Germany
165,133
competitiveness of countries around the world. 3 In 2013
Italy
150,690
Mexico remained ranked 44th in the world (and 5th in The
Colombia
125,882
Americas). Mexico receives impressive marks for its natural
UNWTO Compendium of Tourism Statistics 2012
resources (ranked 8th), and has improved in that area since
the last assessment. Mexico’s natural resource ranking is bolstered by the country’s rich fauna and
natural reserves, many of which can be found in Campeche. The country’s cultural resources are also
among the best in the world (ranked 21st), with 34 World Heritage cultural sites (including the City of
Campeche and Calakmul), several international fairs and exhibitions, and strong creative industries.
These inherent strengths are reinforced by the overall prioritization of the tourism sector in the country
(34th) and the country’s effective marketing and branding campaigns. Some areas have improved, yet
continue to require attention—for example, ground transport infrastructure is being developed but still
ranks relatively low (69th), and more efforts are required to ensure that the sector is being developed in
a sustainable way (105th). Finally, despite a marginal improvement since last year, safety and security
remains the main source of concern for the travel and tourism sector, where Mexico still ranks a low
121st. Campeche, however, excels in safety and security.
2.1.3 Tourism in the State of Campeche
According to SECTUR and DATATUR statistics, the State of Campeche had 1.2 million tourist arrivals in
hotels in 2011, an increase of 7.3 percent over the previous year. In addition, the State generated 1.9
million hotel nights, an increase of 9.5 percent over the previous year. However, the small ratio of hotel
room nights to hotel tourist arrivals indicates a short average stay for tourists in the State.
Campeche ranked 24th out of 32 states (including the Federal District) for total room nights. The State
had a relatively high hotel occupancy rate (for the country) of 51.7% in 2011, which placed it 5th out of
the 32 states. Tourists visiting the State were predominately domestic at 87% of total room nights.
2
UNWTO. (2012). Compendium of Tourism Statistics. Madrid: UNWTO.
Blanke, J. and Chiesa, T. (2013). The Travel & Tourism Competitiveness Report 2013. Geneva: World Travel and Tourism
Council.
3
16
As Figure 3 illustrates, total hotel room nights in the State of Campeche have grown over the past few
years with an average annual growth rate of 2.1 percent from 2001 to 2011. 4
2,000,000
Figure 3
State of Campeche Hotel Room Nights
According to the most recent data
from the State government, the total
number of tourists in the State of
Campeche increased by 7 percent in
2012 to a total of more than 1.6
million tourists. Visits to archeological
zones also increased by more than 18
percent to reach nearly 146,000
visitors. Hotel inventory grew to meet
the increased demand. The State
added nine new hotels and 515 total
hotel rooms to its inventory in 2012. 5
Hotel Room NIghts
1,800,000
1,600,000
1,400,000
1,200,000
1,000,000
800,000
600,000
2001
2003
2005
2007
2009
2011
Source: SECTUR 2012
The most recent visitor statistics
from the City of Campeche show
the total number of visitors in 2012
at 506,552, an increase of 7 percent
over the previous year. 7
Hotel Room NIghts
2.1.4 Tourism in the City of Campeche
According to SECTUR and DATATUR, the City of Campeche had 302,840 tourist arrivals in hotels in 2011,
representing about 26 percent of the total hotel arrivals in the State. Tourist arrivals in hotels grew by 10
percent year over year in 2011. Total room nights also grew by 10 percent in 2011 to a total of 493,433.
The ratio of hotel nights to hotel arrivals for the City of Campeche was higher than the state, indicating a
longer average stay. Eighty percent of hotel room nights in the City were generated by domestic
tourists. As figure 4 illustrates, hotel
Figure 4
room nights in the City of
City of Campeche Hotel Room Nights
Campeche have grown at a slightly
550,000
higher rate than the state at an
500,000
average yearly growth of 2.5
450,000
percent from 2001 to 2011, with
the growth occurring primarily in
400,000
6
the last four years.
350,000
300,000
250,000
200,000
2001
2003
2005
2007
2009
2011
Source: SECTUR 2012
4
Secretaría de Turismo. (2012). Mexico Compendium of Tourism Statistics. Mexico City: Secretaría de Turismo.
Secretaría de Turismo. (2013). Data File: Histórico Ciudad. Campeche: Secretaría de Turismo.
6
Secretaría de Turismo. (2012). Mexico Compendium of Tourism Statistics. Mexico City: Secretaría de Turismo
7
Secretaría de Turismo. (2013). Data File: Histórico Ciudad. Campeche: Secretaría de Turismo.
5
17
The recent tourism data suggests a positive outlook for future tourism growth. Mexico and Campeche
have both seen growth with the recovery of the global economy. However, continued economic
concerns in Europe could have an impact on tourism in Campeche. Furthermore, while Campeche’s
occupancy rates are high for the country, they remain low overall, leaving unused room capacity. The
strength of the Mexican economy should continue to support domestic demand, while the growth of
international markets such as Argentina and Colombia could present an opportunity for attracting new
visitors to Campeche.
2.2
Visioning Workshop
With the support and cooperation from the
client group, the Consulting Team organized
and facilitated a tourism stakeholder workshop
to discuss the current and future state of
Campeche’s tourism industry. The goal was to
encourage collaboration among all stakeholders
to work towards a common vision.
Over 70 individuals from the public sector,
private sector, and civil society participated,
representing many different facets of the tourism industry including hotels, restaurants, tour operators,
suppliers, academia, government officials, and others. The participants were divided into six teams to
facilitate discussion. José Melenez, Consultant Team Project Leader, officiated the event and led the
teams through three activities.
2.2.1 Activity 1: Strengths & Challenges
The first activity prompted each team to determine five
major strengths and five major challenges for the tourism
industry. Teams then shared results with each other and
voted for those they believed to be the most important.
The results were as follows:
Campeche’s top strengths:
• Peacefulness and security
• Cultural and natural diversity
Campeche’s greatest challenges:
• Lack of professionalism among tourism providers
• Weak links between private businesses and the
government
2.2.2 Activity 2: Ideal Future of Campeche
The second activity stimulated discussion over the ideal future for Campeche’s tourism industry. The
resulting vision statement represents the diversity of ideas that were discussed and envisioned:
18
“An important tourist destination that is tranquil, safe, and friendly, which is known for its
historical, natural, and cultural treasures, where the tourism providers are a knowledgeable and
cooperative team working together to promote their sustainable tourism destination.”
2.2.3 Activity 3: Topical Priorities & Actions
The third activity encouraged teams to develop priorities and actionable steps to achieve Campeche’s
tourism goals. Teams worked together to discuss both long-term and short-term goals in the following
topics:
•
•
•
•
Destination Management
Marketing
Tourism Awareness
Product Development
Teams also identified the organizations and institutions who would be responsible for undertaking the
prioritized goals; a very important part of any successful plan of action. Notes from this section and the
entire visioning workshop can be viewed in Appendix 2.
The discussions revealed that the
success of Campeche’s tourism
industry
is
not
the
sole
responsibility of one organization
or sector. Rather, it is a collective
effort from the public and private
sectors, with each playing a role to
strengthen Campeche’s tourism
industry. The idea of creating a
separate organization, representing
both
public
and
private
stakeholders, was suggested as a
solution to achieving the discussed goals. Recommendations for establishing this cooperative
organization are presented in Section 8 of this report.
2.3
Resident Survey Results
A resident survey was conducted to identify and measure the city of Campeche residents’ perceptions
toward tourism. The survey covered the following key areas: attitudes towards visitors; knowledge of
local attractions; appeal for tourism-related jobs and careers; and awareness of tourism impacts. In
total, 79 completed resident surveys were analyzed. Recommendations and further discussion
stemming from these results are covered throughout this report. Appendix 3 presents the survey
methodology and Appendix 4 provides the questionnaire that was utilized as well as the data results for
each individual question.
19
2.3.1.1 Residents Feelings Toward Visitation
More than 90 percent of respondents enjoyed having visitors in their city (Figure 5) . When residents
were asked about their role in the tourist
experience, more than 82 percent agreed
Figure 5
Residents Enjoy Having Tourists in Campeche
or highly agreed that residents play an
important role (49 percent and 33 percent
respectively). These results demonstrate
that residents acknowledge the impact
they have on tourism visitation. However,
interviews with local stakeholders
revealed concerns about the lack of
professional training among residents,
including customer service providers. So
while residents may understand their
important role in the tourism supply
chain, they may not realize how their
professional shortcomings negatively
impact the visitor experience.
5% 3%
37%
55%
Disagree
Undecided
Agree
Source: GW Consulting Team, 2013
Strongly
Agree
2.3.1.2 Perceptions of Tourism’s Economic Impact
Residents’ awareness of the economic impacts of tourism was also measured. The respondents were
asked whether tourism creates jobs and how tourism affects the cost of living. Seventy-two percent of
respondents agreed that tourism generates jobs in the community. However, nearly half of those
Figure 6
Tourism Jobs Are Highly Desirable
Strongly
Agree
Agree
Undecided
37%
15%
Disagree
Strongly
Disagree
0%
10%
20%
30%
40%
Tourism jobs are NOT highly desirable
50%
60%
70%
Tourism generates jobs
Source: GW Consulting Team, 2013
20
Figure 7
respondents felt that tourism jobs are not
Cost of Living vs. Quality of Life
highly desirable. In addition, a high
percentage, nearly 40 percent, of 50%
respondents
were
undecided
40%
regarding the desirability of tourism30%
related jobs, while 15% were
undecided on whether the tourism 20%
sector generates employment. These 10%
results (illustrated in Figure 6) prove
0%
that there is an opportunity for
Strongly
Disagree Undecided
Agree
Strongly
Disagree
Agree
Campeche’s tourism leaders to
educate residents on the actual and
Increases Cost of Living
Improves Quality of Life
Source: GW Consulting Team, 2013
potential
value
of
tourism
employment.
Figure 7 shows the close distribution of responses to two different statements: tourism increases the
cost of living and tourism increases the quality of life. While residents believed that tourism increases
the cost of residing in Campeche, they also enjoyed the benefits it has on their experience living in the
city. The parity between these responses suggests that the negative and positive impacts of tourism
were perceived to be relatively balanced.
2.3.1.3 Tourism Benefits vs. Negative Impacts
Further evidence that residents had a balanced view of negative and positive tourism impacts is
depicted in Figure 8. The pie chart shows responses to the statement, “The benefits of tourism
outweighing the negative consequences of tourism.” Responses were evenly divided between those
who agreed and those who disagreed with this concept. Perhaps most surprising is the percentage of
residents who were undecided (43 percent).
Figure 8
This result could indicate a lack of knowledge
Tourism Benefits Outweigh its Negative Consequences
about
both
tourism
benefits
and
consequences, representing a need for
Strongly
awareness on these subjects.
9% 7%
Disagree
21%
20%
Disagree
Undecided
43%
Agree
Strongly
Agree
Source: GW Consulting Team, 2013
Finally, when asked to describe Campeche in
one word, respondents provided a variety of
characteristics and attributes. Nearly one-third
of all respondents described Campeche as a
beautiful place, while 16 percent highlighted
Campeche’ tranquil and peaceful atmosphere.
Other respondents, nearly 15 percent, utilized
words such as ancestral, unique, colorful,
friendly, historical, and magical to define the
destination.
21
2.4
Visitor Survey Results
A visitor survey was also carried out to collect
demographic information, marketing data, and
assess visitor satisfaction with various attributes
of Campeche. In total, 127 visitor responses
were analyzed. The implications of these
results are discussed throughout the report.
Appendix 3 includes the visitor survey
methodology and Appendix 5 provides survey
questionnaire as well as the data results for
each individual question.
2.4.1 Demographics Characteristics
More than 80 percent of the respondents surveyed were domestic visitors. Less than 20 percent were
international visitors who arrived to Campeche by air transportation. Half of the respondents were
repeat visitors.
The largest visitor age group was 26 to 35-year-olds. After this group, 18 to 25-year-olds and 36 to 45year-olds were the most represented. The majority of the visitors had a relatively high level of
education. Nearly half completed a college education, and an additional twenty percent completed a
post-graduate education.
2.4.2 Trip Attributes and Visitor Motivation
According to the survey results, the top three memorable experiences for visitors to Campeche were
Mayan sites and history (30 percent), colonial history (25 percent) and Campeche’s culture (21 percent).
With regard to the visitor motivation, the most prevalent trip purpose was leisure. However, not
insignificantly, thirty percent of respondents indicated that they were business travelers. Others cited
visiting family and relatives as the purpose of their visit. Three-fourths of all respondents reported that
they will definitely recommend the City of Campeche to friends and relatives. While this latter figure
represents the vast majority of visitors, the destination should strive to target a definitely-recommend
rate above 90%.
2.4.3 Satisfaction Gap Analysis
To measure visitor satisfaction, a combination of a semantic scale (from very bad to excellent) and a
five-point numerical scale (with 1 being very bad, 2 being bad, 3 being neutral, 4 being good, and 5 being
excellent) was used. Figure 9 shows the overall visitor satisfaction with the city of Campeche was 4.4.
Visitors were most satisfied with the friendliness of the residents (4.4), food (4.3), and the service at
lodging places (4.2). Limited knowledge of foreign languages received the lowest satisfaction score
(3.2). While not unsatisfactory, the variety of the activities, organized excursions, and interpretation of
local community received average scores below 4, revealing room for improvement in those areas.
22
Figure 9
Product, Service & Hospitality Satisfaction
Overall Sarisfaction
4.4
Degree of knowledge of foreign languages from…
3.2
Convenience and access to local transport
3.5
Variety of the activities
3.5
Organized excursions
3.7
Interpretation of local community
3.8
Convenience and access to public facilities
3.8
Service at airport
4.1
Accessibility to the cultural heritage site
4.1
Service at lodging places
4.2
Food
4.3
Friendliness of the residents
4.4
0
Source: Consulting Team, 2013
1
2
3
4
5
2.4.4 Importance-Performance Analysis
Using the average scores above, an Importance-Performance Analysis (IPA) was conducted to help the
city of Campeche prioritize response to these issues. IPA examines the importance of each attribute to
the visitor relative to their satisfaction in that area. The results of this analysis are plotted in Figure 10.
Figure 10
Importance-Performance Analysis
23
The highest scores in both satisfaction and importance also represent the greatest threats. These are
identified in Quadrant I (service at airport and service at attractions) and are considered vulnerabilities
because if they are not maintained, they will decline. Attributes in Quadrant IV (food, friendliness, and
value) were found highly satisfactory to visitors, but they were also considered relatively unimportant to
their experience. Therefore resources are better allocated to other areas. Quadrant III represents
attributes with relatively low performance and importance scores (convenience of local transport and
variety of activities). These are also not top-priority items. The greatest opportunities are captured in
Quadrant II (organized excursions, quality of activities, interpretation of local community, and safety).
These attributes are important to visitors but were ranked relatively low in satisfaction overall. Items in
this quadrant should be the focus of improvement efforts.
2.4.5 Information Delivery Analysis
According to the cross tabulation between booking channel and booking time, forty percent of visitors
did not book their trip before arriving in Campeche. With the exception of this group, visitors tended to
book their travel 1 to 2 months in advance. Online travel agencies were the preferred method for
Source: thepointsguy.com
making reservations. Word of mouth was the primary source for visitor information about Campeche
before and during the visit. Visitors were more likely to depend on their laptop, television, and different
social media to gather information before their arrival. Once in Campeche, visitors used tour operators,
guide books, and information centers to obtain more information on the destination.
24
3 Marketing
3.1
Marketing Preview
Challenges
Solutions
Campeche does not have a consistent and
compelling brand
Campeche is not focusing its resources on
attracting target markets
Agree upon a brand positioning statement and use to
craft messaging and media plans
Pursue target marketing opportunities that align with
the brand
• Media outlets
• Tradeshows
• Associations
• Travel agents/operators
Visitors are not using the destination
website
Residents, including tourism sector
employees, are often unaware of tourism
attractions and tourism benefits in
Campeche
Optimize SEO
Utilize social media
Host a Tourism Awareness Week to market the
destination internally
One of the principal challenges facing Campeche is that the current marketing effort does not clearly
define the destination’s identity, and therefore does not resonate with the right markets. To address
this challenge, developing a compelling Campeche brand and promoting it through targeted marketing
and sales strategies is highly recommended.
3.2
Building a Brand
Many of the stakeholders interviewed cited
Campeche’s lack of a strong, long-term brand as
one of the key obstacles to attracting tourists to
the destination. Currently, Campeche has an
effective new slogan and logo, but a clear brand
has not been established. A brand influences and
builds positive perceptions of a place and
distinguishes a destination from all other destinations. Ultimately, a brand appeals to travelers on an
emotional level and communicates what makes a destination unique and special.
A slogan is a short phrase used consistently across advertising outlets, while a brand
is a collection of qualities that defines the destination in the minds of travelers.
25
A previous advertisement for Campeche shows five different
activities available in the region in an attempt to appeal to a
very broad audience. The advertisement is essentially saying,
“We have everything here – from beaches and ruins to outdoor
activities and city tours.” While tourists can indeed enjoy all of
these activities in Campeche, the advertisement does not
create an emotional connection with the viewer and fails to
reveal what distinguishes Campeche from other destinations
with similar offerings.
SECTUR needs to identify exactly the type of destination
Campeche wants to become and the kinds of tourists the State
wants to attract. In this way, SECTUR can create a powerful
brand that is relevant to the market segments that are best suited for the destination. The overarching
goal is for Campeche’s brand to be in alignment with the values of its target markets.
During the stakeholder interview process, visioning workshop, and site visits, the Consulting Team
gained a better understanding of the types of tourists that find Campeche appealing and the types of
travelers that the people of Campeche are interested in attracting.
While tourism stakeholders in Campeche would like the State’s tourism to grow, the consensus among
most stakeholders is that the State does not want to become a mass tourism destination like Cabo San
Lucas or Cancún. Instead, SECTUR should focus on preserving the State’s unique qualities and building a
destination brand around Campeche’s three core assets:
•
•
•
Past and present Mayan culture
Colorful and storied colonial history
Captivating eco-adventures
Concentrating on building a
focused brand around these
strengths, SECTUR will be better
positioned to target its marketing
efforts towards specific groups of
travelers that are aligned with the
qualities that the destination has
to offer. Campeche’s identity can
be summarized succinctly in the
following
brand
positioning
statement:
“Campeche is a safe and relaxed destination with rich offerings of
Mayan culture, colonial history, and captivating eco-adventures.”
26
It is important that once SECTUR embraces a new brand, it become a long-term strategy that is
maintained and promoted even through governmental and institutional changes. Brands take time to
develop. If the destination brand is recreated every few years, it will be difficult to shape a consistent
perception of Campeche.
Additionally, the most effective destination brands should be communicating in a unified and consistent
manner across all channels. Everyone working in the tourism sector and promoting the destination must
do so in a way that preserves and reinforces the Campeche brand. This involves internal marketing so
that all tourism stakeholders have a better understanding of the newly defined brand.
This can be achieved by creating a series of guidelines about what the brand represents and how it
should be communicated. One excellent example of such guidelines is the Experience Tool Kit created by
the province of Nova Scotia in Canada. The Toolkit provides a clear outline of the destination’s core
assets, experiences and values, and offers guidelines on how to best communicate these aspects to
external audiences. Campeche could develop a similar publication to promote its new brand. Nova
Scotia’s
Experience
Tool
Kit
can
be
downloaded
here: http://www.gov.ns.ca/econ/tourism/docs/ExperienceToolkitApril2011.pdf
3.3
Developing Messaging to Promote the Brand
After a brand positioning is identified, it is important to develop messaging that supports and builds that
brand. Messaging makes the brand more tangible and can help the destination better deliver a cohesive
story.
A series of four sample messages that capture and communicate Campeche’s core experiences and
unique selling propositions have been created. The messages are combined with dramatic photos to
create advertisements that tell the story of the Campeche brand and establish an emotional connection
with each target audience. Rather than trying to appeal to a very broad and unfocused audience like in
the advertisement presented before, each advertisement targets a specific audience that would be
interested in the core experience presented. This creates a more memorable impression which in turn
can help shape positive perceptions of Campeche.
27
All of the advertisement examples in Figure 11 clearly present the logo and slogan for Campeche, and
provide a call to action to drive viewers to the website. In the visitor survey it was discovered that
visitors are not using the Campeche.travel website. The revamped website is a great resource for the
State and additional efforts should be made to drive more traffic to it. These calls to actions will
encourage prospective visitors to gather information and book their travel via the website. Larger
versions of these advertisements can be found in Appendix 6.
Figure 11
Examples of Advertisements
This advertisement uses a message that speaks to the colonial
history portion of the brand. It specifically references exploration
since exploring the historic city is one the most popular activities in
the region.
This advertisement showcases one of the intimate eco-adventures
that the State has to offer. The photo is a powerful way of showing
that Campeche is everything that Cancun is not. In Campeche, a
visitor can escape the crowds common in other Yucatan destinations
and enjoy a more intimate and natural experience.
The messaging in this advertisement references both the
Mayan culture and the eco-adventure part of the brand. The
enticing message, combined with the photo showing Calakmul
nestled in the thick jungle, attracts adventurers and Mayan
enthusiasts.
This advertisement pictures the chocolate workshop in Casa 6,
highlighting the cultural component of the brand. The
message and photo show the important human connection
that brings Campechano culture to life.
28
Target Marketing
3.4
Branding and messaging are only two components of an effective marketing strategy. Equally important
is finding the right media outlets to apply its messaging. SECTUR should use Campeche’s brand
attributes to identify the destination’s target markets, and then advertise in media outlets where it can
effectively reach those markets.
There are many different kinds of tourists, each looking for a specific type of destination. Consequently,
to ensure that advertising budgets are efficiently allocated, target marketing is employed. Target
marketing is the concept of dividing a market into segments and then concentrating marketing efforts
on the segments that are most likely to visit the destination. Segments can be based on geography,
demographics or lifestyle preferences.
The Consulting Team recommends that SECTUR use target marketing to reach prospective visitors more
efficiently. Based on the research, visitor interviews, and visitor profiles that were carried out, the types
of leisure tourists most likely to travel to Campeche are the following:
•
•
•
•
FITs (Free and Independent Travelers)
Domestic or European travelers (primarily from Germany, France and Italy)
Adventure and cultural travelers
Niche tourists interested in specific activities such as fishing or bird watching
Target marketing to these groups can be achieved through various channels, including: media outlets,
tradeshows, groups and alliances, and travel agents and tour operators. Please see Appendix 7 for a list
of suggested targeted marketing outlets.
3.4.1 Media Outlets
Reaching travelers who are interested in Campeche’s brand is
just as important as developing the actual messaging. One of the
most direct ways of communicating with travelers is through the
media. SECTUR should continue to pursue both paid advertising
and public relations efforts with media outlets that align with its
brand. Niche publications and magazines that speak to specific
hobbies or interests, such as archeology and fishing, are an
excellent way to reach the appropriate target markets.
As a best practice, print advertisements should be run at least
three issues in a row to build awareness of your destination.
Online advertisements may be cheaper and a good way to drive
people to the Campeche Travel website. See Appendix 8 for
examples of media outlets that may be a good fit for Campeche's
advertising and public relations efforts.
29
3.4.2 Tradeshows
Attending industry trade shows is an effective and simple way to initiate and develop relationships with
tour operators. Stakeholder interviews indicated that Campeche has participated actively in many trade
shows, such as ITB, FITUR, Tianguis Turístico and
others. However, it is also important to attend some
smaller and more targeted shows that fit with
Campeche’s brand. Appendix 9 lists examples of trade
shows that are recommended for Campeche tourism
stakeholders to attend.
3.4.3 Groups and Alliances
Associations and alliances offer an opportunity to share best practices with similar destinations, build
travel packages with other regions, engage in joint promotion efforts, and obtain up to date industry
information. Campeche’s in-bound tour operators should participate in
organizations built around specific types of travel that align with the
destination’s brand. Additionally, rather than participating in many
organizations, tour operators should join one or two organizations and
be an active participant in order to fully realize the benefits. Appendix
10 gives examples of associations that would be valuable to join.
3.4.4 Travel Agents and Tour Operators
Travel agents and tour operators are an indirect marketing channel but
can be helpful, particularly in linking international visitors to Campeche
and building awareness of the destination. They can also be instrumental in overcoming safety concerns
surrounding travel to Mexico; travel agents and tour operators build trust with their clients and can
speak to Campeche’s safety as a destination. Considering these potential benefits, stakeholders should
forge more and stronger relationships with travel agents and tour operators to integrate Campeche into
their itineraries.
Tour operators are more likely to sell a destination if they have firsthand
knowledge and experience in that destination. Tourism stakeholders in
Campeche need to identify high-potential tour operators and travel agents. They
then need to contact them with targeted destination information and facilitate
FAM tours to visit the destination. Appendix 11 presents a selection of tour
operators and agencies that are considered as viable options for Campeche to
partner with.
3.5
Online Marketing
The rapid growth of technology has permanently changed the way travelers plan trips. Today, almost 83
percent of leisure travelers plan their travel online 8. In addition to increasing the number of online
customers, technology is making traditional marketing techniques less effective and more expensive.
8
DMAI Digital/Mobile Toolkit, 2013
30
Traditional marketing efforts are generally poorly targeted and, more than ever, people have ways of
filtering out content they are not interested in.
To stay relevant, an online marketing strategy called inbound marketing is recommended. Inbound
marketing has the objective of organically attracting end-users to a website, rather than using traditional
advertising and sales techniques. Campeche’s website is very user friendly and easy to navigate. Driving
web traffic to Campeche.travel, therefore, has the potential to increase tourism in Campeche. However,
as appealing as the current website is, it does not appear to be utilizing inbound marketing techniques
to attract online visitors. The most successful inbound marketing campaigns have three key
components: Content, Search Engine Optimization, and Social Media.
3.5.1
Content
Content creation is at the center of any inbound Marketing campaign. It is the instrument that attracts
potential customers to visit a website and learn more about a destination. Continuously generating new,
relevant and unique content is vital to drive potential tourists to Campeche online outlets.
3.5.2
Search Engine Optimization (SEO)
Search engines are the number one tool for planning travel among leisure travelers. Nearly 63 percent
of leisure travelers agree that search
Figure 12
engines are their go-to source for travel
information, and 56 percent of
travelers say they always start their
travel booking and shopping process
using search engines 9.
Components of Inbound Marketing
SEO is the practice of building an online
presence and attracting inbound links
from other websites to achieve a higher
page rank in search engine results.
Since many web users find content
through search engines, it is imperative
to be ranked in the top results of
relevant keywords.
Currently, a search for “Campeche” in
Google returns Campeche.travel as the
9th search result. The search results for
“Campeche, Mexico” do not even list Campeche.travel on the first page. Sixty percent of users click only
on the first three search results, which emphasizes how important it is to have a strong inbound
marketing strategy 10. Figure 12 illustrates the components of an inbound marketing strategy. To
9
DMAI Digital/Mobile Toolkit, 2013
Marketing Sherpa, February 2007
10
31
improve the website’s SEO for Google (representing 84 percent of global searches 11), it is highly
recommended to use free web resources as a guide and/or contract an SEO expert. The Google Search
Engine Optimization Starter Guide and the Hubspot Introduction to Search Engine Optimization are
great resources for learning about SEO techniques. SEO implementation can be tedious, time consuming
and complicated to manage. However, improving Campeche’s SEO would greatly increase the likelihood
that users would find and click on Campeche.travel’s link.
3.5.3 Social Media
Social media is a key distribution tool for content and has a strong influence on how people make travel
decisions. Using various social media channels allows for content to be shared and discussed openly.
When content is shared in this non-invasive way it encourages customers to learn more in an authentic
and natural manner. Consequently, the likelihood of them booking a vacation is greatly increased. To
ensure that Campeche has access to the most innovative web-based tools and solutions, following are
the social media platforms that were researched and evaluated.
3.5.3.1 Facebook
A traveler-centric Facebook page for Campeche was not found. . Facebook is one of the most popular
websites on the internet and is central to any social media campaign.
SECTUR can generate excitement and build a database of Facebook followers by promoting a contest in
conjunction with its Facebook Launch. Interactive contests are one of the most common and successful
promotions on Facebook, and are an effective method of maintaining engagement with followers.
11
Ibid.
32
To run a successful contest, SECTUR would partner with an established company like Aeromexico.
Aeromexico would be an ideal corporate partner because it shares an interest in bringing more tourists
to Campeche, and has more than 320,000 Facebook followers. SECTUR would purchase online
advertisements on the Aeromexico website and give the company positive exposure through its contest.
In return, Campeche would receive the benefits of joint promotion and two roundtrip airline tickets
from Mexico City. SECTUR may also consider running targeted advertisements featuring the contest in
Mexico City, to increase local visibility. To enter the contest, users would be required to “like” both the
Aeromexico and Campeche Facebook pages, which would generate followers of Campeche’s Facebook
page for future promotions.
The Facebook contest would then ask users to vote for their ideal Campeche experience, choosing from
the three tenets of the brand: Mayan culture, colonial history and eco-adventure. The winner would
receive a three-night trip to Campeche based on the type of trip they selected. Local businesses in
Campeche would offer in-kind donations of hotel rooms, meals, and activities in exchange for promotion
during the contest.
A Facebook launch contest would be a great way to quickly build an audience of Facebook followers and
generate media and traveler attention in the process. Once a Facebook community is established, the
staff responsible for managing the
Facebook page need to engage followers
by regularly posting photographs, events,
information and news about the
destination. It is recommended that staff
post on Facebook at least once every two
days. Facebook posts should be
interesting and engaging, with a maximum
of 80 characters.
It is free to set-up a destination Facebook
page and to run a contest on Facebook.
However, it is recommended that SECTUR
hire a contest application company to set Source: teknolosys.com
up the contest and manage Facebook’s
rules
and
regulations.
The
Team
recommends
working
(http://www.easypromosapp.com/; the first online contest is free.
with
EasyPromos
3.5.3.2 Twitter
Twitter is a popular forum for communicating with travelers and sharing information about a
destination. SECTUR currently has an active and successful Twitter feed for the destination. The
“Campeche Travel” Twitter account has more than 3,000 followers and tweets regularly. It does a good
job of highlighting the attractive elements of the destination and featuring timely promotions from local
businesses. It is recommended to continue to promote the destination on Twitter and build on its
previous success.
33
One recommendation for improving the destination’s Twitter efforts is to engage other users more
regularly. SECTUR should retweet relevant content from other users and reply to users when
appropriate. Campeche’s Twitter manager should use the search bar to find the most recent tweets
Source: www.smartpassiveincome.com
about Campeche and read what other are saying about the destination. SECTUR should also encourage
followers to share their favorite things about Campeche. Asking users to tweet their favorite photo or
activity in Campeche is a good way of building a more active and robust Twitter community.
In addition, the Twitter manager should use more links in Twitter posts. Linking to photos, webpages,
and news articles gives readers a chance to go beyond the brief posts of Twitter. Links can often be
lengthy, so Tweeters should use a shortened URL to abbreviate links, allowing more text to be included
in the tweet. To better track the effectiveness of tweets and links, as an added benefit, click analytics
such as such as tinyURL, bit.ly, and bre.ad should be used.
3.5.3.3 YouTube
Video content can introduce Campeche to potential visitors and help them learn more about the
destination. YouTube is the second-largest search engine in the world, surpassed only by Google 12. It
was discovered that after searching for “Campeche” on YouTube the destination’s videos are buried in
the search results. In order to improve access to its YouTube channel, Campeche’s YouTube manager
should retitle its videos to more accurately match the content and add a summary paragraph for each
one in the “description” field. The name and logo of the YouTube channel should also be updated to
reflect the current brand. Finally, the channel needs a larger collection of videos. Campeche could build
the content of its YouTube channel by asking local businesses, students, media, and citizens to
contribute their videos via a contest with a prize for the best video.
3.6
Internal Marketing
It is impossible to effectively market a destination without the support of both the community and the
tourism sector. Marketing Campeche as a destination internally will make residents feel more positively
about tourism and become self-motivated ambassadors for the city. A tourism awareness campaign is
an effective internal marketing strategy that involves a coordinated communication plan aimed at
raising the tourism sector’s profile and status in a destination. When targeting residents and service
providers alike, a tourism awareness campaign will typically include one or more of the following goals:
12
DMAI Digital/Mobile Toolkit, 2013
34
to create a better understanding of tourism benefits, to attract high achievers to the tourism sector, and
to establish a tourist-friendly culture.
3.6.1
Tourism Awareness Week
Based on the data collected from the surveys and information gathered in interviews, city residents are
often unaware of Campeche’s tourism attractions and tourism sector impacts. To illustrate this point,
67 percent of residents surveyed estimated that tourism constitutes over 20 percent of the State’s
economy, when it fact it makes up less than 10 percent. This misperception could negatively impact
public support for tourism development in Campeche
To bridge informational gaps like this one, the creation of a Tourism Awareness Week is recommended
specifically for residents and service providers. Titled “Tourism pa´ mi Campeche pa´ ti”, this initiative
would coincide with the celebration of World Tourism Day on September 27th. Over the course of
seven days, residents would learn about Campeche’s tourism resources and experience first-hand its
culture, its history, its thriving businesses, and celebrated hospitality. A sample video that communicates
the meaning of being a “Campechano” could be used as a basis to promote the tourism awareness
initiatives. The video can be found
at: http://youtu.be/xSj91oaDcMo
In an effort to communicate
logistics and generate excitement
surrounding Tourism Awareness
Week, it is recommended to
organize a media blitz featuring
broadcast, print, and online
advertisements leading up to, and
throughout
the
initiative.
Campeche’s tourism leaders
should use Tourism Awareness
Week as an opportunity to
educate residents about tourism’s
positive
impact
on
the
community.
Communicating benefits like
infrastructural improvements, job
creation, and tax revenues will
better inform residents on the
current state of tourism. Airing
radio spots to share these aspects
are recommended, especially for
children and focusing and sharing
fun facts about Campeche.
35
Working with print media outlets, tourism officials could be enlisted to contribute a weekly column
about the benefits of tourism. In addition, video vignettes profiling different career opportunities within
the tourism sector, or a miniseries giving residents an inside look at different hotels and restaurants in
Campeche (meet the owner, learn the history, and take a virtual tour) could be produced for local
television.
Organizing local familiarization trips during Tourism Awareness Week is also recommended to help
tourism sector employees become more knowledgeable of local attraction through first-hand
experience. SECTUR could work with local tour operators to established diverse itineraries for maximum
exposure.
One of Campeche’s most charming qualities is the pride that residents share in their history and way of
life. To leverage this sentiment, a series of promotional initiatives during Tourism Awareness Week that
encourages Campechanos to see and explore the city they know and love in new and exciting ways is
recommended.
Local attractions could set special rates and restaurants could offer set menus at a discounted prices to
encourage visitation among residents. Patrons could watch local chefs compete in a live cooking
competition in the plaza to see who
can prepare the best version of a
traditional Campechano dish. In
addition, organized events could
take place at a combination of wellknown centers of activity as well as
underutilized historical sites. For
instance, Trivia in the Plaza, a night
of games, could be hosted by Niños
Custodios in the Plaza de la
República, the city’s main center.
After hearing historic fun facts on
the radio, residents will have the
opportunity to test their Campeche
Source: www.tropicaldiscovery.com
knowledge and win prizes. Another
event is to host a fashion show on the Baluarte San Carlos rooftop to effectively showcase modern and
traditional clothing styles from Campechano designers around the State. Towards the end of the week a
Tourism Parade would be held, whereby each municipality in the state of Campeche would showcase
their cultural assets and tourism attractions on uniquely decorated platform floats.
It is recommended that funding for the Tourism Awareness Week should be raised through a
combination of sources, including government agencies, in-kind donations from local businesses, and
corporate sponsorships. While a program has been outlined, the success of Tourism Awareness Week
will depend on the solid collaboration between the public and private sectors, and Campeche’s
resident’s participation.
36
3.7
Marketing Summary
Challenges
Solutions
Cost
Implementing
Partner
Timeline
Campeche does not have
a consistent and
compelling brand
Agree upon a brand positioning
statement and use to craft
messaging and media plans
No cost
SECTUR and local
tourism community
Sep 2013–Oct
2013
Campeche is not focusing
its resources on attracting
target markets
Pursue target marketing
opportunities that align with the
brand
• Media outlets
• Tradeshows
• Associations
• Travel agents/operators
Varies. See Appendix 7 for
costs of examples provided.
SECTUR
Ongoing
Visitors are not using the
destination website
Optimize SEO
$900-$1,200 MXN per hour for
a SEO expert
SECTUR
Ongoing
Utilize social media
Social media is free. There is
no cost to run contest on
Facebook. First online contest
with EasyPromos is free. Each
additional contest is $188 MXN
SECTUR and local
tourism businesses to
provide in-kind
donations for contest
Ongoing
$200,000 – 300,000 MXN for
ads, costs associated with
events and hiring of PR firm;
consider seeking corporate
sponsorships from local
businesses and organizations
SECTUR
September 2013New fiscal year
Residents, including
Host a Tourism Awareness Week
tourism sector employees, to market the destination
are often unaware of
internally
tourism attractions and
tourism benefits in
Campeche
37
4 Visitor Experience
4.1
Visitor Experience Preview
Challenges
Tourists are unaware of the products in
the region
Solutions
Develop a comprehensive visitor guide for every hotel room
Place a community events board in the main plaza
Foster business linkages with referrals, networking events,
and internal FAM trips
Attraction signage is too academic
Replace signs with more compelling interpretation
Calakmul is not optimized for tourists
Establish a single entry point and fee for Calakmul
The significance of World Heritage is not
known to all residents and tourism
employees in Campeche
There are few ecological initiatives
promoting sustainable tourism
Provide English translations of signage
Improve transport options and engaging in joint promotions
with city of Campeche
Attend the XII Congreso Mundial de la Organización de las
Ciudades Patrimonio Mundial to learn best practices
Incorporate World Heritage in Youth’s Hands Education
Program in school curriculum
Install dual receptacles
Apply for Distintivo S certification
Reduce water consumption in hotels
Twenty (20) sites were visited and evaluated to develop an understanding of the different kinds of
experiences that Campeche offers to visitors, both in the city and throughout the state. A summary of
the challenges and opportunities for the sites that were assessed can be found in Appendix 12.
The overall conclusion is that numerous tourists are not taking advantage of the range of activities
available in the city and throughout the state of Campeche. The survey results indicated that one-third
of tourists visiting Campeche were on a day-trip, and only 43 percent of tourists were repeat visitors. In
addition, visitor satisfaction with the “variety of activities” ranked the second-lowest of all the attributes
assessed. These results, along with interview feedback, suggest that tourists perceive that there are few
worthwhile activities in Campeche, leading to short stays and low return rates. The following section
provides actions that can reduce this perception and enhance the visitors’ experience in Campeche.
38
Selling Campeche in the Destination
4.2
While a lack of activities in Campeche is a significant issue, the absence of promotion for the activities
that already exist is equally important to address. Visitors’ length of stay, eagerness to return, and
willingness to recommend Campeche are factors dependent on their ability to find and experience
quality tourism products. It is imperative that tourism stakeholders in the destination are playing a role
in promoting and selling these experiences.
Many of the hotels in the city had limited information to offer about activities and attractions in the city
and state. Information, if available, was typically limited to a few brochures. Most staff members did not
seem knowledgeable or enthusiastic about the tourism offerings in the area, and required significant
prodding to produce detailed recommendations on what to do during a stay. In order to address this
issue, it is recommended to create a comprehensive visitor guide and community events board as well
as strengthen business linkages in the tourism community.
4.2.1 Comprehensive Visitor Guide
A fundamental solution to the lack of local promotion is to create an easy-to-use visitor guide. The guide
would profile the main activities, attractions, and services in the State. Each profile would provide a
baseline level of detail for the tourist:
•
•
•
•
•
What is the attraction/tour?
What will I do there?
How will I get there?
How long will it take?
What type of amenities can be found?
