Springdale Public Schools 2014 – 2015

Comentarios

Transcripción

Springdale Public Schools 2014 – 2015
1
Springdale Public Schools
2014 – 2015
Dear Parents and Students:
Please review the high school graduation policy. Graduation from Springdale Public Schools is the
responsibility of the student and parent. The school’s staff can and will give advice about the courses that
are offered, but ultimately success in high school rests upon the shoulders of each student. NO student will
be allowed to participate in graduation ceremonies without having successfully completed graduation
requirements prior to the date of graduation ceremonies.
The high school teachers and administrators are your greatest source of information when making course
selections for the coming year. Please consult the school website to learn more about each course we offer.
When questions arise should you need to call or email your high school to get information, please do so.
The appropriate person will return your call or set up an appointment with you, so that you can make
informed decisions about which courses to take. Courses listed in this booklet that do not attract enough
students during registration will not be offered.
Please plan on attending the CAP (Career Action Planning) Conference to choose your student’s schedule
for the upcoming year. The conference will be held at your school.
Har-Ber High School
will all meet on March 31st and April 1st from 4:30 – 7:30pm
Springdale High School
will all meet on April 2nd and April 3rd from 4:30 – 7:30pm
All schools will have CAP Conferences on April 4 th from 7:45am until 3:15pm.
We recommend that students and parents work together to plan the courses to be taken for the entire three
years of high school, not simply those to be taken during the coming year.
Regardless of the students’ post-high school plans, it is strongly recommended that students remain enrolled
in English, math, science, and social studies courses each year.
Sincerely,
School Administrators, Faculty, and Staff
Springdale High School
Mr. Peter Joenks, Principal
[email protected]
www.springdalehs.sharpschool.net/
750-8832 Fax – 750-8811
Cover art designed by:
James M. Ham - SHS
Har-Ber High School
Dr. Danny Brackett, Principal
[email protected]
www.springdalehb.sharpschool.net/
750-8777 Fax – 306-4250
2
Graduation Requirements
Smart Core (24 units)
English
4 units
English
9th, 10th, 11th, and 12th grades, AP Language, AP Literature, College Comp I, II
Oral Communications
½ unit
Mathematics
4 units
Algebra I
Geometry
Algebra II
Choice of: Advanced Topics & modeling in Mathematics, Pre-Calculus, Algebra III, Advanced Placement Statistics, AP
Calculus AB, AP Calculus BC, College Algebra and College Trigonometry. (Comparable concurrent credit college
courses may be substituted where applicable.) Note: Students are to be enrolled in a math course every semester,
throughout their high school careers.
Natural Science
Chosen from:
Physical Science
Biology - required
Chemistry
Physics or
Principles of Technology I &
Social Studies
Civics or American Government
Economics
World History
U.S. History
Physical Education
Health and Safety
Fine Arts
Career Focus/Electives
3 units with lab experience
II
3 units
½
½
1
1
unit
unit
unit
unit
½ unit
½ unit
½ unit
8 units
Core (24 units)
English
4 units
English 9th, 10th, 11th, and 12th grades
Oral Communications
½ unit
Mathematics
4 units
Algebra or its equivalent
1 unit
Geometry or its equivalent
1 unit
Plus two additional math units that build on the base of algebra and geometry knowledge and skills.
Science
3 units with lab experience
Chosen from:
At least one (1) unit of Biology
At least one (1) unit of Physical Science
Social Studies
3 units
Civics or American Government ½ unit
Economics
½ unit
World History
1 unit
U.S. History
1 unit
Physical Education
½ unit
Health and Safety
½ unit
Fine Arts
½ unit
Career Focus/Electives
8 units
3
Honor Graduate Requirements
Highest Honors:
Completion of the International Baccalaureate (IB) curriculum OR
Completion of Six (6) Advanced Placement units of credit
High Honors:
Completion of four (4) Advanced Placement or IB units of credit
Honors:
Completion of two (2) Advanced Placement or IB units of credit
PLUS
The following basic requirements:
3.50 Cumulative Grade Point Average based on 8 semesters
4 Credits of English
4 Credits of Math
(Including Algebra 1 & 2, Geometry and a 4th math above Algebra 2)
3 Credits of Science
(Including at least 2 lab sciences: Biology, Chemistry, Physics, or any AP Science course)
3 Credits of Social Studies
(American History, World History, Civics or American Government, Economics)
2 Credits of the Same
World Language
½ Credit each of
Oral Communication, Health, Physical Education, and Fine Arts
Other Graduation Notes
One half unit is earned for each course each semester.
Two units of Physical Science and one unit of Biology are required for all Smart Core students.
In addition to completion of the courses of study, students will be required to successfully complete state end-of-course
examinations. (Act 2243)
Students must be enrolled in Math and English every year.
Early Graduation
Requirements for graduation may be completed in less than four years. In order to graduate early, a student must
submit a letter of request signed by parents/guardians prior to the beginning of the senior year. Correspondence
course(s) may not be taken in lieu of the final semester of school.
Course Load
All students are required to attend Springdale High Schools for a full 7-period day.
*Exceptions to the above:
Eleventh and twelfth graders who are enrolled in an approved work program must be in attendance a minimum of 4 periods per day.
Fifth year seniors are only required to enroll in the number and types of courses necessary to fulfill their graduation requirements.
4
Grading System
Credit is based on Carnegie Units as per North Central Association guidelines. Therefore, a semester course is valued
as a half Carnegie unit. A year-long course is valued as one (1) Carnegie unit.
Grade Points
A= 4
B= 3
C= 2
D= 1
F= 0
IB/AP Grade Points**
A= 5
B= 4
C= 3
D= 2
F= 0
Grading Scale
90-100
80-89
70-79
60-69
59 & below
**Only for those courses designated as College Board Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate Programme.
Preparing for the Future
Research and experience of students, faculty, and administration indicate that students taking a solid high school core
of courses have better test scores and greater success in institutions of higher education. Advanced Placement and/or
International Baccalaureate coursework is strongly advised. To increase your chances of success, the following minimum
core of high school courses is recommended.
English - Four units
Science - Four units, with one Biology and two from the following: Physical Science, Chemistry or Physics. A fourth
unit can be a science elective
Mathematics – Four units including Algebra I & II and Geometry and one upper level math course (beyond Algebra II).
Social Studies - Four units, including one of American History, one of World History, one of Civics, and ½ unit of
Economics, and another Social Studies elective.
World Languages - Two units in the same world language
Getting Ready for
And
Paying for College
Consult the Planning Your High School Courses section to select the coursework that
best prepares your student for his/her future.
Take the PSAT, ACT, Compass, and other tests at the recommended time.
Take rigorous courses including Advanced Placement courses.
Consult with your high school counselor regularly.
Review the Senior Timeline to be sure that deadlines are met.
5
What Tests Should I Take?
PSAT/NMSQT
2nd week in October
Enroll: Counseling Center
Juniors - Qualification for National Merit Scholarship Competition
Sophomores - Practice only
(The fee is waived for sophomores as part of the AAIMS Initiative.)
ACT
Offered 5 times per year
Seniors encouraged to take in the Fall
Juniors encouraged to take in Spring
Register online at www.actstudent.org or check with the Counseling Center for a registration packet.
Students qualifying for Free or Reduced Lunch should see their counselor for a fee waiver.
(The ACT exam includes an interest inventory, biographical data, and four tests of education development that are
used by colleges for admission, advising, course placement, and scholarship selection.)
The ACT is intended for those students who have completed or enrolled in at least Algebra II.
SAT I - Reasoning Test
SAT II - Subject Tests
Offered 5 times
Seniors encouraged to take in the fall; juniors in the spring
Registration packets available in Counseling Center or register online at www.collegeboard.com
(The SAT I exam is primarily a multiple-choice test that measures verbal and mathematical reason abilities. Some
colleges also require SAT II subject tests.)
Compass Test
COMPASS is a comprehensive computer-adapted testing system from ACT that helps place students into appropriate
college courses and maximizes information needed to ensure student success.
Offered at NWACC, NTI, HBHS and SHS
Contact your Counseling Center to sign up.
Arkansas Scholarships
The Arkansas Department of Higher Education offers scholarship and grant programs to qualified graduating seniors. For
complete information, visit the Arkansas Department web site, your one-stop shop for Arkansas state financial aid at
www.adhe.edu.
Arkansas Academic Challenge (Lottery) Scholarship
The Arkansas Academic Challenge (Lottery) Scholarship is open to high school seniors and non-traditional students
who are Arkansas residents. High school seniors must have an overall grade point average of at least a 2.50 in the
Smart Core curriculum OR a composite of at least 19 on the ACT OR the equivalent on a COMPASS test.
Note: Completion of the Smart Core curriculum with a 2.5 GPA will be required for consideration for this
scholarship.
6
All students applying for the Arkansas Academic Challenge (Lottery) Scholarship MUST submit the FAFSA (Free
Application for Federal Student Aid) AND the Arkansas Academic Challenge (Lottery) application at www.adhe.edu.
Application period is January 1 – June 1.
Arkansas Governor’s Scholarship
The Arkansas Governor’s Scholarship Program is open to high school seniors with a 27 ACT or a 1220 SAT or a 3.5 grade
point average. Up to 300 Governor’s Distinguished Scholars - $4,000 annually – are awarded. Application deadline is
February 1. To apply go to the www.adhe.edu web site.
Sports Scholarships, Athletic Scholarships and
Financial Aid for Student Athletes
The NCAA Clearinghouse can be accessed by calling toll free 1- 877-262-1492 or going to the web site at
www.ncaaclearinghouse.net. The clearinghouse is available for students and parents to provide general information
about NCAA Division I and Division II initial-eligibility requirements. It is the responsibility of the parent and the student
athlete to know all the eligibility requirements in order to register with the NCAA Clearinghouse. Below is a Quick
Reference Sheet to help you KNOW THE RULES:
Core Courses
NCAA Division I and II requires 16 core courses.
Please see Shane Patrick, Assoc AD, SHS or Chris Wood, Assoc. AD, HBHS if you are interested.
Test Scores and Grade-Point Averages for each Division are listed annually on the Clearinghouse web site.
DIVISION I & II
16 Core-Course Rule
4
3
2
1
2
4
years of English
years of Mathematics (Alg. 1 or higher)
years of natural/physical science (1 year of lab science)
year of additional English, Mathematics or natural/physical science
years of social science
years of additional courses (from any area above or World language or nondoctrinal religion/philosophy)
College Timeline Checklist
The following guidelines provide a skeleton list of activities to consider at each grade level as you prepare
for college. For more completely information, consult your counselor.
Grade 10




