In a four-month period, Yvette ended up dealing with more than 10

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In a four-month period, Yvette ended up dealing with more than 10
SUMMER 2011
Peace Talk
HOPE FOR HURTING FAMILIES –
CREATING FAMILY JUSTICE CENTERS ACROSS AMERICA
Casey Gwinn, JD with Gael Strack, JD
After Thirty Years, We Have a Big Problem
Yvette moved in with Mitch six months after they met in a karate class.
She worked in a photography store. He was a former teacher, now a law
student. He had teenage children and was a single father after his wife had
died from cancer. He was winsome and physically fit, and quickly fell madly
in love with Yvette as soon as they met. His constant attention, notes, phone
calls, flowers, and compliments over-whelmed her within weeks of their
decision to get involved with each other. But she did, in her heart of hearts,
enjoy all the attention. They bonded quickly and when he asked her to move in,
it seemed to make sense.
Within weeks of giving up her
apartment, she saw his rage for the
first time. It was over something
stupid. But his rage was consuming
and terrifying. Within days, the rage
turned physical. Yvette called the
police the first time Mitch hit her. She
soon realized she must leave him. He
was a dangerous man. Though some
personal contact continued as she
slowly extricated her life from his, she
knew that it would never be a healthy
relationship. By then, however, she
had developed a close relationship
with both his daughters. They still
worked out at the same karate studio.
And they had quickly developed
mutual friends.
Police took a report of Mitch’s first
physical abuse, but he successfully
convinced Yvette that he would leave
her alone if she would not press
charges. She feared his legal
training and did not want to have to
face him in court. She never recanted
her statement, but she did not return
the domestic violence detective’s
phone calls.
Within days of promising to leave her
alone, though, Mitch started calling
her, writing her notes, and begging
to get back together. Yvette did
everything she was supposed to do.
She called the Volunteer Lawyer
Program and soon obtained a
restraining order. Each time Mitch
contacted her, she called the police.
She kept a journal and contacted a
private lawyer.
In a four-month period,
Yvette ended up dealing
with more than 10
agencies and individuals
in the criminal and civil
justice systems as she
tried to get help. She was
forced to tell her story over
and over again. She was
referred from one agency
to another.
OUR MISSION
We create peaceful
communities in which
domestic respect and a life
free from violence is
the right of every woman,
man and child.
WHO WAS
SOJOURNER TRUTH?
Our emergency domestic
violence shelter for women
and children, Sojourner Truth
House, is a tribute to, “Belle,”
a woman born into slavery
in 1797. In 1843 she walked
onto the pages of history
when she became Sojourner
- God’s pilgrim. A second
name - Truth - came to her
“in a voice as true as God’s is
true.” Sojourner Truth traveled
widely, speaking about slavery
and women’s rights and the
dignity of all people.
You are not Alone.
If you are in an abusive
relationship and need help,
call Sojourner Family Peace
Center, 24 hours a day, at
414-933-2722.
CONTINUED ON PAGE 2
PEACE TALK - SUMMER 2011 | 1
Only in recent decades has the
battered women’s movement
evolved and produced major
changes in the culture and the
substantial increases in
resources.
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1
Incidents happened in multiple jurisdictions, and different agencies referred her
to other agencies. As she sank into depression from the constant harassment,
the bewildering system she was suppose to seek help from became a
confusing blur of jurisdictional lines, differing policies and procedures, and
multiple locations. She met with the District Attorney’s stalking team but was
later referred to the City Attorney’s Office. She almost lost her job and finally
had to contact a private therapist for help.