Each attraction would be presented with compelling photographs and language. In addition to profiling
attractions and tours, itineraries would be created based on the length of stay and interests of the
traveler. The current Campeche website presents this type of information effectively. Many of the
experiences found on the site could be paired with appealing photos and added to this new guide. For
reference, guide books such as Lonely Planet and Rough Guides can be helpful resources for identifying
39
the type of information travelers seek. The
guide should be available in both Spanish and
English to accommodate international visitors.
Most importantly, it is recommended that the
guides be distributed in every hotel room,
information center, and at the airport. Given
the high percentage of visitors who arrived
without a hotel reservation (40 percent) and
the significant portion of business travelers
(30 percent), making information easily
accessible to visitors who have not planned
leisure activities in advance would increase
the likelihood that they engage in the destination during their stay. By including a guide in the hotel
room, tourists would have immediate access to a wealth of information, encouraging them to start
planning their activities.
4.2.2 Community Event Board
Along with attractions and tours, it was discovered that the events in Campeche are not being promoted
successfully to tourists. Events like drawing classes, theater productions, and dance performances are
distinctive, local experiences that tourists should have the opportunity to attend. Information about
events in Campeche is scattered throughout a number of sources and is difficult to find. While the
Ministry of Culture produces a fairly comprehensive monthly event guide for the cultural offerings
taking place in the city, they are not distributed to tourists and are only available in Spanish.
To eradicate the notion
that “there is nothing to
do in Campeche,” it is
recommended that a
community events board
be placed in the Central
Plaza. The board would
feature a monthly events
calendar on one side, and
a map indicating the
locations of the events on
the opposite side. An
interactive calendar of
events would also be
available
on
the
destination
website.
40
While this recommendation requires a relatively small capital investment, it can encourage longer stays,
additional spending, and enhance the overall visitor experience.
4.2.3 Business Linkages
Another recommendation for improving the internal promotion of activities and attractions is to forge
stronger linkages between tourism businesses in the city and throughout the state. Improved business
connections can be achieved by implementing the following recommendations:
•
•
•
Incentivize referrals
Host networking events
Run internal familiarization tours
4.2.3.1 Incentivize Referrals
Businesses should work together to establish incentives for customer referrals. Following are a set of
examples of incentive agreements:
•
•
•
A hotel receives a 5 percent commission on every tour booked through their front desk
A tour operator receives a small commission for sending their clients to a bar for happy hour
Attractions band together to offer customers a discounted pass for purchasing admission to all
of the sites
These types of incentives provide businesses with a financial stake in promoting other tourism services.
It also improves the visitor experience by offering deals or increasing access to destination information.
4.2.3.2 Host Informal Networking Events
Despite the fact that collaboration takes place amongst several business associations in the city, there is
a lack of communication across individual businesses and between tourism employees. Informal
networking events such as happy hours and open houses provide an opportunity for tourism
stakeholders to come together to share knowledge and build relationships. Informal networking events
among tourism businesses in Campeche are therefore recommended.
4.2.3.3 Run Internal Familiarization Tours
Source: networkedblogs.com
The final recommendation for strengthening
business linkages is to provide internal
familiarization tours to tourism employees.
This
recommendation
addresses
interviewees’ concern that some tourism
employees, including front desk and
information center staff, do not have
experiential knowledge of the attractions and
activities in Campeche. This concern was
confirmed through the Consulting Team’s site
assessments.
41
The best recommendations come from visitors’ first-hand knowledge, so it stands to reason that tourism
representatives should experience products they are promoting. To implement this program, SECTUR
should organize a periodic internal familiarization tours program with tour operators and attractions.
Tour operators would be incentivized to take motivated hotel and information center staff on a free tour
to excite and inform tourism employees about their products. Afterwards, staff members would be
more likely to recommend their experience to visitors.
4.3
Sign Interpretation
In the context of attraction signage, the term “interpretation” refers to the translation of cultural and
physical resources into language, which allows visitors to ascribe meaning to them. These meanings
enrich the visitor experience by establishing an intellectual and/or emotional connection with the
destination. From a destination management perspective, this connection can instill pride in the
community, increase visitor spending in the destination, and promote stewardship efforts.
4.3.1 Singularly Academic Interpretation
The evaluations
throughout the
conducted
state of
Figure 13
Plataforma de los Cuchillos Sign
Campeche reveal that current
attraction signage is written
from an academic perspective
for an academic audience
(Figure 13). Particularly at
the Mayan ruins, signage
primarily communicates the
dates relevant to the site and
a literal catalogue of the
structures
found
there.
There are also a number of signs describing technological achievements like the Mayan calendar and
aqueduct system, as well as religious beliefs and practices. While these signs expound plenty of
historical facts, they fail to make Mayan history relatable or emotionally salient to the visitor. For
example, Figure 13 pictures a sign at Edzná which describes the Plataforma de los Cuchillos. It states,
“The rooms of the central section are roughly made, smaller and correspond to a later period,
that is, to the Early Post classical period (1000-2000 A.D.). The building has stairways in the
center of its four sides and in the upper part conserves remains of several walls, butts of vaults
and benches. It had 20 rooms in total, 12 vaulted (although today none preserve the false
arch) and eight which were roofed over with perishable materials.”
While these details might interest a few architecturally-minded visitors, most would be more concerned
with the unanswered questions: Who used this building? For what activities? Why was there an offering
of knives? Rather than providing a pedantic explanation, this sign might better inform and intrigue
visitors with one large illustration: a colorful cross section of the building as it might have looked when it
was in use.
42
4.3.1.1 Creating Visitor & Site-Centric Interpretation
The Signage Guidelines in Appendix 13 provide specific instruction for developing effective signage
interpretation. Content should always be written for the visitor audience and attempt to make a
connection between the site and their lives. Also, the archeological perspective prevalent in INAH’s
signage is just one possible interpretation of many. Effective signage programs use multiple
perspectives (i.e. cultural, historical, and environmental) to convey multiple meanings to the target
audience.
When writing content for an individual sign, here are some basic principles to follow:
Do
Do Not
Tell a short, engaging story
Describe what the visitor can already see
Ensure key ideas are conveyed in < 45 seconds
Have long line lengths with small text
Replace longer words with short, plain ones
Overwhelm audience with facts
Make content support the attraction’s Use subject headings like “Plants”- instead choose
purpose and intended outcomes
words that deliver meaning
Answer the question, “Why should they
Ignore the needs & interests of the site’s audience
care?”
4.3.2 Sign Graphics
Sign graphics may include photographs, illustrations, maps, and newspapers or a combination of these
for the most effective presentation. Graphics can often capture the interest of visitors and convey the
interpretive theme better than text. Especially at archeological sites, graphics present an opportunity to
awaken the visitors’ imagination to the grandeur of what once was.
4.3.2.1 Current Signage Not Visually Relevant
The majority of the assessed attraction signage
was found to be visually uninteresting. The signs
posted in Campeche’s museums, bastions, and
archeological sites are typically dense, with
lengthy lines of small-print text. Graphics and
photographs are rarely included. When images
are present, they often lack explanation and color.
While the neutral tones of the signs integrate
them into their natural setting, the lack of visual
interest fails to capture the attention, or the
imagination, of visitors.
Figure 14
Effective Use of Sign Graphics
Throughout the site evaluations, it was determined that the existing map signage is confusing to
understand.
Many maps fail to identify the visitor’s current orientation and do not provide a
43
meaningful level of detail. Furthermore, in interviews with INAH representatives, it was suggested that
inadequate signage may be partly responsible for visitors getting lost at certain archeological sites. It is
imperative that map signage keep visitors and attractions safe.
Figure 15
Overly Detailed INAH Map
4.3.2.2 Utilizing Images Effectively
As a general rule, every interpretive sign
should include a graphic image to attract
visitor attention. The image selected
should relate directly to the specific
attraction or landscape in front of the
sign and tell a story. The graphic should
also be easily understood; signs are
typically viewed from a few feet away
and must be clear under various degrees
of brightness if placed outdoors. This
makes high contrast text and images a
priority.
Campeche’s attractions require the creation of new maps which can be quickly understood and easily
remembered. For orientation maps, there should always be a “you are here” indicator and they should
only include enough information to get the visitor to the next point of interest. For more information
about signage graphics, please refer to Appendix 13.
Figure 16
INAH vs. NPS Signage
Signs are best limited to 2 languages to
avoid this text-heavy appearance
“Structure 1” is unlikely to
attract visitor attention
Select graphics that tell a story about
the landscape. This graphic explains how
fossils look when they are discovered.
Keep white space to a
minimum
This title is much more
intriguing than the
alternative subject title,
“Shale Layers”
The main text block below is focused on one key
idea. These supporting details provide interested
visitors with more in-depth information.
44
4.4
Assessment and Recommendations for Calakmul
The Consulting Team was asked to provide a special assessment of Calakmul Biosphere, one of the most
valuable natural and archeological resources in the state of Campeche. Considered one of the largest
and most powerful ancient Maya cities, Calakmul contains the remains of roughly 1,000 structures. It
was designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 2002, making it the second World Heritage Site in the
state of Campeche.
4.4.1 The City of Campeche as a Gateway
The Calakmul Biosphere would benefit from a greater connection to the city of Campeche. Calakmul’s
distance from the city deters many visitors; an issue exacerbated by the lack of available public
transportation and poor road conditions leading up to the site. Providing transportation options to
Calakmul from Campeche would undoubtedly increase visitation.
In addition to transport, strengthening the relationship between the city of Campeche and Calakmul is
recommended by developing joint marketing efforts. The city of Campeche should be promoted as the
main gateway city to Calakmul. Indeed, many of the artifacts found at Calakmul and other archeological
sites in the region are displayed in museums in the city of Campeche. To capitalize on this cultural
relationship, the joint marketing campaign should compel museum-goers to make the worthwhile trip to
the archeological site after their visit.
4.4.2 Site Logistics
There are a number of logistical
issues upon entering the
Calakmul Biosphere. Tourists are
required to pay multiple fees and
pass
through
various
checkpoints. This process is
confusing, takes time, and
detracts from the visitor
experience due to its seemingly
unofficial nature.
One entry fee at a single
checkpoint for visitors is
recommended. The fee should
benefit the local community and
Source: natamerica.blogspot.com
be collected in a uniform,
organized manner. To implement this recommendation, a meeting between local officials, INAH,
community members, and other stakeholders involved in the management of the site is required.
45
Another issue affecting the visitor experience is the fact that most of the interpretive signs are only in
Spanish. This makes it difficult for international visitors to learn about the site without a guide. Many of
the directional signs are only available in Spanish, as well, making it challenging to navigate the site and
posing a safety issue. Adding translations in English would make the site more accessible and enjoyable
for international tourists.
Finally, providing basic amenities within the park is recommended. The Biosphere can be extremely hot,
sunny, and inundated with mosquitoes so visitors should be able to purchase water, sunscreen and bug
spray at the welcome center or museum. These few items keep visitors healthy and safe, and should be
available at all times. Foldup maps of the entire Calakmul Biosphere site would also improve visitors’
ability to navigate the site.
4.4.3 Community Connections
Given the distance between Campeche and Calakmul, most visitors stay overnight in the area to have
adequate time to visit the ruins. However, local communities are not deriving much economic benefit
from these overnight tourists because they are largely excluded from the tourism supply chain. This
presents an opportunity to link communities to tourism while also enriching the visitor experience to the
Calakmul area. For example, a visit to the hammock makers in nearby 20 de Noviembre would provide a
memorable cultural experience to visitors and economic benefits to artisans when hammocks are
purchased as souvenirs. To connect sites like this one to the tourism supply chain, tour operators in the
city of Campeche should work with the local tourism stakeholders in the Calakmul area to gauge
46
community interest in tourism, assess attractions, develop these into a circuit, and promote the circuit
to tourists in the gateway city.
4.5
San Francisco de Campeche, a World Heritage City
San Francisco de Campeche as a main component of the visitor experience and its relevance as a World
Heritage City were also
examined. Designated as
a World Heritage City in
1999, the city of
Campeche is one of ten
cities in Mexico to
receive
such
distinguished
recognition.
Despite this designation,
the City of Campeche has
struggled to attract more
tourists groups, and
most importantly, to
anchor them for longer
stays. To address this
challenge, the City of
Campeche as a World Heritage City was evaluated in order to identify gaps, and provide feedback and
recommendations to emphasize the importance of the city as a World Heritage Site.
4.5.1 Fieldwork Findings on World Heritage Site
Not surprisingly, results of the resident survey showed that 99 percent of Campeche residents are aware
of Campeche’s designation as a World Heritage Site. Furthermore, 88 percent of respondents believe
that tourism helps preserve Campeche’s historical and cultural heritage.
During stakeholder interviews, a variety of public educational programs relevant to the World Heritage
designation being offered throughout Campeche were discovered. One of the most popular programs is
“Guardianes del Patrimonio”. This program, managed by the children’s cultural center, La Characa, in
collaboration with INAH, provides training for children to become guide simulators in various attractions
around the city. In addition, INAH offers educational workshops in communities around Mayan
archeological sites to provide information regarding the importance of conservation of these sites. The
workshops are run by a group of professionals which include scientists, archeologists, researchers, and
other INAH representatives.
Most recently, on July 4th, 2013, a broadcaster from Este Día Noticias informed a young Campechano
boy that he won a national drawing competition titled “Mi ciudad Mexicana, Patrimonio Mundial”.
47
Organized by the Asociación Nacional de Ciudades Mexicanas Patrimonio Mundial (ANCMPM), the
winning artwork depicted La Puerta del Mar, an iconic image of the fortified city of Campeche.
4.5.2 Challenges Facing Campeche’s Heritage
One of the main challenges is the lack of economic resources. Sufficient economic funds are needed to
continue the educational programs mentioned earlier and to promote Campeche as a World Heritage
City. Several stakeholders also identified the lack of knowledge among tourism employees and tour
guides about the significance of the city’s World Heritage designation as a primary challenge. Finally,
the lack of adequate urban services, particularly the absence of trash and recycling bins around highlyvisited areas such as the main plaza, are negatively impacting the site and its heritage status.
4.5.3 Preserving World Heritage
Increasingly, travelers around the world are seeking experiences in nature, culture, and heritage.
Consequently, a World Heritage City designation provides unique economic opportunities, improves
conservation awareness, and allows for sustainable community development. Educating the local
population about the significance of heritage is the best way to create ambassadors for their own
culture and history. Continuing current educational initiatives is vital to raising tourism awareness and
cultural appreciation in the local community, and especially among the younger generations.
Most of the programs currently offered have a selection process and limited space which keeps many
children from participating each year. To address this problem, it is recommended to review the
48
World Heritage Education Program offered by the
World Heritage Convention (WHC) and UNESCO. 13
This program was created to encourage young
people to become involved in heritage conservation
and to promote cultural awareness. It offers a kit for
secondary school teachers, which includes
educational and informational materials on skill
development, research and investigation, fieldtrips,
and science camps. This kit is available in Spanish
and
may
be
downloaded
at
this
link: http://whc.unesco.org/en/educationkit/ free of
cost. It is recommended that this kit be integrated
in the 2014 public school curriculum. This initiative
would be advocated as a joint effort between the
Secretary of Education, Secretary of Culture and the
Ayuntamiento de Campeche.
Figure 17
UNESCO Patrimonito Logo
Campeche could also seize another opportunity to collaborate with the World Heritage Foundation by
participating in their Patrimonito Storyboard Competition. This competition provides young people with
an opportunity to use their creative problem-solving skills to raise awareness about World Heritage sites
using only images specific to their destination. If selected, these images are turned into a video and
promoted on the UNESCO website. 14
It is also recommended that several members of the Organization of World Heritage Cities (OWHC) and
SECTUR in Campeche attend the upcoming XII Congreso Mundial in Oaxaca.
The XII Congreso Mundial provides an
opportunity for Campeche to learn
best practices from fellow national
and international World Heritage
Cities. The Congress agenda includes
seminars on sustainable development
and cultural heritage preservation.
The city of Oaxaca will be recognized
as the “World Cultural Capital” for the
year 2013 during this event.
In
stakeholder interviews, Oaxaca was suggested as a potential World Heritage benchmark for Campeche,
against which to evaluate tourism activities and events. This event therefore provides an opportunity to
learn more about Oaxaca’s and other cities’ training and educational programs surrounding heritage.
13
World Heritage Convention, The UNESCO Young People's World Heritage Education Programme,
http://whc.unesco.org/en/wheducation/ (June 4, 2013)
14
World Heritage Convention, Patrimonito Storyboard Competition, http://whc.unesco.org/en/patrimonito/ (June 4, 2013)
49
To help preserve the aesthetic value of Campeche, the implementation of dual waste containers in the
city center is recommended. These containers should be strategically positioned in areas with the
highest levels of foot traffic: four containers around the central plaza and two in the Fountain Plaza,
adjacent to the Cathedral. This first set of six containers would serve as a trial to assess the additional
quantity needed. With the implementation of these new bins, locals and visitors would be motivated to
recycle and cooperate with the city’s beautification and maintenance efforts.
4.6
Sustainability
In order to best preserve the visitor experience over the long
term, it is important for Campeche to consider sustainability
issues when further developing the destination. A sustainable
destination recognizes the need and ability to build a strong
tourism industry while also respecting the local culture and
environment. Tourism is a growing sector in Campeche and
promises to be an important economic driver going forward.
However, in anticipation of this growth, stakeholders must
consider mitigating potentially negative tourism impacts before
they become problematic. Sustainable tourism requires that
destinations foresee development pressures and apply limits
and management techniques to preserve natural habitats,
heritage sites, scenery, and local culture.
Mexico is already taking action to support sustainability in
tourism. In late 2012, Federal SECTUR in coordination with
EarthCheck, announced the creation of the “S” Distinction that
certifies sustainable practices for service providers in the
tourism sector. Interested companies are asked to develop a
self-evaluation in four main areas: sustainability policy, energy consumption, water consumption and
waste. The benefits of carrying the “S” Distinction include recognition from the Federal Government of
sustainable practices, a reduction in operation costs in terms of water, electricity, and fuel consumption,
increased profitability without sacrificing service quality, increased competitiveness and market
position, and access to promotional campaigns.
Consumers are increasingly demanding more sustainable travel options, and certification via the “S”
Distinction program would be an excellent opportunity for tourism providers in Campeche to show the
public that operating sustainably is a priority. In 2011, 93% of Conde Nast Traveler readers surveyed said
“The tourism sector is embracing responsible tourism not as an option, but as
a condition for its continuous growth.”
-Luigi Cabrini, Director for Sustainable Development, UNWTO
50
that travel companies should be responsible for protecting the environment and 58% said their hotel
choice is influenced by the support the hotel gives to the local community 15.
Tourism businesses simply need to email [email protected] to begin the certification
process. The Federal Secretary of the Economy has established a fund (Fondo PYME) that will finance up
to 85% of a business’ certification costs. Certification normally costs approximately 50,000 pesos 16.
Along with potential certification via the “S” Distinction program, tourism stakeholders in Campeche
should also consider the following factors to ensure a more sustainable tourism industry:
4.6.1 Reducing the Environmental Impact of Hotels
Hotels can reduce their environmental footprint by providing recycling receptacles throughout hotels,
offering filtered-water filling stations rather than bottled water, and allowing guests the option to not
have their linens and towels washed daily. The Minimum Standards towards a Sustainable Hotel put
forth by the International Tourism Partnership are an excellent set of guidelines that could be adopted
by many hotels in Campeche.
4.6.2 Conserving Marine Resources and Biodiversity
Marine life is an important part of tourism in Campeche. It yields much of the region’s outstanding
cuisine and provides exciting tourism experiences such as turtle watching and tarpon fishing. SECTUR
should act as a bridge between SEMARNAT and the local government and residents to ensure that
marine conservation management plans are put into action. SECTUR should communicate to the local
community how these plans can sustain a high-quality marine ecosystem that can attract high-value
tourists to the area.
Since wetlands such as Los
Petenes are one of Campeche’s
key marine assets, SECTUR could
also work with SEMARNAT to
follow the guidelines outlined
in
Destination
Wetlands:
Supporting Sustainable Tourism, a
guide published by the UNWTO in
partnership with the Ramsar
Convention on Wetlands. The
publication
emphasizes
the
significant value of wetlands for
tourism and the economic
benefits that tourism can yield for the management of wetland sites.
15
16
Center for Responsible Travel (CREST). The Case for Responsible Travel: Trends and Statistics. 2013
SECTUR, Boletín 226 Anuncia Sectur Distintivo S, Para Empresas Comprometidas Con El Cuidado Al Medio Ambiente. 2012
51
4.7
Visitor Experience Summary
Challenges
Tourists are unaware of
the products in the region
Attraction signage is too
academic
Calakmul is not optimized
for tourists
The significance of World
Heritage is not known to
all residents and tourism
employees in Campeche
There are few ecological
initiatives promoting
sustainable tourism
Solutions
Cost
Implementing Partner
Timeline
Develop a comprehensive
visitor guide for every hotel
room
Place a community events
board in the main plaza
Foster business linkages with
referrals, networking events,
and internal FAM trips
Replace signs with more
compelling interpretation
Establish a single entry point
and fee for Calakmul
$40,000 MXN for 1,000 copies
SECTUR and local tourism
associations/businesses
Sep 2013–Jan 2013
$4,400 MXN board
$1,000 MXN for map
Business and event-specific
costs
SECTUR
Ongoing
Hotel, restaurant, and tour
associations
Ongoing
$17,500 MN per sign
INAH
No cost
Local officials communities,
SECTUR, INAH and CONANP
6-month project at
each site
Sep 2013 – Nov
2013
Provide English translations of
signage
Connect Calakmul with
Campeche tourism
Attend the XII Congreso
Mundial de la Organización de
las Ciudades Patrimonio
Mundial to learn best
practices
Incorporate World Heritage in
Youth’s Hands Education
Program in school curriculum
Install dual receptacles
See signage estimate above.
INAH
Varies
SECTUR, INAH, tour
operators.
OWHC Campeche
Members, SECTUR
Apply for Distintivo S
certification
$14,700 MXN per attendee
(includes airfare, hotel, and
$550-$650 USD cost of
attendance)
Spanish kit available to
download free of charge
$10,300 MXN for 6 dual
receptacles
$50,000 MXN, 85% can be
subsidized by Fondo PYME
Dep. of Education; Sec. of
Culture, Ayuntamiento de
Campeche
Oficina de Servicios Públicos
de la Municipalidad
Tourism service providers
Sep 2013 – Nov
2013
Ongoing
Nov. 18-22, 2013
Register before
August 31st to
receive a discount.
Begin teacher
training Jan 2014
Launch Aug 2014
Jan. 2014
Begin certification
process Aug. 2013
52
5 Product Development
5.1
Product Development Preview
Challenges
Solutions
Attractions outside of the city are not wellknown and difficult to navigate
Establish tourism circuits
Product gaps exist in the city of Campeche
Create new tourism activities in the city like bike
tours, cooking classes, and photography tours
Pursue SAVE Tourism opportunities to attract longterm visitors interested in “off-the-beaten” path
attractions
Many of Campeche’s finest attractions are in
rural, difficult to reach areas of the State with
minimal tourism infrastructure.
5.2
Creating Circuits
Another way to promote existing attractions is to create circuits. Circuits are created by grouping similar
tourism attractions into a more complete and attractive tourism product.
Established itineraries and circuits are attractive to international tour operators as they can be
integrated into their offerings without additional work from the operator. In an Adventure Travel Trade
Association (ATTA) survey of international tour operators, one respondent stated that Mexico could
make its adventure travel product more attractive to clients by “having tour operators with attractive
itineraries vs. outfitters that have to be added to an itinerary.” 17
Circuits could be especially beneficial for the city of Campeche because, as the international guidebook,
Fodors, states, “Campeche is a good hub for exploring other areas, many of which have only basic
restaurants and primitive lodgings.” Tourists staying in Campeche will spend more time in the city if they
have full and half-day itineraries planned to outlying areas. 18 In addition, circuits can expose visitors to
new tourism products and spread the benefits of tourism across the state.
Creating circuits is a multi-step process and requires commitment from both the attractions and the
businesses involved. The steps for creating successful circuits include identifying complementary
products, developing itineraries, creating maps and tours and, finally, branding and promoting the
circuit. These steps are described in more detail below.
17
18
Adventure Travel Trade Association. (2012). Tourism in Mexico. Seattle: Adventure Travel Trade Association.
Hamilton, V., & Kast, M. E. (2013). Fodor's Cancun and the Riviera Maya. New York: Fodor's Travel.
53
5.2.1 Identify Complementary Products
The first step is to identify tourism products
that complement each other. Circuits can be
built around a specific activity such as hiking or
bird-watching, or around a theme such as
Mayan culture or local cuisine. To identify
complementary products, it can be helpful to
hold a planning session with tourism or
community leaders from the surrounding area.
5.2.2 Develop Itineraries
The next step consists in developing itineraries
that connect the complementary products.
Itineraries should follow a logical geographic route and have a feasible length and scope. For example,
an itinerary should avoid sending tourists to a natural area during lunchtime, when there may not be
food available.
5.2.3 Create Maps and Tours
Once tourism planners have developed plausible itineraries, it is important to make those itineraries
available for tourists. Maps of the circuit should be created illustrating different points of interest and
suggested routes. Special signs can be created directing people to attractions on the circuit. The
involvement of tour operators is also important, especially for international visitors. Tour operators can
provide in-depth interpretation to connect the sites and manage logistics such as transportation.
Circuit Example: Camino Real
The Camino Real is an example of a
successful circuit currently operating in
Campeche.
The
circuit
pairs
the
complementary products of food, crafts, and
cultural sites to give visitors an authentic
picture of small-town life in Campeche. The
circuit is built around an itinerary that is
geographically logical and alternates types of
sites to keep visitors interested. Trained tour
guides educate tourists on the history and
culture of the attractions. Finally, the name
“Camino Real” makes it easy to remember
and promote.
5.2.4 Brand the Circuit
After a circuit has been created, it is
necessary to give it an identity or brand.
This process starts with naming the circuit.
Places like the Inca Trail and the Mayan
Riviera conjure dramatic images and
associations beyond their individual parts.
A captivating name makes it easy for
travelers to remember and recommend to
friends and family.
5.2.5 Promote the Circuit
Finally, promoting the circuit is critical to
its success. Start by promoting the circuit
to tourism organizations in the city and
state such as tour operators, hotels,
attractions, information centers, and local media. Tourism professionals may be interested in
incorporating the circuit into their products, or simply motivated to share their knowledge with visitors.
There also needs to be an evaluation of the types of tourists who may be interested in each particular
54
circuit experience and a plan for reaching these types of tourists. For example, a culinary circuit could be
advertised in the best restaurants and markets in Campeche.
5.3
New Tourism Products in the City
The fortified city of Campeche is excellent for wandering through the streets and visiting museums.
However, it was determined that there are relatively few activities for tourists in the city. To bridge this
product gap, several low-investment ideas were identified. For a minimal cost, numerous existing
businesses in the city have the equipment and infrastructure to add new activities.
5.3.1 Cooking Lessons
Cooking lessons are an especially promising tourism product given Campeche’s unique and outstanding
cuisine. Cooking lessons might start with a tour of the local market to talk about the local produce and
ingredients. Participants could then learn how to prepare one or two local dishes and enjoy their feast.
At the end of the lesson, the chefs-in-training would receive postcards with pictures and recipes for the
dishes they cooked. Participants could keep the postcards to remember their experience or send it to
family and friends – a great opportunity for promoting the destination of Campeche.
5.3.2 Malecón Bike Tour
Campeche's Malecón, which stretches over two miles, has a dedicated path for cyclists and skaters as
well as scenic lookout points. A bike tour would allow visitors to enjoy the beauty of the Malecón while
learning about the importance and history surrounding the sea in Campeche. This tour would be best
offered around sunset or early evening, when the temperatures begin to drop. Several tour operators
currently rent bikes, which could be used for these tours. These bikes could be more prominently
displayed and advertised so that tourists know they are available.
Sources: www.jlbphotos.com and www.viajeros.com
5.3.3 Art and Photography Classes
The colorful and picturesque buildings of Campeche are also great subjects for art and photography
classes. Visitors would welcome the opportunity to paint the sea at sunset or photograph the pastel
streets of the city. A tour operator or art gallery capable of providing materials and instruction could
easily turn these activities into appealing new tourism products.
55
5.3.4 Pirate Legends Tour
Campeche’s tumultuous history with pirates is one of the most interesting and under-utilized aspects of
the city. A pirate legends tour could bring the pirate history to life through the stories and sites of the
city. The tour could be offered as a walking tour or on the pirate ship currently operating in Campeche.
Sources: bakesspot.blogspot.com and countryheritagepark.com
5.4
SAVE Tourism
Another product development opportunity for Campeche is the growing niche market of Scientific,
Academic, Volunteer, and Educational (SAVE) travel. SAVE travelers are driven by the desire to engage in
travel experiences that involve close interaction with the nature, culture, and people of the destination,
and advance knowledge or contribute to the enhancement of the destination. SAVE travelers place a
high value on the natural, social, and cultural assets and observe the principles of sustainable tourism.
For SAVE travelers, a lack of development can be an attractive quality in a destination. Many enjoy the
unique experiences that can only be had off-the-beaten-path. They tolerate and even enjoy rustic
conditions, and often handle delays and inconveniences with a greater degree of patience than other
types of travelers.
However, this doesn’t mean that SAVE travelers will simply show up on their own accord. Like any other
travel
segment,
SAVE
travelers have expectations
as well. SAVE travelers need
logistical support from the
destination in the form of
transportation,
lodging,
food, and interpretation to
overcome
language
barriers. Most importantly,
SAVE travelers need a
compelling
reason
to
choose a destination like
Campeche. They travel with
56
a purpose – whether to further scientific knowledge, enhance their education, volunteer to help others
or bring other benefits to the destination.
For Campeche, archaeology and birding have been identified as two potentially lucrative SAVE markets,
stemming from the state’s excellent archaeological ruins and marine/terrestrial bird habitats. A welldeveloped and promoted SAVE tourism program could attract archaeology and birding academics,
experts, and enthusiasts to Campeche. This program could achieve long-term economic and social
benefits by building the capacity of rural tourism and facilitating relationships between educational,
scientific, and cultural institutions.
Six essential factors should be analyzed when developing any type of SAVE tourism product in
Campeche. These are outlined in Appendix 14. The SAVE Travel Alliance, a network designed to connect
travelers with sustainable destinations, is a valuable resource for developing SAVE products and
attracting groups of travelers.
5.4.1 Archaeology
Academic institutions that focus on archaeology could be excellent partners for a SAVE travel program in
Campeche. The Study Abroad market is the most visible type of academic travel and the most
economically significant. Every year, millions of students choose to spend time away from their home
university, ranging from a period of weeks to an academic year. Developing specialized study abroad
programs with the cooperation of local and international academic institutions could help bring in
visitors that stay longer and are interested in preserving the unique qualities of Campeche. The World
Youth Student & Educational Travel
Confederation estimates that total youth
Profile of Academic Tourists
and student travel (which includes language
Academic tourists travel with the intention of
participating in experiential learning activities,
travel,
higher
education
travel,
leading to credit for formal degree programs or
exchange/work
experience,
volunteer
courses offered by higher education institutions.
travel, and backpacking/adventure travel)
generated 196 million arrivals and an
Benefits for Campeche
Academic groups have a tendency to visit more
economic impact of US$173 billion in
remote places and are more willing to interact
2011. 19
with local residents. They often do not require
sophisticated facilities and services. In most
The dozens of Mayan sites scattered
cases, academic visitors travel in groups for
throughout Campeche are an attractive
extended periods of time, which is linked to
resource
for
academic
institutions
economic benefits for local communities. They
specializing in Mayan archaeology. The city
have the power to raise awareness on the
importance of a destination’s assets and to
of Campeche has the potential to act as a
spread the word among their networks. The
hub from which academic visitors can
Consulting Team’s Practicum to Campeche to
conduct fieldwork and research throughout
work on this project is a form of academic
the State. Three potential partners have
travel.
been identified and are described below.
19
WYSE. (2012). Industry Review No. 3: Youth and Student Travel Market Product Development.
57
5.4.1.1 Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universitat Bonn in Germany
The Institute of Archaeology and Cultural Anthropology within this German University houses a strong
Department of Anthropology of the Americas and has experience working at archeological sites in
Campeche and elsewhere in Mexico.
5.4.1.2 Maya Research Program
The Maya Research Program is a U.S.-based non-profit organization that sponsors archaeological and
ethnographic research in Middle America. Each summer for over two decades, the program has
sponsored archaeological fieldwork at the Maya site of Blue Creek in northwestern Belize and
ethnographic research in the village of Yaxunah, Yucatan. The Maya Research Program is affiliated with
the University of Texas at Tyler.
5.4.1.3 Archaeological Institute of America
The Archaeological Institute of America is North America's oldest and largest organization devoted to
promoting and preserving the world of archaeology.
Specific contact information for key personnel at each of these potential partner institutions can be
found in Appendix 15. When conducting this outreach, it is very important to convey how Campeche
can provide a unique learning experience for specialized students. The critical step in developing a
successful SAVE project is building a strong relationship with an external partner by enticing them with
the significant assets that Campeche has to offer. It may be useful to create specific marketing materials
customized for these markets.
It will also be necessary to demonstrate how Campeche will accommodate groups when they arrive. It is
recommended that SECTUR initiate an
archaeological SAVE program with the approval
and assistance from INAH, and the Centro de
Profile of Educational Tourists
Investigaciones Históricas y Sociales at the
Individuals, or groups, that travel to enhance
their knowledge for personal gratification
Universidad Autónoma de Campeche. An intern
rather than academic credit.
or staff member within INAH and/or the
Universidad Autónoma de Campeche could be
Benefits for Campeche
Acquiring
skills or knowledge usually
responsible for identifying sites that would be a
requires extended stays at the destination
good fit for academic visitors and developing
and increased interaction with local
these into more polished SAVE products. A
communities. In cases where the focus of the
designated program coordinator at SECTUR
educational experience is associated with the
would also play a key role by liaising with
pristine natural setting of the destination,
such as with bird watching, this can help
foreign academic contacts, local lodging and
contribute to local pride in resources, species
transportation providers, and experienced tour
and habitat preservation, and an enhanced
operators to manage the logistics of the
profile of local attractions.
program.
58
5.4.2 Birding
Campeche is a compelling destination for bird
experts and enthusiasts. Nearly 500 species of
birds have been sighted in the state of
Campeche 20 and 40% of its territory has been
declared a Protected Natural Area. Reserves
like Balam Kin and the Biosphere Reserves of
Calakmul, Petenes and Ría Celestún all have
excellent potential for the development of
educational and academic SAVE tourism
opportunities. Calakmul, in particular, offers
the comparative advantage of combining
Source: http://ivangabaldon.com/rideintobirdland/2013/tripbirding with visits to impressive Mayan ruins.
report-amazing-campeche
Based on the aforementioned, another great option for SAVE tourism in Campeche is to capitalize on
the State’s excellent birding habitats. Bird watching is a multi-billion dollar business globally, and
continues to gain in popularity. Bird watchers can be considered educational tourists in that they have a
strong desire to enrich their knowledge outside the classroom. Campeche’s birding resources could also
be an attractive asset to academic tourists seeking to work on ornithological fieldwork and research.
Campeche.travel lists a number of tour operators in the “Bird Watching” section of the website.
However, it is unclear how knowledgeable these operators are, what level of interpretation they can
offer, and what kinds of technical equipment (i.e. high-powered binoculars) they can provide.
International bird watching tourists are typically well-educated and seek expert guides for their trips.
Likewise, students and researchers seeking to participate in ornithological fieldwork seek the support of
knowledgeable guides and support personnel while visiting the destination. It is recommended to
pursue the following three strategies to raise the prominence of Campeche as a premier destination for
birders in Mexico. Specific contact information can be found in Appendix 15.
5.4.2.1 Develop a Relationship with the American Birding Association (ABA)
The ABA is a nonprofit organization that promotes
knowledge, skills, and enjoyment of birding. The
organization also contributes to bird and habitat
conservation through a number of programs. The
Birders’ Exchange program at the ABA could be a
valuable way for tour guides and conservationists in
Campeche to build local capacity and obtain
specialized equipment. The program receives donated
equipment and re-distributes it to colleagues working
to protect birds and their habitats throughout Latin America and the Caribbean. The Exchange program
20
Birdlife International. “Bird Checklists of the World – Campeche.” Avibase. 24 Jun 2003. http://avibase.bsceoc.org/checklist.jsp?lang=EN&list=howardmoore&synlang=&region=MXca.
59
has also developed a comprehensive manual in Spanish to help develop local guiding capacity. A strong
relationship with the ABA can help increase Campeche’s visibility in the birding community, while
simultaneously increasing local expertise to support tourists.
5.4.2.2 Build bird watching tour operator partnerships
Many of the most well-known international birding tour operators already have itineraries in Mexico,
and several include Campeche as part of their tours. For example, Natural Encounters spends 4 days
inthe Calakmul Biosphere Reserve as part of its 14-day tour in the Yucatan peninsula. Other tour
operators like VENT, WINGS, Field Guides, and Tropical Birding all have tours in Mexico and are always
looking for new locations where their customers can view interesting bird species. It is recommended to
reach out to such operators in an effort to have Campeche featured more prominently within their tour
packages.
5.4.2.3 Partner with the Cornell Lab of Ornithology
The Cornell Lab of Ornithology is recognized as one of the premier ornithological research institutes in
the world. By developing a relationship with the Lab, Campeche can develop links with some of the
world’s leading bird experts. Eventually, this relationship can be leveraged to identify students and
researchers that could perform fieldwork in Campeche as part of an academic SAVE product similar to
the archaeological product previously described.
On a local level, tourism sector leaders will be needed to guide the development of these relationships
and foster the continued growth of birding tourists. SECTUR is considered to be the best-positioned
institution to build the aforementioned relationships. SECTUR could also work with the NGO PronaturaYucatan to develop a training program for local ecotourism/birding guides using the American Birding
Association manual. If birding tourism develops into a promising niche, SECTUR or another entity will
need to designate a coordinator to manage relationships with foreign institutions and local logistics.
60
5.5
Product Development Summary
Challenges
Solutions
Cost
Implementing Partner
Timeline
Attractions outside of the city are
not well-known and difficult to
navigate
Establish tourism
circuits
$60,000 MXN est. cost of
developing and printing a
circuit guide with map
SECTUR and local tour companies
Ongoing
Product gaps exist in the city of
Campeche
Create new tourism
activities in the city
like bike tours, cooking
classes, and
photography tours
Varies based on activity
and existing capabilities of
business
Sep 2013 –
Jan 2013
Many of Campeche’s finest
attractions are in rural, difficult to
reach areas of the State with
minimal tourism infrastructure
Pursue SAVE Tourism
opportunities to
attract long-term
visitors interested in
“off-the-beaten” path
attractions
No cost for outreach
Local tourism businesses and cultural
institutions. For example, bike tours
could be run by tour operators.
Cooking lessons could be provided by
a local restaurants. Art classes could
be provided by Casa Cultural Seis
SECTUR, INAH, Centro de
Investigaciones Históricas y Sociales at
the Universidad Autónoma de
Campeche
Sep 2013 –
Ongoing
61
6 Training and Professional Development
6.1
Training and Professional Development Preview
Challenges
There is a lack of motivation to attend training
courses
Solutions
Develop a leadership course to teach tourism
managers how to motivate employees
There is no way to assess whether training
courses are effective
Examinations should be required for every
training course
There are no long-term, inexpensive foreign
language classes offered in Campeche
A language institute should be founded in
Campeche
Numerous interviews on the subject of tourism training and professional development were conducted
with representatives of SECTUR, the city government, tour guides, university faculty members, trainers,
students, and other individuals to ascertain the state of capacity-building programs in Campeche. In
addition to these interviews, the breadth of training opportunities available to residents, employees,
managers, and others, were assessed using course information provided by the interviewees.