August
Keep in mind that competitive colleges are more impressed by respectable grades in challenging courses than
by outstanding grades in less difficult ones.
Check credits to make sure you are on schedule for completing graduating requirements.
Consult college web sites to make sure your courses meet college entrance requirements.
Consider participating in clubs/activities.
7
September



Register to take the PSAT if you have taken or are currently enrolled in geometry. Consider participating in a
PSAT preparation program.
Review for the PSAT. Study the PSAT/NMSQT Student Bulletin and old tests. Use web sites, computer
software, and printed aids for study.
Get involved in clubs/school activities.
October

Take the PSAT. On the test form, check the box which will put you on the mailing list for college
information.
December/January

Study your PSAT score report. Compare items missed with the correct response.
Throughout the Year






Continue taking appropriate courses. Research shows that full participation in academically challenging
courses is the best preparation for college entrance examinations and for success in college.
Maintain good grades.
Gather and review information about colleges.
Investigate costs of various college programs.
Continue to review career choices. The ACT website (www.actstudent.org) has an excellent six-step
planning guide in the Life Roles section for parents to help you with this important process.
Take interest inventory if available.
Grade 11

May/June
Athletes who plan on playing college level sports need to register with the NCAA clearinghouse. The website
is www.ncaastudent.org.
August




Get off to a good start this semester. Your junior year grades are very important. Take as many academic
courses as possible.
Check credits to make sure you are on schedule for meeting graduation requirements.
If possible, narrow your career interests to one or two fields.
Continue volunteering for community service.
September





Register to take the PSAT.
Start thinking more seriously about what sort of college you would like to attend. Use resources listed
earlier in this guide to find the school that’s right for you. The College Board website may help you get
started.
Log on to Tassel Time to find options on how to pay for college. See your counselor or the Career Center on
how to long on.
Register for a PSAT preparation class if available.
Review for the PSAT. Study the PSAT/NMSQT Student Bulletin and old tests. Use computer software,
websites, and printed aids. Consider participating in a preparation program.
October

Take the PSAT for National Merit Scholar recognition. On the test form, check the box which will put you on
the mailing list for college information.
October/November

Write to the colleges that interest you.
December


Study college information.
Collect information on scholarships and financial aid programs.
January/February

If you plan to apply for an ROTC scholarship or admission to a service academy, write for application packets.
8

Check registration deadlines for the SAT, ACT, and other appropriate tests and take preparation class if
available.
March/April

Plan program of study for senior year with your counselor. Learn about opportunities to earn college credit
for advanced placement. Take as many academic courses as possible. Register for college entrance tests.
May/June





Participate in a SAT/ACT preparation program.
Take SAT or ACT.
Take Achievement Test(s).
Continue to develop strong study habits.
Explore opportunities for college dual-enrollment credit.
Summer (Before Senior Year)





Select the top five to ten colleges you feel best meet your needs. Try to pare your list to five or six by
August. Make sure to include a “sure bet”, two or three “good prospects”, and a “dream” school.
Visit college campuses. You only get two college visit days during your senior year.
Keep a record of the advantages and disadvantages of each college.
Request catalogs, applications, financial aid information, and specific information about your proposed major
area of study.
In August begin thinking about personal statements for college admission essays. Reflect on interesting
experiences you have had. Think about how you might explain how you are different from other students.
Grade 12
The repeated references to dates of the various SAT and ACT tests are not meant to imply that you should take them
every time they are listed. You should determine which dates are the most appropriate for you, keeping in mind
application deadlines. If you need assistance in this decision, please be sure to check with your guidance counselor.
August