I met Yvette after the case was forwarded as a simple restraining order
violation to the San Diego City Attorney’s Office. Though I was serving as the
elected City Attorney, I had taken six weeks out of my regular job that summer
to handle a case load in our specialized Domestic Violence Unit. Sitting in
a little office in the middle of the 35-member prosecution unit, I read the police
report, which described an incident in which Mitch had been found lying on the
front seat of his car around the corner from Yvette’s job. She called the police,
believing she had seen him watching her. As officers approached the car,
Mitch pretended to be asleep. After they asked him to step out of the car, he
told them he dropped his daughter at her school nearby and then got sleepy
while driving home and parked the car. The officers informed him he was
less than 1,000 yards from Yvette’s employment location, and though not
technically within 300 yards of her person, his behavior was harassing and
menacing. Mitch told the officers that Yvette should not be afraid of him.
He said if he really wanted to kill her he would use one of his high-powered
rifles and shoot her from a long distance. He said if he was really stalking her,
she would never know he was there.
After two interviews with Yvette, we pieced together the long history of
stalking in the relationship. We identified over 60 illegal contacts Mitch had
made, contacted the 10 agencies that had been involved, and identified a host
of witnesses who had valuable information about Mitch’s harassing behavior.
We arrested Mitch on the day of his last final in his last year of law school on
a $500,000 bench warrant. Later that day, we seized 11 of Mitch’s firearms
from his father’s house, including automatic handguns and a number of rifles
with high-powered scopes. Finally, we pulled all the pieces together and started
connecting all the agencies that had been involved with this couple in order to
hold an abuser accountable and provide safety and support to an extremely
traumatized victim of violence and stalking.
2 | PEACE TALK - SUMMER 2011
Mitch and Yvette’s case played itself
out two years before the opening of
the San Diego Family Justice Center.
It became powerful encouragement
for collaboration between agencies,
even in a case with a happy ending.
Although more than 10 agencies had
been involved, none knew what the
other agencies were doing. Agency
personnel never met together to work
on the case. The agencies never sent
staff to one place for Yvette’s benefit.
Yvette had to go from place to place
in the middle of shock, trauma, and
fear to try to get help. Her effort to get
agencies to pay attention to her took
nearly a year. Thankfully, she did not
give up or die during that terrifying
12-month period! But still today when
she e-mails me or calls to say hi and
touch base, I am reminded how
courageous she was in persevering
through San Diego’s domestic
violence intervention system.
Yvette’s story frames the problem.
It is a long-standing problem from a
historical perspective.
Violence in the home
has been around for
thousands of years.
Only in the last 30 years
have significant resources
been allocated to address
the issue.
Only in recent decades has the
battered women’s movement evolved
and produced major changes in the
culture and the substantial increases
in resources. But committing
significant resources has spawned
another major problem.
We keep adding agencies and
programs across the country and in
local communities to help victims of
domestic violence and their children.1
As attention focused on the issue of
family violence and laws and policies
started changing, programs began
to multiply and not just in traditional
intervention agencies that had
participated in domestic violence
task forces or coordinating councils.
The business community, the medical community, the law enforcement
community, and the court system all
started new initiatives, including
agencies that traditionally did not
work with domestic violence victims.
The challenges created by the
proliferation of programs were
identified and regularly addressed
in the domestic violence movement
through the concept of coordinated
community response.2 The sexual
assault movement and the child
advocacy movement also promoted
the concept of coordinated community
response as the solution to coordinating agencies.3 Task forces and
coordinating councils were promoted
by many in the domestic violence
movement as the solution to the
coordination problems.4
Though the problem was
identified, most of our
problem-solving efforts
were system-centered, not
victim-centered.5
Though much was studied and written
about the developing system challenges, no one stopped to figure out how
many places victims would need to go
for help as we continued to expand
the number of new programs offering
services to those in need.
Too Many Places to Go for Help
In 1998, using principles developed by
Ellen Pence and her team in Duluth,
we created a type of “community
safety audit” in San Diego to
analyze the system we had created
to help domestic violence victims and
their children. We spent a number of
months talking to victims and survivors
and reviewed the list of agencies then
being provided by the San Diego
Police Department to victims at the
scene of each reported domestic
violence incident. The question was
posed: How many places does a
victim have to go to get all the help
she/he needs in San Diego?