Overall, it was determined that the state and city of Campeche offer numerous and diverse tourismrelated courses. Over a hundred different classes available through SECTUR, the city government, and
private institutions were identified. Course topics ranged from towel folding to stress management.
The target audience is also varied, with some tourism programs designed for school-aged children and
others intended for senior-level managers in the tourism industry.
Despite these available resources, interviewees consistently voiced concern over the low level of
professionalism of tourism personnel and the general lack of tourism culture in Campeche. This
sentiment was also echoed by
participants in the visioning
workshop.
6.2
Participant Motivation
Based on interviews carried out
with government officials and
trainers, one of their greatest
challenges is getting participants to
show up for training. Even when
compensation is offered to
prospective participants, there is
62
weak interest to attend courses and many of those who sign-up fail to show. This absenteeism could be
attributed to one or more of the following factors:
•
•
•
•
Courses are typically selected by management and/or members of government, not by the
participants
The classes are inconvenient to attend
Tourism employees do not see the benefit of attending training sessions
Tourism employees are not interested in a future career in tourism
Currently, the state government works with the municipal governments to determine which training
courses to offer in each jurisdiction. These decisions are typically made by considering current tourism
development projects, private sector interest/needs, and budgetary resources. Thus, the first absentee
factor in the above list is salient. The other issues, however, should be addressed prior to allowing
participants the ability to determine which courses should be offered.
The second factor regarding the logistical difficulty of attending courses is more pervasive in rural areas
than those offered in the city. SECTUR offers flexible course times and locations, but access likely
remains a barrier to attendance, especially in areas where participants have to travel long distances and
attend during non-working hours. Even by
offering stipends or other means of
compensation, some of these obstacles
cannot be overcome.
The last two elements address the lack of
vocational motivation.
Interviewees
believe that tourism employees are
apathetic toward their jobs. If tourism
employees do not take pride in their work,
accept it as a career, or feel responsibility
for their own success, they will not be
motivated to attend professional training.
Some individuals may come into the
workplace with a driven attitude, but it is
the manager’s responsibility to foster this
attribute in every employee.
6.2.1 Empowering Managers to Motivate Employees
The main challenge impeding training success in Campeche is the weak employee motivation to attend
courses. Simply put, if employees do not want to be there, they will not benefit from the training. To
address this challenge, it is recommended that SECTUR require tourism managers to attend a leadership
training course each year to instruct them on the subject of employee motivation.
63
Many managers in the tourism industry are experts within the field of hospitality but are not necessarily
experts in the areas of leadership and mentorship. Mastering these subjects is critical to creating a
dynamic, successful, and motivated team. The leadership training course will focus on four key learning
areas:
1. Create a Career Path: Managers will learn how to structure careers paths within their
businesses so employees have opportunities to advance themselves over time. Even in
small organizations, employees can learn new skills in different roles to keep work fresh
and exciting.
2. Establish Goals and Indicators: Managers will understand the importance of working
with their employees to set periodic goals with tangible measures of success. This
activity is important in understanding employee interests and keeping them challenged.
3. Implement Incentives: Incentives are a great management tool for motivating
employees. In this course, managers will learn the many ways to use material and
intangible incentives to link employee goals with organizational goals.
4. Recognize Employee Achievement: Managers will learn different methods of recognizing
and celebrating employee success. Workplace recognition allows the manager to
highlight positive examples for employees and reward the achiever for their hard work.
Together, these learning areas will help businesses create a motivated workforce. Fostering employee
motivation may increase job satisfaction and lower turnover, creating business savings.
As a required SECTUR course, businesses would have to send one manager each year to leadership
training. Businesses that fail to complete the training would not be permitted to send employees to
other SECTUR courses until the requirement is satisfied. This requirement is intended to create a more
motivated tourism sector in Campeche and increase attendance of SECTUR training courses. Motivated
employees are more likely to show up to professional development courses than unmotivated
employees and learn the material.
6.3
Assessing Training Success
The recommendation above addresses the need for motivated employees to attend professional
development courses. While obtaining eager participants to attend training courses is important, it
does not guarantee learning success. The effectiveness of the instructor, the course material, and the
learning format are just a few of the factors that contribute to a successful lesson. Ultimately, this
success is demonstrated by the knowledge and skills transferred to the student or participant.
In Campeche, this training success is impossible to measure because there is no student evaluation after
completing SECTUR training courses. It was discovered that standard questionnaires are typically given
to students at the end of each training course to assess the instructor, course content, and solicit
requests for future instruction. These questionnaires are qualitative in nature and do not test the
64
participants directly on the material taught during the course.
questionnaire results are not being digitized regularly for analysis.
It was also determined that
This current system is inadequate for determining the effectiveness of training courses being offered by
SECTUR. There is no student, instructor, or governmental accountability for learning outcomes.
Without subject matter evaluations, it is impossible to establish if tourism capacity is improving and to
differentiate between effective and ineffective instructors.
6.3.1 Training Accountability
SECTUR should require an examination at the conclusion of every course it offers. Currently, trainers are
responsible for formulating their own lesson plans and course materials for instruction. To remain
consistent with this process, trainers would additionally be responsible for creating the final exam. Each
exam would be approved by SECTUR before it could be administered. The approval process would
ensure that the exam addresses all of the intended learning outcomes and that it is appropriately
challenging.
The final exam would be given by a local government administrator on the final day of the training
course. This role is best fulfilled by a third-party (from outside SECTUR and the classroom) to reduce
conflict of interest. The
administrator would be
responsible for grading
the exams using a key
provided
by
the
instructor and sending
the results to SECTUR.
Credit for completing the
course should only be
given to students who
pass the final exam.
Additionally, a record of
exam grades should be
kept on file for each
participant who completes a SECTUR course. Good scores demonstrate participants’ commitment to
work in the tourism industry and could be used on resumes or by managers to reward performance.
The average exam score from each class would be added to the instructor’s permanent file. With the
knowledge of this record, trainers will be more accountable to the course content and their students’
ability to learn it. Once examinations are implemented and standardized, SECTUR may decide to create
performance incentives for trainers. At the very least, these scores should factor into SECTUR’s future
hiring decisions.
Perhaps most importantly, instituting training examinations will assist SECTUR in determining the
strengths and weaknesses of their professional development programs. Using this information, the
65
government can adapt programs to make their offerings more effective. Ultimately, training evaluations
brings accountability to students, instructors, and administrators alike.
6.4
Knowledge of Foreign Languages
Although only about 15 percent of visitors to Campeche are of international origin, representatives from
the tourism sector expressed a strong interest in attracting more international visitors in the future.
However, with limited access to bilingual information, international visitors will have difficulty
navigating Campeche’s sites and making transactions, especially outside of the city. On the visitor
survey, knowledge of foreign language by
service personnel received the lowest
satisfaction score of all attributes (3.2 out of 5).
This further demonstrates that communication
is a challenge for some visitors.
Foreign languages are being taught in
secondary school and university classrooms.
However, there is no language proficiency
requirement to graduate, even for students
studying tourism in the Campechano Tourism Institute, who will presumably be interacting with
international tourists throughout their careers.
Both SECTUR and the city government offer courses that teach basic foreign phrases to residents and
professionals to use with international visitors. Unfortunately, both organizations lack the resources to
provide residents and professionals more extensive training, despite the fact that a foreign language
course for taxi drivers was considered among their most successful training programs.
6.4.1 Establish a Language School
Foreign language proficiency should be considered a top priority
for improving the competitiveness of the destination. In order to
provide all tourism sector employees a long-term, quality
language program, it is recommended that a language school be
established through a private-sector coalition. The model
presented here is based on the successful example of the
Dunham Institute in Chiapa de Corzo, which is located in the
neighboring state of Chiapas. Like Campeche, Chiapa de Corzo is
a colonial town that mainly serves as a visitor stopover.
The Dunham Institute was founded by two teachers specializing
in Teaching English as a Foreign Language (TEFL) instruction and
certification. TEFL certification programs are intensive multiweek classes that prepare students to teach English abroad. This
certification is often required to obtain international English
teaching positions.
66
The four week TEFL certification course at the Dunham Institute costs $1,600 USD per student and
includes all course materials and a homestay for the duration of the program. Both international and
domestic students come to the Institute to become certified. After the certification course, TEFL
students can choose to stay in Chiapa de Corzo to gain classroom experience by becoming a volunteer
Figure 18
Dunham Institute, Chiapas, Mexico
English teacher for residents. This four week extension costs an additional $450 USD. The revenues
generated by this certification and volunteer programs keep the cost of English instruction for local
students to a minimum. The Dunham Institute started with one instructor and four students. By the
second semester, there were two instructors and thirty TEFL students. For more information about the
Dunham Institute, see http://dunhaminstitute.com/index.html.
Campeche’s tourism private sector should establish a similar language school by pooling resources to
cover startup costs. A preliminary investment is necessary to secure classroom space, instructor
accommodation, teaching materials and an initial teacher salary. A simple website for the school must
also be developed. Once these pieces are in place, a job description for an experienced TEFL instructor
can be posted on TEFL job websites. The revenues generated from TEFL course enrollment will quickly
reimburse this initial investment, sustain the school, and subsidize foreign language instruction in
Campeche.
67
6.5
Training and Professional Development Summary
Challenges
Solutions
Cost
Implementing Partner
Timeline
There is a lack of
motivation to attend
training courses
Develop a leadership
course to teach tourism
managers how to
motivate employees
$21,000 MXN for
attendance to an
established management
course, research
materials, development of
course materials
SECTUR
August 2013- December
2013
There is no way to assess
whether training courses
are effective
Examinations should be
required for every training
course
$0 MXN
SECTUR – Academia as a
third party
August 2013-December
2013
There are no long-term,
inexpensive foreign
language classes offered
in Campeche
A language institute
should be founded in
Campeche
$70,000 MXN total
investment for classroom
space, instructor
accommodation, learning
materials, and initial
salary; total investment to
be reimbursed once
school is established
Fundación Avanza,
Asociación de Hoteles de
Campeche y Gerente
General Hotel Plaza
Campeche
August 2013- May 2014
68
7 Convention Center
7.1
Convention Center Preview
Challenges
The Convention Center has no
defined marketing strategy
The Convention Center has low
and non-diversified revenue
Solutions
Hire an in-house Marketing & Sales Manager
Create a targeted marketing campaign
Strengthen online presence
Create a marketing database
Rent food carts to local chefs
Develop the food court
Create a signature event
Sell corporate sponsorships
The Convention Center has few
loyal clients outside Campeche
The Convention Center has weak
relationships with the Campeche
community
Create linkages within center to Campeche’s culture
Emphasize ambiance and comfort
Improve staff service and performance levels
Improve linkages to appropriate trade associations
Increase sustainability practices
Develop a student internship program with local universities
Formalize partnerships with local hotels
Form a Campechano Ambassador Program
Create a Resident Awareness Campaign
The following section analyzes the current challenges for the city of Campeche’s Convention Center and
provides recommendations to enhance its performance as a top-level convention center in the Yucatan
peninsula. The analysis is the result of the research and fieldwork conducted specifically for the
convention center. Research methodology and main findings can be found in Appendix 16.
7.2
Marketing Plan for the Convention Center
The Convention Center does not have its own marketing plan. Its current strategy consists of marketing
to every group it can possibly reach, without focusing on those who would benefit the most from
hosting an event in Campeche. The Convention Center should create a brand for meetings, incentives,
conferences and events (MICE) that concentrates on the destinations best features: it is safe, relaxing,
and offers plenty of cultural, historical, and eco-adventure experiences. Formulating and executing a
marketing plan involves the design and publication of marketing materials, hiring an in-house
marketing/sales manager, developing targeted marketing campaigns, and strengthening the Convention
Center’s online presence.
69
7.2.1 Marketing Materials
The Convention Center currently does not have exclusive marketing material that features the
Campeche Convention Center of its
Figure 19
own accord. Current marketing
Sample Follow-up Postcard (front)
materials promote Campeche’s
Convention Center vis-à-vis the
convention center in Ciudad del
Carmen. When compared sideby-side, the city of Campeche
has fewer hotels, rooms, and
number of beds 21. Marketing
the Convention Centers together
is not highlighting Campeche’s
strengths.
The Campeche
Convention Center needs to
market the overall destination to
attract niche market segments. There are two samples of marketing materials in Appendices 17 and 18.
The first sample is a brochure that can be distributed to potential clients at tradeshows, meetings, and
online. The second sample is a thank you postcard to follow-up with clients and invite for them to return
to Campeche for their next event.
7.2.2 In-House Marketing/Sales Manager
The Convention Center’s sales and marketing responsibilities are currently being carried out by the
operations manager and SECTUR. Reintroducing an in-house marketing/sales manager role to the
Convention Center is critical to establish an identity and attract more business. The responsibilities of
the position are as follows:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Create and implement a marketing plan, on a yearly basis
Serve as a liaison between SECTUR and Proeventos
Follow-up with past clients to collect feedback and pursue new business opportunities
Create and manage the “Ambassadors Program” by working with local businesses and nearby
municipalities (explained below)
Maintain the Convention Center’s website with up-to-date information
Respond to all incoming Request For Proposals (RFPs)
Negotiate rates for potential events
Create and approve sales contracts
Create and promote the premium meeting packages (explained below)
Assign tasks to student interns, as necessary
Ensure that marketing data is collected and analyzed
The remainder of the recommendations for the marketing plan assumes that the marketing/sales
manager role will be contracted.
21
Proeventos. Marketing Material for Centro de Convenciones in Campeche.
70
7.2.3 Targeted Marketing Campaigns
The main operational challenge that the Convention Center faces is the limited number of national and
international congresses and conventions that they host on a yearly basis. The majority of the events
held involve local clients, including the local government. In the past year, the Convention Center has
only hosted three international events. To increase the utilization of its facilities, it must create targeted
market campaigns to attract clients whose needs it can fulfill. It is recommended that targeted
marketing campaigns focus on seasonal promotions, brand-aligned client bases, and premium meeting
packages for executives and attending trade shows.
7.2.3.1 Seasonal Promotions
The Convention Center should reinstate seasonal promotions during shoulder periods to attract
bookings. From May to September, a typically low period for events, the Convention Center should
offer meeting planners discount and incentives, such as free or reduced-price meeting/exhibit space,
free wireless Internet, free ground transportation, and discounted food and beverage packages.
7.2.3.2 Attend Travel Trade Shows
It is essential for Convention Center operational staff to regularly attend and purchase booths at trade
shows that target event and meeting professionals, especially those that focus on traveling to cultural
destinations. By maintaining a presence at trade shows like the Incentive Travel Exchange, ICOMEX, and
EIBTM, the Convention Center will be able to stren gthen its relationships with meeting planners whose
clients prefer destinations with adventure activities. Increasing the awareness of meeting planners to
the Campeche Convention Center will increase the chances that they will conduct a site visit and book
their next event in the City.
7.2.3.3 Build Client Base That Aligns With Brand
It is recommended that a brand similar to the one used for the state of Campeche (see section 3 on
Marketing) be created for the Convention Center. When searching for new convention and exhibition
business, the Convention Center should pursue companies and organizations that are already interested
in working in the markets that are aligned with Campeche’s offerings, such as travel adventure groups,
cultural or historical associations, and groups with an eco-tourism focus.
For example, the Adventure Travel Trade Association
holds an annual summit that attracts more than 650
attendees and generates over 3,000 hotel room nights
for the host city. 22 Other examples of potential clients
22
Adventure Travel Trade Association, http://www.adventuretravel.biz/connect/summit/ (July 15, 2013).
71
in similar markets are The International Ecotourism
Society and the World History Association. By
targeting clients that are already interested in what
Campeche has to offer, the Convention Center
would be able to increase the probability of winning
the business and continue to strengthen
Campeche’s destination brand, which is beneficial to
all tourism stakeholders.
Another way that the Convention Center could capitalize on Campeche’s brand of cultural, historical,
and eco-adventure experiences is by offering pre-convention and post-convention tours to eventattendees. For example, a 3-day conference could conclude with an organized weekend trip to
Calakmul. Another option is to have shorter afternoon or evening activities that conference attendees
can elect to participate in, such as a traditional Mayan chocolate-making class or a performance in the
city center. The cost of these activities could be included in the conference registration fee so that
participation is effortless and enjoyable for both the attendees and the hosting organization. These
“extracurricular” activities would attract more visitation to the city’s attractions, increase spending at
supporting and/or nearby businesses, improve attendee experience, and encourage repeat visits for
either business or pleasure.
The Convention Center should work with SECTUR’s advertising and promotion department to invite
meeting planners on familiarization (FAM) tours. Although FAM tours are typically organized for media
professionals and travel agents, meeting planners who produce trade shows, conferences, conventions,
and incentive programs should have first-hand experience to determine Campeche’s destination
potential for the MICE market.
7.2.3.4 Premium Executive Meeting Packages
An effective way to engage potential attendees is to target business executives who have an interest in
the activities that Campeche has to offer.
For an executive audience, a premiummeeting
package
complete
with
Options for Premium Meeting Packages
transportation during their stay, all-access
• Access to VIP Meeting Rooms
to the Convention Center’s facilities
• Business Class Flight Tickets
including VIP rooms and technical
• Executive Transportation
equipment, will entice a higher-end
• Cultural and Eco-Tourism
corporate clientele. Those who use the
Excursions
services frequently will be able to set up a
• Catered Fine-Dining
contract to have regular board meetings
• Hacienda Accommodations
and events at the Convention Center.
To offer this premium meeting package, the Convention Center will first need to invest in high-end
boardroom furniture and luxury catering supplies. Brochures should also be created to promote this
service.
72
Figure 20 gives an
example of a
sample brochure
for
Premium
meeting packages
and
a
larger
version can be
found
in
Appendix 19.
Figure 20
Sample Brochure for Premium Meeting Packages
The Convention
Center would be
responsible
for
selling
this
package
and
should charge a
10% commission
on the value of
the
other
business amenities sold in the package. This arrangement could help boost the Convention Center’s
bottom line.
7.2.4 Strengthen Internet Presence
A convention center’s website is often the first go-to resource for meeting planners. Accordingly, it is
important that the content on the website is easy to understand, accurate, and current. It was discovered
that the Convention Center’s website has numerous links that are incorrect or inactive. Moreover, some of
the subpages do not convey the professional appearance that is needed to acquire more business. For
example, when looking up “Restaurants” under the “Service Providers”, the first providers listed are fast
food restaurants such as Burger King. Redesigning the website and keeping it updated with current
information is recommended. By hiring a Webmaster, the Convention Center can revamp its website and
fix the broken links. The Convention Center should also consider adding new features to the website such
as printable material, an interactive events calendar, and testimonials. Examples of printable materials
include brochures, a flipbook, and floor plans to assist meeting planners.
In addition to refurbishing the Convention Center website, the Center’s overall presence online should
be strengthened. Meeting planners use other websites to gather information about Convention Centers
such as Cvent and MeetingsinMexico.com, which provide meeting planners with logistics on facilities.
Although the Convention Center is featured on Cvent, the profile does not include detailed information
or photos that would give a meeting planner a better idea of what type of service they can expect in
Campeche. In addition, statistics regarding square footage and number of rooms are out of date. The
Convention Center should also post regularly to social media websites such as Facebook and Twitter to
73
ensure that viewers remain abreast of Campeche and Convention Center activities. An active social
media presence engages both new and repeat customers.
7.2.5 Marketing Database
A marketing plan must be evaluated on a semiannual basis to ensure that it is effective. To evaluate the
plan, data and feedback from marketing initiatives must be collected. This includes data on clients, RFPs
and other inquiries, website hits, client and vendor feedback, and reasons for lost bids. By collecting and
analyzing this data, the marketing/sales manager can justify making changes to the marketing plan. For
example, the amount of marketing material ordered should increase if demand for events increases. An
initial system could be established through a number of computer programs, such as Microsoft Excel,
that would consolidate this data and make it readily available for evaluation. An end-of–year report
should also be prepared using this information. Data should be collected as soon as initial contact is
made with a potential client. Once an event has ended, a survey should be sent to obtain any follow-up
information. A sample survey can be found in Appendix 20. Below is an example of a database
spreadsheet for lost bids.
Lost Bids Database
Date of
Initial
Inquiry
Event Information
Response to RFP
sent
Date
Declined
Reason for declining
A detailed action plan detailing the marketing plan for the Campeche Convention Center can be found in
Appendix 21.
7.3
Challenge: Diversify Revenue Streams
The analysis and evaluation of the Convention Center revealed the lack of diverse revenue streams and
the venue’s need to generate income. The international convention center market is oversaturated meeting planners have hundreds of destination options and thousands of venue choices. In Mexico
alone, there are nearly 2,000 venues. As a result, the traditional operating model to maintain a
profitable Convention Center is in jeopardy. To address the issue, major Convention Centers around the
globe are seeking alternative methods of generating income to help close budget gaps.
Based on industry trends, field interviews, and a site inspection, four recommendations were
formulated to allow the Convention Center to generate more income by creating a diversified revenue
stream: develop cultural food stations, build “The Pirate Food Court”, create a signature event, and
selling corporate sponsorships. These recommendations are highlighted below, and a detailed action
plan for implementation can be found in Appendix 22.
74
7.3.1 “A Taste of Campeche”: Cultural Food Stations
During field interviews, it was discovered that the Convention Center does not have on-site food and
beverage stations for guests and event attendees to purchase beyond the refreshments provided during
events. This presents an opportunity for developing a new revenue stream through the creation of
cultural food stations, collectively called “A Taste of Campeche.”
From Mayan hot chocolate to panuchos, Campeche offers visitors a special gastronomical experience.
“A Taste of Campeche” would be a “value-add service” food option that would allow meeting planners
to offer their attendees an opportunity to experience Campeche’s authentic cuisine. Local food service
providers and restaurants could rent mobile carts or stands for operation during conferences or events
held at the Convention Center. Placed strategically throughout the building, local food vendors would
provide seasonal menus to attendees during
breaks or in between meetings.
The advantage of developing cultural food
stations is clear; the attendees get to
experience local foods while food suppliers
generate additional revenue and increase
awareness about their business. With as few
as five cultural food stations, the Convention
Center has the potential to produce a new
revenue stream by charging rental fees and
collecting a percentage of goods sold. Both
the start-up and maintenance cost to
implement and sustain cultural food carts are
low.
7.3.2 The Pirate Food Court
A Convention Center food court provides an excellent opportunity to earn additional revenue. It was
learned that the initial design for the Convention Center included space for a multi-restaurant food
court. Currently the food court space is unoccupied. It is recommended that the original space for the
multi-restaurant food court be used and named “The Pirate Food Court.” Without leaving the
Convention Center, “The Pirate Food Court” would provide event attendees with convenient access to a
variety of food and beverage options. Food and restaurant areas consistently rank highly among a
Convention Center’s most valuable amenities.23 The unused space could be divided into several
restaurant concepts for food service providers to lease from the Convention Center, either on a monthly
or annually basis. Building on its established relationship with the Campeche Restaurant Association,
the Convention Center would partner with the association to identify potential food court tenants.
Additionally, the Convention Center should target premium coffee shops such as Italian Coffee Company
and Café Frappisimo to provide coffee, snacks and pastries. It would be the responsibility of the tenant
to design and build out its restaurant space. In addition to low-cost rent, food court tenants would have
23
The HNTB Companies. The Evolving Convention Center. White Paper/October 2009.
75
an obligation to pay monthly common area maintenance fees. Promotion of “The Pirate Court” would
be the responsibility of the Convention Center; which would
feature it in its marketing materials. Hours of operation for “The
Pirate Food Court” would change daily and/or weekly depending on
the needs of the Convention Center’s.
In addition to increased income, benefits of establishing “The Pirate
Food Court” include:
•
•
•
•
•
A new amenity for the Convention Center
Additional revenue for the Convention Center
The creation of new jobs for Campeche residents
Increased awareness for tenant restaurants
Convenient access to food and beverage service for event
attendees
7.3.3 Signature Events
Often seen in Europe, a popular strategy to generate an alternative revenue stream is for Convention
Centers to host and manage their own signature events. The key to developing a successful event is to
hone in on a niche market that is unique to the destination and does not compete with an event hosted
by an existing client. It is recommended that the Convention Center apply this effective model to
develop its own signature event based on niche areas that Campeche is known for like panama-style
hats, honey production, Mayan archeology, or colonial history.
7.3.4 Corporate Sponsorships
Many convention centers worldwide sell corporate sponsorships to local business to generate revenue.
Based on this common industry practice, the establishment of a corporate sponsorship program is
recommended. This advertising vehicle would allow local
businesses to market their goods and services to business
leaders, meeting planners, and attendees at the Convention
Center.
Initially, the program would consist of two
sponsorship opportunities: plasma screen advertising and the
Campeche Merchant Discount Guide.
7.3.4.1 Plasma Screen Advertising
During the Convention Center site visit evaluation, it was
observed that plasma screen televisions and monitors are
positioned in high-traffic areas throughout the venue. This
technology provides the Convention Center with an
opportunity to increase advertising and sponsorship revenues
by selling airtime to local businesses. Businesses would
develop their own commercials or static billboard ads to play
on loop during Convention Center events.
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7.3.4.2 Campeche Merchant Discount Guide
When a destination is selected to host a major event, convention, meeting, or congress, the entire city
benefits from attendee spending during the event. In order to maximize this impact, the Convention
Center staff should collaborate with local businesses to create a premium merchant discount guide. This
guide would provide Convention Center guests with exclusive discounts and offers for retail products,
dining experiences, attractions, activities, and tours. There would be no cost to participating businesses
to offer their discounts in the guide. The cost of producing the guide could be covered by the attendee
purchase price.
7.4
Operations
While marketing recommendations have been presented, several operational solutions could be
undertaken by the Convention Center as well. A review of convention center best practices revealed the
value of a repeat customer compared to the expense associated with attracting new business. Given
that customer satisfaction increases the probability of return customers, this section discusses three
operational solutions for improving client satisfaction:
1. Redefine some of the Center’s interior spaces; enhancing ambiance and comfort
2. Increase professional training and development
3. Incorporate sustainable practices into the Center’s operational model
These recommendations are outlined below. A detailed action plan for implementing these operational
solutions can be found in Appendix 23.
7.4.1 Emphasize Ambience & Culture
Meeting, convention, and exhibition spaces are often chosen
because they exhibit the flavor of a destination. Campeche’s
Convention Center does not represent the feel of the city or
region in any way. Redefining the interior space of Campeche’s
Convention Center based on the following suggestions is
recommended.
Figure 21
Example of Re-Designed Banner
Sala Edzná
7.4.1.1 Create Cultural Linkages
Renaming the Convention Center’s meeting rooms after the
archeological sites found in the State would link the Center to
Campeche’s rich Mayan cultural heritage. Instead of Sala 1 and
Sala 2, for example, the meeting rooms should boast names like
Sala Calakmul and Sala Edzná Additionally, the banners hanging in
front of each meeting room should include photos or illustrations
of the site it is named after as is pictures in Figure 21.
7.4.1.2 Create Inviting Conversation Spaces
Adding comfortable, stylish couches, chairs, and table groups in
the atrium areas near the entrance is also recommended. These
77
open spaces should be utilized to promote casual interaction amongst attendees during meeting breaks.
These open spaces should be bright and aesthetically appealing to add to clients’ sense of tranquility.
7.4.1.3 Bring the Outdoors In
Green spaces are appealing for the same reasons cited above. They are aesthetically pleasing, add life
to dull areas, and give off a sense of calmness. Introducing trees and plants, especially native species in
the atrium would improve the overall ambience of the Center, and make a positive first impression on
potential clients.
7.4.1.4 Display Campeche’s Unique Attractions, People, and Products
Large, vivid photographs and artwork of Campeche’s attractions, people, and products should be
prominently displayed on the walls of the Convention Center’s atrium. Exhibits could feature local
Figure 22
Example of Mural-sized Photo or Artwork
Source: “Mayan World” Edzna ’05 by Pablo de Gorrion on Flickr
photographers, children’s artwork, or colorful textiles produced in the area. These displays will give
Campechanos a sense of pride when they enter the Convention Center and encourage visitors to set out
and explore the destination.
7.4.1.5 Staff Professional Training & Development
Exceeding clients’ expectations is how the Campeche Convention Center can best secure repeat
business. To perform at this level, continuous professional training and development is required for
Convention Center staff.
Additionally, becoming members to industry organizations that stress
professional development would demonstrate the Center’s commitment to service. These memberships
are also marketing assets when pitching for new business.
The Puerto Rico Convention Center (PRCC) provides a shining example of how investment in training and
professional memberships can pay off. Nearly fifteen years ago, the Puerto Rico Convention Bureau
(PRCB) launched its “Extraordinary Service Program”, providing team members with cutting-edge sales
training. These efforts resulted in causing their Convention Center to be considered the premier Center
in the Caribbean.
78
Based on models for best practices and interviews conducted with SECTUR and Convention Center
personnel, the following training initiatives are recommended for the Convention Center’s staff:
1. Provide English language classes for senior staff members
2. Sponsor event-planning training and certification for the Center’s senior staff members with
reputable industry associations that have
internationally recognized standards (i.e. the
Certified Meeting Professional [CMP] designation
offered through the Convention Industry Council
[CIC])
3. Encourage the Center’s senior staff to become
members of the MICE industry. For example, the
Center’s dedicated sales manager may greatly
benefit from Convention Sales Professionals
International (CSPI) membership.
4. Develop a service program that recognizes
employee achievements, and can be mentioned
in Convention Center marketing materials
5. Ensure the Convention Center is a member of
appropriate
industry
organizations
that
emphasize training and development, like the
CIC. The Center should strive to set itself apart
through its training and development initiatives. For example, the Center could apply to be the
first Mexican Convention Center to become a member of the International Association of
Conference Centers (IACC).
7.4.2 Practice Sustainability
Sustainability has become an important consideration for meeting
and event planners when choosing a location for their event. The site
visit evaluation of the Convention Center and interviews with its
personnel revealed that managers are aware of the growth of green
meetings and that some sustainable practices are already in place.
Incorporating more sustainable practices into the operational model
can reduce costs over time and improve the Center’s marketing to
conscientious prospects. The Convention Center should utilize
technology to reduce paper waste, implement green practices into
procurement methods, and partner with suppliers who are practicing
sustainability. A Sustainability Toolkit can be found in Appendix 24.
Methods to “reduce, reuse and recycle” at the Center’s events are
detailed, as well as information on how to measure the potential cost
savings.
79
7.5
Developing Partnerships
Another challenge facing the Convention Center is a weak and undefined relationship with members of
the tourism community. Building strong, mutually beneficial partnerships is an effective method to
grow and sustain meetings and convention tourism in Campeche. Therefore, the Convention Center
should form specific programs to strengthen its partnerships with hotels, restaurants, attractions, and
other establishments that business travelers come in contact with. Additionally, the Convention Center
would also benefit from improved relations with the community as a whole. The four programs outlined
below will strengthen the Convention Center’s local relationships and help grow its meetings business.
An action plan for developing Convention Center Partnerships is provided in Appendix 25.
7.5.1 Student Internships
One partnership opportunity to pursue is with local university students, especially those earning a
degree in tourism from the Instituto Campechano. Establishing an internship program would create a
mutually beneficial relationship for both parties.
Benefits to the Convention Center
• Free or low-cost professional assistance for
otherwise neglected projects
• Valuable input from young, innovative, and
energetic individuals
• Positive public relations within community
• An experienced talent pool for potential hires
Benefits to Students
• Fulfillment of internship requirements
• Hands-on work experience
• Exposure to national and international
companies and organizations
• Opportunities to learn and improve skills like
English and online marketing
• Mentorship with established meeting
professionals
Responsibilities that may be particularly suitable for university student-interns include managing the
Convention Center’s social media outreach, assisting English-speaking clients, and conducting marketing
research. Universities such as the Instituto Campechano are already familiar with how to run internship
programs and can thus provide guidance and support in setting-up and running the program. Although
the supervision of interns may cost some additional staff resources, such costs will be offset by the
benefits that the Convention Center will gain from the program.
7.5.2 Hotel Partnerships
Perhaps the most important partnership to strengthen is that between the Convention Center and local
hotels. These two parties should work together to attract more and larger conferences but current
collaboration is sporadic and inefficient.
7.5.2.1 Formal Hotel Partners
The Convention Center should formalize partnerships with strategic hotels. Under a partnership
agreement, a hotel would offer a fixed, competitive room rate to any guest coming to Campeche for a
multi-day conference at the Convention Center. In return, the Convention Center would approach
partner hotels first when securing lodging for conference attendees. The greatest benefit of this formal
partnership to the Convention Center is that it can use these rates during initial discussions with
80
potential clients without having to go through prolonged negotiations with several different hotels each
time. In addition, this partnership makes the planning process more seamless for host organizations and
meeting planners. Even if a hotel receives a lower price per room from their partnership agreement, the
increased volume of room nights sold on a regular basis creates a stable revenue stream. Hotel partners
would also benefit from the ancillary spending typical of business travelers, such as room service and
dry cleaning.
This program would work best with larger hotels located within a 5-10 minute walking distance from the
Convention Center. Suggested partners include Best Western, Hotel Ocean View, and Hotel Baluartes.
Other large hotels that are farther away, such as the Holiday Inn, may establish a free shuttle service
between the hotel and the Convention Center to increase its attractiveness to an organization hosting a
conference or exposition.
7.5.2.2 Increased Dialogue and Marketing Education
Another effective way the Convention Center can work with local hotels is by increasing dialogue and
teamwork, especially around the subject of marketing Campeche as a business tourist destination. For
example, in the case of a lost bid, the Convention Center should follow up with the organization to find
out the reasons why it decided to go elsewhere. If lodging price, proximity, or amenities were a factor,
the Center should be proactive in sharing this information with the hotels involved in the bid. Periodic
meetings or informal networking sessions between key players of the Convention Center and the hotels
could provide a forum to facilitate this communication.
7.5.2.3 Long Term Goal of New Hotel
Finally, Campeche should consider the construction of a large, first-class anchor hotel next to the
Convention Center as an important long-term goal for advancing its MICE industry. The Convention
Center has a large, empty lot located next to the building; the ideal site for the future hotel.
Field interviews revealed that prospective clients regularly voice concern over the lack of appropriate
lodging that can accommodate all attendees. This hotel would have the capacity to accommodate
entire conferences as well as small and medium-sized meeting rooms to host meetings and social
functions. As with other business-class hotels, it is recommended that this hotel have an internationally
recognized and respected
brand name.
While the construction of a
hotel of this caliber years to
plan, it is important to
envision the future of the
Convention
Center
and
establish short and long-term
goals to realize that vision.
Even as the Convention
Center proceeds with low-
81
cost, easily implementable actions, the plans for establishing a major hotel should be integrated into the
long-term strategy for growing the city’s meetings business.
7.5.3 Campechano Ambassador Program
The Convention Center is currently facing a shortage of
proactive meeting and event leads. One way to address this
challenge is to create a Campechano Congress Ambassador
Program.
The proposed Ambassador Program would consist of a select
group of high-achieving volunteers from the Campeche
community, representing a variety of professional fields. An
ideal volunteer would be an accomplished leader in a
corporation and a social networker, with an active
membership in professional groups or associations. As a
Congress Ambassador, these volunteers will become the Convention Center’s advocates who are
committed to generating essential contacts and leads for prospective meetings and convention
business.
The success of the Ambassador Program rests on finding volunteers who are both successful business
people and passionate about their city. Above all, the key mechanism that drives volunteers to generate
leads for the Convention Center is Campeche pride. They understand the positive impact, financial
value, and economic benefit that the entire city of Campeche would gain from hosting more meetings,
conventions, and expositions. It is these natural leaders and networkers who are the city’s best
spokespeople, and the goal of the Ambassador’s program is to tap into these advocates to attract more
business meetings.
Successful ambassador programs have
been used in destinations like Puerto
Rico and London. In Puerto Rico, the
ambassadors program represents up to
20 percent of the total sales in the
destination’s meetings and conventions
industry. 24 In London, the Convention
Centre recognizes some of its most influential ambassadors each year with the Ambassador Award. One
recent award recipient is credited with stimulating an estimated £1.44 million in economic impact by
supporting the city’s bid for an international governmental conference. 25 Although the Campechano
Congress Ambassador Program would naturally operate on a smaller scale, the theory behind it is the
24
Puerto Rico Convention Bureau 2007, Puerto Rico Convention Bureau Revamps Ambassodors Program. [press release]
9/14/07
25
Londoncc.com. 2000. LCC Ambassadors Awards / London Convention Centre – London, Ontario. [online] Available at:
http://londoncc.com/lcc-ambassador-awards [Accessed: 17Jul 2013]
82
same: ambassadors promote the city within their professional networks as a desirable destination for
meetings and conferences, generating new leads for the Convention Center.
7.5.4 Building Community Relations
Finally, it is recommended that the Convention Center improve its relationship with the local community
by initiating a few effective community relations campaigns.
7.5.4.1 Resident Awareness Campaign
Anecdotal evidence from field interviews suggests that many Campeche residents and members of the
tourism community are not aware of all of the activities the Convention Center offers. There is also
concern over the cost of operating the Center. To address these issues, the Convention Center should
create a Resident Awareness Campaign. The primary focus of the campaign should be on the economic
impact of the Convention Center. Many people may not realize that Convention Centers are typically
expected to operate at a loss. Their real value lies in bringing visitors to the city to spend money with
hotels, restaurants, and other local suppliers.
Relevant metrics that would support the positive impact of the Convention Center include the number
of non-local meetings, conferences, and expositions hosted, the number of hotel room-nights
generated, and the number of meals provided by local restaurants to meeting held at the Convention
Center. The awareness campaign can also inform residents about the Convention Center’s future goals
and plans for growth. The overall campaign could be held in conjunction with the Tourism Awareness
Week proposed in Section 3 of this report. By reaching out to the local community, the Convention
Center could generate goodwill for both supporting its current clients and attracting new business.
7.5.4.2 Student Art Contest
In addition to a formal Resident Awareness Campaign, another opportunity for the Convention Center to
connect with local residents is by hosting a student art contest. Local primary and secondary schools
could participate by having students create artwork based on a given theme as provided by the
Convention Center. Themes could focus around Campeche sights, history, or culture, or around the
subjects of future expositions that are
scheduled to be held in the Convention
Center.
Schools would then select a designated
number of pieces of art to submit to the
Convention Center, which would then exhibit
the artwork in a prominent location like the
atrium. The Convention Center could host an
“open house” for the community to view the
artwork on display. This event would bring
community members who may not be well
acquainted with the Convention Center through its doors. Community outreach efforts can strengthen
the Convention Center’s presence and connection to the residents of Campeche.