Check your credits. Be sure you have all of the required courses and credit for graduation. Make any
adjustments needed in your schedule to meet the requirements for graduation or the requirements at the
particular college you wish to attend. Think about volunteering for community service.
September









Meet with your guidance counselor to review your records. Match these with the entrance requirements of
the colleges you are considering. Make a list of your activities and awards. Update this list throughout the
fall.
Register for and take college admissions tests if you haven’t already.
Choose a minimum of three to five colleges to which you will apply. Your selection should include at least
one that you feel will definitely accept you. Athletes should discuss their ability to play at college level with
the respective coaches.
Go to the college websites to complete your applications for admissions at the schools of your choice. Your
college may take the “common application” that is used by many colleges and universities. Check
www.commonapp.org.
Begin thinking more seriously about your financial aid needs. Calculate your Estimated Family Contribution
(ESF) and judge whether you will need a scholarship, grant, loan, or work/study program. You can find
assistance at the web site addresses provided earlier in this guide.
Get an early start on applying for scholarships and grants. You can apply throughout the year, but start now.
Check college catalogs and web sites for applications for admissions, housing, financial aid, required
entrance exams (SAT or ACT) and deadlines for financial aid forms (FAFSA). If you are a candidate for early
decision, file your application in time to meet that deadline. Also be sure to check the LAST acceptable test
date for an early decision candidate. Parents and students need to be aware of the contractual obligations
for early decisions.
Register to take the appropriate college entrance exam.
Talk with teachers and other people who know you well and whom you will ask to write a recommendation
for you.
9





Prepare a resume to assist any person from whom you will request a letter of recommendation.
Schedule college tours. Check your school calendar for dates when you are not in school other than holidays.
Use these. Call ahead for an appointment.
Meet with college representatives when they visit your school.
Maintain good grades.
Distribute applications and recommendation forms to guidance counselors and teachers for completion of
their sections. (Teachers and counselors are asked to write numerous recommendations; always allow at
least four weeks for them to complete recommendations.)
October





Make more college visits.
Arrange sending of transcript and recommendations to colleges. Provide a stamped, addressed envelope if
needed.
Begin to fill out application forms. Many colleges require essay responses. Allow yourself ample time to do a
good job. Request that an English teacher check your essay for grammar, spelling, punctuation, style, etc.
(Again, allow sufficient time for the teacher to check and make suggestions.)
Meet application deadlines for early decision (usually November 10), housing, scholarships, or financial aid.
Take/retake the SAT/ACT if necessary.
November



Continue to study hard because your first semester senior year grades are very important.
Research the quality of the departments at colleges you like the most. Ask questions of current students
when you visit. If interested in a pre-professional program, check on the placement record for the
university.
Complete college applications for admissions. Follow up on letters of recommendation. Request transcripts
as needed. Copy ALL forms before you mail them. Mail to meet deadlines.
December




Look back over your timeline to be sure you have completed each step in the college admissions process.
Request that SAT or ACT scores be sent to all colleges to which you have applied. If you did not list them
when you registered for the tests, fill out the special form for additional college scores. These forms are on
the ACT/SAT websites.
Expect notification of early decision acceptance or deferral by December 15. If you are not accepted, file
your other applications IMMEDIATELY.
Ask your parents to begin gathering their financial information.
January


File your FAFSA as soon as possible after January 1. The FAFSA website is www.fafsa.ed.gov. (Estimate the
required tax information if your tax forms are still incomplete. It is best if your family completes tax returns
by the end of the month.) Pay attention to the deadline since some states require an earlier deadline than
others. Keep a photo copy for your records.
Research for scholarships and loans. Log onto Tassel Time for more information.
February


Keep your grades up….finish strong….remember that you will be accepted to college.
Check deadlines for financial aid/scholarship grants. Many forms are due March 1.
March



Check dates for Advanced Placement test if needed.
Check new College tips and bulletin boards for scholarship deadlines.
Make certain all scholarships are completed and mailed.
April



Look for acceptance notices. April 15 is the most popular date for some competitive colleges to notify
students. Let your counselor know what has happened.
Choose your college and write the college a letter of acceptance, which the college should receive before
May 1.
Write other colleges to decline their acceptance (also before May 1).
10





If you are wait-listed and with to be kept in consideration, be sure to advise the college.
If all colleges send rejections, don’t panic! There are several alternatives. See your counselor.
Finalize plans for housing, financial aid, and/or scholarships.
Make any deposit required by the institution you plan to attend. May 1 is the generally accepted nationwide
deadline for deposits for fall term.
If applicable, register for Advanced Placement Tests. List colleges you wish to receive your scores.
May







Make final choice of college or university if you have not already done so. Complete all details concerning
college admissions.
Notify your counselor of your final college choice and whether you have been awarded any scholarships
(academic, athletic, artistic, dramatic, or musical).
Request that a final transcript be sent to your college choice.
Take Advanced Placement Tests.
Attend Senior Practice Assembly and Graduation.
Sign up in the Counseling Center for your final transcript to be mailed to all colleges of your choice.
Return all books, equipment and uniforms. Pay any fines and clear any holds on your records or diploma.
June
HAVE A HAPPY GRADUATION
July/Summer before College Freshman Year