CONTINUED ON PAGE 4
JOIN SOJOURNER FAMILY PEACE CENTER FOR THE BREWERS
TAILGATE TO END DOMESTIC VIOLENCE
Join Sojourner Family Peace
Center as we raise awareness
of domestic violence at the
Brewers Tailgate to End
Domestic Violence, presented by
WaterStone Bank, to be held
Friday, July 29th, from
4:00 to 7:00 p.m. at
Helfaer Field, Miller Park.
Gene Mueller of WTMJ News
Radio will emcee
the event.
After the Tailgate, the Brewers will
take on the Houston Astros.
This family-friendly event will
include ballpark style food and
beverages, face painting for the
kids, the chance to get your photo
taken with the Racing Sausages,
some amazing raffle prizes and a
silent auction featuring one-of-a-kind
autographed Brewers’ memorabilia.
Every attendee will also receive a
Milwaukee Brewers baseball cap.
Ticket prices are $65 per person
including Tailgate and a ticket to
the Brewers vs. Houston Astros
game at 7:05 p.m., $50 for
Tailgate only and $25 for
children 12 and under.
Order tickets by
calling 414-276-1911.
GAME TICKETS ARE LIMITED FIRST COME, FIRST SERVED.
PEACE TALK - SUMMER 2011 | 3
If a victim needed medical help, she would go to a hospital emergency room.
If she needed follow-up assistance, she would go to her primary care doctor
(if she had one). If she wanted to go to a battered women’s shelter but needed
to have her pets cared for, she had to find someone to take her pets. If her children were actually physically abused, they would end up in the child protective
system, and a whole new set of agencies would be necessary. If the victim had
been sexually assaulted, sexual assault protocols would kick in, and a long list
of agencies and services would be added to the referral sheet handed to her by
well-meaning professionals.
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 3
Within a few months, we were able
to identify 32 different agencies that
had services for victims of domestic
violence. And few of those agencies
were in the same place! Creating a
coordinated community response,
developing a task force, creating a
host of specialized units to provide
services to victims had not solved the
problem; we had made it worse.
Any reader might say, “Wow!
San Diego really created a mess by
having so many programs run by so
many different agencies.” Sorry, no
community gets off the hook so easily.
San Diego’s reality had also become
America’s reality. Perhaps San Diego
had a few more places that offered
help than some smaller communities,
but the problem was the same across
the country.
To be sure, some communities went
down the road toward co-located
services.6 A few communities had
police officers and prosecutors housed
together. Some shelters had five to six
disciplines represented in a single
location. But in most places, victims
traveled from place to place to place
to tell their story over and over in an
attempt to get the help they needed.
4 | PEACE TALK - SUMMER 2011
By 1998, we could not deny the reality. We had created a gauntlet for victims
of domestic violence and their children. At one end of their journey was the
violence and abuse; at the other end was supposed to be safety and healing.
But in between, we made them run through a nightmarish, confusing obstacle
course of agencies. To fit our policies, protocols, and procedures, we were
sending victims careening back and forth across the community for help.
To make it convenient for our bureaucratic systems to provide services, we
were demanding almost superhuman tenacity and endurance from victims.
The more I think about it, the more dumbfounded I get.
We created a system for the convenience of system
professionals, not for the convenience of victims and
their children.
So what happened to our victims in San Diego when we put them through the
gauntlet? It was no different than much of the rest of the country is today. They
did not make it through the system. They might get to a police department, but
they would never make it to the prosecutor’s office. They might spend a few
days in a shelter, but they would never make it to the restraining order clinic.
It should have been no surprise. Most of our victims were returning to their
abusers without comprehensive intervention ever occurring. Here we were,
30 years into the battered women’s movement, and we had a big problem.