83
7.6
Convention Center Summary
Challenges
The Convention Center
has no defined marketing
strategy
Solutions
Hire an in-house
Marketing & Sales
Manager
Create a targeted
marketing campaign
Strengthen online
presence
The Convention Center
has low and nondiversified revenue
The Convention Center
has few loyal clients
outside Campeche
Cost
Implementing
Partner
Timeline
$456,000 MXN/annual salary
Convention Center
Operations Director
August - October
2013
$6,000 MXN for 1,000 brochures and
1,000 postcards
$45,000 MXN for participation in
tradeshows
$35,000 MXN for boardroom meeting
equipment
$25,000 for web development work
Marketing and Sales
Manager
October 2013 –
January 2014
October 2013 –
July 2014
Create a marketing
database
Rent food carts to local
chefs
$2,000/annual for printing surveys
$64,800 MXN for three food carts or
stands
$36,000 MXN for marketing materials
Marketing and Sales
Manager, web
developer, interns
Marketing and Sales
Manager, Interns
Convention Center
operations and
marketing staff
Develop the food court
$20,000 MXN for architect to assist in
food court design
$36,000 MXN for marketing materials
Convention Center
operations and
marketing staff
August 2013 –
July 2014
Create a signature
event
$65,000 MXN for consultant to assist in
event development
Marketing and Sales
Manager
August 2013 –
March 2014
Sell corporate
sponsorships
$30,000 MXN for 200 discount guides
Marketing and Sales
Manager
August 2013 –
July 2014
Create linkages within
center to Campeche’s
culture
$20,000 MXN for banner production
36,000 MXN for photo enlargements and
mounting
Convention Center
operations team
August 2013 – July
2014
November 2013 –
July 2014
August 2013 –
July 2014
84
The Convention Center
has weak relationships
with the Campeche
community
Emphasize ambiance
and comfort
$60,000 MXN for purchase of furniture
and plants
Convention Center
operations team
August 2013 – July
2014
Improve staff service
and performance
levels
Improve linkages to
appropriate trade
associations
Increase sustainability
practices
$12,000 MXN for investment in
professional development
Convention Center
operations team
August 2013 – July
2014
$12,375 MXN/annual membership dues
Convention Center
operations team
August 2013 – July
2014
No cost
Convention Center
operations team
August 2013 – July
2014
Develop a student
internship program
with local universities
$8,800-13,200 MXN in personnel wages
to establish program
$26,400-52,800 annually to maintain
program
$13,200-17,600 MXN in personnel wages
to establish program
Convention Center
operations and
marketing staff
August 2013-June
2014
Convention Center
operations and
marketing staff
Convention Center
operations and
marketing staff
August 2013December 2013
Convention Center
operations and
marketing staff
August 2013-July
2014
Formalize partnerships
with local hotels
Form a Campechano
Ambassador Program
Create a Resident
Awareness Campaign
$13,200-$26,400 MXN in personnel wages
to establish program
$11,400-57,200 annually to maintain
program, $12,000 for events and
materials
$8,800-22,000 MXN in personnel wages
August 2013-July
2014
85
8 Destination Management Strategy
8.1
Destination Management Strategy Preview
Challenges
Solutions
Lack of holistic, integrated tourism planning
and implementation between the public and
private sectors.
No coordinated and inclusive group to choose
DMO model
Establish DMO for the State of Campeche
Need of a catalytic event that unites tourism
stakeholders and launches DMO strategy
Tourism Cares GO Expedition including:
• Volunteer event
• Knowledge sharing activities
• Matching grant program
• Famtrip for International Tour Operators
Create a DMO Working Group to:
• Analyze and decide most suitable DMO Model
• Implement short-term destination management
strategies as the basis for the future DMO
Decide on the model for the creation of a DMO Model 1: Maintain DMO Working Group
Model 2: Civil Association
Model 3: DMO operating as a Fideicomiso
One of the major issues facing the future of tourism in Campeche is the lack of cooperation and
communication between the private sector and the government. This key challenge was identified
during the visioning workshop and confirmed through numerous stakeholder interviews. The solution
for uniting the tourism sector is the creation of a holistic destination management strategy, including
the establishment of a Destination Management Organization (DMO) in Campeche.
8.2
Managing Campeche as a Destination
In the previous sections of this report, many challenges facing the tourism sector in Campeche have
been identified, and numerous implementable solutions presented. In order to efficiently realize these
solutions, Campeche is in need of a holistic destination management strategy, which encourages
collaboration between public, private, community and non-governmental organizations. The consulting
team recommends the formation of a destination management organization to address this need. DMOs
have been successful in other destinations by providing an enabling environment for all stakeholders to
work together. The result is a more competitive and sustainable destination.
International best practices demonstrate that an effective DMO is required for destinations to compete
globally. A DMO can take one of several forms: public agency, mixed public-private entity or private
organization. This structure is ultimately decided by the stakeholders at the destination according to
which organization they believe will best accomplish the management and coordination of tourism
86
policy, planning, and marketing for the destination. 26 Whichever type of organization is chosen, the
DMO should have sufficient autonomy, flexibility, and funding to manage the destination’s tourism
development process. This will enable it to react to local conditions and the ever-changing market.
8.3
Creating a DMO
It is recommended that a DMO Working
Group be formed to select a DMO model for
Campeche. This section details the founding
of the Working Group and proposes three
plausible DMO models. These models should
be analyzed within the Working Group to
decide which would best increase
Campeche’s tourism competitiveness.
8.3.1 Form a DMO Working Group
TIP 1: Recruiting Working Group
Members
Stakeholders who participated in the
visioning session have already
demonstrated an interest in volunteering
their expertise and time to enhancing
Campeche as a destination. The executive
committee should reach out to these
participants as a starting point in
assembling the Working Group’s
membership.
Members of the Client Group should lead the
formation of the DMO Working Group. They
would first elect an executive committee
amongst themselves, comprised of a President,
Vice-president and Secretary. The executive committee would then build Working Group membership.
The Working Group should include members
from: academia, tourist attractions, hotels,
restaurants, entrepreneurial enterprises,
cultural and environmental NGOs, and the 11
TIP 2: Enhancing Member Commitment
municipalities of the State.
The DMO
The Working Group could adopt the
Working Group should be as inclusive as
Geotourism Charter to solidify the group’s
possible so that it arrives at a representative
decision for the creation of a DMO.
commitment to advancing tourism through
sustainable concepts and forge a
relationship with National Geographic. See
Appendix 26 for the benefits and tools
associated with the Geotourism charter.
26
8.3.2 DMO Working Group Activities
The Working Group’s primary mission would
be to analyze the feasibility of the three DMO
models for Campeche. In addition, it would
carry out recommendations to enhance the
institutional and legal framework of the
tourism sector. These goals and activities are
discussed in Figure 23.
Ritchie, J. R. B., & Crouch, G. I. (2003). The competitive destination: A sustainable tourism perspective. Oxon, UK: CABI Pub.
87
Figure 23
DMO Working Group Goals and Activities
Encourage Stakeholder Collaboration
•Hold a DMO Working Group meeting during which each member presents their individual or
organizational purpose, scope of work, members, etc
•This meeting would encourage communication, partnerships, and understanding among the
members as they work towards mutual goals
Consider DMO Models
•The Working Group should discuss the feasibility of establishing a DMO for the State
• Analyzing which of the alternatives in section 1.3.2 would be most effective for monitoring
and implementing the recommendations proposed in this report over the long-term
Increase communication efforts between stakeholders
•The Working Group and the Congress Commission for Tourism (CCT) should collaborate to
produce a monthly online tourism newsletter
•It should include the main discussions and decisions in each Working Group and CCT meeting,
current SECTUR initiatives, and a section for individual members to report actitivites
•The newsletter should be sent to all tourism stakeholders and open to the general public; a
link to subscribe should be available through the CCT and SECTUR websites.
Advocate for an adequate legal framework
•The DMO Working Group, SECTUR and the CCT should discuss the topics and regulations that
would be included in Reglamento de La Ley de Turismo del Estado de Campeche
•This draft is an opportunity to include legal mechanisms to implement the recommendations
in this report, especially the possible creation of a DMO financed by a fideicomiso.
Promote Tourism Entrepreneurship
•SECTUR and the Working Group should develop an online portal that compiles all information
about micro, small and medium enterprise development and resources for tourism
entrepreneurs (grants, loans, incubators, technical assistance)
• The Working Group should advocate for more tourism projects within current enterprise
incubators in Campeche (SEDICO, Tecnológico de Monterrey, CCE, etc.) and encourage
members to provide voluntary technical advice to tourism entrepreneurs
Commit to a Tourism Cares GO Campeche Expedition 2013
•A GO Expedition is an international cooperative tourism event that brings U.S. and foreign
travel industry executives together to share values, expertise, talents and skills to assist in the
sustainability and conservation of important sites
•The DMO Working Group should nominate Campeche for a Tourism Cares GO Expedition for
2014. The nomination should be sent to Tourism Cares before Spetember 2013. The Tourism
Cares GO Campeche expedition would serve as a catalytic event to institutionalize the creation
of a DMO. A detailed plan for the Campeche GO Expedition can be found in Appendix 27
88
TIP 3: Hosting the Campeche GO Expedition
If selected, the DMO Working Group would implement the GO Campeche Expedition.
The Expedition would entail:
• Volunteer Event: The tourism community “gives back” by engaging in a project to
conserve a heritage site in Campeche
• Educational Event: A US operator shares best practices for developing a DMO
• Grant Matching Funds Program: Establish program to provide funds for tourism
projects in Campeche (entrepreneurship development, scholarships, etc.)
• Famtrip for Tourism Cares members: Create business leads between US tourism
professionals and Campeche tourism businesses
For more information:
http://www.tourismcares.org/about/whats-new/global-outreach,(2013),
http://www.tourismcares.org/images/documents/TourismCares2014HostCountryRFEI.pdf
8.3.3 Establishing a DMO for Campeche
The DMO Working Group would be charged with deciding between possible DMO structures for the
State of Campeche. In this section, three options are discussed: (a) the DMO Working Group would
continue as a voluntary working group, (b) it could incorporate as a civil association, or (c) it could
operate as a trust (fideicomiso).
8.3.3.1 Maintain the DMO Working Group
The DMO Working Group could choose to maintain its structure and work on democratically selected
initiatives. Its mission would be to enhance private sector involvement in destination management.
DMO Working Group initiatives could address the following needs:
• Education/training (developing curricula for customer service, language workshops, etc.)
• Focused promotion (creation of maps and guides, outreach to niche markets)
• Product development (installing interpretive signage, marketing tourism circuits, etc.)
• Event planning & hosting (festivals, networking opportunities, public forums, etc.)
The Working Group can be an effective organization if its members are dedicated to the collective
efforts. However, it would be unable to legally hire staff and work would continue to be on a voluntary
basis. The Group could increase the number of voluntary members and interns to handle more
activities.
As a DMO Working Group, initiatives could be funded primarily through:
• Proposals for federal and international funding (e.g. Federal SECTUR)
•
Public-private partnerships between its members
Maintaining the DMO Working Group would be the easiest solution to adopt because it allows the
organization to grow organically. This organization would meet little stakeholder resistance and
89
therefore scores fairly well in terms of political feasibility. Additionally, by relying on voluntary efforts,
an entrepreneurial, innovative tourism environment would be created. Maintaining the original
structure of the Working Group also has major limitations, of which financial viability is the most critical.
Without a guaranteed source of financing, the Working Group may not be able to accomplish its goals.
This is why dedicated taxes are considered the most important and consistent source of funding for
DMOs 27.
8.3.3.2 Become a Civil Association
The DMO Working Group could choose to incorporate as a non-profit organization in order to form a
civil association. Its members would only represent the private sector. Destinations like Veracruz and
Guadalajara have been successful in establishing DMOs with this model. Please refer to Appendix 29 to
examine their organizational structures.
This Association’s projects would be funded by grants, while its operating budget would be funded by
cash or in-kind contributions of its members. In addition, it can establish tiered membership dues to
create additional revenue. The dues could be based on member budgets; with larger businesses paying
more and smaller enterprises or individuals paying less.
Other means of generating and diversifying revenue for a Civil Association:
• Produce festivals or events
• Sell merchandise
• Engage in joint promotions with industry members
• Seek corporate sponsorships
• Charge website hosting fees
Additionally, the organization can minimize operating costs by leveraging interns and volunteers, and
developing strategic relationships for training, promotion, and other collaborative efforts.
The Civil Association would be governed by a general assembly, who would meet once a year and have
legislative authority over the DMO. A board of directors would report to the general assembly; usually
honorary (unpaid) members. Other positions typically include a president, secretary, and treasurer.
One major advantage of operating as a Civil Association is having a dedicated staff to plan and
implement tourism initiatives. Additionally, the governance provided by the general assembly adds
more transparency to DMO management and fund-use. Third, incorporating as a nonprofit enables the
Association to pursue revenue-generating activities as long as proceeds are reinvested in the
organization’s mission.
The downside to operating a nonprofit is that government reporting requirements can be complicated
and involve a number of funding, fiscal, and tax reports 28. In addition, this option could face stakeholder
27
InterVISTAS Consulting Inc., Destination Marketing Organization Best Practices and Benchmarking Study
http://www.tourismvancouver.com/pdf/members/dmo_best_practices.pdf, (2009).
28
The International Center for Not-for-Profit Law, NGO Law Monitor: Mexico
http://www.icnl.org/research/monitor/mexico.html, (2013).
90
resistance from those resistant to change, or concerned that this Civil Association may duplicate the
efforts of other tourism associations. Furthermore, while this model offers more funding opportunities
than the DMO Working Group model, it does not assure financial sustainability because it depends on
member contributions for its operating budget.
8.3.3.3 DMO Operating as a Fideicomiso
The third option is for the DMO to function as an independent institution that supports, contributes and
complements the current mandate of SECTUR. In this model, the DMO would be funded by a
fideicomiso, a trust that is drawn from a portion of Campeche’s 2 percent lodging tax. The portion of the
lodging tax that is dedicated to DMO can be increased as the organization shows positive results. This is
a common DMO model in Mexico, with close to 40 OCVs currently operating as fideicomisos 29.
This model requires a trustor to provide the resources needed to operate the fideicomiso (SECTUR), a
trustee (an authorized bank), and a beneficiary (the DMO). The fideicomiso would be governed by the
terms under which it is created. Thus, it is vital that the statutes make provisions for the governance of
the fideicomiso and outline the organizational structure of the DMO. Appendix 30 provides a flowchart
illustrating how the fideicomiso model could access the 2% lodging tax. Fideicomiso funds could be
supplemented by the private sector in the form of membership dues or in-kind contributions. The
organization should also carry out grant-based projects, in addition to pursuing the revenue-generating
activities suggested in 8.3.3.2 above.
The fideicomiso would be overseen by a technical committee, headed by a president and consisting of
an average of 13 members who all have equal voting power in operational decisions. Aside from a
president, committees typically include a secretary and a commissioner, who would oversee the
allocation and use of resources.
To ensure a collaborative approach, the technical committee should represent the following public and
private sector organizations:
•
•
Public Sector: Secretary of Tourism, Secretary of Economic
Development, Head of the State Treasury, INAH, and Secretary of
Environment.
Private Sector: President of Associations and Chambers of
Tourism, Hotel and Motel Associations, Restaurant Association,
Other representatives from various geographic and professional
areas of Campeche tourism
It is recommended that the DMO define its organizational structure before signing the fideicomiso
agreement in order to secure sufficient funding for investments and operations. At minimum, the DMO
should have the following full-time personnel: Executive Director, Marketing Coordinator, Product
29
Federal SECTUR, Organización y Actividades de Mercadeo de Destinos Turísticos,
http://www.sectur.gob.mx/en/sectur/sect_Documentos_de_consulta_sobre_OCVs, (2006).
91
Development Coordinator, Competiveness Coordinator and Administrative Assistant. Figure 24 provides
an example of what this organizational structure would look like.
The Consulting Team suggests the following functions for the full time staff:
Executive Director: The Executive Director would be in charge of the overall strategy, operations and
finances of the DMO and will report to the technical committee. This individual would also be
responsible for communicating the DMO’s capabilities, building membership, and securing partnerships.
They should also have a seat on the CCT to report on the DMO activities.
Administrative Assistant: The Administrative Assistance would support to the Executive Director in
managing the day-to-day operations and activities of the DMO. He/She should also coordinate meetings
for the functional areas and the technical committee.
Marketing Coordinator: The marketing coordinator should provide outreach to niche markets. Examples
include archaeological expeditions, birding and other types of SAVE tourists. He/She would also be
responsible for building international alliances with tourism associations such as The International
Ecotourism Society. Finally, the marketing coordinator would enforce the use of Campeche’s brand
attributes within the private sector to ensure consistent messaging.
Product Development Coordinator: The Product Development Coordinator would identify viable new
tourism products or services and provide
Figure 24
technical assistance for their development. To
Suggested Organizational Structure
ensure that the Coordinator has capacity to
address this mandate, he/she should create
partnerships with other institutions. For
President
example, the Comision Nacional para el el
Desarrollo de los Pueblos Indigenas is currently
investing in community based tourism but lacks
Technical
Committee
of the tourism expertise; the DMO could play a
fundamental role in providing tourism expertise
for sector development.
Private Sector
Local Government
Representatives
Representative
Competitiveness
Coordinator:
The
Executive
Director
Administrative
Assistant
Marketing
Coordinator
Product
Development
Coordinator
Competitiveness
Coordinator
Competitiveness Coordinator would be
responsible
for promoting
stakeholder
collaboration. This can be accomplished with
networking events and workshops.
This
individual would also connect infrastructure
development plans with tourism development
needs by facilitating communication between
INAH, SECUL, SMASS and the Secretary of
Urban Development and Public Works, and the
tourism sector. The Coordinator could also
92
identify the data needs of the private sector and work with educational institutions to commission
studies
It is important that the DMO establishes an on-going internship program for each of the functional areas
proposed above. This will ensure adequate staffing for the DMO and create tourism management
capacity in local tourism students. These interns would be assigned administrative and operational
tasks; however it is recommended that they also have project ownership with the intention of nurturing
young tourism leaders.
The Consulting Team believes that this option would be a strong course of action for the DMO.
Operating as a trust guarantees a source of funding. Another advantage of this model is accountability
and transparency –the technical committee would be split between public and private sector
representatives, ensuring that decisions are governed by the interests of the tourism community as a
whole.
However, this model also has its shortfalls. First, asking for a portion of the bed tax from the State
government could be a difficult process and require strong advocacy from the private and public sectors.
Second, there is a risk of becoming overly-reliant on tax funds, which are tied to unstable economic
markets. These fluctuations will inevitably impact the DMO budget.
8.3.4 Analysis of Destination Management Models
Each of the models above were evaluated using four main criteria: effectiveness, ease of establishment,
financing, and political feasibility (Figure 25). The results are summarized and compared in the matrix
below (Figure 26). Based on this assessment, each alternative was assigned a score in a scale ranging
from poor to good.
The
fideicomiso-backed
DMO model received a
“good” result in the
assessment. This model
offers the most viable
financial
structure
and
organizational longevity. In
addition, it promotes more
accountability and inclusivity
than the other two models.
And while it may be more
difficult to implement and
meet stakeholder resistance,
these initial hurdles will be
overcome once benefits
become apparent.
Effectiveness
Figure 25
DMO Scoring Criteria
Ease of establishment
•Does it foster public/private
partnerships?
•Does it promote transparency in
management?
•Does it offer sustainable financing
options?
•Is it difficult to establish this
organization?
Financing
Political feasibility
•Is there access to public, private, and
donor funds?
•Does it allow for revenue-generating
activities?
•Are stakeholders likely to accept the
changes needed to make this model
successful?
•Will it support all tourism
stakeholders in the private, public,
and civil sectors?
93
Maintain DMO Working Group
Alternatives/Criteria
•
•
Effectiveness
•
•
Ease of
establishment
Financing
•
•
•
Political feasibility
Overall Rating
Score: Poor
Short-term effectiveness in enhancing
public/private collaboration through
joint ventures
Sustainability of financing options not
guaranteed and risk of prolonged
inadequate funding moderately high
Transparency of operations low, as
working group only consists of private
sector and civil society members
No dedicated staff to carry out
tourism promotion and development
functions
Score: Good
Easy, as no changes are required and
organization remains as it was in
phase one
Score: Poor
No dedicated source of financing
leaves future of organization in
precarious position
Score: Good
Unlikely that stakeholders will oppose
maintaining business-as-usual
scenario
Moderate
Figure 26
DMO Scoring Matrix
DMO operating as a civil association
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Score: Moderate
Short and long-term effectiveness
potentially high, as long as board
consists of public and private sector
members
Sustainability of financing options is
an adequate if DMO diversifies
revenue streams
Transparency of operations depends
on the DMO model; generally more
overseeing bodies means more
checks and balances
Dedicated staff to carry out DMO
mandate
Score: Poor
Incorporation and reporting
requirements may be cumbersome
Score: Moderate
No dedicated source of public
funding, but variety of private and
donor financing options available
Score: Good
Public and private partners in
association are drawn together by
united goal in managing tourism
Moderate
DMO operating as a fideicomiso
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Score: Good
Short and long term effectiveness
very high in terms of private/private
collaboration due to shared
representation on technical
committee
Sustainability of financing options
good since DMO combines
dedicated public funding with
private financing
Transparency of operations good
due to representation from both
sectors.
Dedicated staff to carry out DMO
mandate
Score: Poor
Fairly difficult to establish a
fideicomiso and incorporate
organizational structure in bylaws
Score: Good
Dedicated source of public financing
and private funding sources strongly
guarantee DMO’s longevity
Score: Moderate
Idea might meet with initial
resistance by stakeholders who may
feel threatened by changes
Transparency and shared decisionmaking can encourage support with
continued positive outcomes
Good
94
8.3.5 Budgeting for the Campeche DMO
Regardless of the alternative the DMO Working Group chooses to pursue, it must have an operating
budget. The way the organization will allocate its budget is crucial to its continuity and success. The
Consulting Team reviewed a wide variety of DMO budgets in various countries and identified the
following major expense categories:
•
•
•
•
General and administrative expenses
Personnel expenses
Travel trade expenses
Meetings and conventions expenses
•
•
•
•
Consumer marketing expenses
Media and communications expenses
Visitor center operations expenses
Market research expenses.
Federal SECTUR has also provided an itemized annual operational budget for a typical OCV in Mexico of
four staff, which can be referenced in Appendix 31. The newly formed DMO should use these guidelines
and other sample budgets provided in Appendix 32 as a reference when planning its budget.
95
8.4
Destination Management Strategy Summary
Challenges
Solutions
Cost
Implementing Partners
Timeline
Lack of holistic,
integrated tourism
planning and
implementation between
the public and private
sectors.
Creation of a DMO for the
State of Campeche
Depends on the
alternative to be chosen Please see below.
Private and Public tourism
sector
Aug 2013 –Dec 2016
No coordinated and
inclusive group to choose
DMO model
Create a DMO Working
Group
Overall estimated costs
depend on projects
selected
Client Group
August 2013 – July 2014
Need of a catalytic event
that unites tourism
stakeholders and
launches DMO strategy
Tourism Cares GO
Expedition
All costs will be covered
in-kind - Overhead cost to
be covered by utilizing
interns and volunteers.
DMO Working Group
Aug 2013 – March 2014
Collaboration with SECTUR
and Tourism Cares
Decide on the model for
the creation of a DMO
Model 1: Maintain DMO
Working Group
Model 2: Civil Association
Model 3: DMO operating
as a Fideicomiso
Dependent on chosen
model. Budget examples
are provided in
Appendices 31 and 32
DMO Working Group
*The Client must inform
Tourism Cares of their
interest and commitment
before September 2013
Decision to be announced
at Tourism Cares GO
Campeche Expedition, in
2014
96
9 Conclusion
Over a period of two months, an in-depth study of tourism in Campeche has been conducted, with the
dual objectives of increasing destination competitiveness and sustainability. This report represents the
culmination of that work, presenting the findings and recommendations in the following key areas:
marketing, products development, visitor experience, tourism awareness, professional development,
the convention center and destination management.
Campeche can improve its marketing effectiveness by building on existing assets such as its colorful new
logo and excellent website. The development of a value-added brand, which captures Campeche’s most
sought-after experiences, would guide future target marketing efforts and help the destination achieve
success using new tools like inbound marketing. Internal marketing efforts, like a Tourism Awareness
Week, would help bridge informational gaps and instill pride among residents. These recommendations
will help Campeche efficiently allocate marketing dollars and attract new visitors to the destination
In Campeche, visitors need more information about cultural, natural, and historical attractions and
activities to keep them engaged. Creating a comprehensive visitor guide and community events board
would strengthen the promotion of existing products at the destination. To address product gaps in the
city, several inexpensive new product recommendations are presented like cooking lessons and art
classes. However, longer stays also requires drawing tourists to attractions located further from the city
of Campeche, where tourism infrastructure is less developed. The SAVE tourism market represents an
opportunity to attract archeological and birding groups to these areas. These recommendations raise
awareness of existing products and provide for new, complementary ones.
There are numerous training and professional development courses available in Campeche. However,
attendance and effectiveness of the courses continue to be major obstacles in achieving a highly
professional tourism workforce. A leadership course for tourism managers to learn methods of
employee motivation is recommended. Examinations should also be implemented to promote
accountability among students, instructors, and administrators. Training solutions like these will create
a more competitive tourism workforce in Campeche.
Campeche’s Convention Center’s recent renovation will not automatically bring in new business. With
the numerous options that meeting planners have when deciding where to host an event, it is up to the
convention center to do everything possible to make it competitive in the MICE industry. Strategic
recommendations include creating a marketing strategy, diversifying revenue streams, and enhancing
the client experience at the Convention Center. If the convention center implements these actions, it
will become more marketable, gain new business, and increase its revenue.
The overarching challenge facing Campeche’s tourism is the lack of holistic, integrated tourism planning
and implementation. This report has identified numerous specific challenges. While these issues can be
addressed on a piecemeal basis by various organizations as resources permit, it would be most effective
and efficient through a joint effort from all stakeholders. The key to this strategic collaborative effort
97
lies in the creation of a DMO. This DMO would be an independent entity linking private and public
sectors to jointly manage tourism development in Campeche.
Whether or not tourism stakeholders choose to form a DMO, the establishment of a DMO Working
Group is proposed that should lead the discussion on models available for the creation of a DMO for the
State of Campeche. This Working Group, spearheaded by the Client Group, should implement proposed
short-term recommendations (e.g. Tourism Cares GO Campeche Expedition) that can return immediate
benefits for destination management of Campeche. These recommendations are relatively easy to
implement and focus on promoting open and candid dialogue between stakeholders. In addition, they
lay the foundation for increased transparency and cooperation across multi-sector stakeholders in the
destination. It is through the implementation of these recommendations, that Campeche can better
manage its tourism assets and in doing so, strengthen the tourism industry. While this report serves as
the final stage in the project, it should also mark the first step towards enhancing tourism
competitiveness in Campeche.
98
Appendix 1
Términos de Referencia (en Español)
Universidad de George Washington
Términos de Referencia para el Practicum en Consultoría
Campeche, Campeche, México
20 de mayo al 31 de Julio de 2013
Cliente: Colectivo Turístico de Campeche
Fecha: Junio 6, 2013
Nombre del Proyecto: Turismo Sostenible en Campeche
Tema de Proyecto: Estrategias para la mejora de la Competitividad Turística de Campeche.
Propósito
Campeche es un destino turístico con enorme potencial debido a su rico patrimonio cultural y sus
prístinas áreas naturales. Poco a o poco el turismo se ha convertido en uno de los sectores más
importantes para el desarrollo sostenible de la región. Este proyecto busca identificar y proponer
recomendaciones para desarrollar el turismo estratégicamente en la región e incrementar los
beneficios sociales y económicos del turismo.
El proyecto abordara los siguientes pilares estratégicos:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Campaña de Concientización Turística
Mayor integración de servicios turísticos con base en productos turísticos existentes
Mejorar el posicionamiento del destino de Campeche
Análisis de la ciudad de Campeche como destino turístico, desde la perspectiva del turista
Análisis de la situación del Centro de Convenciones de la Ciudad de Campeche
Creación de una Organización de Gestión de Destino (OGD) para la ciudad/destino de
Campeche
Necesidades del Proyecto
En el documento Borrador de términos de Referencia versión 25/04/1, el cliente y los consultares
llegaron a un acuerdo de las principales necesidades que deberían cumplirse en el presente e
proyecto. A continuación se hace referencia a dichas necesidades y sus respectivas explicaciones:
1. Campaña de concientización turística. Formulación de una campaña de concientización
turística, incluyendo un presupuesto para su implementación, dirigida principalmente a los
residentes permanentes de la ciudad de Campeche, así como a los proveedores de servicios
turísticos (cadena de valor – hoteles, restaurantes, museos, transporte, tour operadores,
agencias de viajes, etc.) y los negocios que tienen contacto directo con el turista en el día a día
en el destino de Campeche (por ejemplo: farmacias, casas de cambio, mercados, tiendas, etc.). La
campaña deberá hacer énfasis sobre la importancia y prestigio del estatus de Patrimonio
Mundial de la Humanidad que posee la ciudad histórica fortificada de Campeche. Dentro de este
ejercicio, se deberán analizar los elementos locales del destino que contribuyan a realzar los
valores de la hospitalidad “Campechana” y en la calidad del servicio hacia el turista.
2. Mayor integración de servicios turísticos con base en productos turísticos existentes. Se
evaluará el inventario de los atractivos turísticos que tanto el Gobierno del Municipio de
Campeche posee en cartera y aquellos puestos en valor, como también los del Estado de
Campeche a los efectos de lograr los siguientes objetivos: (i) fortalecer la cadena de valor; (ii)
mejorar, complementar y diversificar la oferta existente; (iii) identificar nuevos nichos de
mercado; y (iv) lograr que la estancia del visitante sea mayor a 2 noches en la ciudad de
Campeche. Dentro de este ejercicio, se llevará a cabo una evaluación especial de los servicios
turísticos asociados con la visita a la Reserva de la Biosfera y Sitio arqueológico Maya de
Calakmul, así como los elementos y/o aspectos especiales que están impidiendo el
mejoramiento de su posicionamiento como Patrimonio Mundial de la Humanidad.
3. Mejorar el posicionamiento del destino de Campeche. Se realizará un análisis de los
elementos de competitividad de la ciudad histórica fortificada de Campeche y su entorno, las
estrategias existentes de promoción por parte de las Secretarias de Turismo y Cultura del
Estado, así como del Gobierno del Municipio de Campeche y del sector privado turístico con el
objetivo de proponer lineamientos estratégicos para mejorar el posicionamiento del destino.
Dentro de este evaluación se realizará un análisis de la marca del destino, de la página web
(Campeche.travel), así como de otros medios de información y comunicación utilizadas por los
actores locales del destino en la promoción del destino.
4. Análisis de la ciudad de Campeche como destino turístico, desde la perspectiva del
turista. Realizar una evaluación de los módulos de información turística existentes (contenido,
idiomas, etc.), señalización, facilidad de movilidad (transporte público), etc. Asimismo, evaluar
la percepción de los visitantes con base en una encuesta a ser realizada in situ. El objetivo de
este análisis consiste en identificar las brechas y, en función de las mismas, proponer un plan de
acción que mejore la experiencia del visitante en el destino.
5. Análisis de la situación del Centro de Convenciones de la Ciudad de Campeche. Se
realizará una investigación sobre el mercado de turismo de reuniones, incentivos,
conferencias/congresos y exhibiciones (MICE – acrónimo en inglés = Meetings, Incentives,
Conferences and Exhibits), con énfasis en casos de éxito en América Latina, demostrando
diferentes modelos de operación y promoción, así como información cuantitativa sobre el
impacto económico de centro de convenciones a nivel de destino. El resultado de la
investigación será plasmado en un documento que sirva de base para definir un plan de acción
que permita recuperar el propósito original del Centro de Convenciones de la Ciudad de
Campeche.
6. Creación de una Organización de Gestión de Destino (OGD) para la ciudad/destino de
Campeche. Se llevará a cabo una investigación sobre casos de destinos a nivel internacional,
donde se han establecido organizaciones de gestión de destinos de ciudades históricas. Estos
casos serán presentados y discutidos con los actores y autoridades locales de la ciudad destino
de Campeche con el objeto de determinar la viabilidad de establecer un ente similar que se
responsabilice por gestionar la promoción, planificación y desarrollo turístico del destino, así
como poseer el mandato para dirigir, preservar y mantener el patrimonio cultural de la ciudad
histórica fortificada de Campeche con base en lineamientos estratégicos sustentables de
crecimiento urbano.
Descripción del Trabajo
El cliente se encuentra interesado en incrementar el flujo turístico a la ciudad de Campeche. El
equipo consultor analizara estrategias que permita incrementar el posicionamiento de la ciudad
mediante la mejora de la experiencia del visitante y la creación de vínculos entre productos
turísticos existentes y nuevos, y nuevos michos de mercado. Asimismo, el equipo consultor
explorara mecanismos para posicionar la amabilidad “Campechana” como una ventaja competitiva
a través de campañas de concientización turística. Finalmente, se examinara la estructura
organizacional de una institución que sea apta para aplicar las estrategias a recomendar teniendo
especial énfasis en la preservación del patrimonio cultural de Campeche.
En función al propósito y necesidades del proyecto, el equipo consultor determino tres ares de
enfoque estratégico: 1.Desarrollo de Producto y Marketing, 2. Cultura Turística y Satisfacción del
Visitante y 3. Fomento del nicho de mercado MICE y Gestión de Destino. El equipo consultor ha
identificado metas y componentes para cada área. Se espera que cuando estas sean alcanzadas
serán de gran apoyo para la mejora de la competitividad turística de Campeche. Durante el
proceso de consultoría orientado a dichas metas, se buscará involucrar a los actores turísticos para
garantizar que las estrategias y recomendaciones a proponer cuenten con apoyo de la comunidad
turística y sean sostenibles en el largo plazo.
Enfoque Estatégico:
1. Desarrollo de Producto y Marketing
El desarrollo y marketing de atracciones turísticas de alta calidad es esencial para atraer turistas a
un destino. Mejorar y diversificar las atracciones turísticas de la región colaborara a: una mejor
distribución de los beneficios económicos, mejora de la competitividad turística, e incremento del
promedio de estadía en el destino. Asimismo, incrementar las actividades de marketing permitirá
que Campeche atraiga más turistas y la imagen de la ciudad se fortalezca a nivel nacional e
internacional.
Metas de Desarrollo de Producto y Marketing
a) Mejorar y desarrollar productos turísticos para incrementar el impacto económico del
turístico de la ciudad.
b) Mejorar las estrategias de marca turística, marketing y comunicación de manera que se
incremente el reconocimiento de Campeche como un destino turístico y se aumente el flujo
turístico a la ciudad.
Componentes esperados del trabajo de consultoría en desarrollo de producto y marketing
a) Evaluación del estado actual de las atracciones turísticas y recomendaciones de desarrollo y
mejora.
b) Evaluación de las iniciativas de marketing y marca turística actuales de Campeche y
recomendaciones para su mejora.
2. Cultura Turística y Satisfacción del Visitante
Para que Campeche pueda incrementar su competitividad en el largo plazo es importante que los
actores involucrados en el turismo, incluyendo, residentes y negocios turísticos, tengan pleno
conocimiento del rol que tiene el turismo en el desarrollo sostenible de la ciudad, así como del valor
de la legado histórico de la ciudad reconocido por UNESCO patrimonio de la Humanidad. Por otro
lado, es sumamente importante evaluar Campeche desde la perspectiva del visitante e manera que
se puedan identificar y reducir brechas entre las expectativas del visitante y los productos turísticos
actuales.
Metas para Cultura Turística y Satisfacción de Visitante
a) Informar a los residentes de Campeche acerca de los beneficios del turismo y atraer a
residentes de alto rendimiento a la industria
b) Mejorar la calidad del servicio, fomentar redes de negocios y proveer herramientas para
crecimiento de negocios turísticos
c) Reforzar la hospitalidad “Campechana” y fomentar la identidad en lo que se refiera a la
designación como ciudad patrimonio
d) Evaluar y optimizar la experiencia del visitante
Componentes esperados del trabajo de consultoría en Cultura Turística y Satisfacción de Visitante
a) Evaluación de las actitudes de los residentes frente al sector turísticos y los turistas
b) Plan de comunicaciones dirigido crear conciencia turística en los residentes y proveedores
de servicios
c) Evaluación de la experiencia del visitante mediante una encuesta in situ
d) Plan de acción para mejorar la experiencia del visitante en Campeche
3. Fomento del nicho de Mercado MICE y Gestión del Destino
Atraer visitantes que tengan un mayor gasto promedio y estadía promedio en la ciudad es esencial
para la sostenibilidad de Campeche como un destino turístico. Utilizar el centro de convenciones de
Campeche y contar con una organización unificada que ejecute las metas previstas son dos formas
en las que se puede incrementar la competitividad. Uno organización de gestión de destino puede
cumplir un rol vital en integrar a los actores involucrados en el turismo de manera que se
concentren esfuerzos y creen sinergias. Esta organización podría cumplir funciones tales como:
actuar como una entidad independiente que fomente el dialogo entre los actores involucrados,
facilitar campañas de cultura turística, monitorear la satisfacción de los visitantes, promover
iniciativas de desarrollo de productos turísticos y conducir marketing del destino a los turistas y al
mercado MICE.
Metas para el fomento del nicho de Mercado MICE y Gestión del Destino
a) Crear un plan de acción para incrementar la estadía promedio en Campeche mediante el
fomento del Mercado MICE, y a su vez incrementar el impacto económico del Centro de
Convenciones de Campeche
b) Facilitar la conversación entre los actores involucrados en turismo para desarrollar una
visión y un plan de acción para la mejora de la gestión del destino.
Componentes esperados del trabajo de consultoría en el fomento del nicho de Mercado MICE y
Gestión del Destino
a) Sugerir un plan de acción para el Centro de Convenciones de Campeche
b) Proveer recomendaciones para la creación y operación de una Organización de Gestión de
Destino
Entregables:
Los resultados de las investigaciones preliminares y el trabajo de campo, así como las
recomendaciones por enfoque estratégico serán presentadas en una presentación final seguida por
un reporte escrito final.
Cronograma de entregables
Junio 10, 2013: Presentación inicial de incepción
Junio 21, 2013: Presentación final al cliente
Julio 31, 2013: Reporte escrito final
Ubicación y Duración del Trabajo
Mayo 20, 2013- Julio 31, 2013 con 14 días de trabajo de campo en Campeche, México. Se realizará
trabajo de investigación y trabajo preparatorio y previo y luego del trabajo de campo.
Perfil de los Consultores y Calificaciones
Los consultores son estudiantes de postrado de la Maestría de Administración en Turismo de la
Universidad de George Washington en Washington D.C. El equipo de consultores será asistido por
un grupo de estudiantes de Turismo del Instituto Campechano.
Consultores de la Universidad de George Washington (bajo la dirección de la Dr. Kristin
Lamoureux y el Prof. Juan Luna Kelser, Profesores la universidad de George Washington)
Aaron Skelly
Anna Barrera
Ariana Luquin Sanchez
Bridget Krider
Charlene Arrillaga
Chelas Porter
Constance Wang
Evita Broughton
Jason Kreiselman
Jenee Cannady
Jennifer Burns
Jose Melenez
Joyce Jue Shi
Linda Githanga
Samantha Hogeson
Seamus Hogg
Shavonne Harding
Consultores del Instituto Campechano (bajo la dirección de los profesores Álvaro Santos and
Rubén Pastrana)
Álvaro Abraham Guerrero Rodríguez
Cecilia Gonzaes
Daniel Domingo Medina Olivares
Heyder Vicente Cruz Huicab
Idiomas de Trabajo
Jorge Cruz Salazar
Juan Carlos Cahuich May
Karen Paredes Pérez
Melvi Arely Kantún
Ninive del Carmen
Ricardo Pinzón
Victor Aaron May Alonso
El reporte final será entregado en idioma Ingles. Las presentaciones de incepción y final serán es
Castellano.
Comunicación
Los consultores reportaran avances, novedades o necesidades directamente al cliente. El cliente
proveerá soporte logístico para el trabajo de campo en Campeche incluyendo transporte, espacios
de oficina, acceso a computadoras, teléfonos, otros insumos de oficina, así como alojamiento y
comidas para el equipo de consultores.
Appendix 1a
Scope of Work (English)
George Washington University
Scope of Work for the Consulting Practicum
Campeche, Campeche, México
20 de May, 2013 - 31 de July, 2013
Client: Working Group of Campeche
Date: June 6, 2013
Project Name: Sustainable Tourism in Campeche
Project Subject: Strategies for enhancing the tourism competitiveness in Campeche.
Statement of Purpose
Campeche is a tourism destination with enormous potentialities due to is rich cultural heritage and
pristine natural areas. Tourism is increasingly becoming one of the most significant sectors to
achieve sustainable development in the Region. This project will help identify ways to enhance the
social and economic benefits of tourism through strategic tourism development recommendations.