When you receive your Advanced Placement Test grades, if you have not already requested that the scores
be sent to the college that you will be attending, request College Board to do so.
Participate in the orientation program of the college you will attend. This may have occurred in the spring
or may take place just prior to the fall term.
Check on opportunities to pre-register for fall term classes. Learn about campus resources and facilities.
Scholarship and Financial Aid Resources
Free Application for Federal Student Aid: www.fafsa.ed.gov
Arkansas Department of Higher Education: www.adhe.edu
Arkansas Student Loan Authority: www.fundmyfuture.info
General College Information: www.tassseltime.com
Archer Learning Center
The Archer Learning Center is designed to adequately prepare high school students for their desired college and career.
This is achieved through personalized instruction, small classes, the use of technology, and the hiring of dedicated,
fully-certified teachers.
Admission:
Unlike most schools, students must apply to attend the Archer Learning Center. Students are chosen based on academic,
social, and personal needs. Students are able to earn up to eight credits per year.
Class Size:
By state policy, classes at the Archer Learning Center are limited to fifteen students. The low student to teacher ratio
enables all pupils to receive personalized instruction by caring teachers.
Technology:
11
The Archer Learning Center is committed to preparing students for 21st Century. Last year, the district invested heavily
in technology. The school is equipped with over 100 new computers. Furthermore, nearly half of the classrooms are
equipped with Promethean Boards. These tools promote student engagement, the use of multimedia instruction, and
pupil interaction.
Faculty:
All teachers at the Archer Learning Center are certified to teach their content. All teachers participate in a minimum
of 60 hours of professional development per year.
Instructional Support:
In order to support teachers and students, the Archer Learning Center is staffed with full time mathematics, literacy,
and ELL coaches. These individuals promote sound teaching practices, the analysis of student data, and Common Core
State Standards.
Community Partnerships:
At the Archer Learning Center, we believe that learning extends beyond the classroom. The school has many partnerships
throughout northwest Arkansas. These partnerships include the University of Arkansas, the Jones Center for Families,
and many local businesses. These partnerships support the needs of the whole student as they prepare for their postsecondary education.
The Archer Mission:
The Archer Learning Center faculty, in collaboration with parents and community members, will provide a safe
environment and will meet the needs of the whole student by re-engaging students in rigorous and relevant learning
process to prepare them for college and careers, healthy life styles, and to be productive members of society.
Four Year Plan
Plan your next four years:
Read the graduation requirements on the previous page carefully.
The Smart Core curriculum is best for most students.
Read the requirements for Honor Graduates.
Remember that one semester each of health, physical education, fine arts, and oral communications must be
completed during the high school years.
Select at least two years of the same World language if you want to be an honor graduate. This is also a requirement
for some scholarships.
Take as many Advanced Placement courses and as rigorous a curriculum as you can.
Consult the departmental sections on the following pages. Select your electives based upon your career choices.
Look ahead and make sure you have met the prerequisites for the courses you want to take in subsequent years.
10th Grade Schedule Planning:
All students need to be able to use computer software well. Consider taking Computer Applications I and II during to
sophomore year. This will also meet the prerequisite for advanced computer classes.
Students who plan to be Honor Graduates need to take 2 years of the same World language.
Many areas of study have a 3-year sequence of courses. The following courses need to be completed during the
sophomore year by students who wish to complete the full sequence of courses:
Art - Art I (yr.)
12
Construction Technology - Construction Fundamentals (yr.) - HBHS Only
Culinary Arts - Foods & Nutrition (sem.) and Introduction to Culinary Arts (sem.) - SHS Only
EAST - EAST I (yr.)
Graphic Arts - Fundamentals of Advertising and Graphic Design (yr.)
IT/Programming - Pre-AP Computer Science - Alice (1st sem.) & Pre-AP Computer Science - Java (2nd sem.)
Television Production - Fundamentals of Television (yr.)
Theatre - Theatre I (yr.)
There are many other electives open to 10th graders listed on the following pages.
13
High School Courses
Grades 10 - 12
PSAT/ ACT Prep
PSAT Prep Course
999990
10, 11, 12 – 1 semester, ½ credit
This course will prepare students to take the PSAT National Merit Scholarship test. This class will focus on learning and
practicing test-taking techniques as well as reviewing content to improve scores on the PSAT. Time management,
anxiety relief and general test-taking skills will also be included in the curriculum. Students will take official previouslyadministered exams for practice, and progress will be monitored. This class is recommended for college-bound students.
ACT Prep Course
999990
10, 11, 12 – 1 semester, ½ credit
This course will prepare students to take the ACT college entrance test. This class will focus on learning and practicing
test-taking techniques as well as reviewing content to improve scores on the ACT. Time management, anxiety relief
and general test-taking skills will also be included in the curriculum. Students will take official previously-administered
exams for practice, and progress will be monitored. This class is recommended for college-bound students.
English
English 10
411000
10 - 1 year, 1 credit
Open to all students
English 10 is a sophomore course. Students are expected to read works of fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and drama, and
to study the elements of literature. Students are exposed to a variety of reading strategies and given common
assessments in content, practical, and literary reading. At the conclusion of Q4, students write a fully developed literary
analysis, using the literature studied in the course, and take an end of course exam to demonstrate an understanding
of reading comprehension.
Pre-AP Literature and Composition 10
411007
10 - 1 year, 1 credit
Students complete work each week in the following areas: reading and responding to a variety of literary works; writing
in a variety of forms for different audiences and purposes, including several critical analysis essays each quarter;
studying a unit of vocabulary words each week; keeping a notebook; maintaining a portfolio; reviewing grammar, usage,
and mechanics of compositions; completing at least one major project.
English 11
412000
11 - 1 year, 1 credit
Open to all students
In English 11, students review grammar and usage and receive instruction in American literature (i.e. fiction, poetry,
drama, and essay), and composition (i.e. paragraph, theme, and analysis of literature). Two courses of English 11 are
offered - Regular and Advanced Placement. Each course has the same general content; however, the courses differ in
the materials used, the pace of study, and the intensity.
14
English 12
413000
12 - 1 year, 1 credit
Open to all students.
In English 12, students review grammar and usage and receive instruction in world literature (i.e. fiction, poetry, drama,
and essay) and composition (i.e. essay, summary, business letter and resume, research paper, and literary analysis).
Two choices of English 12 are offered - Regular and Advanced Placement. Each course has the same general content;
however, the courses differ in the materials used, the pace of study, and the intensity.
AP Language and Composition
517038
11 - 1 year, 1 credit at SHS; 12 - 1 year, 1 credit at HBHS
Advanced Placement Language and Composition is a college-level course. Students will read nonfiction prose from a
variety of periods, disciplines, and contexts; write in a variety of forms for different audiences and purposes; learn to
analyze style and apply that analysis to nonfiction prose; complete a research paper according to MLA guidelines; study
vocabulary; review grammar, usage, and mechanics of compositions; and prepare for the APLAC exam that is
administered in May.
AP Literature and Composition
517048
12 - 1 year, 1 credit at SHS; 11 - 1 year, 1 credit at HBHS
Advanced Placement Literature and Composition is a college-level course. Students will read and respond to a variety
of literary works; write at least five critical analysis essays each quarter; study a unit of ten vocabulary words per week
with a cumulative test each quarter; maintain a portfolio; learn to analyze the elements of style and apply that analysis
to short stories, novels, poetry, and drama; improve critical thinking skills; review grammar, usage, and mechanics of
compositions; work towards increasing ACT scores; and prepare for the AP exam administered in May.
English Composition I & II (Concurrent Credit)
519900519905 - SHS
12 - 1 year, 2 credits
(See Northwest Arkansas Community College section p60 & 61)
Language Arts Electives
Speech
Oral Communication
414000
10, 11, 12 - 1 semester, ½ credit
This course meets high school graduation requirements. Areas covered include the communication process, public
speaking, oral interpretation, problem-solving, and mass communications.