Conclusion
We were not providing the necessary services to those in need. We had,
through a very well-intentioned series of actions, created a nightmare for
victims and their children. We understood the importance of coordinated
community response. We worked hard to facilitate it. But simply trying to get
everyone on the same sheet of music through a task force or coordinating
council was not good enough. We had to do better. We had to move beyond
protocols and policies. We needed to provide a closer connection between
community-based organizations and government agencies.
CONTINUED ON PAGE 11
MILWAUKEE’S JOURNEY TOWARD THE FUTURE
AND A MORE UNIFIED SYSTEM
In nearly 40 years of walking with survivors of domestic violence,
we have witnessed thousands of stories similar to Yvette’s. These
stories keep us committed to reaching out to those impacted by
domestic violence. Based on the San Diego model, Sojourner Family
Peace Center continues to work toward expanding and strengthening
services to survivors of domestic violence by adopting the model of a
Family Justice Center (FJC).
This approach is a collaborative effort that seeks
to provide, in one location, the essential agencies
and organizations needed by survivors in our
community.
Planning, which began in 2008 and continues today, has led SFPC to
take the lead in this effort locally and is rooted in the vision of a future
where:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
All the needs of survivors are met
Children are protected
Violence fades
Batterers are held accountable
Economic justice increases
Families heal and thrive
Hope is realized
We all work together
Our plans are to develop a permanent site in Milwaukee at 619 W.
Walnut Street. Once this site is developed, SFPC will be even more
effective in reaching out to survivors. Stories such as Yvette’s will not
have to be repeated here in Milwaukee. Survivors of domestic violence
will find assistance that is survivor-centered, not system-centered.
Currently, SFPC is located at 135 W. Wells Street,
Milwaukee, WI 53203. We will be piloting
co-located services with partners starting this
summer.
Stop by to visit us when you are in the
neighborhood!
FALL
VOLUNTEER
TRAINING
DATES
The fall Volunteer Training session
is coming up. We rely on the
support of volunteers throughout all
our programs and departments.
The five-night training session will
give you an overview into each
program and service offered at
Sojourner Family Peace Center.
This session’s training dates are:
Tuesday
Thursday
Tuesday
Thursday
Tuesday
September 13
September 15
September 20
September 22
September 27
Training sessions are held from
5:30 – 8:15 p.m. each night.
To register or for more
information, please call
Melinda at (414) 933-2722.
PEACE TALK - SUMMER 2011 | 5
SCHOOL
SUPPLIES
NEEDED
In preparation for the
upcoming school year,
the following school supplies
are needed for our children:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Backpacks
Loose leaf paper
Notebooks
Folders
Markers
Colored pencils
Pens
Scissors
Erasers
Pencil sharpeners
Glue & glue sticks
All items
must be new.
Please call
(414) 276-1911 for
more information.
THANK
K
YOU!
THANK YOU TO EVERYONE WHO MADE AWEAR
A HUGE SUCCESS!
On Thursday, March 24th,
guests at Awear –
Sojourner Family Peace
Center’s seventh
annual fashion show to
raise awareness and reveal
the truth about domestic
violence, presented by
Brewers Community
Foundation - were treated
to a sneak peek of the
season’s hottest fashions.
The event got underway with an
amazing auction featuring uniquely
themed gift baskets, getaways,
gorgeous jewelry and more.
The models, including media
personality Julie Feldman,
Cecelia Gore of Brewers Community
Foundation and R&B artist Cincere,
modeled the trendy clothing of area
retailers Miss Groove, Boston Store,
Picardy Shoe Parlour, m.e. Lou,
Simon Oliver, Zita Fashions and Goldi.
The event was a terrific success,
raising over $82,000 for our programs
and services!
Thank you for helping us
have such a successful
and memorable event!
Models pre-show
We would like to thank all of our
guests, retailers, auction donors,
emcees and committee members.