The project is designed to address the following pillars:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Tourism awareness campaign
Increased integration of tourism services based on existing tourism products
Improve the positioning of the destination of Campeche
Analysis of Campeche city as a tourist destination, from the visitors’ perspective
Situation analysis of the Convention Center in the City of Campeche
Creating a Destination Management Organization (DMO) for the city / destination Campeche
Statement of Needs
Below is a brief description of the statement of needs that the students/consultants of George
Washington University and the Instituto Campechano will address; as stated on the Borrador de
terminos de Referencia version 25/04/13.
1. Tourism awareness campaign. Formulate a tourism awareness campaign, including a budget
for its implementation, intended primarily for the permanent residents of the city of Campeche,
as well as tourism service providers (value chain - hotels, restaurants, museums,
transportation, tour operators, travel agencies, etc.) and businesses that have direct contact
with the tourist on a day to day in the destination of Campeche (e.g. pharmacies, currency
exchanges, markets, shops, etc.). The campaign should emphasize the importance and prestige
of the World Heritage status of the historic fortified city of Campeche. In this exercise, the
destination’s local elements that contribute to enhance the hospitality "Campechano" values
and the quality of service to the tourist will be analyzed.
2. Increased integration of tourism services based on existing tourism products. An
assessment will be undertaken of the inventory of tourist attractions that both the Government
of the State of Campeche and the Municipality of Campeche have in their respective portfolios
and those that are already in use for the purpose of achieving the following objectives: (i)
strengthen the value chain; (ii) enhance, complement and diversify the existing supply of
tourism products; (iii) identify new market niches; and (iv) extend the 2 night length of visitors’
stay in the city of Campeche. Under this task, a special evaluation of the tourism services
associated with the visitation to the Biosphere Reserve and Mayan archaeological site of
Calakmul will be undertaken, as well as the elements and / or special issues that are impeding
the improvement its positioning as a World Heritage Site.
3. Improve the positioning of the destination of Campeche. An analysis will be carried out of
the competitiveness elements of the historic fortified city of Campeche and its immediate
surroundings environment, as well as existing promotion strategies by the Ministries of
Tourism and Culture of the State of Campeche and the Municipality of Campeche and those of
the private tourism sector with the aim of proposing strategic guidelines to improve the
positioning of the destination. This assessment will analyze the destination brand, the website
(Campeche.travel) and other information and communication media used by local actors that
assist in promoting the destination.
4. Analysis of Campeche city as a tourist destination, from the visitors’ perspective. Conduct
an assessment of existing tourist information modules (content, language, etc.), signage, ease of
mobility (public transport, etc.). Also assess the perception of visitors based on a survey to be
conducted in situ. The objective of this analysis is to identify gaps and propose an action plan to
improve the visitor experience at the destination.
5. Situation analysis of the Convention Center in the City of Campeche. Research the MICE
tourism market (Meetings, Incentives, Conferences and Exhibits), with emphasis on successful
case studies in Latin America, demonstrating different operating models and promotion, as well
as quantitative information on the economic impact of convention centers at the destination
level. The result of the research will be articulated and conveyed in a document that will serve
as the basis to define a plan of action to regain the original purpose of the Convention Center.
6. Creating a Destination Management Organization (DMO) for the city / destination
Campeche. Research will be conducted on international case studies of destinations, whereby
destination management organizations have been established in historic cities. These cases will
be presented and discussed with local destination stakeholders and authorities of the city of
Campeche to determine the feasibility of establishing a similar body that would be responsible
for managing the promotion, planning and tourism development of the destination and have the
mandate to manage, preserve and maintain the cultural heritage of the historic fortified city of
Campeche on the basis of strategic guidelines for sustainable urban growth.
Description of Assignment
The working group is interested in increasing tourism in the city of Campeche. The Consulting team
will look into strategies that will improve the city’s positioning by enhancing the visitor experience
and increasing linkages between existing and new tourism products and new potential markets. In
addition, the consulting team will explore ways in which to showcase the “Campechano” hospitality
as a competitive advantage by increasing the resident’s awareness. Finally, the conception of a
tourism entity that takes ownership of proposed strategies and manages the destination with
especial emphasis on the preservation of the cultural heritage of the city will be examined.
From the statement of purpose and needs, the consulting team determined three areas of strategic
focus: 1. Product Development and Marketing, 2. Tourism Awareness and Visitor Satisfaction, and 3.
MICE Market Enhancement and Destination Management. The consulting team has identified
specific goals and tasks for each area, that when fulfilled, will support and sustain the Campeche
tourism efforts. It is anticipated that this process will engage local stakeholders in an effort to
ensure that the proposed strategies and recommendations are supported and sustainable.
Strategic Focus
1. Product Development and Marketing
The development and marketing of high-quality tourist attractions is critical for attracting tourists
to a destination. Improving and diversifying its tourist attractions will help Campeche distribute
more economic benefits across the city, enhance its tourism competitiveness, and encourage
visitors to stay longer at the destination. Furthermore, improving marketing efforts will allow
Campeche to attract more tourists, and will improve the city’s image both in Mexico and
internationally.
Goals for Product Development and Marketing
a) Improve and develop tourist attractions and services to generate greater economic impact
for the city.
b) Improve branding, marketing and communications to increase awareness of Campeche as a
tourist destination, and to bring more tourists to the city.
Deliverables for Product Development and Marketing
a) Assessment of current tourist attractions and recommendations for improvement and
development.
b) Assessment of current marketing and branding efforts and recommendations for
improvement.
2. Tourism Awareness and Visitor Satisfaction
In order for Campeche to thrive long-term as a tourist destination, key stakeholders, particularly
residents and service-oriented businesses, must be educated about the important role of tourism in
the sustainable development of the city’s economy as well as the prestige associated with the World
Heritage designation. It is equally as important to dutifully assess Campeche from the visitor’s
perspective so we can identify and close the gaps between their expectations and current
experiences.
Goals for Tourism Awareness and Visitor Satisfaction
a) Inform Campeche residents of tourism’s benefits and attract high achievers to the industry
b) Improve service quality, build business networks and provide tools for growth among
tourism service providers
c) Reinforce Campechano hospitality and foster community pride as it relates to the World
Heritage designation
d) Assess and optimize the visitor experience in Campeche
Expected Outcomes for Tourism Awareness and Visitor Satisfaction
a) Assessment of resident attitudes towards the tourism industry and tourists.
b) Communications plan aimed driving tourism awareness among residents and tourism
service providers
c) Assessment of visitors based on a survey conducted in situ
d) Action plan to improve the visitor experience in Campeche
3. MICE Market Enhancement and Destination Management
Attracting multi-day, high quality visitors is crucial to the sustainability of Campeche as a tourism
destination. Utilizing the convention center to the fullest potential and having a unified organization
to act on tourism goals are two ways this can be accomplished. A Destination Management
Organization can play a critical role in bringing together stakeholders to work for the common good
of the destination, by providing an independent entity to encourage dialogue, facilitate tourism
awareness campaigns, monitor visitor satisfaction, promote necessary product development, and
market the destination as a whole to both the MICE markets and leisure travelers.
Goals for MICE Market Enhancement and Destination Management
a) Generate a plan to provide additional overnight visits to Campeche through the MICE
Market, in order to increase the economic impact of the convention center at a destination
level
b) Facilitate conversation amongst stakeholders to develop a vision, and ultimately a plan, for
the destination management of Campeche
Expected Outcomes for MICE Market Enhancement and Destination Management
a) A suggested plan of action for the Campeche convention center
b) Recommendations for the creation and operation of a Destination Management
Organization (DMO) for the city of Campeche
Deliverables
The findings and recommendations of each thematic area will be a presented in a final presentation
followed by a final report.
Dates for Deliverables
June 10, 2013: Initial Inception presentation
June 21, 2013: Final Presentation to client
July 31, 2013: Final Report to client
Locations, Duration, and Timing of Assignment
May 20, 2013- July 31, 2013 with 14 days in Campeche, Mexico. Preparatory and follow up work to
be completed before and after the in country consulting.
Consultant Profile and Qualifications
The consultants are graduate candidates at The George Washington University in Washington, D.C.
The consulting team will be assisted by a group of local students from the Instituto Campecheno
studying Tourism Administration.
GW Consultants (Under the direction of Dr. Kristin Lamoureux and Prof. Juan Luna Kelser, GW
Faculty)
Aaron Skelly
Anna Barrera
Ariana Luquin Sanchez
Bridget Krider
Charlene Arrillaga
Chelas Porter
Constance Wang
Evita Broughton
Jason Kreiselman
Jenee Cannady
Jennifer Burns
Jose Melenez
Joyce Jue Shi
Linda Githanga
Samantha Hogeson
Seamus Hogg
Shavonne Harding
Instituto Campechano Consultants (Under direction of Prof. Álvaro Santos and Ruben
Pastrana)
Álvaro Abraham Guerrero Rodríguez
Cecilia Gonzaes
Daniel Domingo Medina Olivares
Heyder Vicente Cruz Huicab
Working Languages
Jorge Cruz Salazar
Juan Carlos Cahuich May
Karen Paredes Pérez
Melvi Arely Kantún
Ninive del Carmen
Ricardo Pinzón
Victor Aaron May Alonso
The final report will be in English. The inception and final presentations will be in Spanish.
Reporting
The consultants will report directly to the Working Group. The Working Group will provide incountry logistical support, including transportation, office space, and access to computers,
telephones, and other supplies, in addition to lodging and meals to the consulting team.
Appendix 2
Taller de Involucrados Notas
9:45
9:46 – 9:53
Inauguración a cargo de (José Melenez)
Seguido de la Secretaria de Turismo acerca de los objetivos a tratar (nuestro nivel,
como estamos, que nos hace falta) taller de retroalimentación. (enfocarse en
el turismo de negocios ya que tenemos 2 grandes centros de convenciones)
Primer tema- las reglas de convivencia
Celular en vibrador
Límites de tiempo establecido
20 minutos por cada actividad
10 minutos para exponer cada conclusión de cada mesa
Actividad 1
Discutir acerca de la situación de Campeche ahora, que está pasando hoy en día con el desarrollo,
discutirán diversos aspectos 5 fortalezas y 5 desafíos… 20 minutos
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
Fortalezas
Riquezas en atractivos culturales
y naturales
Mesa 1
o
Seguridad
o
Ubicación estratégica en la
península de Yucatán
o
Distintivos internacionales
o
Oportunidades de inversion
o
Fortalezas
Cultura Maya
Gastronomía
Diversidad ecológica terrestre y marina
Seguridad
Cultura Maya
Mesa 2
o
o
o
o
o
Desafíos
Preparación del sector turístico
Alianzas estratégicas integral con los estados
que nos rodean en el mundo maya
La conectividad
Posicionamiento (que nos conozcan a nivel
mundial)
Concientización en cultura turística como
tratar al turista
Desafíos
Patrimonio tangible e intangible
Falta de capacitación
Comunicación terrestre y área
Comunicación marítima
Información turística
Fortalezas
o
o
o
o
o
Seguridad del estado
o
Pueblo mágico palizada
o
Ubicación geográfica bien definida
o
Patrimonio cultural
o
Gastronomía
o
Fortalezas
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
Mesa 3
o
Seguridad
o
Arqueología 17 zonas abiertas
o
Calakmul
Gastronomía
Fortalezas
Buena ubicación y del otro lado con
Europa
Patrimonio cultural
o
o
No tenemos una buena organización
Falta de diversidad focal
Mas capacitación en meseros y lenguajes
(inglés)
Concientización de la comunidad (todos)
Infraestructura turística (portuaria, aérea, nomenclatura y
señales para llegar a sitios turísticos urbanas más a modo
como en otros países)
La conectividad es nula no hay congresos por altos costos de
los boletos de avión y las campañas de promoción son caros
o
No hay inversión turística y Campeche tiene
una gran oportunidad de inversión turística
o
o
Mesa 6
o
Calakmul
o
Gastronomía
o
La naturaleza manglares, selvas
o
La palabra “Campechanídad” ya está en el diccionario
somos gente amables y buenas gentes y organizados
o
Desafíos
La conectividad es nula no hay congresos por altos costos de
los boletos de avión y las campañas de promoción son caros
o
o
Fortalezas
Fortalezas la ciudad de Campeche
patrimonio
Infraestructura actual no soporta para hacer trabajos
de reuniones
Mesa 5
Patrimonio natural, la gran diversidad de
cosas que hay en Campeche
Seguridad en general en todo el estado
Falta de capacitación en los servicios
Mesa 4
La única ciudad fortificada del país
Desafíos
Posibilidad de inversión muy alta por ser mercado
nuevo virgen
Desafíos
Falta de capital humano – fomentar un
mejor servicio
Fomentar una cultura turística en todo el estado hacer una
integración o una conectividad y ofrecer más de una noche
(mas folletos para ir a los manglares en los restaurantes)
Productos diversificados o integrados en el
estado
Focalización de esfuerzos turísticos- por parte del gobierno y
nosotros dependencias tanto del sector privado como de
gobierno
Falta de capital humano – fomentar un
mejor servicio
Desafíos
La conectividad de llegar por avión las carreteras no
sabes cómo llegas, rural, estatal y mundial
Mejorar la calidad de servicios turísticos en
general tanto de empresarios y
La cultura del cuidado del medio ambiente
Diversificación de servicios no solo centro
histórico
Debemos de enfocarnos en solo objetivo la cuestión de la
promoción turística y no hablar ce corto y largo plazo sino
más bien de inmediato
Fortalezas
o
o
Seguridad y tranquilidad
Diversidad cultural y natural
Puntos ganadores
o
o
Desafíos
Falta de profesionalización de prestadores
turísticos
Vinculación entre empresas y gobierno
Actividad 2
¿Cómo queremos ver al turismo dentro de 10 años?
Mesa 1
Campeche se posiciona como uno de los principales destinos de alta ocupación turística con
excelencia, cultura en el servicio y turismo sustentable/sostenible
Verbal:(Resumir una frase vemos a Campeche que se posiciona de alta ocupación turística en
sustentabilidad protegiendo nuestras zonas, cultural en diversidad de destinos que sería el
principal el cual es europeo. Para tener mayor derrama económica, todos con una cultura turística
muy buena que todos den información acerca de lo que tenemos en el estado)
Mesa 2
Campeche un destino turístico preferido por su tranquilidad y cordialidad en el cual los
turistas encuentren tesoros históricos, culturales y naturales
Verbal: (Campeche destino preferido mundialmente por su tranquilidad y amabilidad explotando
nuestros recursos. Equilibrios en historia, cultura y naturaleza)
Mesa 3
Con una buena organización integral en Campeche será en 10 años una potencia turística en
clase mundial
Verbal: (Buena organización en Campeche dejar de ser improvisados hacerla a u n lado todo a
ultima hora y ser más organizados dentro de 10 años ser un turismo de clase mundial)
Mesa 4
Campeche posicionado como destino cultural alternativo y de negocios
Verbal: (Campeche posicionado no solo a 10 años por turismo cultural que intentemos conservar
esa parte para tener una vida de negocios, Campeche es foco para los inversionistas ahora tenemos
que cuidar nuestros recursos)
Mesa 5
Campeche destino con identidad cultural altamente competitivo con productos y desarrollos
sustentables (culturales y naturales), que promuevan la equitativa distribución de la riqueza
y desarrollo del capital humano
Verbal: (Imagen o concepto de Campeche como una ciudad competitiva, destino con identidad
cultural que promuevan la equitativa riqueza natural y humano)
Mesa 6
Campeche como un destino consolidado, con una ocupación, afluencia turística mediante el
fortalecimiento de los servicios y una planeación a largo plazo consensada, desarrollando
nuevos productos turísticos (arte, turismo rural, pesca deportiva, turismo acuático,
observación de aves, ecoturismo y de aventura) en el estado. Un destino maduro
Verbal: (Campeche con un destino consolidad con afluencia constante en base a una planeación que
todos los sectores trabajemos juntos para que logre y que se oferte a nivel mundial y nacional)
Actividad 3
Discusión de áreas a las que vamos a enfocarnos:
(Concentrarse en el tema del grupo) estrategias que llenemos las brechas entre las fortalezas y
debilidades. Estrategias a corto plazo 1-3 años y quien debería ser el responsable de implementar
las estrategias largo plazo 4-10 3 estrategias e identificar los responsables de implementar las
estrategias.
Desarrollos de productos - Parte #1
Corto plazo
1. generación de información turística profesional por municipio
•
Responsable: turismo municipal, SECTUR, sector empresarial
2. establecimiento de rutas turísticas bien planificas, congruentes e integradas
•
3.
Prestadores de servicios turísticos, SECTUR.
profesionalización y regularización jurídica de los prestadores turísticos
•
Responsable: los prestadores, sector gobierno
4. entretenimiento turístico
Largo plazo
1. desarrollo de nuevos productos turísticos
•
Responsable: universidades, INAH, sector turismo.
2. centro de desarrollo e innovación turística de Campeche
•
Responsable: sector gobierno, educativo y de investigación, sector empresarial
3. gestión de dominaciones de origen para productos del estado
•
Responsable: sector gobierno, sector empresarial, involucrados
Rutas que estén identificables las zonas rojas y azul que los prestadores ya estén integrados, la
profesionalización y regularización de los prestadores de servicio sector gobierno que no están bien
regulados ambientalmente que no debe de ser de los demás sino también del prestadores, turismo
nocturno y ofrecer alternativas aquí la iniciativa privada
Largo plazo zonas vírgenes que no se les está dando el impulso y apoyarse con ejidatarios
Centro de desarrollo de innovación turística de Campeche para que no se queden los proyectos en
las oficinas sino más bien darle seguimiento, la parte educativa, institucional, gobierno
Muchos productos que tiene Campeche, sombrero de jipi, pan de cazón y hay estados que están
integrados y ellos los están ejecutando y la secretaria de gobierno, la secretaria de desarrollo
económico y cultural también involucrados
La parte estratégica el diseño de la plataforma del estado el producto demanda y oferta
La identificación de estos atractivos que incluyan a otras zonas
La elaboración de proyectos hablamos de facilidades turísticas, servicios, proyectos que estén bien
enfocados a las necesidades
Gestión a través de marcos normativos en los planes de desarrollo estatal y municipal, la voluntad
de los servicios públicos sector y privado
Desarrollos de productos - Parte #2
Corto plazo
1. identificación de los productos
•
2.
Responsables: autoridades estatales (3 niveles)
elaboración de proyectos (identificación, clasificación, zonificación)
•
Responsable: ---
3. gestión para la ejecución de los proyectos (financiamiento, infraestructura)
•
Responsable: Turismo, iniciativa privada
Largo plazo
1.
integrarnos en un corredor turístico regional
•
Responsable: autoridades gubernamentales
2. aprovechar las similitudes culturales y temáticas del circuito
3. integrar un marketing en conjunto
4. aprovechar las alianzas como mundo maya
•
Responsable: colaboración entre los entes privados y públicas
Productos que ya estén ahora integrarlos en un acuerdo para hacer una promoción de los estados
vecinos y que Campeche ofrezca cultura y naturaleza mientras los otros ofrezcan otras variedades
esto se lograría aprovechando las temática que tenemos, explotar temáticas que tenemos las rutas
que tenemos de famosos Catherwood famosas que son Bestseller en Europa y después lanzar una
campaña de marketing en las ferias internacionales no solo aquí en Campeche y lograr un mayor
atractivo como región y no como estado y captar mayor número de turistas para que pernoten más
tiempo.
Las Alianzas aprovecharlas entre servidores turísticos y logar derrama económica.
Gestión de destino
Corto plazo
1. preservar y conservar el patrimonio
•
Responsable: CONAPESCA, INAH, CONANP
2. capacitación
•
Responsable: CDI, SECTUR, SEP
3. promoción y difusión
•
Responsable: ayuntamientos, SECTUR, patrocinadores privados
Largo plazo
1. creación de una organización publica/privada
•
Responsable: SECTUR, SCT, INAH, estado y ayuntamiento
2. órganos de control y seguimiento
•
Responsable: privado/público empresarial
Precisión más valorada principalmente por el patrimonio que tenemos
A corto plazo estamos considerando una organización pública y privada que se destinen a los
recursos por ejemplo Calakmul destinarlo en carretera de acceso y que lo haga la SCT SCT, INAH
No existen órganos de control que faciliten recursos
Patrimonio natural como la CONAPESCA el INAH nuestro país ha sido saqueado por extranjeros y
que capaciten a gente locas
Desarrollo sustentable hay ejidatarios que quieren enfocarse a eso y apoyarlos. Asociación hoteles y
moteles y privadas,
Rubro para que gente experta capacite a estas personas
Muchos guías no ofrecen la información exacta, que los trípticos sean más confiables, en el aspecto
ecoturismo saber de los animales marítimos pescado saber de las temporadas de lluvia, siembra,
procesos—SECTUR y buscar patrocinadores un evento
Marketing turístico
Herramientas que debemos utilizar para que los demás en el mundo nos conozcan.
Marketing turístico
Corto plazo
1. posicionamiento de una marca permanente
2. promoción nivel estatal, peninsular, nacional y mundial
3. uso de herramientas electrónicas (internet)
Largo plazo
1. desarrollo de productos turísticos
2. creación de institución de vigilancia de marketing
3. alianzas estratégicas
•
Responsables: empresarios, gobierno (3 niveles)
Una marca permanente como el de las vegas lo que se hace en las vegas se queda en las vegas
Hacer una en Campeche y que sea continua hablando de Campeche
Los 11 municipios se deben promocionar entre si y en general todo el edo. Para generar nuevos
empleos, derrama económica y que es un proceso.
Uso de elementos o herramientas electrónicas ejemplo el internet que es un muy importante,
desarrollo de productos turísticos y fortalecerlos los que ya existen o los hagan más fuerte y apoyar
a los nuevos empresarios para que crezcan- estrecha comunicación del gobierno y de propietario
hablando de presupuesto – tener una actitud positiva
Crear alianzas estratégicas con proveedores que los hoteleros le compren a los locales porque ellos
no tiene factura por eso no le compran- responsable todos (empresarios)-comprometernos con los
3 niveles de gobierno
Concientización turística
Corto plazo
1. campañas a través de foros al público (medio ambiente, historia)
•
Responsable: capacitación de SECTUR, desarrollo urbano, municipal y CCE
2. información a prestadores turísticos
•
Responsable: Prestadores de servicio, instituciones educativas
3. comité ciudadano de capacitación
•
Responsable: iniciativa privada
Largo plazo
1. integrar en planes de estudios programas de cultura turística
•
Responsable: SEP, SECUD, SC.
2. fortalecer la identidad cultural
•
Responsable: turismo y cultural, iniciativa privada
3. creación y actualización de cédulas informativas
•
Responsable: INAH, SECTUR.
4. incentivas participación de iniciativa privada y a la comunidad
•
Responsable: cámaras y asociaciones
Darle a conocer a la población el beneficio que ellos recibirían del turismo, realizar encuestas de
satisfacción para que sustente las demandas, integrar a la comunidad al sector turístico, todas las
escuelas sobre la información turística del estado, estar preparados para recibir el turismo,
Comunidad informada ya que es el mejor promotor del turista, ellos dicen nuestras bellezas
naturales, informarle a la comunidad acerca de limpieza que n o tiremos basura en el mar, corregir
la falta de limpieza, prestadores de servicios turísticos deben estar bien informados incluyendo las
dependencias como SECTUR tanto estatal como municipal, comité ciudadano que se encargue de las
capacitaciones, nuestros jóvenes hacerlos consientes de nuestras fortalezas turísticas que tenemos
ellos son el futuro, fortalecer nuestra identidad cultural y creación y actualización de cédulas
informativas ya que hay zonas de las cuales no tenemos promoción y que las cámaras y
asociaciones se encarguen de esto.
Pregunta importante de la ciudadanía este orgulloso de lo que tenemos
campañas atreves de foros públicos sería conveniente fortalezas de Campeche para que estén
orgullos y lo cuiden ahí tenemos al público cautivo y a ellos le decimos que necesitamos para decirle
a turista que tenemos que ubicar botes de basura, letreros, concientización a los turistas por medio
de nuestra comunidad
Concientización turística
Corto plazo
1. campaña beneficios del turismo para la población (integración)
•
Responsable: gobierno, sector empresarial
2. encuestas de satisfacción al turista así se tiene información que sustenta lo que falta
específicamente
Largo plazo
1.
elaborar programa de integración de la comunidad al sector turismo (beneficios,
necesidades)
Primarias secundarias y prepas
•
Responsable: gobierno y sector empresarial
Lic. Vania (Secretaria de Turismo)
Una nueva instituciones que pueda aunar los esfuerzos para que apoyen a todas las empresas
Que trabajen juntos, en equipo
Nota: Poca participación de la secretaria de turismo (solo 3 presentes) hacer que se interesen más.
Taller de Involucrados - Registro de Participantes
Nombre
Organizacion o Institucion
Titulo
Correo electronico
Gerente
[email protected]
CCE
Desarrollo Empresarial
[email protected]
Ricardo Pinzón Pedraza
SECTUR
Guía de Turístas
[email protected]
Tatiana Macossay Arteaga
SECTUR
Directora de Congresos y Convenciones
[email protected]
Erendira Rebolledo
API
Directora de Puerto-Ciudad
[email protected]
Julio A. Sanchez Chavez
UAC Vinculación
Coordinador
[email protected]
María José Aguirre Cachón
Viajes Programados
Lic. en Tursimo
[email protected]
Arón Ricardo Cach
CIAC Consultores
Lic. en Tursimo
[email protected]
Lisset del Rosario Flores
INAH
Licenciatura
[email protected]
Verenice Ramirez Rosado
INAH
Lic. En Historia
[email protected]
Carla Alayola
DDETC/Gob. Mpal.
Lic. Inf.
[email protected]
Noemí Zapata
DDETC/Gob. Mpal.
Lic. en Tursimo
[email protected]
Julio Peña
Hotel del Mar
Director Comercial
[email protected]
Andrea Sanchez
Hotel Socaire
Gerente
[email protected]
Linyu Garcia Anal
Hotel Socaire
Gerente de Ventas
[email protected]
Marley Plascencia S
Hotel Casa Don Gustavo
Gerente de Ventas
[email protected]
Atziri González R.
Chocol'ha / Cafeteria
Propietaria
[email protected]
Joel Oxte Gomez
Anahuac
Maestria
[email protected]
Magally Medina Farfán
Secretaria de Cultura
Directora en Cultura Infantil
[email protected]
Fernando Calderón
Restauran la palapa
Propietario
[email protected]
Salvador Espinola Espadas
API CAMPECHE
Coordinador
[email protected]
Mauricio Arceo
Hotel Baluartes
Director General
Hector Solis Alpuche
Barco Pirata Lorencillo
Gerente General
Iran Lorena Gonzalez Lara
Instituto Politecnico Nacional
Subdirectora
Daniela Lavalle Milea
Particular
Jorge Manos
DDETC/Gob. Mpal.
Director de Turismo Municipal
Luis González
Tucan Siho
Gerente
[email protected]
Oscar Cano
AAK-BAL
Director
oscar.cano @aakbal.com.mx
Victor Rodriguez
Sabaleando
Director
[email protected]
Francisco Miss
IPN
Vinculación
Aracely Castillo Negrin
Hotel Geminis
Carlos Castillo Brown
Hotel Geminis
Ivonne Konik
Maria del Carmen Alocan
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
Jorge A. Camara May
City Express
Gerente de Ventas
Delio Carrillo
UAC
Director de Difusión Cultural
Carlos J. Lopez Guerrero
Hotel Alhambra
Gerente
[email protected]
Antonio Lopez Cen
PRONATURA
Director de Proyectos
[email protected]
Jean Du Bar del Río
Restauran Casa Vieja
Dueño
[email protected]
Marta Arceo Ofal
ICATCAM
Jefe de Capacitacion
[email protected]
José Arturo Hab Cardenaz
INAH
Aux Jurídico
[email protected]
Daniel Pat Cruz
INAH CAMPECHE
Pentajes
[email protected]
Mario Cisneros
INAH CAMPECHE
Armando Sosa Salazar
Productor de Espectaculos
Productor
[email protected]
Vanessa Arceo Ofal
AHC
Contador Público
[email protected]
Hugo del Río Richaud
Profesional Independiente
Licenciado en Adm. De Emp. Tur.
[email protected]
Laura Cano Zetina
INEFAAC
Dir. Del Bazar Artesanal
[email protected]
Beatriz Mena Pacheco
Patronato de la Ciudad
Gerente
[email protected]
Beatriz Baumes Arceo
CANACO
Presidenta
[email protected]
Sara Avilez
CCE / Hotel Debliz
Gerente de Ventas
[email protected]
Hector Cámara
Hotel Puerta Seyba
Gerente General
[email protected]
[email protected]
Gabriela de la Cruz
Secretaria de Cultura
Turismo Cultural
[email protected]
Vicente Vega Pavón
SECTURCAM
Subdirector de Relaciones Públicas
[email protected]
Jacqueline Martinez Solis
Guía de Turistas y Operador
pasante
[email protected]
Apolinar Aguilar
Restaurante la Pigua
Secretaria
[email protected]
Francisco Castilla
Fundación Avanza
Contador Público
Ericka Mendicuti
Lic. en Tursimo
[email protected]
Myrna Franco
AAK-BAL
Directora de Ventas
[email protected]
Juan Elias Salazar
ITESM
Coordinador
[email protected]
Abraham Reynoso
Secretaria de Cultura
Subdirector de Culturas Populares
[email protected]
Daniel Alberto Escobedo
"El Tucan" Operadora
Guía de Turístas
[email protected]
Zazil Rejon Vivas
Avanza
Maestra en Derecho
[email protected]
Norma Sujey Estrella May
Agencia Buenaventura
Lic. en Tursimo
[email protected]
Enrique G. B.
INAH
Carlos Galles
El Bastion
Contador Público
[email protected]
Rosa M. Calan
Hotel San Fernando
Administrador
Alejandra M.
Migan M. G.
Xpicob
[email protected]
Appendix 3
Survey Methodology and Limitations
Resident Survey Methodology
The consulting team utilized a self-administered questionnaire which included a survey invitation and a
list of 24 structured and unstructured questions. This survey consisted of three sections: First, it
(Questions 1-11) asked residents to measure their level of agreement or disagreement in various
tourism topics by utilizing a five-point rating scale; the second section was comprised of open-ended
questions (Questions 12-22) which allowed respondents to write what they considered an appropriate
answer in their own words. Lastly, the third section concluded with two demographic questions to
measure the respondents’ age group and level of education.
The initial resident questionnaire was created in English then translated into Spanish. Both the English
and Spanish questionnaires were pre-tested among 13 Spanish speakers of whom 11 were natives of
Campeche, and five English speakers. Based on the pre-test feedback, questions and language were
modified to produce two clear and concise questionnaires (Appendix 1). The finalized Spanish
questionnaire was then implemented June 11 through 15 by members of the Consulting Team. The
team strategically selected areas highly-frequented by residents of which include: the Bus Station, the
library, shops around the main plaza, Casa Seis, the Malecón, and the local airport. Furthermore, the
team divided each surveying day into two shifts: 9-12 pm and 5 – 8pm to cover a broader range of the
resident population.
All the survey administrators completed a 15-minute training session to cover basic research ethics. The
training was provided by a member of the consulting team with previous experience in research
projects.
The Consulting team compiled a total of 79 complete resident questionnaires. These questionnaires
were then analyzed to create the results presented in the section below and throughout this report. To
assure data-entering accuracy, unstructured questions’ responses were coded into categories for
analysis; secondly, all responses were input into an Excel spreadsheet by two survey administrators, and
lastly, data was transferred into SPSS statistical software for analysis and the creation of tables and
charts.
Visitor Survey Methodology
The GW Consulting Team received the client’s Statement of Work and objectives for the visitor survey.
The Consulting Team designed a survey that would provide reliable, practical and consistent responses.
The 16-question survey focused on visitor perception and experience in Campeche. The survey
established the following purposes:
•
•
•
•
Collect Visitor Demographics
Measure Trip Attributes and Visitor Motivation
Discover Information Delivery Gap
Investigate the Satisfaction Gap
The GW consulting team led the trained local students from the Instituto Campechano and produced a
random sample of 127 tourism parties from the much larger population. The survey, which was
conducted over a week period, covered the ADO Bus Station, the Campeche International Airport, the
Old Town of Campeche and the typical tourist attractions.
Coding was conducted on the completed questionnaire levels. The results were input into the
spreadsheet software and analyzed using SPSS statistical software. The important findings were
identified based on the data collection and processing.
Limitations of the Surveys
The Consulting Team found a few limitations with this study. First, due to limited study time, the
Consulting Team did not utilize a statistical formula to determine a representative sample of the target
population to be surveyed. Instead, they opted for a convenience sample method in which respondents
were chosen based on availability and accessibility, thus suggesting that not all residents had the same
opportunity to participate in this survey. Second, the initial questionnaire was created in English and
then translated into Spanish. Although both questionnaire versions were pre-tested, there exists a
possibility of semantic and conceptual inconsistencies in the Spanish-translated questionnaire.
Appendix 4
Resident Awareness Questionnaire
and Survey Results
Campeche Resident Questionnaire
Hello! We are students of the Instituto Campechano and The George Washington University in
Washington, D.C., conducting a survey to better understand how residents are involved in tourism in
Campeche. We would appreciate it if you took a few minutes of your time to complete this brief
questionnaire by simply marking your responses in the spaces provided below. You may opt out of
answering any question if you choose. Your responses are completely anonymous and will be used to
improve the tourism experience for visitors and locals alike here in Campeche. Thank you for your help!
Strongly
Disagree
Disagree
Undecided
Agree
Strongly
Agree
Please indicate your degree of agreement/ disagreement with each of the following statements:
1.
Tourists are friendly towards the local people.
1
2
3
4
5
2.
I enjoy having tourists in my community.
1
2
3
4
5
3.
Tourism helps preserve Campeche’s historical
and cultural heritage.
1
2
3
4
5
4.
Tourism increases the cost of living in
Campeche.
1
2
3
4
5
5.
Tourism improves the quality of life for
people in Campeche.
1
2
3
4
5
6.
Tourism in Campeche creates jobs for local
people
1
2
3
4
5
7.
The jobs in the tourism industry are not
highly desirable.
1
2
3
4
5
8.
I am concerned that tourism is negatively
impacting the local environment.
1
2
3
4
5
9.
The benefits of tourism outweigh the
negative consequences of tourism.
1
2
3
4
5
10.
The residents of Campeche play an important
role in tourists’ experience.
1
2
3
4
5
11.
Tourism increases crime in Campeche.
1
2
3
4
5
12. Are there any “rules” or cultural customs that you feel tourists should obey? (circle one) Yes No
If Yes, What are they? ____________________________________________________________
13. What would you be most proud to show a tourist in Campeche? _____________________________
PLEASE SEE REVERSE SIDE
Campeche Resident Questionnaire (Continued)
Please help us gauge local tourism awareness by answering the questions below to the best of your ability.
1. Tourism constitutes approximately what percentage of Campeche’s state economy? Please guess if unsure.
(circle one)
0-10%
11-20%
21-30%
31-40%
41-50%
2. Which organization manages heritage attractions in the city of Campeche? __________________
3. Name two museums in the city of Campeche.
(1)_______________________ (2)_______________________
4. Name two Mayan sites in the state of Campeche.
(1)_______________________ (2)_______________________
5. Where would you advise a tourist to find information about Campeche’s attractions?
_____________________________________________________________
6. What is one evening activity a tourist could enjoy in the city of Campeche?
_____________________________________________________________
7. Is the historic fortified town of Campeche a World Heritage Site? (circle one) Yes
No
8. In one word, why do tourists visit Campeche? _______________________
9. How would you describe Campeche in one word? _____________________
Age (circle one)
Gender (circle one)
Less than 25 years
Between 26 and 35 years
Between 36 and 45 years
Between 46 and 55 years
Between 56 and 65 years
Over 65 years
Male
Female
Highest Level of Education (circle one)
Grade School
High School
College
Post-Graduate
Occupation (circle one)
Student
Retiree
Health
Education
Business
Law
Government
Transport
Construction
Hospitality
Agriculture
Finance
Thank you!
Energy
Retail
Fishing
Other __________
Cuestionario Turístico para Residentes Campechanos
¡Hola! Somos estudiantes del Instituto Campechano y de la Universidad George Washington en
Washington, D. C. Estamos llevando a cabo una encuesta para entender mejor cómo los residentes
de Campeche están involucrados en el turismo. Apreciaríamos si nos regalara unos minutos de su
tiempo para completar este breve cuestionario marcando, simplemente, sus respuestas en los
espacios proporcionados más abajo. Usted puede optar por no responder alguna pregunta si así lo
desea. Sus respuestas serán completamente anónimas y serán usadas para mejorar la experiencia
turística de los visitantes y locales por igual aquí en Campeche. ¡Gracias por su ayuda!
Fuertemente
en desacuerdo
En desacuerdo
Indeciso
De acuerdo
Fuertemente
de acuerdo
Por favor indique su grado de acuerdo / desacuerdo con cada uno de las siguientes afirmaciones:
1.
Los turistas son amigables con la gente local.
1
2
3
4
5
2.
Disfruto que haya turistas en mi comunidad.
1
2
3
4
5
3.
El turismo ayuda a la preservación del
patrimonio histórico y cultural de Campeche.
1
2
3
4
5
4.
El turismo incrementa el costo de vida en
Campeche.
1
2
3
4
5
5.
El turismo mejora la calidad de vida de los
habitantes de Campeche.
1
2
3
4
5
6.
El turismo en Campeche crea empleos para la
gente local.
1
2
3
4
5
1
2
3
4
5
1
2
3
4
5
1
2
3
4
5
1
2
3
4
5
1
2
3
4
5
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
Los trabajos en la industria turística no son
altamente deseados.
Estoy consciente de que el turismo está
impactando de manera negativa el ambiente
local.
Los beneficios del turismo sobrepasan las
consecuencias negativas del turismo.
Los residentes de Campeche juegan un papel
importante en la experiencia de los turistas.
El turismo incrementa la delincuencia en
Campeche.
12. ¿Existen algunas “reglas” o costumbres culturales que usted considere que el turista deba obedecer?
(Encierre uno)
Sí
No
Si su respuesta es Sí, ¿Cuáles son? __________________________________________________
13. ¿De qué se sentiría más orgulloso de mostrar a un turista en Campeche?_______________________
FAVOR DE VER EL REVERSO DE LA HOJA
Cuestionario Turístico para Residentes Campechanos (Continuación)
Por favor, ayúdenos a medir la sensibilidad turística local, contestando las siguientes preguntas en la
medida de sus conocimientos.
1. ¿Qué porcentaje aproximado constituye el turismo en la economía del Estado de Campeche Por
favor, adivine si no está seguro. (encierre uno)
0-10%
11-20%
21-30%
31-40%
41-50%
2. ¿Qué organización administra los atractivos turísticos en la ciudad de Campeche? ____________
3. Nombre dos museos en la ciudad de Campeche.
(1) _______________________ (2) _______________________
4. Nombre dos zonas arqueológicas en el estado de Campeche.
(1) _______________________ (2) _______________________
5. ¿Qué lugar le recomendaría a un turista para encontrar información sobre los atractivos de
Campeche?
_____________________________________________________________
6. ¿Cuál sería una actividad nocturna que un turista podría disfrutar en la ciudad de Campeche?
_____________________________________________________________
7. ¿Es la ciudad histórica fortificada de Campeche un Patrimonio Cultural de la Humanidad?
(encierre uno) Sí
No
8. En una palabra, ¿por qué visitan los turistas Campeche? _______________________
9. ¿Cómo describiría Campeche en una palabra? _____________________
Edad (encierre uno)
Género (encierre uno)
Entre 18 y 25 años
Entre 26 y 35 años
Entre 36 y 45 años
Entre 46 y 55 años
Entre 56 y 65 años
Más de 65 años
Masculino
Femenino
Último Grado de Educación (encierre uno)
Educación Básica
Preparatoria
Universidad
Posfrado
Ocupación (encierre uno)
Estudiante
Retirado
Salud
Educación
Negocios
Leyes
Gobierno
Transporte
Construcción
Hospedaje
Agricultura
Finanzas
¡Gracias!