Competitive Speaking I/Oral Communication
414050
10, 11, 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
This is a speech course offered to students interested in entering competitive speech. Areas of concentration are in
dramatic and humorous interpretation, solo and duet acting, readers, theatre, and poetry and prose interpretation.
Students practice communicating in different group situations. Students learn how to prepare notes and outlines for
speeches and practice giving speeches. With guidance from the speech coach, the students choose and prepare
selections for competition. Participation in tournaments is encouraged, but not required. Must be able to meet AAA
rules.
Competitive Speaking II
414060
11, 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
Prerequisite: Teacher approval.
Students participate on the experienced level of competition at tournament. They work on more advanced projects and
students may participate at the Arkansas Student Congress. Tournament participation is required. Must be able to
meet AAA rules.
15
Competitive Speaking III
414070
12 - 1 year, 1 credit
Prerequisite: Teacher approval.
This course is for the students ready to compete at the championship level at tournaments. Students also serve as peer coaches
for less advanced competitors. Tournament participation is required. Must be able to meet AAA rules.
Journalism
Journalism I
493680
10, 11, 12 - 1 semester, ½ credit
Journalism I is a one-semester course designed to introduce students to the world of media. Students in Journalism I
will become analytical consumers of media and technology to enhance their communication skills. Writing, technology,
and visual and electronic media are used as tools for learning as students create, clarify, critique, and produce effective
communication. Students will learn journalistic guidelines for writing, design, and photography, which include
objectivity, responsibility, and credibility.
Journalism II
415010
10, 11, 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
(May be taken all 3 years for credit)
Prerequisite: B or better in Journalism I or teacher approval.
Journalism II is a two-semester course designed to provide students with an intermediate study of media applications
above Journalism I. Students will progress in their academic knowledge through the roles of reporters, photographers,
ad sales, and marketing team members. Students will learn to apply journalistic guidelines for writing and design, which
include objectivity, responsibility, and credibility. In this course, students will publish a quality school newspaper
electronically with the primary purpose of providing a means of communication among students, faculty, administration,
school board, parents, and community.
Journalism III
415020
10, 11, 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
(May be taken all 3 years for credit)
Prerequisite: B or better in Journalism II or teacher approval.
Journalism III is a two-semester course designed to immerse students in the production process through an advanced study of
media production. Students will use academic knowledge gained in Journalism I and II to assume leadership roles and/or
become advanced writers, designers, and photographers. Students will adhere to journalistic guidelines for writing and design,
which include objectivity, responsibility, and credibility. This course is an intermediate study of newspaper production and
publication. These students will participate in the publication process form the brainstorming phase to the final product
distribution.
Yearbook I
493690
10, 11, 12 - 1 semester, ½ credit
This course concentrates on feature writing, yearbook layout and design, theme development, coverage, content, planning
and the principles of photography. Students learn the techniques for producing a modern school yearbook. Practical
experience includes interviewing, photography, and the business aspects of the high school yearbook. Upon successful
completion of this course, students may apply for membership on the Yearbook staff.
Yearbook II
493700
10, 11, 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
(May be taken all 3 years for credit)
Prerequisite: Introduction to Yearbook or teacher approval.
Yearbook II is a two-semester course designed to provide students with an intermediate study of media applications above
Yearbook I. Students will progress in their academic knowledge through the roles of reporters, photographers, ad sales, and
marketing team members. Students will learn to apply journalistic guidelines for writing and design, which include objectivity,
responsibility, and credibility. In this course, students are responsible for the entire production of the high school yearbook.
Using advanced computer technology, students market, design and photograph and copy edit the school's yearbook.
16
Yearbook III
493710
10, 11, 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
(May be taken all 3 years for credit)
Prerequisite: Introduction to Yearbook II or teacher approval.
Yearbook III is a two-semester course designed to immerse students in the production process through an advanced study of
media production. Students will use academic knowledge gained in Yearbook I and II to assume leadership roles and/or
become advanced writers, designers, and photographers. Students will adhere to journalist guidelines for writing and design,
which include objectivity, responsibility, and credibility. Yearbook III is an intermediate study of yearbook production and
publication. These students will participate in the publication process from the brainstorming phase to the final product
distribution.
World Languages
World Language courses are recommended as part of a College and Career Readiness plan. All Modern Languages and Spanish
for Heritage and Native Speaker courses qualify as World Language credit. Two consecutive years of the same language is not
required for graduation but is highly encouraged for college acceptance. It is the expectation of Springdale Schools that
students who begin language courses in 8th, 9th or 10th grade will continue until their senior year.
Modern Languages I, II, III, and IV provide basic instruction in pronunciation, aural comprehension, vocabulary, and grammar,
and lead to increased communicative and cultural proficiency in the target language(s). Target language cultures, traditions,
and current events are introduced on the appropriate level through selected readings, audio/visual recordings, and other
authentic materials. Listening, speaking, writing, role-playing, and group activities are designed to instruct, reinforce, and
connect language skills. Modern Languages I, II, III, and IV include applications, problem solving, higher-order thinking skills,
and performance-based and project-based assessments. This course description applies to French, German, Spanish and
Chinese languages levels I - IV.
French I
441000
9, 10, 11, 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
French II
441010
10, 11, 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
Prerequisite: C in French I.
French III
441030
10, 11, 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
Prerequisite: C in French II.
French IV
441040
10, 11, 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
Prerequisite: C in French III.
German I
442000
10, 11, 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
German II
442010
10, 11, 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
Prerequisite: C in German I.
17
German III
442030
11, 12-1 year, 1 credit
Prerequisite: C in German II.
German IV
442040
11, 12-1 year, 1 credit
Prerequisite: C in German III and/or teacher recommendation.
Mandarin Chinese I
447000
10, 11, 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
Spanish I
440000
8, 9, 10, 11, 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
Spanish II
440020
10, 11, 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
Prerequisite: C in Spanish I.
Spanish III
540030
10, 11, 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
Prerequisite: C in Spanish II.
Spanish IV
540040
10, 11, 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
Prerequisite: C in Spanish III or Spanish for Native Speakers I-III, placement assessment, and teacher recommendation.
Spanish for Heritage and Native Speakers I, II, and III are intended for native speakers (those raised in an environment
using mainly a language other than English) and heritage speakers (those raised in an environment where the language
was mostly likely spoken in the home). The courses provide a thorough review of the Spanish language and are conducted
entirely in Spanish. Students improve literacy through extensive, varied writing activities and exposure to a variety of
Hispanic literature, newspapers, magazines, films, music, and current Issues. Language skills are improved through oral
presentations, debates, and class discussions in both formal and informal settings. Hispanic culture and traditions are
presented to deepen students' appreciation of the native language. SHNS I, II, and III include applications, problem
solving, higher-order thinking skills, and performance-based, open-ended assessments with rubrics. Students should be
conversant in Spanish.
Spanish for Heritage and Native Speakers I*
540101
1 year, 1 credit
9, 10, 11, 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
Prerequisite: Placement assessment and/or teacher recommendation.
Spanish for Heritage and Native Speakers II*
540112
9, 10, 11, 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
Prerequisite: C in SHNS I, placement assessment, and/or teacher recommendation.