A special thank you to the co-chairs
of the event, Jessica Cook,
Carla Cummings, and Holly Langdon,
and to all of the sponsors: American
Family Insurance, Assurant Health,
Brewers Community Foundation,
Cramer-Krasselt, Fiduciary
Management, Harley-Davidson Motor
Company, Hupy & Abraham, s.c.,
Reinhart Boerner Van Deuren, s.c.,
Robert W. Baird, Roundy’s
Supermarkets, Inc., Runzheimer
International, Stark Investments,
6 | PEACE TALK - SUMMER 2011
United Healthcare, von Briesen and
Roper, s.c. and Wheaton Franciscan
Healthcare.
A featured spring look
“HEALING” NECKLACE DESIGNED SPECIFICALLY
FOR SOJOURNER FAMILY PEACE CENTER
Kessler’s Diamonds of Germantown has
created an exclusive piece of jewelry
with us in mind!
This unique necklace is available for
$50.00, and 100% of the proceeds will
benefit Sojourner Family Peace Center.
Call (414) 276-1911 to order yours
today!
The necklace features a
sterling silver 18” rolo chain,
from which hangs a sterling
silver pendant with an image
of cherry blossom branches,
symbolizing feminine beauty.
The word “Healing” is
inscribed on the back.
Three different finishes- rose gold, white gold, and yellow goldare available for purchase at $275, of which $125 will be donated to
Sojourner Family Peace Center.
As Kessler’s associate Amy Schaefer said of the
necklace, “Every woman deserves to feel beautiful.”
THANK YOU TO Kessler’s Diamonds
of Germantown for creating such a beautiful necklace
for Sojourner Family Peace Center!
EVENING OF
HOPE SAVE
THE DATE
Save the Date for an Evening
of Hope! Join us in early
November for the 17th annual
Evening of Hope at the
Bradley Center.
The
evening
will include
de
live entertainment
from one of
Milwaukee’s
favorite bands,
the 5 Card Studs,
food stations and
beverages, a wine pull
and a live auction.
We are always looking for new
committee members, corporate
sponsors and event volunteers.
For more information please
contact Courtney at
414-276-1911.
Watch for more information at
www.familypeacecenter.org!
PEACE TALK - SUMMER 2011 | 7
SUPPORT SOJOURNER FAMILY PEACE CENTER TODAY!
Your gift will help further our mission of creating peaceful communities
Thank You!
PLEASE ACCEPT MY GIFT OF $_____________
Name:_________________________________________________________________________
Address:________________________________________________________________________
City, State, Zip:__________________________________________________________________
Phone Number :______________________E-mail:______________________________________
CHECK ENCLOSED (Please make payable to Sojourner Family Peace Center)
PLEASE CHARGE MY:
Visa
MasterCard
American Express
Card Number: _____________________________________________ Expiration Date:____________
Authorized Signature: ________________________________________________________________
This gift is in honor or memory (circle one) of:_______________________________________
Occasion: ______________________________________________________________________
PLEASE NOTIFY THE HONOREE:
Name:_________________________________________________________________________
Address:_______________________________________________________________________
City, State, Zip:_________________________________________________________________
I will make a gift of securities. Please contact me for details.
I would like information on including Sojourner Family Peace Center in my will.
If you have already done so, please let us know so that we may acknowledge your generosity.
I would like information on making a gift to The Kathie Stolpman Endowment Fund.
I prefer to remain anonymous.
I am interested in volunteering.
PLEASE DETACH AND ENCLOSE CHECK IF PREFERRED METHOD OF PAYMENT.
PLEASE MAIL TO: SOJOURNER FAMILY PEACE CENTER, P.O. BOX 080319, MILWAUKEE, WI 53208
8 | PEACE TALK - SUMMER 2011
THANK YOU FOR YOUR SUPPORT!