Energía
Pesca
Ventas
Otro __________
Resident Survey Data
2. I enjoy having tourists in my community
1. Tourists are friendly towards the local people
Valid
Valid
Frequency
Valid
Missing
Percent
Percentage
4
5.1
5.3
6.8
3
2
2.5
2.6
62.0
66.2
4
42
53.2
55.3
14
17.7
18.9
5
28
35.4
36.8
74
93.7
100
Total
76
96.2
100.0
5
6.3
3
3.8
79
100.0
79
100.0
6
7.6
8.1
3
5
6.3
4
49
5
Total
System
Valid
Percent
2
2
Total
Frequency
Percentage
Missing
System
Total
4. Tourism increases the cost of living in Campeche
3. Tourism helps preserve Campeche’s historical and
cultural heritage
Valid
Frequency
Valid
Frequency
Valid
Missing
Total
Percent
Percentage
Valid
Percent
Percentage
1
1
1.3
1.4
2
3
3.8
3.9
2
13
16.5
17.6
3
6
7.6
7.8
3
19
24.1
25.7
4
38
48.1
49.9
4
29
36.7
39.2
5
30
38.0
39.0
5
12
15.2
16.2
Total
77
97.5
100.0
Total
74
93.7
100.0
2
2.5
5
6.3
79
100.0
79
100.0
System
Missing
Total
System
5. Tourism improves the quality of life for people in
Campeche
6. Tourism in Campeche creates jobs for local people
Valid
Valid
Frequency
Valid
Missing
Percent
Frequency
Percentage
Percentage
1
1
1.3
1.4
11.8
2
9
11.4
12.2
22.8
23.7
3
11
13.9
14.9
34
43.0
44.7
4
36
45.6
48.6
5
14
17.7
18.4
5
17
21.5
23.0
Total
76
96.2
100.0
Total
74
93.7
100.0
3
3.8
5
6.3
79
100.0
79
100.0
1
1
1.3
1.3
2
9
11.4
3
18
4
System
Total
Valid
Percent
Missing
System
Total
7. The jobs in the tourism industry are NOT highly
desirable
8. I am concerned that tourism is negatively impacting
the local environment.
Valid
Frequency
Valid
Total
Valid
Percentage
1
7
8.9
9.2
2
18
22.8
3
28
4
5
Total
Missing
Percent
System
Frequency
Valid
Percent
Percentage
1
12
15.2
15.6
23.7
2
42
53.2
54.5
35.4
36.8
3
12
15.2
15.6
19
24.1
25.0
4
6
7.6
7.8
4
5.1
5.3
5
5
6.3
6.5
76
96.2
100.0
77
97.5
100.0
3
3.8
2
2.5
79
100.0
79
100.0
Total
Missing
Total
System
9. The benefits of tourism outweigh the negative
consequences of tourism
10. The residents of Campeche play an important role in
tourists’ experience
Valid
Frequency
Valid
Valid
Percentage
1
5
6.3
6.7
2
16
20.3
3
32
4
5
Total
Missing
Percent
Valid
Percent
Percentage
2
7
8.9
9.2
21.3
3
7
8.9
9.2
40.5
42.7
4
37
46.8
48.7
15
19.0
20.0
5
25
31.6
32.9
7
8.9
9.3
Total
76
96.2
100.0
75
94.9
100.0
3
3.8
79
100.0
Missing
Syste
m
Syste
4
m
Total
Frequency
5.1
Total
79
100.0
12. Are there any “rules” or cultural customs that you feel
tourists should obey? Yes No (If yes, what are they?)
11. Tourism increases crime in Campeche
Valid
Frequency
Valid
Frequency Percentage
Valid
Percentage
18
22.8
23.7
33
41.8
43.4
Yes
33
41.8%
45.8
2
3
15
19.0
19.7
No
39
49.4%
54.2
4
8
10.1
10.5
72
91.2%
100.0
5
2
2.5
2.6
7
8.8%
76
96.2
100.0
3
3.8
79
100.0
Syste
m
Total
Percentage
1
Total
Missing
Percent
Total
Missing
Total
79
100%
Rules: respect culture, patrimony, archeological sites;
obey the law
13. What would you be most proud to show a tourist in
Campeche?
Frequency
Valid
14. Tourism constitutes approximately what percentage
of Campeche’s state economy?
Percent
Frequency
19
21.6
25
28.4
3
CL
Valid
Percent
5
6.3
0-10%
4
5.1
3.4
11-20%
17
21.5
21
23.9
21-30%
29
36.7
MA
7
8.0
31-40%
14
17.7
MU
2
2.3
41-50%
10
12.7
N
3
3.4
Total
79
100.0
O
8
9.1
88
100.0
C
CAM
Total
15. Which Organization manages heritage attractions in
the City of Campeche?
SECTUR
INAH
Frequency
Percentage
Valid
Percentage
36
45.6%
64.3
19.0%
26.8
4
5.1%
7.1
1
1.3%
1.8
56
71.0%
23
29%
79
100%
15
Don't Know
Casa de la
Cultura
Total
Missing
Total
100.0
17. Name two Mayan sites in the state of Campeche?
Top Mayan Sites
16. Name two museums in the City of Campeche?
Top Museums
Popularity
Fuerte de San Miguel
29.3%
Fuerte de San José
18.8%
Baluarte de San Carlos
14.3%
Baluarte de la Soledad
13.5%
Centro Cultural Casa Seis
12.8%
Baluarte de Santa Rosa
3.0%
Jardín Botánico Xmuch´Haltun
2.3%
Others mentioned: Edzná, Calakmul, Cathedral,
Puerta de Tierra
18. Where would you advise a tourist to find information
about Campeche’s attractions?
Popularity
Edzná
45.3%
Information Channel
Popularity
Calakmul
35.8%
SECTUR
36.80%
32.40%
Becán
2.2%
Visitor Center at the Main Plaza
El Trigre
2.2%
Centro Cultural Casa Seis
7.40%
X'tacumbilxuna'an
2.2%
Official Website
4.40%
Xkalumkín
2.2%
Others mentioned: Hochob, Hormiguero,
Kankí, Santa Rosa Xtampak, Uxmal, Xpuhi
Travel Agencies
2.90%
Others mentioned: Hotels, INAH, Bastions
19. What is one evening activity a tourist could enjoy in
the city of Campeche?
20. Is the historic fortified town of Campeche a World
Heritage Site (circle one) Yes No
Yes
72
91.10%
Valid
Percentage
98.6
No
1
1.30%
1.4
73
92.40%
100.0
Valid
Frequency
Valid
Percent
Frequency
Percentage
10
11.4
11.4
C
2
2.3
2.3
CH
8
9.1
9.1
CL
1
1.1
1.1
E
6
6.8
6.8
F
7
8.0
8.0
LS
21
23.9
23.9
LY
4
4.5
4.5
M
12
13.6
13.6
N
2
2.3
2.3
O
9
10.2
10.2
R
4
4.5
4.5
T
2
2.3
2.3
88
100.0
100.0
Total
Total
Missing
Total
Percentage
6
7.6%
79
100%
Gender
Frequency
Valid
DEMOGRAPHICS
Age
Frequency
Valid
Percent
3
3.8
<25
8
10.1
>65
2
2.5
18-25
34
43.0
26-35
16
20.3
36-45
11
13.9
46-55
2
2.5
56-65
3
3.8
Total
79
100.0
Percent
8
10.1
F
36
45.6
M
35
44.3
Total
79
100.0
Education Level
Frequency
Valid
Percent
6
7.6
10
12.7
6
7.6
Preparatoria
32
40.5
Universidad
25
31.6
Total
79
100.0
Educacion Basica
Posgrado
Appendix 5
Visitor Survey Questionnaire
and Survey Results
Campeche Visitor Questionnaire English
Campeche Visitor Questionnaire Spanish
Visitor Survey Data
Appendix 6
Sample Marketing Advertisements
Appendix 7
Target Marketing Channels
Target Marketing
Target Marketing is the concept of breaking a market into segments and then concentrating marketing efforts on
the segments that are most interested in your particular destination. Segments can be based on geography,
demographics or lifestyle preferences. Target markets can be reached through various channels including: media
outlets, tradeshows, groups and alliances, and travel agents and tour operators.
Marketing
Channel
Media Outlets
Tradeshows
Groups and
Alliances
Travel Agents
and Tour
Operators
Recommendations
Utilize both broad
travel publications
and niche
publications in the
U.S. that could be
used to target very
high-value markets.
Participate in broad
outlets on both a
global and Mexican
scale, as well as
more specific
tradeshows that
focus on adventure
destinations or
luxury experiential
travel.
Join and take an
active role in both
Global and Regional
Alliances.
Create FAM tours
and educate agents
and operators from
both large
international
operators and
specialized, incountry operators
that offer cultural
and adventure
experiences in
Mexico.
Samples
Frequency;
Distribution and/or
Geography
Mexico Desconocido
Monthly; National
Fly Fisherman Magazine
5 per year;
International
In-country
National Geographic
Traveler
ATMEX
Tianguis Turistico
8 per year;
International
In-country
Circulation /
Participation
85,000
735,450
77,500
578 Exhibitors
673 Exhibitors
The Travel & Adventure
Show
United States
The International
Ecotourism Society
Global
1600+ Members
Adventure Travel Trade
Association
Global
800+ Members
World Indigenous Tourism
Alliance
Global
Unknown
AMTAVE
Viator
Regional
Intrepid
Global
80+ Members
Global
Pure Life Experiences
TUI
Tia Stephanie Tours
Journey Mexico
Four Directions
Europe
Global
In-country
In-country
In-country
900 Exhibitors
Estimated Cost
A one-page color
ad in these
publications
runs from
18,000 to
111,000 pesos,
excluding taxes.
Ranges from
45,000 pesos to
53,000 pesos to
exhibit.
455 Exhibitors
N/A
Membership for
these
organizations
starts at around
2,500 pesos and
can be as high as
20,000 pesos.
Costs vary
depending on
size of groups
and
transportation
for FAM trips.
Many times local
hotels and
airlines will offer
discounts and
deals to bring
tour operators
on FAM trips.
Appendix 8
Media Outlets
Below are a few examples of media outlets that may be a good fit for Campeche's advertising and public
relations efforts.
National Geographic Traveler en Español is a magazine and website that
features stories and photographs about travel around the world. Its content and
readership is focused on adventure and cultural travel, aligning well with
Campeche's core attributes. For further information on this media outlet, please follow this
link: http://travel.nationalgeographic.com/travel/traveler-magazine
Arqueología Mexicana is a bimonthly magazine that contains scholarly
articles and a wide selection of photographs on the diverse Mesoamerican
cultures, as well as maps and timelines to provide a modern
understanding of the Mesoamerican legacy. This magazine’s readership attracts scholars, researchers
and archeologists interested in Mayan and Mesoamerican culture, which is abundant in the state of
Campeche. For further information on this media outlet, please follow this
link: http://www.arqueomex.com
Mexico Desconocido is a magazine and a bi-lingual website (Spanish
and English) that features the “hidden treasures” and aspects of
Mexico that will motivate tourists to travel to the exotic Mexican
‘locales’ described. Campeche has been featured several times in
Mexico Desconocido, and could be a good advertising opportunity for reaching adventurous domestic
travelers.
For
further
information
on
this
media
outlet,
please
follow
this
link: http://www.mexicodesconocido.com.mx
Fly Fisherman is a magazine and website that serves the interests of fly fishing
enthusiasts. The content provides comprehensive information on fresh and
saltwater destinations, techniques, conservation and more. The audience, primarily
in the US, represents a highly targeted but valuable market for Campeche given its
fly fishing resources. For further information on this media outlet, please follow this
link: http://www.flyfisherman.com
Appendix 9
Trade Shows
Below are a few examples of trade shows the consulting team suggests for Campeche's to participate in
and attend. Two are within Mexico and two are international.
ATMEX is an international trade and consumer adventure travel
fair featuring Mexico’s top adventure travel tour operators and
destinations. By attending, Campeche would have the
opportunity to develop new partnerships with international
buyers and media and to stimulate sustainable growth in its
adventure tourism market. For further information on attending this tradeshow, please follow this
link: https://www.adventuretravel.biz/connect/atmex2013
Tianguis Turístico Mexico is a tradeshow meant to encourage the promotion and marketing of Mexico’s
tourism products and services by fostering interaction between
domestic and international buyers. This tradeshow is an important
platform for the promotion of Campeche and its unique products and
offerings. For further information on attending this tradeshow,
please follow this link: http://tianguisturisticomexico.com.mx/es
The Travel & Adventure Show is the United States’ longest running
series of consumer travel events, taking place in multiple cities
throughout the year. Destinations from around the world come to
advertise their destination to the thousands of consumers and
travelers that attend. Participating in such an event could be a way
for Campeche to raise its profile among the U.S. market. For further
information on attending this tradeshow, please follow this link: http://www.adventureexpo.com
PURE Life Experiences Show is considered the 'must-attend' event for leaders in high-end Experiential
Travel. PURE provides a productive and exhilarating show for suppliers,
destinations, and private travel designers specializing in creating high
emotion, low impact travel experiences, similar to the types of
experiences the consulting team recommends for Campeche. For further
information on attending this tradeshow, please follow this
link: http://www.purelifeexperiences.com/Programme.html
Appendix 10
Associations
Below are a few examples of associations that would be valuable resources for Campeche.
The Adventure Travel Trade Association (ATTA) is a
global membership organization and community of
more than 800 responsible and profitable businesses,
destinations and media who transform customers and
businesses alike into advocates for sustainability and
justice worldwide. Members include tour operators, tourism boards, specialty travel agents, guides,
accommodations, media and service providers. For more information on this association, please click
here: http://www.adventuretravel.biz
The International Ecotourism Society (TIES) is a nonprofit
organization dedicated to promoting ecotourism. TIES' global
network of ecotourism professionals and travelers is leading the
efforts to make tourism a viable tool for conservation, protection of
bio-cultural diversity, and sustainable community development. TIES
currently has members in more than 120 countries, representing
various professional fields and industry segments. For more information on this society, please click
here: http://www.ecotourism.org
The Mexican Association of Adventure Tourism and Ecotourism (AMTAVE) is a civil
association. Its current members include businesses and individuals that are
dedicated to operating and promoting adventure and ecotourism in Mexico as well
as conserving the natural and cultural heritage of the country. For more
information on this association, please click here: http://www.amtave.org
The World Indigenous Tourism Alliance (WINTA) was founded to
create and support an international network of indigenous
individuals and groups dedicated to tourism development. WINTA is
committed to cooperatively developing and implementing
strategies for the advancement of indigenous tourism. The
organization works within the tourism industry in ways that promote partnerships and heightened
respect for indigenous wisdom, values and knowledge. For more information on this alliance, please
click here: http://www.winta.org
Appendix 11
Tour Operators
Below is a selection of tour operators and agencies that the consulting team researched as viable
options for Campeche to partner with:
Viator is a global tour operator that offers traditional tours to once-in-alife-time experiences, providing something for every kind of traveler. With
offices around the globe, Viator’s team of travel insiders’ handpicks the
best local tours and activity providers. Campeche needs to be on their
radar as one of the best off the beaten path experiences of Mexico. For more information regarding this
tour operator, please follow this link: http://es.viator.com
Intrepid is a global tour operator that prides itself on its grassroots and responsible
travel philosophies. Intrepid has run more than 100,000 tours helping tourists explore
places unknown. It has become one of the top websites for the adventure tourist or
“organized backpacker,” which is one of the primary markets for Campeche. For more
information
regarding
this
tour
operator,
please
follow
this
link: https://www.intrepidtravel.com/us/about-intrepid
TUI Travel is Europe’s leading travel group. TUI is represented in 30
worldwide markets and services more than 30 million customers as
the world's leading provider of specialist and experiential travel.
Campeche is already attracting the European market, and partnering
with TUI could lead to significant growth in this area. For more
information regarding this tour operator, please follow this link: http://www.tuitravelplc.com
Four Directions is a tour operator that specializes in Mayan culture and archeology. Four Directions’
tours combine main attractions throughout Mexico and Central
America with lesser-known places and direct contact with local
people. Four Directions multi-country operations include tours
throughout Guatemala, Mexico, Belize, Honduras, and El
Salvador. For more information regarding this tour operator,
please follow this link: http://fourdirections.travel
Journey Mexico is a full-service luxury travel company that provides authentic and
unforgettable travel experiences throughout the Mexican republic. Journey Mexico
specializes in customized itineraries that go beyond the more established resort
destinations and focus on Mexico’s lesser-visited cultural, archeological and
wilderness destinations. For more information regarding this tour operator, please
follow this link: http://www.journeymexico.com
Tia Stephanie Tours is a Mexican tour operator that
ensures a significant portion of a visitor’s travel
expenditures goes directly into the cities, towns, and communities that are visited. All tour guides,
hotels, and restaurants are selected based on local ownership. For more information regarding this tour
operator, please follow this link: http://tiastephanietours.com
Appendix 12
Visitor Experience
The consulting team performed numerous site visits to many of the tourist attractions in and around the
city of Campeche. Below is an assessment of each product evaluated with recommendations for
improvement.
XPICOB RURAL TOURISM
Xpicob is an excellent place to observe marine life such as sea turtles and a variety of marine birds in
their natural habitats. The owner, a biologist, is extremely passionate about natural resources
conservation and loves to share this knowledge with his guests. The destination is also a nice area for
kayaking along the shoreline and recreational snorkeling. The beautiful white sand bar within short
kayaking distance is a great place for wading and relaxing, and the owner fought diligently over the past
year to protect this area from developers wanting to harvest the sand for a luxury development in
another location. While the environment is meant to be very casual, it may a bit too rough around the
edges for some tourists that expect a higher standard of quality. The facilities are bit worn and could use
some improvements. The service quality is also not as professional as some tourists would expect. Very
limited food and drink options are available, which means tourists must know ahead of time to bring
their own supplies if they plan on spending a significant amount of time at the sites. Xpicob is an easy
half or full day trip for tourists that have their own private car, but may be costly to arrive at by taxi and
time-consuming by public bus.
CAMPECHE MERCADO PRINCIPAL
The Campeche market is not a traditional tourist attraction, and as such there are no support services
for tourists such as an information kiosk. However, for adventurous tourists and cultural explorers the
market is an excellent place to experience a real slice of life in Campeche, engage with friendly and
helpful vendors, and browse through aisle after aisle of dazzling fruits and vegetable, prepared foods,
clothing, and artisan products. The market is the epitome of an authentic experience with a cacophony
of sights, sounds and smells. However, the buzzing energy and hoards of locals could prove to be a bit
overwhelming for tourists that are not comfortable stepping outside their everyday comfort zones.
These tourists may benefit from a tour of the market by a local guide. Most of the vendors have little to
no English experience so this could be a challenge for non-Spanish speaking tourists.
LAS CHENES SITES
The team visited the Chenes sites of Hochob, Tabasqueño, Dzibilnocac, and Tacoh. These smaller sites
are well-managed and provide an intimate look at the distinct Chenes architectural style. The sites are
enhanced through the use of a tour operator as signage is limited and some of the sites are difficult to
find or access (particularly Tabasqueño). The team recommends tour guide training for the Chenes
circuit that helps tour guides identify and communicate what makes each site unique. Currently, the
interpretation of these sites becomes repetitive and doesn’t tell the overarching story of how the
Mayans lived. A more standardized interpretation would bring the sites together with a cohesive and
compelling narrative. The team also recommends that each of these sites sell the basic necessities of
water, sunscreen, and bug spray. Finally, the community outside of Dzibilnocac may be good location for
a tour lunch. Currently the community does not seem to be benefitting from the site and the Mayan
heritage in the town could provide a great link between the past and present.
CALAKMUL
The World Heritage site of Calakmul is several hours away from the city of Campeche with limited
transportation options available. Tour operators in Campeche do not work in partnership with the local
Calakmul community when booking and planning tours to the site which makes it difficult for small local
tourism attractions to be prepared for the arrival of tour groups.
The consulting team recommends creating a tourist route from Campeche to Calakmul, highlighting
interesting attractions along the way. This would break up the long drive and encourage tourists to
spend more time in the State. It would also help establish Campeche as the main gateway city to
Calakmul. Tour operators should also communicate with the community of Calakmul in advance about
incoming groups. With more advanced notice the communities could better prepare for tourists and
deliver an improved visitor experience.
EDZNA
The Mayan archaeological site of Edzna is an impressive and well-maintained attraction within easy
access of Campeche City. The site does not provide on-site tour guides, and signage is very limited even
though there is a big story to tell. Onsite tour guides would lessen this gap. The site closes at 5 PM but
then reopens 2 hours later at 7 PM for a sound and light show. Since there is little for visitors to do in
and around the site, many visitors end up returning to Campeche or going to a different tourist
attraction instead of waiting the two hours. Extending the site’s hours of operations or providing an
activity for visitors between 5 PM and 7 PM would encourage more visitors to attend the sound and
light show. Very limited food and drink is available for purchase via a vending machine at the site, and
no drinking water was available at all during the consulting team’s visit. A kiosk that sells water, snacks,
insect repellent, sunscreen, and other amenities would significantly improve the visitor experience and
would provide an additional source of income at the site.
EDZNA SOUND AND LIGHT SHOW
The Edzna sound and light show is impressive and spending time at the archeological site at night is a
memorable experience. Mosquitos were a major issue making it a necessity for the welcome center to
sell insect repellent. The recording of the show is also only broadcasted in Spanish. The team was told
that an English version of the recording is available. Providing headsets with the English version could
broaden the audiencehow. The headsets could be available for an extra charge in order to recoup costs.
CHAMPOTON
Upon arrival in Champoton via a shared public van, the consulting team found that it was unclear what
Champoton has to offer and where the key sites and restaurants are located. There are no maps, guides
or directions upon arrival so tourists are left having to walk down the main avenue for quite some time
before arriving at a couple of restaurant options. It would be helpful if there was a shuttle service from
the drop-off location to the center of Champoton or at least some maps or brochures available at the
drop-off point. Since the city is well known for its seafood, it would be interesting to develop a
comprehensive ‘Seafood Trail’ brochure that highlights and connects all the restaurants and suppliers in
the destination in a unified presentation.
CAMINO REAL
The Camino Real, a circuit of culinary, crafts, and cultural attractions, was one of the highlights of the
site visits. The tour guide did an excellent job of bringing the sites to life by offering interesting facts and
stories. The circuit was also well paced, spending a minimal amount of time in the car between stops
and alternating between the types of attractions in order to keep the tourists’ interest. The consulting
team believes the Camino Real could be a main attraction for visitors to Campeche and should be
promoted accordingly. The team also recommends that as tourism grows on the route, tour operators
should ensure the local communities are benefitting. For example, since many tourists do not purchase
anything in the market in Hecelchakán, a donation box could be placed in its entrance for tourists to
contribute to market improvements. The attractions of the Camino Real could also be combined with
other attractions in the region to create more specialized circuits. Finally, maps could be created to
make it easier for domestic visitors to find and visit attractions on their own.
LORENZILLO (PIRATE CRUISE)
The Pirate Cruise, while an interesting concept, did not capture the attention of tourists through an
engaging and interactive storytelling experience. The narrative was very short and only offered in
Spanish. Limited food and beverage options were available for purchase. Previously, a Pirate Cruise
existed that included a more engaging dance and musical performance. This type of experience, with
costumed staff, would create a more attractive and memorable experience for guests. Expanding food
and drink options would also be an easy way to increase profits and improve the visitor experience.
CALLE 59
The pedestrian street, Calle 59, has the potential to be a corridor of tourism activity in the old city of
Campeche. A number of restaurants, cafes and travel agencies are located along the street, but there
seems to be a lack of activity here, especially in the evenings and at night. Much of the activity takes
place on the central plaza, so it would be advantageous to create special events that drive visitors and
locals to Calle 59. For example, a ‘First Friday’ event where there could be musicians plus food and drink
specials along the street on the first Friday of every month would help build the vibrancy and
recognition of this corridor. Offering incentives for business owners to open up additional cafes and
restaurants on the street would help increase the concentration of tourism-related businesses on Calle
59 and guide the street into becoming a hub of tourist activity. Current businesses should also better
market the full experiences they have to offer. For example, coffee shops that double as relaxed
bars/lounges need to better communicate this offering to the public.
BAZAR ARTESANAL
The Bazaar Artesenal is a great one-stop-shop to view and purchase locally produced crafts in the City of
Campeche. However, many of the products were stored in glass cabinets making it difficult for
customers to browse and decide which items they want to buy. When buying locally produced items,
many tourists are interesting in connecting deeper with the product by learning about the artisan who
crafted it or learning about the process in which it was made. Therefore, it would be a great asset if
vendors could provide more interpretative information such as biographies of the artists or
photos/videos of the production process. Compelling stories create a stronger connection with the
customer and can help induce a purchase. Bilingual staff would be an excellent asset as well for nonSpanish speaking visitors.
CON SABOR A CHOCOLATE
Con Sabor a Chocolate in Casa 6 is an excellent hands-on experience for tourists that brings
Campechano and Mayan culture to life in an interactive and well-designed presentation. The experience
is well-organized with excellent storytelling and a great value for the cost of admission. The traditional
ambiance of Casa 6 is a wonderful asset as well. The presenter is able to offer some English
interpretation for guests who do not understand Spanish. Currently, the show is only offered once per
day from Thursday through Sunday. The consulting team believes that with more promotion, the
schedule could be expanded such that shows could be offered on other days of the week and/or
additional shows could be offered each day, particular on the weekends.
MALECÓN
The malecón is a great meeting spot for locals and tourists alike. However, it is currently
underdeveloped and many people only walk a small portion of the boardwalk since there is little to do.
More food and activity offerings along the length of the malecón would make it a more functional
attraction. Recurring events such as art classes at sunset, themed bike tours, etc. would help better
integrate the malecón into the tourism framework of Campeche.
FUERTE DE SAN MIGUEL - MUSEO ARQUELOGICO
During the consulting team’s visit to the Fuerte de San Miguel, the staff did not provide a very
welcoming experience. Customer service quality must be improved. Most of the signage is in Spanish,
although there are some wooden plaques written in English. The plaques, however, are not aligned with
each piece in the museum and therefore can be very confusing for a visitor. More bilingual signage and
clearly designed interpretative elements would greatly improve the visitor experience.
TRANVIA TOUR OF CITY
The tranvia tour is a great way to get a general overview of some of the principal tourist attractions in
the city and view some of the less visited historic neighborhoods. The tour offered interesting pieces of
information about the city and its history and is offered in both English and Spanish. However, the
narrative felt a bit tired and could use a boost of enthusiasm from the tour guide. The tour requires a
minimum of 8 people to run, and this limitation can drive business away from the attraction. If the
operator were a bit more flexible in terms of the minimum number of participants required, the
attraction would be more accessible to tourists who are only in town for a short period of time.
BALUARTE DE SANTIAGO - JARDIN BOTANICO XMUCH'HALTUN
The botanical garden is a beautiful space close to the city center and malecón. Signage only includes the
names of individual plant species with no further interpretation. The signage could be improved so as to
reveal the significance of each plant’s inclusion in the garden and to provide more educational
information about the various plant species and their native habitats.
CENTRO CULTURAL CASA SEIS
Casa Seis is a beautiful space showcasing some of the cultural history of the city. However, the exhibits
feel a bit stale and interpretation is lacking. Some of the advertised events do not run consistently in the
low season, which can be disappointing for visitors during this period. It would be helpful instead to
establish two schedules - one for the high season and one for the low season. The space has great
potential to be used for a range of special events, from cocktail parties to interactive educational
workshops, and Casa Seis could work in partnership with the convention center and other local
organizations to bring more special events into the space.
LA CATEDRAL DE NUESTRA SENORA DE LA CONCEPCION
The cathedral is probably one of the most photographed icons of Campeche and is a must stop for
virtually all visitors to the city. Many international visitors bypass the small onsite museum as they see
the cathedral itself as the main attraction and are reluctant to pay the museum’s small entrance fee. The
installation of a small gift shop that sells religious items, crafts, and beverages could offer another
revenue stream to complement the entrance fees collected at the museum.
Appendix 13
Signage Guidelines
These step-by-step guidelines are designed to address the current needs of Campeche’s attraction
signage with special attention given to INAH-managed archeological sites. These guidelines may be used
to assess, plan and implement a new, more effective signage program that strengthens the connection
between visitors and attractions. The research presented here has been primarily adapted from the
United States’ National Park Service resources, namely the report titled, “Wayside Exhibits: A Guide to
Developing Outdoor Interpretive Exhibits”. For more information, please see:
(http://www.nps.gov/hfc/pdf/waysides/Wayside-Guide-First-Edition.pdf).
Getting Started
The first step in creating a signage program is conducting a thorough site analysis to determine the
attraction’s audience, management objectives, and prospective signage placement. Before this site
analysis can take place, a team must be assembled with the skills to undertake the creation of a signage
program.
Create a Team
Diverse teams are best for creating an effective signage program. Along with site managers, there will
be a need for subject matter experts related to the site. Include historians, ecologists, anthropologists,
and other academic experts, where applicable. Sites with multiple interpretations should include team
members who represent those perspectives. For example, a scholar on Mayan religious practices may
have a different understanding of religious relics found at an archeological site than a local community
member with ancestral knowledge of those relics. Both should be represented on the team. In addition
to these subject-matter experts, media specialists like graphic designers are an essential part of the
signage team. Finally, each team should have a project leader and each member should have a defined
role.
Identify Management Objectives
Interpretive signage should support the objectives of the managing organization, so it is important to
clarify these objectives in the first phase. Organizational objectives may include: the conservation of
resources, visitor education, or the responsible enjoyment of the site. Interpretation should be viewed
as a tool to promote these objectives. The goal of conservation, for instance, can be furthered through
interpretation by increasing the visitor’s emotional connection the site. By increasing the emotional
connection, the organization also raises interest in its preservation. These objectives should be clear and
understood by the project team before developing a central interpretive them in the next phase.
Identify the Audience
Use survey data or other statistics to create the site’s visitor profile. Demographics, interests, life
stages, motivations and attitudes are just a handful of important components that contribute to the
visitor profile. Taken together, these aspects represent the target audience and should be used to
determine visitor needs and expectations. The more accurate the visitor profile, the more relevant the
project team can make the interpretation. For example, if a significant percentage of visitors to a
Mexican site speak English, the signage team should consider bi-lingual interpretation.
Best practice calls for the involvement of target audience members in the planning and design of
interpretative signs. This can be achieved through one-on-one interviews or focus groups with potential
visitors, to find out what information they want to know and how to present it in an interesting way.
Gathering information directly from visitors will assist the planning team in forming appropriate
messages that meet them “where they are” in their understanding of the site.
Research Potential Signage Placement
Team members should observe how visitors interact with the site. Identify usage patterns and visitors’
experience with current signage. Are they stopping to read them? Are they following the attraction
route as it was intended? In addition to visitor observation, the National Park Service has created
helpful checklists to evaluate existing signage: http://www.nps.gov/hfc/products/waysides/wayprocess-evaluate.cfm
After evaluating the existing signage, points of interest should be identified for sign placement or
replacement. These points should represent a significant landscape feature with a well-documented
story. Avoid selecting points where a sign would negatively impact the landscape, intrude on a sensitive
site (e.g. a burial ground), or places where the story is too long or complex to convey on a sign.
Develop Interpretive Themes
To create a cohesive signage program, primary interpretive themes must be created to encompass the
site’s significance, audience needs, and management objectives. These primary interpretive themes and
contingent secondary themes will dictate the content and graphics of all interpretive signs and tie them
together under one schema.
Identify Intangible Meanings
The points for signage placement selected in the prior phase represent the tangible places or objects
that the project team believes the audience should care about. The team must now identify the
intangible meanings of these assets, which give them importance and accessibility. Every tangible
resource may have many intangible meanings. These meanings create a context to stimulate
intellectual and emotional understanding, with feelings like discovery, empathy, or amazement. For
example, the grassy courts at Edzna and Calakmul are a tangible assets. The intangible meaning is the
dramatic Mayan ballgame which occasionally featured human sacrifice. Subject experts and additional
research should be drawn upon to identify these intangible meanings.
Write Interpretive Themes and Subthemes
An interpretive theme allows the audience to develop ideas and make connections with the site. Instead
of conveying a specific meaning, the theme inspires individuals to take away their own meaning. It also
serves as a way to focus the many intangible meanings into an overarching thematic structure. Most
sites have more than one primary interpretive theme.
To select primary interpretive themes, team members can derive universal concepts from the many
intangible meanings the team has identified. A universal concept is an idea that everyone can relate to,
but no two people will see exactly the same way. In addition to a universal concept, the interpretive
theme should be a single sentence.
Once the primary interpretive themes are established, secondary themes can be created to narrow the
informational scope and provide a more focused exploration of ideas. These subthemes allow for
greater interpretive depth and complexity. Together, the primary themes and secondary themes
increase understanding and appreciation of resources, and further management objectives. The figure
below gives examples of effective interpretive themes and the difference between primary and
secondary themes.
Hawaii
Volcanoes
National
Park
Primary Interpretive Themes
Secondary Interpretive Themes
The approachable, active volcanoes of the
Park allow first-hand discovery and
connection with one of the most
fundamental forces of our world- in both
its creative and destructive roles.
The unusally high approachability to the park's
active volcanism not only affords opportunities
for personal exploration, but for fundamental
and detailed research that benefits us all.
The journeys of the Hawaiian peoples, who
continue to inhabit these rich and diverse
lands, incude cultural clashes, adaptations
and assimilations that provide enduring
lessons about...
Landforms created by the volcanic activity of
Kilauea and Mauna Loa demonstrate the role of
volcansim in shaping and reshaping the Earth's
surface, and deepends our understanding of
other planetary bodies.
In Hawaii, active volcanism created an
isolated home for a few immigrant species
that gave rise to a rich yet fragile endemic
biota; due to the accelerating change
brought about by human actions...
Earthquakes, tsunamis, ash, and debris fallout
from eruptions - consequences of volcanic
activity - have at times been disastrous for
humans, but have also provided opportunities
for people to thrive.
Figure 1: Example Interpretive Themes, Meaningful Interpretation, Eastern National
Looking at the themes above, the first column contains several universal concepts that define an
effective primary interpretive theme. Creation, destruction, cultural clashes, assimilation, and change
are all overarching universal concepts any visitor can relate to. In the second column, the secondary
interpretive themes relate to the primary theme, but are more specific. This example presents one
secondary theme for each primary theme but there will likely be multiple secondary interpretive themes
for every primary theme. All sign content should speak to these interpretive themes.
Create an Exhibit Plan
In this phase, the project team will utilize the information gathered in the prior two phases to draft the
text and graphics of all of the signs needed for the site. This phase is expected to be the most time
intensive as the team works through multiple iterations of content and gains necessary approvals before
finalizing the layouts.
Identify Sign Specifications
The project team must decide the size and material of new signs. All interpretive signs should be
consistent in size and shape throughout the site. For outdoor interpretation, common panel sizes
include: 42 x 24, 36 x 24 (the most common), and 24 x 24. These are typically low signs angled at 45
degrees to keep them from obstructing the scenery. In contrast with these low, angled signs, upright
signs are better suited for communicating rules, orientation, and safety information rather.
Panel materials should take into account factors like the environment, permanence of information, and
maintenance. For a description of the materials the National Park Service uses for their interpretive
signage, please go to http://www.nps.gov/hfc/products/waysides/way-product-panels.cfm.
Gather Graphic Materials
Interpretive signs should incorporate images such as photographs, illustrations, diagrams, and maps.
The main image should tell the story while highlighting a specific landscape element in view. These
images should be researched and collected from museums, libraries, galleries, and other locations by
the project team. Written permission from the
owner of the graphic and a fee are often required for
use on a sign.
The graphics selected for all of the signs should be
high-resolution and attract attention.
Outdoor
factors should also be considered in image selection.
Blocks of white can be difficult to look at in bright sun
and low-contrast images can be difficult to decipher
in lowlight situations. Visitors often stand a few feet
away from a sign to read, so it is important that the
graphic communicate the story effectively from that
distance.
Figure 2: NPS sign with photography
Illustrations
If a planned sign lacks a significant graphic, illustrations
may be commissioned to relay the importance of the
attraction. While soliciting illustrations can be costly
and time consuming, the originality of the art may
convey the significance of the site better than other
interpretive efforts.
For example, an original
illustration of a Mayan structure at the time of its
construction, with color and activity, would bring a
landscape of grey stones to life.
Figure 3: NPS sign with illustration
Maps
To create a new orientation map, it is most important that map
be quickly understood and easily remembered.
Every
orientation map should include a “You Are Here” feature so the
visitor can easily gain his/her bearings. Glancing at the map,
the visitor should be able to relate the image directly to their
surroundings.
Regarding the level of detail, only the
information required to get from the sign to the next point
should be included on the map. If the level of detail is still
uncertain, it can help to define the purpose of the map and
Figure 4: NPS Map Example
make sure the details serve that purpose.
Create Compelling Content
Now that the signage placements have been determined and themes have been selected, it is time to
write the content for each sign. Each sign should focus on a tangible, physical element in front of the
visitor and link it with intangible elements solicited from subject-matter experts or outside research.
Primary sources like diary entries, letters, photographs, and drawings are especially effective. For
example, a sign describing the excavation of ruins might include photographs of the original archeologist
and a quotation of his/her first impression. These intangible elements should tell a story that sparks a
connection between the site and the visitor, while fitting into one of the interpretive themes. Below are
additional tips for writing signage content.
Keep it Short
Visitors’ attention span is limited to 30-45 seconds on
average for each sign. Thus, it is critical to convey the key
messages in the timeframe. Do not take up time
describing what the visitor already sees. Instead,
enhance their experience by giving them rich new
information presented in a concise passage. Avoid long
lines of small text at all costs. If a story is too complex, it
is best communicated through another medium.
Similarly, do not pack too many facts or scientific ideas on
one board.
One method of organizing content is by using hierarchies.
Content writers can divide up a passage into the main
ideas to be used in the main text block, and supporting
ideas better suited to captions and labels. This division
allows the main passage to remain focused while
providing additional details to visitors looking for more
Figure 5: This sign demonstrates the use of text hierarchy
information.
Several drafts will likely be written to whittle down the main ideas. While there is no formula for the
right number of words for a sign, it is good practice to time reading the draft text aloud. The key ideas
should be read in under 45 seconds. Also note any stumbles and pronunciation issues to address within
the text.
Use Creative Titles
Instead of subject titles, like “Exhibit 1”, “Mayan Religion”, or “Chocolate-Making”, write titles that grab
readers’ attention and speak to the significance of the topic. For example, the title “Chocolate-Making”
in a Mayan context could be replaced with, “Drink of the Gods”. Titles are an important opportunity to
convey meaning.
Maintain Audience Interest
Like any creative piece of writing, the first sentence should compel the visitor to read on. After writing
the text for a sign, find the best sentence and try using it as the first sentence in the passage. While not
a firm rule, the physical features in front of the visitor are typically addressed first.
Other methods of maintaining interest:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Use common language and replace long words with more basic ones
Use the active voice and short verbs
Include conflict, mystery, and surprise
Do not use adjectives that tell visitors what to think
Leave the visitor wanting more
Label the landscape so visitors know what they are looking at
Answer the question, “So what?” This is the most important point to remember when writing
content for interpretive signs. The text must be meaningful and interesting to the visitor, not
what the author thinks the visitor should learn.
If the team decides to create bilingual signs, the United States NPS has a Spanish style
guide: www.nps.gov/hfc/pdf/SpanishStyleGuide.pdf. It is recommended that signs be limited to two
languages to avoid visual clutter.
Create Draft Layouts
The text and the images should support each other and the
landscape. To fit these pieces together seamlessly, the team’s
graphic designer can begin drafting the layout of the panels
before all the elements are finalized. Remember that the sign
layout should be clean, eye-catching and convey key ideas in
less than a minute. When a visitor glances at a sign, the
image should be clear and begin to tell the story.