Spanish for Heritage and Native Speakers III*
540123
10, 11, 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
Prerequisite: C in SHNS II, placement assessment, and/or teacher recommendation.
AP Spanish Language & Composition
540078
10, 11, 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
18
Prerequisite: C in Spanish III, Spanish IV, or SHNS I, II or III, and AP Spanish teacher recommendation.
This course takes a holistic approach to language proficiency and recognizes the complex interrelatedness of comprehension
and comprehensibility, vocabulary usage, language control, communication strategies, and cultural awareness. It promotes
both fluency and accuracy in language use and does not overemphasize grammatical accuracy at the expense of
communication. Students develop awareness and appreciation of products, practices and perspectives, learn language
structures in context and use them to convey meaning, and are engaged in an exploration of culture in both contemporary
and historical contexts. When communicating, students demonstrate an understanding of the culture(s), incorporate
interdisciplinary topics, make comparisons between the native language and the target language and between cultures,
and use the target language in real-life settings. In order to best facilitate the study of language and culture, the course
is taught In Spanish.
AP Spanish Literature
540088
12 - 1 year, 1 credit
Prerequisites: AP Spanish Language or AP teacher recommendation.
This course is designed to provide students with a learning experience equivalent to that of a third-year college course
in literature written In Spanish. The course introduces students to the formal study of a representative body of texts
from Peninsular Spanish, Latin American, and U.S. Hispanic literature and provides opportunities for students to
demonstrate their proficiency in Spanish. Students are provided with ongoing and varied opportunities to further
develop their proficiencies across the full range of language skills, with special attention to critical reading and
analytical writing, and are encouraged to reflect on the many voices and cultures included in a rich and diverse body of
literature written in Spanish. Students will progress beyond reading comprehension to read with critical, historical and
literary sensitivity, and will be able to apply the skills they acquire in this course to many other areas of learning and
life.
Social Studies
World History
471000
10, 11, 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
The study of the events and forces, which have shaped human life since the beginning of recorded history. The events and
forces studied are political, social, or economic in nature. Students who plan to participate in the SHS International
Baccalaureate Programme (IB) should complete either World History or AP World History during their sophomore year.
AP World History
571028
10, 11, 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
This course develops greater understanding of the evolution of global processes. Emphasis is on contact and interaction
between different human societies over the last one thousand years. The course builds on an understanding of cultural,
institutional, and technological precedents that, along with geography, set the human stage for today’s new societies. The
goals are advanced through a combination of selective factual knowledge and appropriate analytical skills. See 471000
(World History) for information regarding IB.
American History
470000
10, 11, 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
Required course for graduation.
A study of our historical heritage with emphasis on the Civil War to present.
AP US History
570028
10, 11, 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
Students may take this AP course even if they have already taken regular US History.
This survey course covers the discovery and settlement of the New World to the modern era. Major focus is on political,
social and economic aspects of American history. The composition portion concentrates on literary analysis, essays on
historical trends, and summaries of historical works. It is designed to provide students with the analytic skills and factual
knowledge necessary to deal critically with the problems and materials in US history. The program prepares students for
intermediate and advanced college courses by making demands upon them equivalent to those made by full-year
introductory college courses. This course is designed to help students develop skills necessary to arrive at conclusions on
the basis of an informed judgment and to present reasons and evidence clearly and persuasively in a debate or essay
19
format.
Civics
472000
10, 11, 12 - 1 semester, 1/2 credit
Required course for graduation.
This course is a one semester course designed to introduce students to the rights and responsibilities associated with being
an American. Emphasis will be place on citizen participation in our democratic system in order to learn about the larger
goal of civic duty and responsibility in our community as well as our nation.
Government
472000
10, 11, 12 - 1 semester, 1/2 credit
This course covers political parties and the presidential election process; the powers and influence of the modern-day
presidency; Congress and how it operates; Congressional reform and the relationship of the U.S. and the world today.
AP United States Government and Politics
572048
11, 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
This class offers the opportunity to gain college credit through taking the AP exam. Both semesters include factual and
analytical concepts in government and politics. The content areas for 1st semester, AP Government and Politics: United
States, are as follows; current events, constitutional development, the executive, the judicial the legislative,
bureaucracy, political parties, pressure groups, the media, civil liberties, and civil rights. The 2nd semester, AP
Government and Politics: Comparative, focuses on the governmental development and current events of England, Russia,
China, Iran, Nigeria, and Mexico.
Psychology
474400
10, 11, 12 - 1 semester, 1/2 credit
This is an introductory psychology class. It emphasizes the scientific study of the behavior of man. The focus is on
concepts and terminology in the following subject areas; learning, memory, personality, stress, abnormal behavior, and
altered states. The student should be prepared to read, write, work in groups, do presentations, and think.
AP Psychology
579128
11, 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
The purpose of the AP course in Psychology is to introduce the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental
processes of human beings and other animals. Included is a consideration of the psychological facts, principles, and
phenomena associated with each of the major subfields within psychology. Students also learn about the ethics and
methods psychologists use in their science and practice.
AP Human Geography
579088
10, 11, 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the systemic study of patterns and processes that have shaped
human understanding, use, and alteration of Earth’s surface. Students employ spatial concepts and landscape analysis
to examine human social organization and its environmental consequences. Students will see how the population of the
world has turned the Earth’s space into place, leaving a human imprint on the land. For example, students will study
pop culture, population trends, migration and immigration and urban development.
Sociology
474500
10, 11, 12 - 1 semester, 1/2 credit
Sociology is the study of human populations, social behavior, and group interaction. Subjects explored are: racism and
minority groups, adolescence, gender roles and sex stereotyping, the population explosion, cults and propaganda, crime
and violence.
Economics
474300
10, 11, 12 - 1 semester, 1/2 credit
This course meets high school graduation requirements. Economics is a one-semester survey course that is designed
to help students gain an understanding of basic economic principles and institutions including scarcity, economic
20
systems, supply and demand, banking, the Federal Reserve, inflation, unemployment, and the role of government in
the economy. Students will be expected to participate in class in a number of different ways, including but not limited
to, note taking, group work, writing assignments, and class projects. Students’ primary resource for this class will be
their assigned texts as well as any outside readings provided by the instructor.
AP Macroeconomics & Microeconomics
579130/579140
11, 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
This course will first focus on the nature of the broader economic system as a whole. Emphasis will be placed on the
study of topics ranging from national income, inflation, unemployment, the measure of national economic growth to
international economics. The second semester focuses on the decision making process of individuals and firms within
the broader economic system. Emphasis will be place d on the nature and function of product markets. Attention will
also be paid to factor markets and the role of government in promoting efficiency and equity in the marketing place.
All enrolled students are expected to take the AP Macroeconomics and Microeconomics Exams.
PodClass Omni - SHS only
579040
11, 12 - 1 semester, 1/2 credit
In this class it is beneficial but not necessary for students to have access to personal iTouch/iPhone technology
for the purpose of downloading podcasts. Students will need to supply their own ear buds.