Wish List
SHELTER SUPPORT:
*Pillows
*Bath towels
*Twin or full size blankets
*Twin or full size sheets
*Women’s slippers & house shoes
(sizes 8½, 9 & 10)
*Women’s nightwear
(sizes L, XL, XXL)
*Women’s underwear (sizes 6, 7 & 8)
*Deodorant
*Body lotion
*Toothpaste
*Bar soap (regular size)
Shampoo (regular size)
Hair care products for
African American women
Cold Medicine (adult & children’s)
Aleve & Advil (adult)
Facial tissue
Paper towels
Paper cups & napkins
Sanitizing hand soap/hand sanitizer
Plastic disposable gloves (not latex)
Lysol spray
Clorox wipes
Mops & brooms
Batteries (AA or AAA)
FOOD:
*Gift certificates for food
(Pick ‘N Save, McDonald’s,
Burger King, Subway)
*Non-perishables
(please no tomato soup or juice)
*Applesauce/fruit cups
*Crackers (Ritz, saltines, Graham)
MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS:
*Gift certificates
(Walmart, El Rey, Target)
Gift certificates for activities
(movies, bowling, skating)
Gas cards
Bus tickets
Used cell phones
Padded business portfolios
Portable memory drives for computer
TEENS:
*Sports equipment
(footballs and basketballs)
*Body Spray (for girls)
Make-up
Jewelry
Hand-held games
MP3 players
Board games
Teen appropriate chapter books
Deodorant (boys and girls)
Summer shorts and t-shirts
for boys and girls
SCHOOL AGED CHILDREN:
Dolls
(baby dolls, Dora, my little pony etc.)
Barbie /Doll clothes
Barbies
Cars (matchbox and larger)
Chapter books for new readers
Puzzles (23-100 pieces)
Craft kits
Building Sets
(i.e. Legos and Connetix)
Backpacks
School supplies
(backpacks, notebooks, loose leaf,
folders, glue, markers, pens, erasers,
scissors, colored pencils &
sharpeners)
Art supplies
(pipe cleaners, popsicle sticks,
construction paper)
Trains
Board games
Summer shorts and t-shirts for boys
and girls
OFFICE SUPPORT:
Pens, pencils
White-out, post-its,
Copy paper
GROUP SUPPORT:
Disposable plates, cups,
silverware, napkins
Containers for leftovers
CHILDREN/INFANTS:
*Diapers (Sizes 3, 4, & 5)
*Gerber Finger Food Puffs
*Baby bottles (BPA free)
*Boys & girls house shoes (all sizes)
*Nightwear (all sizes)
*Formula (Orange-GoodStart)
*Pedialyte
*Wipes
Baby wash, shampoo, lotion, powder
Bibs
Sippy cups
Pacifiers and teething gel
Infant socks
Toddler socks and slippers
Infant & baby toys
Toddler toys (safe for ages 1-3)
Board books
(i.e. books for babies and toddlers)
Umbrella strollers
Crib sheets
CLOTHING, BEDDING & ANY
OTHER LIGHTLY USED ITEMS:
We appreciate the generosity that
sustains Sojourner Family Peace
Center. Due to our lack of storage
space we can only accept
NEW clothing, bedding, towels,
undergarments, etc. Please offer your
slightly used items to the St. Vincent
de Paul Society located on 2320 W.
Lincoln Avenue which credits us with
your gifts. Our residents can then
select what they need at no cost.
Thank you for thinking of us!
If you would like to donate
items from our Wish List,
please call (414) 276-1911
ext.104 to make
arrangements.
*Items currently most needed.