Figure 6: Example of cluttered sign
Common design mistakes include:
•
•
•
•
Too many colors and styles on one sign
Too many small pictures
Too much text
Too many logos
To achieve eye-catching layouts, the NPS uses a digital grid to assist with the panel design and utilizes
typographic standards. These can be found at www.nps.gov/hfc/products/waysides/way-grids.cfm.
Production
Before production, all facts, text and graphics should be double-checked and approved by the project
team. Team members should collaborate with the manufacturer to write-up a contracts that includes
warranty stipulations for panels and bases. The team should also obtain paper production proofs (either
half or full-size scale) for approval. Any changes should be made and the final proofs approved before
the team leader signs-off on the project for manufacturing.
Appendix 14
Key Factors for Developing a SAVE Travel Strategy
1. SAVE resources – What resources does Campeche possess that could be used in the
development of SAVE travel? Examples could include wilderness areas, higher education
institutions, schools, archaeological sites, and animal refuges.
2. Target markets/partners: What are the most appropriate target markets or partners
that would find the greatest value in Campeche’s SAVE resources? Information must be
gathered about the best potential markets and their characteristics.
3. SAVE travel stakeholders – What organizations, departments, offices, businesses,
associations, ministries, NGOs, universities, citizens, and so on will need to work
together to develop SAVE travel? This could include government travel and tourism
authorities, tourism businesses, tour operators, local community groups, university
faculty, scientists, and others.
4. Potential and existing SAVE travel suppliers – What opportunities already exist in
Campeche for SAVE travel? It may be the case that tour operators are already offering
SAVE experiences. Also, who are the potential SAVE travel suppliers? This could include
tour operators who offer traditional activities with the potential to add a SAVE
component to their portfolio of products.
5. Regulatory environment: What are the regulations and laws that might affect the
development of SAVE travel? This could include visa regulations and laws concerning
activities in protected sites.
6. Infrastructure assessment: Does Campeche possess the necessary infrastructure to
service SAVE tourists? Factors to consider include transportation, accommodation,
safety and sanitation, communication and other elements of travel infrastructure such
as banks and car rental facilities.
For more information on the development of SAVE tourism programs, please download
the SAVE Travel Network Development Guide.
Appendix 15
Contact Information for SAVE Tourism
Archaeology Contacts
•
•
•
At the University of Bonn, Dr. Kai Delvendahl has led previous excavations in Campeche
including the Uxul site in Calakmul.
Dr. Thomas H. Guderjan is the president of the Maya Research Program and a professor at the
University of Texas at Tyler.
At the Archaeological Institute of America, Dr. Ben Thomas, is the Staff Liason for the
Committee on Archaeology in Higher Education.
Birding Contacts
•
•
Bill Stewart is the Director of Partnerships and Marketing at the American Birding Association,
and Betty Petersen is the main point of contact for the Birders’ Exchange Program
Irby Lovette at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology is the Associate Director of the Academic Affairs
Department.
Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universitat Bonn
Dr. Kai Delvendahl
Institute of Archaeology and Cultural Anthropology
Department of Anthropology of the Americas
Oxfordstr. 15 53111
Bonn, room 2.002
Phone: +49 (0) 228-73 4449
Fax:. +49 (0) 228-73 4385
e-mail: [email protected]
Institute general e-mail: [email protected]
http://www.iae.uni-bonn.de/espanol/bienvenido
Archaeological Institute of America
Dr. Ben Thomas
Director of Programs
Archaeological Institute of America Headquarters
Located at Boston University
656 Beacon Street, 6th Floor
Boston, MA 02215-2006 USA
+1-617-353-8708
[email protected]
http://www.archaeological.org/
Maya Research Program
Dr. Thomas H. Guderjan
1910 East Southeast Loop 323 #296
Tyler, Texas 75701 USA
Phone: +1-817-831-9011
e-mail: [email protected]
e-mail: [email protected]
http://www.mayaresearchprogram.org/
American Birding Association
Bill Stewart
Director of Partnerships and Marketing
American Birding Association, Inc.
1618 W Colorado Ave
Colorado Springs, CO 80904
phone: +1(800) 850-2473/+1(719) 578-9703
fax:+1 (719) 578-1480
[email protected]
http://aba.org/
Betty Petersen
Birders' Exchange (BEX)
[email protected]
http://aba.org/bex
Birding Tour Operators
Natural Encounters
http://naturalencountersbirdingtours.com/
VENT
http://www.ventbird.com/
WINGS
http://wingsbirds.com/
Field Guides
http://fieldguides.com/
Tropical Birding
http://www.tropicalbirding.com/
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
Dr. Irby Lovette
Director, Fuller Evolutionary Biology Program
Associate Director, Academic Affairs
Department of Evolutionary Biology
159 Sapsucker Woods Rd.
Ithaca, NY 14850
+1-607-254-2140
e-mail: [email protected]
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/
Appendix 16
Situation Analysis & Methodology for
The Campeche Convention Center
BACKGROUND RESEARCH
Background research conducted prior to the consulting team’s departure for Campeche was used in
formulating recommendations for the Campeche Convention Center. Research areas included: the
economic impact of meetings on a destination; a review of Mexico’s MICE market and Campeche’s slice;
MICE operations and promotion; and best practices in Convention Center operations and marketing
within Latin American and Caribbean case studies presented as examples of the best practices found.
Economic Impact of Meetings on a Destination
The meetings industry is a crucial element of a strong tourism industry for any destination. Tourists that
come to a city for business often have more spending capacity than leisure tourists, with some specific
destinations estimating the average business tourist expenditures at 3-6 times that of the average
leisure traveler.1 Another advantage is the group nature of the meetings industry, where one “sale” of
the destination can bring in large numbers of visitors, all of whom will be spending money on lodging,
food, and other attractions.
The meetings industry has also been cited as a mechanism to stabilize the lodging market, by hosting
conferences or large events during the traditional low season for tourism. This is often such a great
benefit to hotel operators and owners that they are willing to create long-term strategies of devoting
room blocks to Convention Centers. A city will also experience several intangible benefits from a strong
meetings industry, such as technology transfer, increased national and international awareness of the
city, and positive branding of the destination.
Finally, as with all tourism, the meetings industry can generate great fiscal impact, especially with regard
to hotel and rental car expenses, which are targeted towards non-residents.
Mexico MICE Market and Campeche’s Slice
Since the creation of Mexico’s national tourism board in 2003, concerted effort has been put forth to
attract the global MICE market. Both national and regional governments have invested in placing “stateof-the-art infrastructure and support services around the country to increase and improve its ability to
host large-scale international meetings 2.” In 2011, the Federal Ministry of Tourism commissioned a
study to examine the Economic Impact of Meetings Activity in Mexico as an attempt to establish a point
of reference for measuring the economic revenue generated from Congresses, Conventions, Incentive
Groups and Trade Shows. The findings revealed that cities throughout Mexico hosted nearly 200,000
meetings in 2010 with 23 million participants generating 24.2 million overnight stays. Furthermore, the
study revealed that meetings in Mexico accounted for $18.1 million in direct expenditures to the
national economy. Within the travel and tourism sector, the MICE market accounts for 18% travel to
Mexico and contributes nearly 2% to the country’s GDP.
An area opportunity for the Campeche Convention Center lies within the Incentive Travel segment of
the MICE industry. This particular group is often small, less than 1,000 participants, which is an ideal size
1
Thailand Convention & Exhibition Bureau. (n.d.). National multiple benefits from mice business. Retrieved from
http://www.tceb.or.th/images/stories/ABOUT/MICE-Industry-Statistics/fact_20090909162425.pdf
2
Special Advertising (2009). Meetings in Mexico. Smart Money. Downloaded on June 1, 2013.
for the venue to accommodate. Incentive Travel is regarded, within the MICE industry, as the highest
yielding sector of the industry but also the most volatile. This multi-billion dollar global industry often
fluctuates in tandem with the global economy. When planning incentive travel, meeting planners often
seek new destinations or destinations that seem otherwise unattainable as key motivators.
MICE Operations & Promotion
The consulting team examined how the MICE industry is managed in select Latin American destinations.
Several examples of different operating and promoting strategies of these destinations are mentioned in
this section. These destinations chose their operating and promoting systems by making sure the needs
of their potential clients, meeting planners, are met. These needs include technology, accessibility,
supporting suppliers, communication, the delegate experience, budget, and security and stability 3.
Meeting planners want facilities that have the latest technology, including free and reliable Wi-Fi, which
is used to communicate with attendees and vendors and to promote the event through social media.
Meeting planners are also concerned with whether or not a destination is accessible enough for their
groups to reach. Many destinations, such as Campeche, upgrade their Convention Center but not the
surrounding infrastructure. Meeting planners also found that it is important to know that the
Convention Center they are working with has employed reliable supporting suppliers, such as the A/V
team and caterers that are trustworthy and able to handle their needs. Communication is another
important concern of meeting planners since they want to make sure that their requests are not lost in
translation since meeting attendees can come from many different cultures and speak different
languages. Even after a meeting planner has chosen the perfect facility, they are still aware that this
might not be the chosen location. Factors that could prevent a meeting from taking place at this stage
include budget restrictions and safety and stability. The group’s decision-maker might decide on having
the meeting at an alternative, more cost-effective Convention Center, sacrificing the better experience
they will get at the first choice. Economic hardships have also forced meeting planners to work with
reduced budgets in order to meet the demands of their clients 4. This is often accomplished by meeting
planners working together with suppliers, in order to create a beneficial partnership. Budget factors
could also affect the distance that groups travel for their meeting 5. Last, meeting planners are always
concerned with the safety and stability of a destination. They want to know that their attendees will be
safe inside and out of the facility.
Using these concerns, the MICE industry bases its operations and promotions on meeting these needs.
For example, in Brazil a government tourism organization, Embratur, was established to attract more
international meetings and encourage new developments and operations into the country. Embratur
has offices in several foreign cities, including New York and Los Angeles, in the United States 6. Another
example of promotions comes from Argentina, where their Ministry of Tourism Office created a National
Institute of Tourism Promotion program called Inprotur as part of its strategy to attract international
meetings6. Since its creation, the amount of international events and meetings in Argentina has
3
Tesse Fox, J. (2012, Oct.). Top Five Industry Concerns -- Meeting Planners Speak Up. International Meeting Review. Downloaded on June 2,
2013: http://www.internationalmeetingsreview.com/research-education/top-five-industry-concerns-meeting-planners-speak-93878).
4
Nishi, J. & Glynn, J. (2012, Dec.). The changing perception of face-to-face meetings. Corporate Meetings Network. Downloaded on June 2,
2013: http://www.corporatemeetingsnetwork.ca/issues/6_4/coverstory/The-changing-perception-of-face-to-face-meetings_4471.html?zkPrintable=1&nopagination=1.
5
Alderton, M. (2012). American Express Predicts Higher Costs, Lower Budgets for 2013 Meetings. Successful Meetings. Downloaded on June 2,
2013: http://www.successfulmeetings.com/Conference-News/Research-White-Papers/Articles/American-Express-Predicts-Higher-Costs,Lower-Budgets-for-2013-Meetings
6
Korn, I. (2007). Heading South. MeetingsNet. Retrieved June, 2013:
http://meetingsnet.com/international/destinations/meetings_heading_south
increased by more than 200 percent6. Finally, in Puerto Rico its convention bureau uses the promotional
theme, "Smooth Meetings" to highlight the unique advantages of the destination 7. This theme is based
on the notion that the goal of every aspect of the meeting is for it to run smoothly 8.
Best Practices: Latin America & Caribbean Case Studies
An examination of Convention Center “Best Practices” was conducted and case studies of Latin
American and Caribbean Convention Centers exhibiting these practices were developed. This research
was based on the determination that how a Convention Center operates and promotes itself directly
impacts how successful it will be in bringing in business, thus supporting itself and the tourist-related
industries that provide economic benefits to the community. Best practices in marketing and operations
were reviewed. In marketing some of the most successful best practices were found to include:
•
•
•
Developing high-tech sales and marketing technology for a Convention Center’s website including
virtual tours, interactive mapping, instant RFP submission and
downloadable marketing materials such as fact sheets
Garnering and publicizing testimonials and awards
Ensuring potential customers know why they should choose you
for their event
Best practices in operations were found to include: recognizing the
value of a repeat customer versus the expense associated with
replacing one with new business, professional development for staff,
and implementing sustainable practices into an operating model. Latin America and Caribbean
Convention Centers that exhibit these best practices were identified their best practice models and
methodologies could be incorporated into recommendations for Campeche. Three Latin American and
Caribbean Convention Centers that exhibited the best practices described here and served as examples
for recommendations found in this section: the Costa Rica Convention Bureau, the Cartagena de Indias
Convention and Visitors Bureau, and the Puerto Rico Convention Bureau (PRCB) and Convention Center
(PRCC) which was found to be a shining example of one of the key best practices uncovered for long
term growth and business development of Convention Centers: partnership formation.
INTERVIEWS
Two interviews were conducted with key Convention Center stakeholders. Four additional interviews
were held with members of Merida’s tourism community. An analysis of the field interviews and the
Convention Center’s current state helped the consulting team formulate recommendations and
solutions that will assist the Convention Center in regaining its original purpose.
SITE INSPECTION
As part of the consulting team’s situation analysis for the Convention Center a site inspection was
conducted. The inspection included a tour of the center’s entrances and lobby/atrium areas and the
center’s various meeting areas including the rooftop terrace. Upgrades, such as the recently installed
escalators, were presented. Finally, the empty lot next door was presented and previous plans for a
Convention Center hotel on its site were explained.
7
Puerto Rico Convention Bureau. (2010). Meet Puerto Rico: Members. Retrieved June, 2013:
http://www.meetpuertorico.com/Members/Default.aspx.
8
Puerto Rico Convention Bureau. (2010). Meet Puerto Rico: Members. Retrieved June, 2013:
http://www.meetpuertorico.com/Members/Default.aspx.
Appendix 17
Convention Center Marketing Mock-up
Main Level Floor Plans
Room Capacities and Configurations
Room
Room 1
Room 2
Room 3
Room 4
Room 5
Room 6
Terraza
Executive
Room
Centro de
Negocios*
Room VIP
Salón de
Negocios
Surface
2
M
Height
m
STAND
3x3M
Classroom
Banquet
Auditorium
Horseshoe
195.70
209.00
209.00
182.87
61.93
139.52
330
6.5
6.5
6.5
6.5
3.5
3.5
8
12
12
12
12
16
108
108
108
108
32
60
120
150
150
150
150
40
60
200
204
204
204
204
70
120
400
60
60
60
60
32
40
-
69.28
2.35
-
56
70
100
30
30.24
2.35
-
-
-
-
-
39.04
2.35
-
12
20
20
14
69.48
2.35
-
20
40
38
22
Services: two computers for unlimited Internet access, 30 photocopying or printing, faxing local receiving fax,
scanner, plasma screen 42 ", DVD and VHS, SKY signal and coffee service extension to this event space.
Centro de Convenciones
Campeche XXI
Campeche is located in southeast of Mexico, making it the
Gateway to the Mayan World.
Hotels: 62
Rooms: 1,920
Number of beds: 3,299
93,770.80 sq. ft available for exhibitions,
conventions and meetings
Newly renovated with capacity of 5,500 people
and a rooftop terrace!
Col. Centro. CP. 24000. San
Francisco de Campeche, Campeche.
Phone: 01 981 81 191 40
Fax: 01 981 81 191 45
[email protected]
www.convencionescampeche.com
Appendix 18
Marketing Mock-up:
Postcard for Client Follow-up
Thank-you!
For letting us host your event
At the Centro de Convenciones Campeche
XXI we are dedicated to providing the best
service possible and meeting all of your
needs. We hope that we exceeded your
expectations during your stay.
Please feel free to contact us at any time to
plan your next event in Campeche!
You will receive an email that contains a link
to a survey where you can provide feedback
and any suggestions you might have about
the convention center. Please take a few
minutes and fill it out.
The Centro de Convenciones Campeche
XXI was built to improve the city’s avantgarde image. Previously, the port was
regarded as nothing more than a spot for
tourists to pass through. Today, with
modern hotel facilities, plus the many
services offered by this business and
meeting center, Campeche has expanded
the options for other national and
international markets. Now, business travel
can be perfectly combined with the
exquisite cultural variety found only in a
destination declared a World Heritage
Site by UNESCO in 1999.
Col. Centro. CP. 24000.
San Francisco de Campeche, Campeche
Phone: 01 981 81 191 40
Fax: 01 981 81 191 45
Email: [email protected]
CLIENT’S NAME
Client’s Address
Suite 555
City, State 55555
Appendix 19
Marketing Mock-up:
Tri-fold Brochure for Convention Center
Premium Meeting Packages
Appendix 20
Campeche Convention Center Client Feedback Survey
Please take a few minutes to fill out this survey. Your feedback it greatly
appreciated and will help us to improve our services in the future.
1. How was your overall experience with the Campeche Convention Center - functionality,
appearance, and cleanliness?
Excellent
Fair
Very Good
Poor
Good
Not Applicable
Comments:
2. How was your experience with catering and food and beverage services?
Excellent
Fair
Very Good
Poor
Good
Not Applicable
Comments:
3. How was your experience with A/V and equipment services?
Excellent
Fair
Very Good
Poor
Good
Not Applicable
Comments:
4. How was your experience with our staff?
Excellent
Fair
Very Good
Poor
Good
Not Applicable
Comments:
5. What was your impression of your group's hotel accommodations?
Excellent
Fair
Very Good
Poor
Good
Not Applicable
Comments:
6. Prior to your group’s event:
a. Were requests for information responded to promptly?
Yes
Unsure
No
Not applicable
Comments:
b. Were questions answered quickly and accurately?
Yes
Unsure
No
Not applicable
Comments:
7. Would you plan a future event in Campeche?
Yes
Unsure
No
Not applicable
Comments:
8. How did you first learn about the Campeche Convention Center?
9. Name and date of your event:
10. Is there anything else about your experience in Campeche that you would like to
share?
Thank-you for taking the time to fill out this survey!
Appendix 21
Action Plan for Convention Center Marketing Plan
Description of Action Plan
The Campeche Convention Center currently does not have its own marketing plan. A marketing plan will help to increase the amount of
events hosted by aiming marketing towards a targeted audience. By creating and following this marketing plan, the convention center will
have a guide for how it should proceed with marketing itself. It will also be able to track its progress and easily identify what worked/failed
in the future. This initial marketing plan advises hiring an in-house marketing/sales manager, creating marketing materials, creating
targeted marketing campaigns, strengthening its presence online, and evaluation tools. The plan should be updated on a yearly basis to
ensure that progress is being made and all utilized marketing is effective. Total Estimated Cost: $585,900 MXN
Objectives
Tasks
1. Hire an in-house 1.1 Finalize the job
Marketing/ Sales
description for this
Manager
position and advertise
1.2 Interview candidates and
hire someone for the
marketing/sales position
Responsibility
Convention
Center’s
Operations
Director
Estimated Cost (MXN)
$456,000/ year salary for
Marketing/Sales Manager
$3,000 advertising fees for
posting job
1.3 Train the new
Marketing/Sales Manager
2. Create
Marketing
Materials
2.1 Solicit for a graphic
designer to design and
layout marketing
materials
2.2 Interview candidates and
hire a graphic designer
2.3 Work with the graphic
designer to create
marketing materials
Marketing/Sales
Manager
$13,900 for 80 hours of
consultant work
$6,000 for printing
expenses for 1,000
brochures and 1,000
postcards
Success Indicators
Job description is approved by
convention center officials
Job is posted in newspapers and
online and attracts many qualified
candidates
A Marketing/Sales Manager is
hired and successfully trained on
all the existing operating systems
at the convention center
Approval for marketing material
is received from Proeventos and
convention center officials
Approved marketing materials
are sent to a printer once the
consultation period has ended
3. Create targeted
marketing
campaigns
3.1 Attend trade shows such
as Travel Exchange,
ICOMEX, and EIBTM on a
regular basis
Marketing/Sales
Manager
$0 for building client base
3.2 Build a client base that
aligns with the brand
3.3 Create Premium
Executives Packages
4. Strengthen
online presence
4.1 Hire a webmaster to
update and revamp the
website
4.2 Update information about
the convention center on
meeting facility websites
5. Create
marketing
databases
4.3 Maintain social media
websites on a regular
basis
5.1 Decide which program
use to for databases
5.2 Create a separate
database for each type of
data collected
5.3 Distribute surveys and
enter data into
appropriate database
$45,000 for the
registration, booths, travel,
and hotel expenses
Marketing/Sales
Manager
Student Interns
will update
information on
meeting facility
and social media
sites
Marketing/Sales
Manager
Interns will enter
data into
databases as
assigned
$35,000 for high-quality
boardroom meeting
equipment and supplies
(chairs, boardroom table,
food servings equipment,
pens and portfolios, linen)
$25,000/200 hours of
work each year
$0 to update information
on meeting facility and
social media websites
$2,000/year for paper and
printing expenses
associated with surveys
Contacts are made and followed
up after each trade show
attendance
Clients state that the reason they
chose the convention center is
due to the branding initiatives
Clients start inquiring about the
premium packages and book the
service
The convention center website is
updated with all suggestions and
broken links are fixed
Inquiries are received through
meeting facility websites
Questions about meetings and
events are received through social
media sites
Databases are created and data is
being input on a regular basis
Timeline for Convention Center Marketing Plan
Task
No.
Obtain an in-house Marketing/Sales Manager
1.1
Finalize the job description for this position and advertise
1.3
Train the new Marketing/Sales Manager
1
1.2
2
Description
Interview candidates and hire for the marketing/sales position
Solicit for a graphic designer to design marketing materials
2.3
Work with the graphic designer to create marketing materials
3
3.3
Create Premium Executives Packages
4.1
4.2
4.3
5
5.1
5.2
5.3
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
Build a client base that aligns with the brand
Strengthen the convention center’s online presence
Hire a webmaster to update and revamp the website
Update center information on meeting facility websites
Maintain social media websites on a regular basis
Create marketing databases
Decide which program use to for databases
Create a separate database for each type of data collected
Distribute surveys and enter data into appropriate database
X
X
X
X
X
X
Create targeted marketing campaigns
Attend trade shows
4
X
Interview candidates and hire a graphic designer
3.1
3.2
Aug Sept Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul
Create Marketing Materials
2.1
2.2
Timing by Month, Beginning August 2013
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
Appendix 22
Action Plan for Diversifying Revenue Streams
Description of Action Plan
Currently, the Campeche Convention Center generates low revenue and does not have additional income streams to increase revenue
outside of meeting and exhibit space rentals. With countless venue options for event planners, this traditional model is in jeopardy and the
Convention Center should seek alternative methods to generate income to help close budget gaps. The four recommendations detailed
below were selected because they have moderate start up cost, but the potential to yield high return over several years. Total Estimated
Cost: $251,800 MXN
Objectives
1
Tasks
Develop “A Taste 1.1 Create operational
of Campeche”
structure and plan, set
cultural food
rental fees and cart
stations
rental guidelines
1.2 Design marketing sales
materials to advertise
and promote “A Taste of
Campeche” to local food
vendors
Responsibility
Convention Center
operations and
marketing staff
Estimated Cost (MXN)
$64,800 MXN – one time
purchase of three food
carts or stands
$36,000 MXN – design and
print production of
marketing materials
1.3 Identify three vendors
for launch
2
Build “The
Pirate Food
Court”
1.4 Purchase three food
carts
2.1 Create operational
structure and plan to
include drafting contract,
setting lease fees and
guidelines, food court
design, etc.
Convention Center
operations and
marketing staff
$36,000 MXN – design and
print production of
marketing materials
$20,000 MXN - architect
consultant to assist in food
court design (100 hours)
Success Indicators
Local food vendors sign up to rent
carts
Planners select “A Taste of
Campeche” for their event
Convention Center receives
additional income from rental
fees and profit share of goods sold
at food carts
Campeche Restaurant Association
signs on as official partner
Five restaurants sign lease for
launch
2.2 Contact the Campeche
Restaurant Association
to aid in identifying
restaurants
2.3 Design marketing sales
materials to advertise
and promote “The Pirate
Court” rental space to
local food business such
as ADO, Italian Coffee
Company
3.1 Identify niche event
3 Create a
focus
signature event
3.2 Seek potential partners
4 Sell corporate
sponsorships
3.3 Consult a successful
event producer to assist
in developing event
concept
4.1 Create advertising
structure and plan, set
sponsorship guidelines
and cost of merchant
guide
4.2 Design marketing sales
materials to promote
advertising
opportunities
4.3 Solicit local businesses
for advertising
Convention Center receives
additional income from rental
fees and profit share of goods sold
in food court; Income exceeds
expenses
Convention Center
marketing staff
$65,000 MXN - consultant
to assist in event
development (120 hours)
Convention Center lays solid
groundwork for development of
new event to launch in Fall 2015
Convention Center
marketing staff
$30,000 MXN – design and
print production of 200
discount guides
10 businesses advertise through
plasma advertising program
40 businesses sign up for
Campeche merchant discount
guide
125 guides are purchased by
event attendees in year one to
recover cost of design
Timeline for Diversifying Revenue Streams
Task
No.
1
Description
Develop “A Taste of Campeche”
1.1
Create operational structure and plan, set rental fees
and cart guidelines
1.3
Launch campaign to secure vendors; ongoing
1.2
1.4
2
2.1
2.2
2.3
2.4
3
Design marketing materials to promote program
Purchase three food carts
Build “The Pirate Food Court:
Create operational structure and plan (drafting
contract, lease fees and guidelines, food court design)
Work with Campeche Restaurant Association to aid in
identifying and securing restaurant partners
Begin build out for inaugural restaurants
Create a Signature Event
Identify nice event focus
3.3
Consult a successful event producer to assist in
developing event concept
3
Seek potential partners
Sell Corporate Sponsorships
3.1
Create advertising plan and sponsorship guidelines
3.3
Solicit local business for advertising
3.2
Aug
Sept
Oct
Nov
Dec
Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
Design marketing materials to promote program
3.1
3.2
Timing by Month, Beginning August 2013
Design marketing and sales materials to promote
advertising opportunities
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
Appendix 23
Action Plan for Convention Center Operations
Description of Action Plan
This plan proposes possible action items that can be implemented in the Convention Center’s Operational model. The ultimate goal of these
action items is to garner new customers and encourage repeat business from current customers by meeting the objectives outlined below, thus,
increasing the Center’s gross revenues. Total Estimated Cost: 140,000 MXN
Objectives
1
2
3
Create
linkages
within the
Center to
Campeche’s
culture
Tasks
1.1 Rename the Center’s salons for
Campeche’s archeological
offerings and redesign the
salon’s banners
1.2 Display large photo murals of
Campeche throughout the
Center’s atrium
1.3 Host art or sculpture exhibits
in the Atrium
2.1 Create inviting conversation
spaces in the Atrium
Emphasize
ambiance
and comfort
2.2 Add plants and native flowers
within the
throughout the Center
Center
Improve
3.1 Arrange for English classes to
staff service
senior staff members
and
performanc 3.2 Sponsor professional event
planning training for senior
e levels
staff members
3.3 Develop a “Pledge of Service”
program to provide the best
possible service to clients
Responsibility
Estimated Cost (MXN)
Convention
Center
Operations
Management
Team
20,000 MXN for banner
production
Convention
Center
Operations
Management
Team
Convention
Center
Operations
Management
Team
60,000 MXN for furniture
and plants
36,000 MXN for photo
enlargements and
mounting
Success Indicators
Convention Center success can often
be associated with creating linkages to
the local culture
Campechanos take extreme pride in
their local culture indicating these
changes will be a great success
Convention Centers with seating areas
see more interaction among clients
English classes can be
Staff is interested in improving their
provided for staff members English
by local students in trade
for internship credits
English speaking staff will facilitate
working relationships with potential
A variety of industry
clients who speak English
training courses are
Implementing training and service
available. A reasonable
programs has resulted in great success
budget (12,000 MXN)
should be allotted for
and growth for other Latin American
professional development
and Caribbean Convention Centers
4
5
Improve
4.1 Ensure senior staff members
linkages to
have access to appropriate
appropriate
industry membership
trade
organizations
associations
4.2 Ensure Center has appropriate
trade memberships
Convention
Center
Operations
Management
Team
5.1 Utilize the Sustainability
Toolkit provided in this report
to increase sustainability
practices by:
Convention
Center
Operations
Management
Team
Increase
sustainabili
ty practices





Using technology to make
events greener
Green the Center’s
procurement process
Share your sustainability
mindset with suppliers
Reduce, re-use and recycle
Measure cost savings
A variety of trade
associations are available
for membership. A
reasonable budget (12,000
MXN) should be allotted to
allow memberships in one
or more of these
MPI individual
membership cost: U.S.
$375 per person
$0 - New sustainability
practices should be
implemented in a way that
no-cost practices are
implemented first and
measured for cost savings
Trade association memberships show
a commitment to being the best in
throur industry to prospective clients
Trade association memberships allow
access to cutting edge trade
information and training and industry
networking
Some sustainability practices are
already in place in the Center
Using the Sustainability Toolkit
provided will facilitate the integration
of additional practices
More frequently meeting planners are
As cost savings are realized
choosing convention centers that are
additional sustainability
practicing sustainability
measures that may induce
costs may be implemented “Going Green” can be done in a way in
which it results in cost savings
Timeline for Convention Center Operations
Task
No.
1
1.1
1.2
1.3
2
2.1
2.2
3
3.1
3.2
3.3
Description
Create linkages to Campeche’s culture
Rename the Center’s salons after Campeche’s
archeological offerings & redesign the banners
Display large photo murals of Campeche
throughout the Center’s atrium
Host art or sculpture exhibits in the Atrium
Emphasize ambiance and comfort in the Center
Create inviting conversation spaces in the
Atrium
Add plants and native flowers
Improve staff service and performance levels
Arrange for English classes for senior staff
Develop a “Pledge of Service” program
4.2
5
5.1
Utilize the Sustainability Toolkit provided in this
report to increase sustainability practices
4.1
Aug
Sept
Oct
Nov
Dec
Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
Sponsor professional event planning training
for senior staff members
Improve linkages to appropriate trade
associations
Ensure senior staff members have access to
appropriate industry membership organizations
Ensure Center has appropriate trade
memberships
4
Timing by Month, Beginning August 2013
Increase sustainability practices
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
Appendix 24
Sustainability Toolkit for Convention Center
This toolkit is intended to aid the Campeche Convention Center in introducing
additional sustainability measures to its operations model. The first section
outlines how to develop a new sustainable framework. The second section
gives sustainable practices that can be implemented including ways of
involving vendors and suppliers and finding sponsors. The third section deals
with ways to measure the cost savings of these new sustainability practices.
Throughout the entire toolkit we will be suggesting you embrace a new framework for doing business: rethink, reduce, re-use, and recycle. Every event held at the Center can be more sustainable and save money
in doing so.
I. Building a New Framework
Re-Think How You Do Business
Begin to re-think your processes by starting with asking yourself the following questions:
•
•
•
•
•
Is this item necessary?
What other uses could this item have?
Can I re-use this item somehow?
Is there a better way to achieve the same objective?
How recently have we reviewed different purchasing
options?
If changing to a “greener” method costs money, ask yourself if
there are ways to offset those costs? Most importantly, start to
think of different ways to do business and how being sustainable
can add value to your business. Offering “green” value add-ons when bidding on an event could be the key
to landing more business. Items and services can be offered to the client to save them time and money.
These items and services do not have to cost a lot if managed in a sustainable way and yet they will reflect
well on both you and your client by making their event more sustainable. Next we will look at ways to
reduce, re-use and recycle and how it can be used to promote business and cost savings.
Reduce
One of the biggest things we can reduce in events is the use of paper. Look at the ways you use paper at
your events and the ways your clients use it and begin to re-think your paper usage. For example, replace
paper signage with digital signage and you look sustainable and sleek. Suggest to your clients that they
replace any paper documents, such as conference programs, with USB drives containing the conference
materials. Offer to manage the conference registration for your client using an online registration tool
thereby offering a green value add-on by reducing paper registration. And constantly look for additional
items you can reduce.
Re-Use
Review the items you might supply a client or begin to think outside the box: what items might a client
require for their conference that you could offer to supply in a sustainable way? For example, almost
every conference member is supplied with a name badge and often these name badges are plastic
lanyards. Instead of the conference planners supplying these, offer to
include them as an add-on but ask all of the conference attendees to use
their own business card as their nametag and then collect the plastic
lanyards at the end of the conference as the attendees exit to re-use them
again at another conference.
In other cases, clients may ask you to supply items at their events or you
could offer value add-ons such as water bottles. Try not to brand these
items with logos (unless they’re yours). If you can supply generic items, they
can be re-used for other events. Begin to look at all the items you use and
ask how they can be re-used?
Recycle
When you can’t think of alternative options or ways to reduce or re-use, your only option left before the
trash is to recycle. Just like reducing or re-using, recycling is also not just a way to be more sustainable
toward the environment, but a good way to save money. These are some good questions to ask yourself
about your recycling program:
•
•
•
•
•
What do we recycle (paper, plastic, glass, metal, aluminum)?
Where do we recycle (front of house, back of house)?
How can recycling save us money?
What does trash disposal cost us?
Is recycling certain items more affordable?
Once you have the answers to these questions, look for gaps in your recycling program and where you can
begin to close those gaps. You don’t have to do everything right away but begin to take one or two new
steps; if you are only recycling paper and aluminum maybe you could look into recycling glass next?
II. Implementing Sustainable Practices
As you begin to apply this new sustainability framework to how you do business you can also begin to
incorporate new sustainable practices into your operations. Start by looking at your energy use and
possible ways of reducing this. Then move on to an examination of your procurement practices and a
review of the vendors you use. You can even look at how you can partner with clients to help them host
“greener” meetings. Finally, you may find that you are ready to implement some sustainability practices or
measures that may incur a cost you’re not ready for. Sponsors can help alleviate these expenses while also
building important relationships in the community.
Energy Reduction
Begin by evaluating your building’s energy usage. Look for ways to reduce light,
power and air conditioning usage. Examine your water consumption in kitchens and
bathrooms; ask whether there are ways you can reduce consumption in these areas.
Assess your landscape practices: how much water do you use to maintain plants?
Can you use recycled or re-purposed water for landscaping? Can you plant species
that require less water? The idea is to do a thorough evaluation of your energy consumption so you can:
•
•
•
Know what you are consuming
Decide what you can improve
Re-examine these processes periodically going forward
Procurement Practices
Review the items you purchase. Keep the “reduce, re-use, re-think and recycle” framework in mind. Which
items can be reduced? Which items can be replaced with re-useable or recyclable ones? Look at how you
purchase. Refrain from purchasing individual packaged items for bulk items that can be served on platters
or pitchers. Purchases such as cloth napkins that can be laundered instead of paper napkins are not just
sustainable practices but cost effective ones.
Vendors and Clients
Review your vendors and suppliers for their own sustainability practices and invite them to join you in
greening their operating models as well. Let them know that you will be looking to partner with
companies that are practicing sustainability. Contact your clients and ask them to think about how they
can be “greening” their meetings and offer to help them with their sustainability endeavors. Below are
letter templates you can use with your venders, suppliers and clients:
Dear [Supplier Name],
Dear [Client Name],
We here at the Campeche Convention Center
have decided to be more proactive in our sustainability
practices and green initiatives and we invite you to join
us in this endeavor. With this in mind, we invite you to
examine your sustainability practices to ensure you are
doing everything you can to practice green initiatives
and be aware that, going forward, we will be looking to
contract and partner with companies who demonstrate
proactive step toward being “green”. As a longtime
business partner, we invite your feedback including any
ideas you may have or examples of successes or failure
you’ve experienced in implementing sustainability into
your organization as we continue to refine our
operating model toward increased sustainability
through best practices.
We here at the Campeche Convention Center
have decided to be more proactive in our sustainability
practices and green initiatives and we invite you to join
us in this endeavor. With this in mind, we invite you to
examine your sustainability practices when planning
your meeting or event to ensure you are doing
everything you can to practice green initiatives. We
would like to support you in doing so any way we can
and would be pleased to provide you with ideas for
“greening” you meeting or event. Please let us know
how we can help. We also invite your feedback including
any ideas you may have or examples of successes or
failure you’ve experienced in implementing
sustainability into your meetings and events as we
continue to grow in this area.
Thank you,
[Name]
Thank you,
[Name]
‘
Procuring Sponsorships
Sometimes green practices can cost money. You have a green initiative you want to implement but it’s
going to cost money so, how do you pay for it? You find a sponsor. Companies love sponsorships and
“green” sponsoring is great for a company’s image. Look for items you use regularly that you can replace
with greener options. For example, replacing your lighting system with LED and energy efficient lights
could be supported by a sponsor that would then receive a plaque noting their sponsorship efforts. Our
earlier example of replacing paper conference materials with USB drives would incur the cost of the USB
drives but sponsors could be found to supply the drives in exchange for placing a logo on the drive.
Sponsors can provide reusable water bottles or event staff t-shirts. There are any number of ways a
sponsor can support an event or meeting or the Center, itself. Procuring sponsorships is another way to
challenge yourself to Re-Think how you do business!
III. Measuring Cost Savings
While some green initiatives may cost money, others will save you money. It is a good idea to track new
initiatives from the beginning. Savings are not only found in dollars and cents so it is a good idea to start
by tracking the various impacts of the sustainable initiatives you implement using a chart such as this:
Initiative
Cost
Impact (+/-)
Client
Impact
Sponsor
Impact
Promotional
Impact
Green
Impact
Replacing
Paper Signage
with Digital
Short Term:
digital sign
purchase
Long Term:
Reduce paper
purchases
Looks sleeker and
more modern
May increase
business or provide
greater client
satisfaction
Possible
opportunities
exist for
purchase or
digital
advertising
Reflects well on
Center for
reducing paper
consumption –
add to marketing
materials
Reduced paper
consumption
(measure this if
you can)
Replacing
Lights with
Energy Efficient
Lights
Short Term: cost
of new lights
Long Term:
Reduced energy
costs
No impact
Possible
opportunities
exist for
sponsored
purchase
Reflects well on
Center for
reducing energy
consumption
Reduced energy
consumption
(measure this if
you can)
Measurement of any actual cost savings and/or losses of the green initiatives you implement can also be
simply tracked in the beginning. An example of a possible tracking budget is below:
Annual Green Initiative Cost Savings
Initiative
Positive
Savings
Eliminated Giving out Individual Bottled Water
10,000 MXN
Reduced Serving Packaged Snacks
5,000 MXN
Changed to Organic Fruit Supplier
TOTALS
Net Savings / Losses
Summary
Negative
Losses
8,000 MXN
15,000 MXN
8.000 MXN
7,000 MXN
This toolkit was designed to start you on your way to thinking more sustainably. The idea is to really
“think” about your sustainability practices. What are you doing? What more could you be doing? And,
what could you be doing differently? Can you involve your suppliers and clients? And, lastly, to enable you
to begin to understand that being sustainable and going “green” can actually have a positive cost impact
to your bottom line. Ultimately going “green” in business is not just a “best” practice but a SMART
practice! Now that you have a way to start, don’t stop here. Look for further ideas for greening your
operational model online. There is a world of resources available to you.