This elective class is a study of the interconnectivity of things students might not have known were connected and the
unexpected twists and turns of that connectivity. The class uses podcasts for its source material and will use multiple
topics with an emphasis on personalized learning based on where the podcasts lead the student. The podcasts include
“…stories that move you, challenge you, and make you think…your ears are a portal to another world.”
Mathematics
Four credits of math are required for each student and must be completed during the regular school year in
9th, 10th, 11th and 12th grades (one per year). Note: All seniors must be enrolled in a math class during
their senior year.
Geometry
431000
10 - 1 year, 1 credit
Prerequisite: Algebra I.
Students who require more time may be placed in a block class, by teacher recommendation only.
Geometry is a course that follows Algebra I. Students study the basic geometric figures while developing an
understanding of the formal structure and proof of geometry. This course helps students develop skills in logical thinking
needed in higher mathematics.
Advanced Geometry
431007
10th Grade Only - 1 year, 1 credit
Advanced Algebra 2 and teacher recommendation.
Students will be required to take the EOC.
This course is only open to students that have taken Algebra II or Advanced Algebra II and have not taken Geometry.
Students are required to take the End of Course Geometry exam at the end of the year. This course covers all topics in
Geometry with additional emphasis on special topics from Advanced Algebra II.
Bridge to Algebra II
435000
11, 12 – 1 year, 1 credit
Prerequisite: Students must have successfully completed coursework for Algebra I, but not Algebra II. Students may
enroll concurrently with Geometry but not concurrently with Algebra II.
(Not a college preparatory course)
Bridge to Algebra II was developed with the intent to provide students who have completed Algebra I, under the 2004,
amended 2006, Arkansas Mathematics Curriculum Framework (AMCF), with the additional math foundation they need to
21
be successful in a Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSS-M) Algebra II course.
Each student’s learning expectation for Bridge to Algebra II is intended to: reinforce linear concepts that were previously
included in the Algebra I Course; master quadratics and exponential concepts not included within the Arkansas
Department of Education Algebra I Curriculum Framework through modeling functions and summarizing, representing,
and interpreting data; or Introduce higher order concepts to prepare students for success in CCSS-M Algebra II.
Algebra II
432000
10, 11, 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
Prerequisite: Algebra I.
This course equips college-bound students with a working knowledge of the fundamentals needed for a college algebra
course. However, Advanced Algebra II is strongly recommended for students planning to specialize in fields requiring a
mathematical background. Algebra II does not serve as a prerequisite for Pre-Calculus.
Advanced Algebra II
432007
11- 1 year, 1 credit
Prerequisite: A in Algebra I and Geometry with teacher recommendation.
This course is an in-depth study of the algebra needed for higher mathematics such as Pre-Calculus and AP Calculus.
Advanced Algebra II is strongly recommended for students who will specialize in fields such as science, engineering, or
mathematics.
Pre-Calculus
433000
11, 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
Prerequisite: Algebra I, Geometry, Advanced Algebra II, and teacher recommendation. Algebra II does not meet this
requirement.
This course is for students interested in continuing their study of mathematics or related fields. Emphasis is on the study
of trigonometric functions, analytic geometry, some higher algebraic skills, and other related topics. A graphing
calculator is recommended for this course.
Algebra III
439070
11, 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
Prerequisite: Algebra I, Geometry, and A or B in Algebra II, or a C in Algebra II with teacher recommendation.
The purpose is to prepare college-bound students for non-mathematical majors in college. Emphasis is on improving and
extending algebraic skills. This course will provide the student with a working knowledge of algebra for College Algebra.
Advanced Topics and Modeling in Mathematics
439050
11, 12 – 1 year, 1 credit
Prerequisites: Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II.
This course builds on Algebra I, Geometry, and Algebra II to explore mathematical topics and relationships beyond
Algebra II. Emphasis will be placed on applying modeling as the process of choosing and using appropriate mathematics
and statistics to analyze, to better understand, and to improve decisions in analyzing empirical situations.
AP Calculus AB
534048
11, 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus.
AP Calculus AB is a college level mathematics course covering single-variable differential and integral calculus. This
course is equivalent to one semester of calculus at most universities. All students are required to have a graphing
calculator and are expected to take the AP exam.
AP Calculus BC
534058
11, 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
Prerequisite: AP Calculus AB.
AP Calculus BC is an extension of AP Calculus AB. This course covers topics in single-variable differential and integral
22
calculus including series and parametric, polar and vector functions. BC is equivalent to two semesters of calculus at
most universities.
AP Statistics
539038
11, 12 - 1 year 1 credit
Prerequisite: Advanced Algebra II or Algebra II with an A and teacher recommendation.
AP Statistics is an introduction to the most common statistical concepts including every aspect of data collection,
analysis and interpretation. These techniques are used in a wide variety of fields of study. All students are required to
have a graphing calculator and are expected to take the AP exam. Students can enroll simultaneously in this class with
Pre-Calculus or AP Calculus.
College Algebra Concurrent Credit
539900
(See Northwest Arkansas Community College section p60 & 61)
College Trigonometry Concurrent Credit
539905
(See Northwest Arkansas Community College section p60 & 61)
Science
The Springdale School District strongly recommends that college-bound students consider taking a Biology,
Chemistry, and Physics course in their high school curriculum. Students should also consider taking at least one or
two additional science courses as electives.
Biology
420000
10, 11 - 1 year, 1 credit – required for all students
Biology is the standard entry level science course for sophomores. A biology course is required by the ADE for graduation
in Arkansas. Since Chemistry and Physics usually have higher math prerequisites they are usually attempted in a student’s
junior or senior year. The course is laboratory-centered and investigates the major themes of biological science including:
the nature of the cell, the chemistry of living systems, inheritance and a study of DNA, plant and animal anatomy and
physiology, evolution, classification of living things, and scientific and social issues relating to biology. The course includes
group activities, oral presentations, and field work at the Lake Fayetteville Environmental Study Center.
AP Biology
520038
SHS: 10, 11, 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
HBHS:
11, 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
Prerequisite: Pre-AP Biology or an A in Biology.
Note: Biology 42000 is a graduation requirement and must be completed prior to enrollment in AP Biology.
AP Biology is equivalent to a two-semester college introductory biology course. The course design will also develop
advanced inquiry and reasoning skills, such as designing a plan for collecting data, analyzing data, applying mathematical
routines and connecting concepts in and across domains.
Anatomy and Physiology
424030
11, 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
Prerequisite: At least a C in Biology.
This advanced course concentrates on human anatomy and physiology. As the structures and functions of the body
systems are covered in class discussion, detailed dissection of an advanced animal is included. This course is for students
interested in a medical field or planning to study advanced biological sciences in college.
23
Environmental Science
424020
(Not a college preparatory class)
10, 11, 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
This is a laboratory investigative approach surveying environmental science, earth science, and meteorology through a
major emphasis on ecological interactions and man’s use of the earth and its resources. In addition, scientific, social,
geographical and economic issues are incorporated in the course work with an emphasis on specific case studies.
AP Environmental Science
523038
12 - 1 year, 1 credit
Prerequisite: The AP Environmental Science course is an excellent option for any interested student who has completed
two years of high school laboratory science - one year of Biology and one year of physical science. Due to the
quantitative analysis that is required in the course, students should also have taken at least one year of algebra. Also
desirable (but not necessary) is a course in earth science.
Note: This course fulfills a life science graduation requirement.
The goal of the AP Environmental Science course is to provide students with the scientific principles, concepts, and
methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world, to identify and analyze environmental