PEACE TALK - SUMMER 2011 | 9
FEBRUARY 28, 2011 – MAY 31, 2011
Memorials & Honorariums
MOTHER’S DAY MEMORIALS:
Genevieve Borzynski
Louise Borzynski
Gisela Bronner
Mark & Amy Bronner
Frances Jean Brovillette
Karen Brucks
Helen Cook
Jayne Honeck
Ruth Cottam
Tom Cottam
Beatrice Cullen
Cindy Barton
Jodi Dassow
Jayne Honeck
Marion Degler
Judy Knapp
Alice Flores
Tina Flores
Marion Frye
Lewis Frye
Rose Groischell
Mary Anne Revolinski
Claire Guiseppi
Ellen Guiseppi
Evella Harsch
Lisa Larson
Shelby Lynn Heinz
Mary Schoultz
Solveig Hansen
Jayne Honeck
Solway Hansen
Jim & Charlotte Honeck
Stella Honeck
Jayne Honeck
Jim & Charlotte Honeck
Marcella Kircher
Margaret Konet
Dorothy Kontowicz
Beans & Barley
Donna Kowalski
Doug & Mary Brzycki
Dolores Krajcir
Antonette Brown
10 | PEACE TALK - SUMMER 2011
Helen Lamb
Judy Kohl
Gene Mathison
Mary Hansen
Helen Neubauer
Carol Neubauer
Susan O’Neal
Kathy Donius &
Paul Kosidowski
Patricia Payne
Kenneth Payne
Jean Reeve
James & Ann Reeve
Miriam Rosenberg
Michael Rosenberg
Florence Salm
John & Mary Heuer
Caroline T. Sandin
Sarah Sandin
Julie Seaberg
James Harasymiw
Cheryl Selaiden
Jayne Honeck
Dorothy Spiro
Lev Spiro &
Melissa Rosenberg
Joanna H. Spiro
Lev Spiro &
Melissa Rosenberg
Jeannette Steiner
Anthony Steiner &
Sue Martin-Steiner
Loretta Stelloh
Karen Wagner
Pearl Toepher
Mark & Mary Carstensen
Janet Varma
Rajiv Varma
Barbara Walker
Ronald & Katherine LaGosh
Helen Wartinbee
James & Ann Reeve
Joan Belle Wendelberger
Mary Pat Wendelberger
Charlotte Wojahn
Karen Woodbury
Irene Wojciechowski
Mark & Mary Carstensen
Mildred K. Wolff
Marilyn John
MEMORIALS:
Mrs. Alles
Rebecca Kane
Sharon Drees
Charles & Carol Biesik
Geraldine Flynn
Milwaukee County
Court Commissioners
Roz Herd
Julie Straszewski Woolridge
Ludie Koons
Robert Koons
David Peterson
Anonymous
John A. “Jack” Price
Mary Seramur
Kathie Stolpman
Robert Rubner
David & Barbara Korpela
Dr. Dennis Sobczak
Sandra Earle
Tammy Howard
Randall & Carol Kuhlmann
Anne Mallinger
David Stoner
Kathie Stolpman
Dr. Charles E. Theisen
Carol Theisen
HONORARIUMS:
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 4
Verne Apke
Neil & Kay Hersh
Chris Binder
William and Elizabeth Altmann
Anne Brower
David Silber
Judy Bultman
Kathie Stolpman
Karen Heitzman
Kelly Kohl
Elizabeth Hering
Steve & Lisa Zajc
Arlene Kohl
Kelly Kohl
Jeanette Mische
Lisa Koneazny
Christine Schmitz
Tyler Nighbor
Carmen Pitre
Joseph Pabst
Sheila Semrou
Virginia Ann Wittig
Margaret Wittig
Daphne Zajc
Steve & Lisa Zajc
We needed to engage the San Diego
community, in large numbers, to
support a better approach to meeting
the needs of victims and their
children.
BIRTHDAYS:
By 1998, we had little doubt what
we needed to do in San Diego. We
needed to lead the way for so many
other communities in showing what
needs to come after coordinated
community response. We needed to
resist the urge to rest on our laurels
and be thankful for the tremendous
progress of the last 20 years. We
needed to build on the relationships
we had cultivated between so many
different agencies. We needed the
Family Justice Center vision! Yvette’s
courageous journey through the
system while trying to stay alive
taught us that very clearly.
Gwinn, Casey and Gael Strack. Hope For
Hurting Families: Creating Family Justice
Centers Across America. Volcano, CA:
Volcano Press, 2006.