Appendix 25
Action Plan for Developing Convention Center Partnerships
Description of Action Plan
This plan proposes action items to develop partnerships between the Convention Center and various members of the Campeche
community. Building strong, mutually beneficial partnerships is an effective method to grow and sustain meetings and convention
tourism. The four programs outlined below will strengthen the Convention Center’s local relationships and help grow its meetings
business. Total Estimated Cost: $200,200 MXN
Objectives
1
Create
mutually
beneficial
student
internship
program
with local
universities
Tasks
Responsibility
Estimated Cost (MXN)
1.1 Set goals for the program,
including what the Convention
Center hopes and its interns
should hope to achieve
Convention
Center
personnel in
conjunction with
local
universities
Time of Convention Center
personnel: 40-60 hours to
establish program, 5-10
hours weekly during
program (estimate $8,80013,200 MXN in wages to
establish, $1,100-2,200
weekly during program)
1.2 Formally outline the roles and
responsibilities of student
intern(s), keeping in mind the
goals established
1.3 Work with local universities to
determine appropriate
timeframes and other logistics
of the internship
1.4 Establish a timeline for the
internship program, including
details such as: application
process; intern training;
“check-ins,” reviews, and wrap
ups
1.5 Determine primary manager
of internship program,
advertise in universities, and
begin program
Success Indicators
Analysis done at conclusion
of internship determines
whether goals set out at
creation of program have
been met
Successful projects
completed by student interns
Student indicates increased
knowledge, skills, and
experience as a result of the
program
Students involved would
recommend program to
other students; Convention
Center would run program
again
2
Create
formal
partnerships
with local
hotels
2.1 Set goals for the program,
including what the Convention
Center hopes to achieve and
what benefits hotels would gain
from participating
Convention Center
marketing manager
2.2 Draft initial proposal of what
partnership agreement would
entail
Time of Convention
Center personnel: 6080 hours to establish
program (estimate
$13,200-17,600 MXN
in wages)
2.3 Contact all local hotels to explain
basics of the program and invite
participation
3
Create a
Campechano
Ambassador
Program
2.4 Work with interested hotels to
refine all specific aspects of the
partnership and create formal
written agreements
3.1 Designate small committee or
champion within the Convention
Center team to take lead on
developing and running program
3.2 Define goals and establish
structure of program
3.3 Create resources for
ambassadors, such as marketing
material for them to
use/distribute, a formal
“welcome letter” and outline of
the program, a FAQ reference
webpage, and an individual to
contact directly with any
questions or strong leads
Convention Center
marketing team
Time of Convention
Center personnel: 60120 hours to establish
program, 1-5 hours a
week to maintain
(estimate $13,20026,400 MXN in wages
to establish, $2201,100 weekly to
maintain)
Costs of producing new
marketing materials:
$3,000 MXN
Kick-off event: $9,000
MXN
Convention Center has
formal partnership with
1-3 hotels
After 6 months,
Convention Center
marketing team
recognizes increased
ease and convenience in
reserving hotels
associated with meetings
After 1 year,
participating hotels
recognize year-over-year
increase in hotel nights
and overall revenue
Local businesspeople are
interested in
participating, with at
least 10 official
ambassadors at initial
kick-off event
Within one year, have
secured at least 5 new
leads and 1 new
conference or event
through the
ambassadors program
Within two years, the
number of ambassadors
in the program, leads
generated by the
3.4 Directly contact key individuals,
corporations, and organizations
that would be ideal participants
of the program and invite them
to participate
program, and business
won through program
leads have all increased
3.5 Advertise the program generally
to increase participation
4
Improve
community
relations
with
Resident
Awareness
Campaign
3.6 Plan and execute kick-off event
to officially begin program and
welcome the ambassadors
4.1 Reach out to other key players
who may be interested in or
already planning a resident
awareness campaign regarding
tourism impacts and benefits to
discuss working together
4.2 Gather important metrics
regarding Convention Center
business
4.3 Determine best ways to publicize
campaign and create timeline for
implementation
Convention Center
marketing team
Time of Convention
Center personnel: 40100 hours (estimate
$8,800-22,000 MXN in
wages)
Reach at least 200
residents with campaign,
measured by any of the
following methods: hits
to a new informational
webpage, attendance at a
publicity event,
distribution of physical
materials, or
participation in a special
event (such as a contest)
Appendix 26
Geotourism Charter
This global template is designed for nations but can also be
adjusted for signature by provinces, states, or smaller
jurisdictions, and for endorsement by international
organizations.
Geotourism is defined as tourism that sustains or enhances
the geographical character of a place – its environment,
culture, aesthetics, heritage, and the well-being of its residents.
The Geotourism Charter
WHEREAS the geotourism approach is all-inclusive, focusing not only on the environment, but also on
the diversity of the cultural, historic, and scenic assets of _______,
WHEREAS the geotourism approach encourages citizens and visitors to get involved rather than
remain tourism spectators, and
WHEREAS the geotourism approach helps build a sense of national identity and pride, stressing what is
authentic and unique to________,
THE UNDERSIGNED parties to this Agreement of Intent commit to support these geotourism
principles, to sustain and enhance the geographical character of _________—its environment, culture,
aesthetics, heritage, and the well-being of its residents:
Integrity of place: Enhance geographical character by developing and improving it in ways distinctive
to the locale, reflective of its natural and cultural heritage, so as to encourage market differentiation
and cultural pride.
International codes: Adhere to the principles embodied in the World Tourism Organization’s Global
Code of Ethics for Tourism and the Principles of the Cultural Tourism Charter established by the
International Council on Monuments and Sites (ICOMOS).
Market selectivity: Encourage growth in tourism market segments most likely to appreciate, respect,
and disseminate information about the distinctive assets of the locale.
Market diversity: Encourage a full range of appropriate food and lodging facilities, so as to appeal to
the entire demographic spectrum of the geotourism market and so maximize economic resiliency over
both the short and long term.
Tourist satisfaction: Ensure that satisfied, excited geotourists bring new vacation stories home and
send friends off to experience the same thing, thus providing continuing demand for the destination.
Community involvement: Base tourism on community resources to the extent possible, encouraging
local small businesses and civic groups to build partnerships to promote and provide a distinctive,
honest visitor experience and market their locales effectively. Help businesses develop approaches to
tourism that build on the area’s nature, history and culture, including food and drink, artisanry,
performance arts, etc.
Community benefit: Encourage micro- to medium-size enterprises and tourism business strategies
that emphasize economic and social benefits to involved communities, especially poverty alleviation,
with clear communication of the destination stewardship policies required to maintain those benefits.
Protection and enhancement of destination appeal: Encourage businesses to sustain natural
habitats, heritage sites, aesthetic appeal, and local culture. Prevent degradation by keeping volumes
of tourists within maximum acceptable limits. Seek business models that can operate profitably
within those limits. Use persuasion, incentives, and legal enforcement as needed.
Land use: Anticipate development pressures and apply techniques to prevent undesired
overdevelopment and degradation. Contain resort and vacation-home sprawl, especially on coasts
and islands, so as to retain a diversity of natural and scenic environments and ensure continued
resident access to waterfronts. Encourage major self-contained tourism attractions, such as largescale theme parks and convention centers unrelated to character of place, to be sited in needier
locations with no significant ecological, scenic, or cultural assets.
Conservation of resources: Encourage businesses to minimize water pollution, solid waste, energy
consumption, water usage, landscaping chemicals, and overly bright nighttime lighting. Advertise
these measures in a way that attracts the large, environmentally sympathetic tourist market.
Planning: Recognize and respect immediate economic needs without sacrificing long-term character
and the geotourism potential of the destination. Where tourism attracts in-migration of workers,
develop new communities that themselves constitute a destination enhancement. Strive to diversify
the economy and limit population influx to sustainable levels. Adopt public strategies for mitigating
practices that are incompatible with geotourism and damaging to the image of the destination.
Interactive interpretation: Engage both visitors and hosts in learning about the place. Encourage
residents to show off the natural and cultural heritage of their communities, so that tourists gain a
richer experience and residents develop pride in their locales.
Evaluation: Establish an evaluation process to be conducted on a regular basis by an independent
panel representing all stakeholder interests, and publicize evaluation results.
Appendix 27
Tourism Cares GO Campeche Expedition Action Plan
The Consulting Team recommends a catalytic event to pave the way for the possible formal establishment
of a destination management organization. Catalytic events serve as a platform to build networks around
a common goal while having public exposure that enhances the transparency and reach of a strategic
activity. The Tourism Cares GO Campeche expedition would be the best fit to institutionalize the creation
of a DMO and to bring additional destination management benefits for the region.
WHAT IS TOURISM CARES?
Tourism Cares is a U.S. non-profit organization composed of tourism related businesses and associations.
The Tourism Cares members donate their time and resources to support volunteer activities focused on
preserving cultural heritage sites, providing educational opportunities for young industry leaders, and by
creating grant programs in the U.S., and internationally, which support projects that preserve tourism
experiences for future generations.
WHAT IS A GO EXPEDITION?
A GO expedition is an international cooperative tourism event that brings U.S. and foreign travel industry
executives together to share values, expertise, talents, and skills to assist in the sustainability and
conservation of important sites. 9 Since 2011, Tourism
Cares has been implementing the GO Expedition in
Peru and Haiti, and is currently looking for new
destinations that are interested in hosting a GO
Expedition for the coming years. Through previous
conversations that initiated the GW Consulting
Practicum, Campeche has been considered as one
destination of particular interest for Tourism Cares
global outreach activities.
In practical terms, a GO Expedition can create
opportunities for the destination to connect with
international tourism operators by developing business-to-business knowledge sharing and networking,
strengthening private sector involvement in tourism development, creating educational opportunities,
saving sites through work made possible by grants, and organizing volunteer events that engage tourism
stakeholders. It is important to mention that Tourism Cares brings international technical expertise to help
the destination develop the programs mention above; in addition it can provide funding (as donations inkind and in cash). At the same time, the local destination is highly involved with the development,
implementation, and follow up GO expedition activities. This requires that a local institution or institutions
commit to certain responsibilities to initiate and support the GO Expedition.
9
Tourism Cares, Global Outreach, http://www.tourismcares.org/about/whats-new/global-outreach, (2013).
Tourism Cares Around the World – GO Peru Expedition
In 2012, Tourism Cares formed its first Global Outreach Committee in Peru. The Global Outreach
initiative (GO Peru) mission was to bring together travel and tourism enterprises and leaders form the
U.S. and Peru to work together in the preservation and conservation of cultural and natural heritage
in Peru.
This joint effort created the interest of eight tourism companies in Peru to form a new organization
that mirrors Tourism Cares’ successful model of social and environmental responsibility in the United
States. Turismo Cuida of Peru’s mission is to preserve the rich natural and cultural heritage of Peru
through sustainable tourism.
During May 2012, Tourism Cares and Turismo Cuida, worked together to sponsor and organize a
volunteer restoration project at the Mercado Central of San Pedro in Cusco, provided a capacity
building program for market vendors, presented an international education forum in Cusco,
supported a National Park Service World Heritage Fellowship and jointly pledged $160,000 to provide
tourism grants in Peru in 2013 and 2014.
PLAN FOR GO CAMPECHE EXPEDITION
The Consulting Team recommends that the DMO Working Group nominates Campeche for a Tourism
Cares Go Expedition for 2014. To do so, it must respond to the Request for Expression of Interest: 20142016 before September 2013, which can be accessed at:
http://www.tourismcares.org/images/documents/TourismCares2014HostCountryRFEI.pdf.
The Expression of Interest must contain the following items:
•
•
•
•
•
Description of the private sector organizing committee or founders, including key contact person
Preliminary commitment to providing the resources required, including interest in forming a
Tourism Cares organization in the host country
Tentative ideas for the volunteer project, educational forum, non-profit matching grant, and
itinerary
Support letter from key governmental agency at the national and destination levels
Supplementary information
The Consulting Team recommends that DMO Working Group utilizes the recommendations described in
this section as part of their expression of interest. It is also important to mention that the Consulting Team
has already contacted the Tourism Cares Global Outreach Committee to suggest the idea of Campeche
being a candidate for a GO expedition in 2014. The Consulting Team highly recommends that the DMO
Working Group conducts efforts to host the host expedition in 2014 due to the possible linkages that can
be created with ASTA Meeting in Merida in March 27-30, 2014. ASTA brings together the major US tours
Operators which could be attracted to the philanthropy activities to be carried out in the GO Campeche
expedition thus bring international exposure to Campeche. For details on the ASTA meeting please
visit: http://www.asta.org/Events/content.cfm?ItemNumber=7246
There is interested among Mexican organizations to form a Mexican Tourism Cares organization that will
ideally work at the national level. Therefore, the GO Expedition in Campeche will be mainly focused on the
volunteer, educational, non-profit matching grant, and Campeche experience. At the same time, the
Campeche DMO could work as local partner for the national level Mexican Tourism Cares organization, in
order to promote tourism philanthropy projects for the long-term in Campeche.
In this sense, the DMO Working Group will work as the private sector organizing committee for the GO
Campeche Expedition. Past experiences in Peru and Haiti have shown that a successful champion for this
expedition has the following characteristics:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Independent private sector representative
Well-connected and know representative of the tourism industry
Inclusive leadership
Adaptive capacity to manage the project
Voluntary spirit
Linkages with educational institutions
Based on the information gathered in the fieldwork, the Consulting Team suggests the following focus for
the GO Campeche expedition (a more detailed action plan is provided below):
Preliminary visit from Tourism Cares: In the past, Tourism Cares has done preliminary visits to
destinations to assess the potential activities for the GO Expedition and build partnerships to enhance the
impact of the event. It is recommended that the DMO Working Group co-sponsor this preliminary visit in
order to strengthen its relationship with Tourism Cares to effectively prepare the activities for the GO
Expedition. This visit will also be useful as a way to announce the GO Expedition to the tourism community
and foster their involvement.
Volunteer Event: The volunteer event will be focused on an activity where the tourism community “gives
back” by engaging in a project to directly support the conservation of a heritage site in Campeche. In this
activity, tourism professionals, entrepreneurs, officials, and other interested members of the community
will work together on a public volunteer project that may include cleaning up a site, painting a historical
building, installing signage, and/or other operational activities that are considered part of the event.
Furthermore, these actions are enhanced not only by the actual work of the volunteers on the day of the
event, but the participants can volunteer their time and expertise in planning and organization the event
(i.e. designing interpretative signage for a historical site).
The volunteer event is a great opportunity to involve the whole tourism community and create networks
of parties interested in the preservation of a Campeche site. It is also a good opportunity to demonstrate
the importance of working
together towards a common
goal and the impact giving back
can have on the preservation
of the travel experience. While
this will be a specific event for
the GO expedition, the
Consulting Team encourages
the
DMO
to
organize
subsequent volunteer events
similar to this one.
Campeche has a wide variety
of historical, archeological, and
natural sites that could be
potential candidates for the volunteer event. However, it is recommended that DMO Working Group, in
cooperation with Tourism Cares, choose one site that will have the most immediate impact as a result of
the work and will maximize the participation of volunteers. The event can serve as an initiator of a longterm project to enhance the tourism experience of the site or start projects at other sites.
Educational Event: The GO expedition is an excellent opportunity for Campeche to develop long-term
relationships with U.S. tour operators, hotels, businesses and associations that promote knowledge
sharing. This will be fundamental in
bridging the gaps identified in the
training section of this report and
meeting the needs of the
international tourism market.
During
the
GO
Campeche
expedition, an educational event
could play a major role in attracting
private and public tourism
stakeholders in the state. In
addition, Campeche should aim to
create long-term relationships that
enable focused capacity building
programs for local stakeholders.
The Consulting Team recommends that the educational event serve as a platform to increase the
awareness of an integral need of a destination management strategy that foster tourism competiveness in
Campeche. The educational event will involve workshops, panel discussions and conferences led by
industry experts from both the U.S. and Mexico. This event can be organized in a multi-day activity where
U.S. tourism stakeholders share their experiences in working as part of DMO, developing public/private
partnerships, and working with competitors to enhance the overall competiveness of the destination
while also maintaining healthy competition. In addition, best practices can be shared with local
communities and entrepreneurs to build capacity in developing small and medium tourism enterprises.
Some potential topics for the educational event are:
•
•
•
•
•
Role of the Private Sector in Destination Management: Experiences of NGOs working as DMOs
and effective public/private executive boards
Public/Private Partnerships that Work: Case studies of public/private projects that have boosted
tourism development in destinations, promoted business development, and increased destination
competiveness
The value of Co-opetition: Strengthening the private sector and cooperating to enhance
destination competitiveness, while maintaining healthy rivalry
Entrepreneurship Education: Entrepreneurship education that emphasizes the development of
micro and small tourism enterprises. Strategies and tools for recent tourism graduates and
communities to create competitive small businesses
Sustainable Tourism Certification Programs: The value of internationally recognized certification
programs at the business and destination level.
Grant Matching Funds Program: Another important section of the GO Campeche expedition is the
potential establishment of a grant-matching program, which would provide funds for future projects in
Campeche, entrepreneurship development, and scholarships based on tourism study. The funds could also
serve as a grant program that finances development of micro and small tourism enterprises that preserve
cultural or natural heritage and directly help improve communities’ livelihoods. Furthermore, the funds
could also serve to establish a technical assistance program that finances the creation of a business plan
for the DMO focused on enhancing tourism competiveness in Campeche.
This program will need the commitment of funds from private sector donors from Campeche that then
could be matched by Tourism Cares. Aside from providing valuable funds to promote other projects and
scholarships, a grant program is a good way to continue giving back to the tourism industry as well as
encourage philanthropy efforts of other industries be directed toward tourism projects that better
Campeche as a whole. To amplify the scope of potential donations, a tiered system could be implemented.
DMO Working Group should analyze the availability of funds from its members and other potential local
donors in order to propose a realistic grant program. In the past, Tourism Cares has matched the amount
raised by the local stakeholders.
Itinerary for Tourism Cares Members: Finally, the Go expedition should serve as an event that gives
Campeche international exposure and creates potential business leads. Therefore, the Tourism Cares
members that travel to Campeche should receive a high quality familiarization (FAM) tour of the state of
Campeche. This tour could be an ideal platform to launch the new product development strategies
proposed in the Final Report. In the past, the Tourism Cares members paid for the cost of the tour, which
is included in the fee paid by all participants of the GO Campeche Expedition.
Formalizing a Destination Management Strategy: The GO Campeche expedition will bring special
attention to the tourism sector in the State. The Consulting Team recommends that the DMO Working
Group utilize this momentum to formalize its destination management strategy, which is dependent on
the one of the three alternatives that will be presented in phase 3. Whichever alternative is chosen, it is
important that the stakeholders affected by the strategy sign a commitment to work together, using
Tourism Cares as a third-party organization that commends this signatory. In the probable case that the
DMO Working Group decides to enhance its roles and form a DMO, it is advised that a legally binding
Memorandum of Understanding is signed between DMO Working Group and SECTUR to solidify ways in
which the newly created DMO will work as an authentic public/private partnership. In addition, the DMO
Working Group should work in building networks with Tourism Cares and its member organizations to
explore possible technical assistance for the future establishment of the DMO.
Action Plan for GO Campeche Expedition
Description of Action Plan
This action plan provides details on the suggested plan for the Go Campeche Expedition. Specifics on Expedition activities are yet to be
determined by DMO Working Group in cooperation with Tourism Cares, therefore these specifics are not explored in detail in this action
plan. Total Estimated Cost: All Costs will be covered in-kind
Objectives
1. Submit Expression
of Interest
Tasks
1.1 Elect Campeche GO
Committee and Chair
1.2 Identify tourism
stakeholders willing to
commit with in-kind or
cash support for Go
Campeche
Responsibility
Estimated Cost (MXN)
Success Indicators
DMO Working Group
Overhead administrative
cost will be minimal. To
be covered by
participant donations
GO Committee has
been elected and is
functioning
GW could provide initial
assistance
1.3 Make initial contact with
Tourism Cares to examine
draft proposal
2. Finalize Go
Campeche
Expedition details
1.4 Complete and Submit
proposal
2.1 Organize expedition trip for Tourism Cares USA
two Tourism Cares
DMO Working Group – GO
representatives
Committee
2.2 Realize Tourism Cares
expedition
2.3 Meet with DMO Working
Group members and
Tourism Cares to discuss
proposal
2.4 Request Grant commitment
for Tourism and nontourism stakeholders
2.5 Work with Educational
Institutions to build
Expression of
Interest is
submitted to
Tourism Cares
Tourism Cares
accepts Campeche’s
proposal
Trip Cost will be covered
in-kind. Should include
two Tourism Cares
Officials
Physical site for
volunteer project
identified
Plan for GO Campeche
will be financed in-kind
with technical assistance
from Tourism Cares
Educational Forum
defined
Planning session – in
kind
Campeche
Commitment is
signed
Grant matching
structure is agreed
Non-tourism donors
contacted
Educational topics
Plan for volunteer
event and follow up
activities
2.6 Create a plan for the
volunteer event and follow
up activities onsite
3. GO Expedition –
Pre-Planning
2.7 Define activities of the GO
Expedition
3.1 Define a price for the
participants
3.2 Promote the GO Campeche
Expedition
3.3 Reserve facilities for
Educational Activities
3.4 Create a transparent fund
for the grant monies
3.5 Organize logistics for
volunteer event (permits,
materials, etc.)
3.6 Define speakers for the
educational event
3.7 Organize trip for Tourism
Cares structure and price
3.8 Discuss and revise the MOU
and all legal provisions
Tourism Cares USA
DMO Working Group – GO
Committee
TBD according to project
needs.
Facilities for the Go
Expedition secured
Speakers and
workshops
confirmed
Materials for
volunteer activities
obtained
MOU or agreement
of understanding
between DMO
Working Group,
SECTUR, and other
necessary parties is
finalized and ready
to sign upon
completion of GO
Campeche,
establishing a
formal DMO
Timeline for GO Campeche Expedition
No.
Task
Description
1
Submit Expression of Interest
1.1
Elect Campeche GO Committee and Chair
1.3
Make initial contact with Tourism Cares to examine draft proposal
1.2
1.4
2
Identify stakeholders willing to commit with in-kind or cash support for Go Campeche
Complete and Submit proposal
Finalize Go Campeche Expedition details
2.1
Organize expedition trip for two Tourism Cares representatives
2.3
Meet with DMO Working Group members and Tourism Cares to discuss proposal
2.2
2.4
2.5
2.6
2.7
3
Realize Tourism Cares expedition
Request Grant commitment for Tourism and non-tourism stakeholders
Work with Educational Institutions to build Educational topics
Create a plan for the volunteer event and follow up activities onsite
Define activities of the GO Expedition
GO Expedition – Pre-Planning
3.1
Define a price for the participants
3.3
Reserve facilities for Educational Activities
3.2
3.4
3.5
3.6
3.7
3.8
Promote the GO Campeche Expedition
Timing by Month, Beginning August 2013
Aug
Sept
Oct
X
X
X
X
X
Nov
Dec
Jan
Define speakers for the educational event
Organize trip for Tourism Cares structure and price
Discuss and revise the MOU and all legal provisions
Mar
Apr
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
Create a transparent fund for the grant monies
Organize logistics for volunteer event (permits, materials, etc.)
Feb
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
Appendix 29
DMO as a Civil Association – Organizational Structure Examples
This is the model adopted by Guadalajara’s Office of Visitors and Conventions. See figure 8.1 for the organizational
structure. Alternatively, the association could consider adopting a model similar to OVC Veracruz, with an executive
director heading the organization. See figure 8.2 for the organizational structure.
FIGURE 8.1
ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE OF DMO OPERATING AS A CIVIL ASSOCIATION OVC
GUADALAJARA PAGE 37
General Assembly
Board of Directors
President
Secretary
Administrative
Director
Administrative
Manager
Treasurer
Public Relations &
Promotions
Director
Promotion &
National Groups
Manager
Public relations
Manager
In House Group
Coordinator
Assitant to
Executive
President
Messenger
Source: Adapted from Organization and Marketing Manual, SECTUR 2006
FIGURE 8.2
ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE OF DMO OPERATING AS A CIVIL ASSOCIATION
OVC VERACRUZ PAGE 38
Executive
Director
Comptroller
Accountant
Administrative
Assistant
Tourism Manager
Public Relations
Manager
Congress and
Conventions
Manager
Executive
Assistant
Source: Adapted from Organization and Marketing Manual, SECTUR 2006
Appendix 30
Application of Fideicomiso with Campeche’s 2% Lodging Tax
Exercised through own
Organizational Structure
Trustor 1
Private sector
Cash contributions
Fideicomiso
Xx
TrustorsTrust
Trustee
Exercised through the
Civil Association
Bank
Beneficiary
JJ
SECTUR
2% Lodging Tax
State Treasury
Campeche’s DMO
Trustor 2
Source: Adapted from Organization and Marketing Manual, SECTUR 2006
Appendix 31
Sample Operating Budget from Federal SECTUR
Sample Annual Operating Budget for Campeche DMO
No
1
1.1
1.2
1.3
1.4
1.5
1.6
1.7
1.8
1.9
1.10
1.11
1.12
1.13
1.14
1.15
1.16
1.17
1.18
1
2
Concepto
Item
PROMOCIÓN
PROMOTION
Páginas de Internet
Internet
Campaña Institucional
Campaña Segmento Cong. Y Conv.
Campaña Segmento X
Campaña Segmento X1
Travels
Fams
Fams medios
Correspondencia masiva
Viajes
Competencias por sedes
Ferias Exposiciones
Eventos
Oficina foránea de eventos
Gastos Diversos
2.7
2.8
2.9
2.10
2.11
2
Manual de convenciones
Folletos recorridos para acompañantes
Papelería membretada
Bolsas impresas
Artesanía Típica
Artículos promocionales
Impresos segmento x2
CamPaña tripartita
3
Apoyo Eventos
3.3
Página Internet
3.1
3.2
3.4
3.5
3.6
3.7
Folleto
Artículo Promocional
Eventos Artísticos del estado
Diversos
Mass Correspondence
Travels
Competencies for headquarters
Institutional Stand
Events
Events for foreign offices
Miscellaneous expenses
% of Total
225,000
6.43%
75,000
2.14%
75,000
30,000
75,000
15,000
20,000
50,000
50,000
50,000
8,000
30,000
75,000
80,000
25,000
100,000
35,000
25,000
2.14%
0.86%
2.14%
0.43%
0.57%
1.43%
1.43%
1.43%
0.23%
0.86%
2.14%
2.29%
0.71%
2.86%
1.00%
0.71%
1,043,000
29.80%
Conventions folder
15,000
0.43%
CD'S
25,000
0.71%
Printed materials
Conventions manual
Tour Partners brochures
Letterhead stationery
Printed bags
Handicrafts
Promotional items
Printed segments X2
Tripartite campaign
Miscellaneous expenses
Total Material Impreso ( Total printed materials)
Posters
Artesanía típica
Media familiarization trips
Total Promoción (Total Promotion)
Material Impreso
Gastos diversos
Familiarization trips
Trade Shows
Stand institucional
CD'S
2.6
Events
Viajes
2.4
2.5
Segment Campaign X
Production
Eventos
Carpeta convenciones
2.3
Campaign for Congresses & Conventions
Segment Campaign X1
Producción
2.1
2.2
Institutional Campaign
Total
($Pesos)
Support events
50,000
15,000
5,000
0
10,000
25,000
35,000
100,000
15,000
295,000
1.43%
1.43%
0.14%
0.00%
0.29%
0.71%
1.00%
2.86%
0.43%
8.43%
Posters
15,000
0.43%
Promotional items
10,000
0.29%
Brochures
Internet
Handicrafts
Artistic Events of the State
Miscellaneous
50,000
15,000
15,000
10,000
15,000
1.43%
0.43%
0.43%
0.29%
0.43%
3
4
4.1
4.2
4.3
4.4
4.5
4.6
4.7
4.8
4.9
4.10
4.11
4.12
4.13
4.14
4.15
4.16
4.17
4.18
4.19
4.2
4
5
5.1
5.2
5.3
5.4
5.5
5.6
5.7
5.8
5.9
5.10
5.11
5.12
5
6
6.1
6.2
6.3
6.4
6.5
6
Operación
Total Apoyo Eventos (Total Support Events)
Operations
Renta de Oficinas
Office rent
Teléfonos
Telephones
Luz
Lights
Agua
Water
Paquetería y correos
Gastos legales
Auditores
Pepeleria y Artículos de oficina
Capacitación de personal
Proveedor de Servicios de Internet (ISP)
Artículos de Limpieza
Equipo de Comunicación
Mantenimiento de oficina y equipo
Mantenimiento de vehiculos
Tenencias y refrendo vehiculos
Honorarios
Gasolina
Gastos Diversos
NOMINAS
Bono Directo
Ejecutivo de Ventas 1
Ejecutivo de Ventas 2
Ejecutivo de atención a eventos
Prestaciones Sociales y Aguinaldos
Impuestos de Nominas
IMSS
INFONAVIT
Practicas Profecionales
Reserva
Gatos diversos
TOTAL NOMINAS
GASTOS TOTALES
ACTIVOS
Equipo de Computo
Mobiliario
Vehiculos
Conmutador y 3 lineas Tel. nuevas
Gastos Diversos
TOTAL ACTIVOS
GRAN TOTAL
0.43%
500
0.01%
35,000
2,000
Counters
15,000
Advisors
Stationary and office items
Personnel training
Internet service provider
Cleaning items
Communication equipment
Office and equipment maintenance
Maintenance of vehicles
Holdings and car insurance
Fee
Gas
15,000
15,000
15,000
15,000
80,000
12,000
2,000
20,000
4,500
15,000
15,000
50,000
1.00%
0.06%
0.43%
0.43%
0.43%
0.43%
0.43%
0.43%
2.29%
0.34%
0.06%
0.57%
0.13%
0.43%
0.43%
1.43%
10,000
29.00%
Executive director
360,000
10.29%
Sales executive 2
180,000
5.14%
Miscellaneuos expenses
TOTAL OPERACIÓN (TOTAL OPERATION)
Director Ejecutivo
15,000
15,000
Legal consultancies
Contadores
3.71%
Mail and parcel
Legal expenses
Asesores Legales
130,000
PAYROLL
Direct bonus
Sales executive 1
Attention and events executive
Social performance and bonuses
Payroll taxes
IMSS
INFONAVIT
Professionals practices
Reserve
Miscellaneous expenses
TOTAL PAYROLL
TOTAL EXPENSES
ASSETS
Computer equipment
Furniture
Vehicles
Three new phonelines
Miscellaneous expenses
TOTAL ASSETS
GRAND TOTAL
15,000
366,000
15,000
180,000
180,000
50,000
160,000
134,000
132,000
150,000
30,000
43.00%
10.46%
0.43%
5.14%
5.14%
1.43%
4.57%
3.83%
3.77%
0.00%
4.20%
0.86%
1,571,000
44.89%
50,000
1.43%
3,405,000
20,000
5,000
20,000
95,000
3,500,000
97.29%
0.57%
0.00%
0.14%
0.57%
2.71%
100%
Appendix 32
U.S. Example Budgets
Blackstone Valley Tourism Council Budgets
Blackstone Valley Tourism Council
Profit & Loss Budget Overview
July 2006 through June 2007
Income
Bike Blackstone
Blackstone Valley Tourism Inc
BRVNHCC Collaborative Marketing
BRVNHCC Information Contract
BRVNHCC Science Center
BV Canoe Trail
BV Distance Learning
BV General Store
BV Mini-Bus
BV RI Room Tax
BV Scenic Railway Tours
BV Sustainable Tourism Lab
Community Support
Conway Tours Ticket Sales
Elderhostel
General
Grants & Donations
Group Tours
RI Dragon Boat Race
RI HPC
Slater/Explorer/Spirit
Canal Boat - Sam Slater
Explorer
Spirit
Total Slater/Explorer/Spirit
Special Events
Golf Tournament
Annual Meeting
Auction
Raffle
Total Special Events
State of RI Grants
Tour RI - No Place Like Home
Visitor Center Contract
Pawtucket Arts Collaborative
Visitor Center Contract - Other
Backlit
Total Visitor Center Contract
Total Income
12,000.00
30,000.00
12,000.00
15,000.00
20,000.00
4,000.00
5,000.00
500.00
65,000.00
1,200.00
2,000.00
4,000.00
45,000.00
6,000.00
35,000.00
10,000.00
2,500.00
5,000.00
3,000.00
278,000.00
115,000.00
5,000.00
9,000.00
6,000.00
115,000.00
3,000.00
50,000.00
2,500.00
40,000.00
60,000.00
54,000.00
44,000.00
10,000.00
35,000.00
66,700.00
1,005,700.00
Expense
OPERATIONS
Automobile
Bad Debts
Bank Merchant Fees
Bank Service Charges
Bookkeeping & Accounting
Cost of Rent/Utilities
Dues and Subscriptions
Equipment Leases
Insurance
Board
Fire Insurance
Liability Insurance
Total Insurance
Interest Expense
Loan Interest
Total Interest Expense
Legal
Office Supplies & Equipment
Petty Cash Expenses
Postage
Repairs
Computer
Equipment
Repairs - Other
Total Repairs
Shipping/Delivery
State Licenses and Permits
Taxes
Telephone
Travel
Total OPERATIONS
1,300.00
900.00
525.00
2000.00
1,000.00
1,500.00
200.00
PERSONNEL
Health Insurance
IRA - Simple- Company Contrib.
Sub-contractors
Wages
Worker's Comp Insurance
Total PERSONNEL
PROGRAMS
BV Canoe Trail
Amber Valley Compact
Annual Meeting
Bike Blackstone
Brochure Distribution
BV Store Products
BV Sustainable Tourism
Consulting
Distance Learning
Educational Supplies
Groups/Sites
Elderhostel
4,300.00
40,000.00
7,500.00
200.00
8,000.00
3,500.00
500.00
1,500.00
2,725.00
2,000.00
1,000.00
9,000.00
250.00
7,000.00
2,700.00
200.00
600.00
50.00
9,000.00
10,000.00
110,025.00
38,000.00
4,000.00
18,000.00
340,000.00
3,500.00
403,500.00
80000.00
10,000.00
2,000.00
13,000.00
2,000.00
5,000.00
1,500.00
10,645.00
500.00
2,000.00
1,000.00
Tour RI - No Place Like Home
Total Groups/Sites
Marketing & Public Relations
BV Collaborative Marketing
General Marketing
Tourism Conferences
Total Marketing, PR & Conferences
Meetings
Photography
Research & Development
RI Dragon Boat Race
RI HPC
Science Center
Special Events
Golf Tournament
?
Total Special Events
Supplies
Tickets (Conway)
Visitor Center
PAC (85% of invoice)
Visitor Center - Backlit
Total Visitor Center
Total PROGRAMS
GROUND TRANSPORTATION
Bus Insurance
Mini Bus/Para Transit Repair
Mini Bus Fuel
Total GROUND TRANSPORTATION
WATER TRANSPORTATION
Advertising
Crane
Fuel
Insurance
Landings & Site Development
Misc
Moving & Storage
Pumping
Registration
Rental Fees
Repair/Maintenance
Research & Development
Supplies
USCG Documentation & Inspection
USCG Drug Testing
Total WATER TRANSPORTATION
Total Expense
30000.00
80000.00
40000.00
7500.00
9,000.00
500.00
1,250.00
1,250.00
110,000.00
127,500.00
3,000.00
500.00
2,500.00
35,000.00
60,000.00
35,000.00
9,500.00
750.00
5,400.00
2,500.00
439,295.00
1,800.00
500.00
1,500.00
3,800.00
3,000.00
1,200.00
5,000.00
18,000.00
4,000.00
100.00
1,750.00
3,000.00
700.00
250.00
7,500.00
500.00
3,000.00
600.00
480.00
49,080.00
1,005,700.00
Blackstone Valley Tourism Council
Profit & Loss Budget Overview
July 2008 through June 2009
Income
Bay Queen/Vista Jubilee
BRVNHCC Blackstone Alert
Bike and Paddle Blackstone Tour Packages
Blackstone Valley Tourism Inc
BRVNHCC Collaborative Marketing
BRVNHCC Information Contract
BRVNHCC Planning Contract
BRVNHCC Science Center
BV General Store
BV RI Room Tax
BV Scenic Railway Tours
BV Sustainable Tourism Lab
Community Support
Conway Tours Ticket Sales
Cumberland Book
Distribution of Information to the Valley
Elderhostel
General
Grants & Donations
Group Tours
Interest Income
Keep The Valley Beautiful
Miscellaneous
RI Dragon Boat Race
RI HPC (Footsteps)
Riversing Event
Slater/Explorer/Spirit
Canal Boat - Sam Slater
Explorer
Spirit
Total Slater/Explorer/Spirit
Special Events
Golf Tournament
Annual Meeting
Auction
Raffle
Total Special Events
State of RI Grants
Tour RI - No Place Like Home
7,000
2,000
8,000
15,000
12,000
0
0
3,000
310,000
150,000
147,525
9,000
2,000
5,000
10,000
15,000
4,000
60,000
10000
100
3000
1000
45000
0
0
10000
30000
0
15000
20000
4000
500
0
35000
Visitor Center Contract:
Arrow Maps
Backlit
Pawtucket Arts Collaborative
VC Salary Reimbursement
Visitor Center Management
Payphone
Visitor Center Management Fee
Total Visitor Center Management
- Visitor Center Total Revenue
RIDEM Dunkin Dounts Visitor Services
Waterfire - Providence Piers
Reimbursed Expenses
Total Income
Expense
OPERATIONS
Automobile
Bank Merchant Fees
Bank Merchant Online Ticket Fee
Bank Service Charges
Bookkeeping & Accounting
Contributions
Cost of Rent/Utilities
Dues and Subscriptions
Equipment Leases
Insurance:
Board
Fire Insurance
Liability Insurance
Total Insurance
Interest Expense:
Loan Interest
Finance Charge
LOC Interest
Other Interest Expense (IRS)
Total Interest Expense
Legal
Trade Memberships
Miscellaneous
Office Supplies & Equipment
Petty Cash Expenses
Postage
100
3000
2000
50,000
15,000
70,000
14,000
1,087,225.00
4,300
5,000
4,500
250
9,000
1500
3,500
500
2,000
1300
1000
525
2500
5000
200
8,000
1,000
2,500
100
5,000
250
5,000
Repairs:
Computer
Equipment
Repairs - Other
Total Repairs
Shipping/Delivery
State Licenses and Permits
Taxes
Telephone
Travel
Total OPERATIONS
PERSONNEL
Health Insurance
IRA - Simple- Company Contrib.
Payroll Taxes
Sub-contractors
Wages
Worker's Comp Insurance
Total PERSONNEL
PROGRAMS
Amber Valley Compact
Annual Meeting
Bike and Canoe Blackstone
Brochure Distribution
BRVNHCC CONTRACT
BV Scenic Railway
Blackstone Valley General Store
Consulting
Cumberland Book
Educational Supplies
Health and Welfare
Grant Disbursement
Groups/Sites:
Elderhostel
Tour RI - No Place Like Home
Groups/Sites - Other
Total Groups/Sites
Keep the Valley Beautiful
Marketing & Public Relations
BV Collaborative Marketing
General Marketing
Website
Tourism Conferences
3,000
750
1,000
200
100
200
7,000
3,500
78,675.00
35,000
4,500
30000
25,000
350,000
3,200
447,700.00
2,000
13,000
1000
5,000
85,000
2,500
500
2,000
1000
400
20,000
15,000
38,500
5000
2,500
20,000
60,000
15,000
2,000
Total Marketing, PR & Conferences
Meetings
Photography
Raffle
RI Dragon Boat Race
RI HPC
Science Center
Special Events
Golf Tournament
Total Special Events
STPDL projects and programs
STPDL research and development
Program Supplies
Tickets (Conway)
Trade Show
Visitor Center
PAC (85% of invoice)
Visitor Center - Backlit
Visitor Center - Other
Total Visitor Center
Total PROGRAMS
GROUND TRANSPORTATION
River Operations
Advertising
Crane
Fuel
Insurance
Landings & Site Development
Misc
Moving & Storage
Pumping
Registration
Rental Fees
Repair/Maintenance
Research & Development
Supplies
USCG Documentation & Inspection
USCG Drug Testing
Total River Operations
TOTAL EXPENSE
90,000
3,000
35,000
8,000
75000
15,000
750
2,000
1000
1500
1000
500
523,150.00
0
3000
10,000
3000
8000
1,000
100
200
2,000
700
1,000
5,000
500
2,000
600
600
37,700.00
1,087,225.00
PWC/Manassas Convention & Visitors Bureau
Budget Summary
FY 2012-2013

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