1
Carla Cummings
Friends of Carla
Catalina Guzman
Bridgette Posey
Sue Logarakis
Mary Horton-Carstensen
Elisabeth Wright
Judy Jones
Joan Kuriansky, Promising Practices:
Improving the Criminal Justice System’s
Response to Violence Against Women,
prepared by the STOP Violence Against
Women Grants Technical Assistance Project,
1998, NCJ 172217. [By 1998, the STOP TA
Project has identified 19 national organizations
with major roles related to domestic violence
initiatives in America.]
National Institute of Justice, Washington, D.C.,
March 31, 1995.
3
K. Barnes et al., Developing a Coordinated
Community Response to Sexual Assault and
Domestic Violence, Ending Violence Against
Women Project, Colorado, 1996.
4
Model Protocol for Local Coordinating
Councils on Domestic Violence, Kentucky
Governor’s Council on Domestic Violence,
1997.
5
Coordinating Community Responses to
Domestic Violence, Melanie Shepard and Ellen
Pence (eds.), Sage Publications. Thousand
Oaks, CA, 1999. [Ellen Pence has done
an excellent job throughout her career of
identifying the way system responses are
generally developed to assist system
professionals. Such protocols and policies are
not generally designed with the victim’s comfort
and ease in accessing services as the primary
goal.]
6
See www.dvert.org. The Domestic Violence
Enhanced Response Team (DVERT)
in Colorado Springs, CO, has been
operating since 1997. DVERT is operated by
the Colorado Springs Police Department and
has been nationally recognized for its
successful collaborative approach – developing
partnerships with 38 different public and private
agencies. DVERT was one of the first
co-located, multidisciplinary service approaches
to domestic violence in the country. Intensive
case management, crisis response, and a
coordinated community response have been
cited as the reason for successful
out-comes in cases handled by DVERT.
2
Building an Effective Coordinated Community
Response: Grants to Encourage Arrest Policies,
conference manual of the Battered Women’s
Justice Project, Washington, D.C.,
July 28-30, 1997. See Family Violence –
Building a Coordinated Community Response:
A Guide to Communities, Chicago, IL, 1996.
See Barbara Hart, Coordinated Community
Approaches to Domestic Violence, paper
presented at the Violence Against Women
Research Strategic Planning Workshop,
PEACE TALK - SUMMER 2011 | 11
Sojourner Family Peace Center
Non-Profit
Organization
U.S. Postage
PAID
Milwaukee, WI
Permit No.
5340
P.O. Box 080319
Milwaukee, WI 53208
ADDRESS SERVICE REQUESTED
You are not Alone.
Visit us at
www.familypeacecenter.org
If you are in an abusive relationship and
need help, call Sojourner Family Peace Center’s
24-Hour Hotline at (414) 933-2722.
Family Advocacy & Support Services
P: (414) 276-1911
F: (414) 276-5001
Shelter/24-Hour Hotline
P: (414) 933-2722
F: (414) 934-6079
Belle Resource Center
(414) 344-4466
Restraining Order Clinic
P: (414) 278-5079
F: (414) 223-1807
Domestic Abuse Victim Advocates
P: (414) 278-4978
F: (414) 223-8147
Beyond Abuse
(Batterer’s intervention program)
P: (414) 276-1911
F: (414) 276-5001
Administration
P: (414) 276-1911
F: (414) 276-5001
TTY
(414) 727-2342
2011 Board of Directors
Rebecca House, President
Kathy Donius, Vice-President
Kent Lovern, Secretary
Cynthia Rooks, Treasurer
Anne Brower
Betsy Brown Wyatt
Peggy Coakley
Jessica Cook
Coreen Dicus-Johnson
Rev. Seth Dietrich
Barbara Gilmore
Holly Gould
Jeanette Johnson
Tonja Jordan
Jim Orth
Eve Romersi
Jenifer Tate
Angela Mancuso and Carmen Pitre
Co-Executive Directors

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