problems both natural and human-made, to evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems, and to examine
alternative solutions for resolving or preventing them.
Geology
425013
(Not a college preparatory class - elective science credit)
11, 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
This class will focus on Earth and its surroundings. Topics of interest will be the composition and history of Earth and
the forces that have changed and shaped it. Additional topics will include the oceans and outer space.
Physics
422000
10, 11, 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
Prerequisite: Grade of A or B in Algebra I, completion of Geometry, or Physics teacher approval.
This is a study of the science of matter and energy, which includes motion (mechanics), heat (thermodynamics), sound,
light, electricity and magnetism, and atomic theory. Emphasis is on problem solving. Experiments and demonstrations
are used to help understand concepts studied. This course is recommended for students who will be required to take
physics or physical science in such areas as architecture, nursing, biological science, agriculture, teaching, forestry,
food sciences, and computers.
AP Physics BI
522038
11, 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
Prerequisite: C in Advanced Algebra II, or C in Physics, or AP teacher approval.
This is the equivalent to a first-semester college course in algebra-based physics. The course covers Newtonian
mechanics (including rotational dynamics and regular momentum); work, energy, power, mechanical waves and sound.
It will also introduce electric circuits.
AP Physics B2
522030
11, 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
Prerequisite: C in Advanced Algebra II, or C in Physics, or AP teacher approval.
This is the equivalent to a second-semester college course in algebra-based physics. The course covers fluid mechanics,
thermodynamics, electricity and magnetism, optics; and atomic and nuclear physics.
AP Physics C- Mechanics
522058
10, 11, 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
Prerequisites: Currently in AP Calculus AB, BC, or teacher approval.
Instruction will be provided in six content areas: Kinematics; Newton’s laws of motion; work, energy, and power; systems
of particles and linear momentum; circular motion and rotation; and oscillations and gravitation. The course is designed
for students planning careers in engineering, architecture, physics, chemistry, mathematical sciences, and advanced
computer sciences. Students will take the AP exam for college credit and/or advanced placement in their college degree
24
program.
AP Physics C - Electricity and Magnetism
522048
10, 11, 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
Prerequisites: Currently in AP Calculus AB, BC, or teacher approval.
Students will develop a deep understanding of foundational principles of physics in electricity and magnetism by applying
these principles to complex physical situations that combine multiple aspects of physics rather than present concepts
in isolation. Students will develop critical thinking skills through applying methods of differential and integral calculus
to formulate physical principles and solve complex physical problems.
Chemistry
421000
10, 11, 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
Prerequisite: Enrollment in Geometry or higher math courses.
*10th admitted after completion of the Pre-AP Biology in 9th grade. They must also be enrolled in Geometry.
This is a laboratory investigative approach to the understanding of chemistry as a science. Students gather information
related to the structure of matter and seek to arrange this information into meaningful patterns. Strong emphasis is on
reasoning and problem-solving in preparation for the ACT. Laboratory experiments demonstrate chemical principles
covered in classroom work. Use of basic algebra is essential.
Pre-AP Chemistry
421007
10, 11, 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
Prerequisite: C or above in 9th grade Pre-AP Biology or teacher approval.
Pre-AP Chemistry is a first year chemistry course designed to meet the needs of the student who plans on continuing on
the AP science track (especially AP Chemistry) or taking a college chemistry class.
AP Chemistry
521038
11, 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
Prerequisite: At least a C in Chemistry I. A strong math background including algebra is highly recommended.
This year is the equivalent of first-year general college chemistry; thus, students who complete it and do well on the
AP exam will receive college credit for the course. The course differs qualitatively from the usual high school course in
chemistry in the kind of textbook used, the topics covered, the emphasis on chemical calculations and the mathematical
formulation of principles, and the kind of laboratory work. Emphasis is on oxidation-reductions, stoichiometry,
equilibrium, kinetics, and thermodynamics, experimentation, and research techniques. There is a required project.
Students are required to take the AP exam for college credit and/or advanced placement in their college degree
program.
Fine Arts
Music
**The following description is for all options of the Instrumental Music program. To enroll in these choices, you must
have a recommendation from the band directors. Instrumental music in the high school band places emphasis on
performance. The band performs at football games, marching contests, parades, Christmas concerts, etc. Participation
and quality of marching and playing are stressed.
Attendance at all performances is required.
Sophomore Band
45104I
(Instrumental II)
10 - 1 year, 1 credit
Prerequisite: Recommendation of Jr. High band director.
25
*This course consists of Marching Band combined with Symphonic Winds, Concert Winds, Varsity Winds, or Band Methods.
Junior Band
45105I
(Instrumental III)
11 - 1 year, 1 credit
Prerequisite: Recommendation of band director.
*This course consists of Marching Band combined with Symphonic Winds, Concert Winds, Varsity Winds, or Band Methods.
Senior Band
45106I
(Instrument IV)
12 - 1 year, 1 credit
Prerequisite: Recommendation of band director.
*This course consists of Marching Band combined with Symphonic Winds, Concert Winds, Varsity Winds, or Band Methods.
*Instrumental Music Ensembles
Marching Band-The marching band performs at half-time of all home football games. The band travels to all away
football games when transportation is available. The marching band performs at various marching contests
throughout the first semester. Attendance at all performances is required.
Symphonic Winds-Performs quality music at a quality level; studies wind and orchestra literature from all periods of
music. Emphasis is on performance and on individual improvement. This ensemble is active in All-Region and State
music festivals. Attendance at all performances is required.
Concert Winds-Emphasis is on performance of band music and individual student progress. This ensemble is active in
the same concerts and festivals as the Symphonic Winds. Attendance at all performances is required.
Varsity Winds-Emphasis is on performance and individual student progress. This ensemble is active in the same concerts
and festivals as the Symphonic and Concert Winds. Attendance at all performances is required.
Band Methods-This course is for students needing additional fundamental musical training. Emphasis is on tone
production, rhythm skills, scale development, and general musical knowledge. Attendance at all performances
is required.
Jazz Band I
45104J
10 -  1 year, 1 credit
Prerequisite:  Audition only.
The Jazz Band performs at all home basketball games and several concerts per year.  Travel is sometimes required.
 Emphasis is on jazz, blues, funk, and rock styles, as well as improvisational techniques.
Jazz Band II
45105J
11 -  1 year, 1 credit
(See Jazz Band I description)
Jazz Band III
45106J
12 -  1 year, 1 credit
(See Jazz Band I description)  
AP Music Theory
559018
11, 12 – 1 year, 1 credit
Prerequisite: Band, Choir or 2 years of piano (must read pitches on a staff, recognize duration of notes, and knows or
can easily learn basic keyboard skills).
This course is designed for those students interested in pursuing a career in music. They can learn the basics of music theory
and composition. This course is also important to students who want to further their music studies after high school. Students
will train in aural skills (ear training), basic composition, and basic music theory in accordance with The College Board
Advanced Placement Program Music Theory Course Description. This course will help prepare students for the AP exam.
26
A Capella Choir--SHS Only
452030
10, 11, 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
Prerequisite: Teacher approval.
Emphasis is on the study of music through performance of choral literature from all periods. The choir participates in
concerts, clinics, contests, and regional, state, national, and international events and is musically active throughout
the year. Attendance at concerts and contests is required.
Colla Voce-Women--SHS Only
45203L
10, 11, 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
Prerequisite: Teacher approval.
Emphasis is on performance and individual student improvement. This ensemble is active in the same concerts and
events as A Capella Choir. Attendance at concerts and contests is required.
Sophomore Select Choir--SHS Only
45200S
10 - 1 year, 1 credit
Prerequisite: Teacher approval.
Emphasis is on performance and individual student improvement. This ensemble is active in the same concerts and
events as A Capella Choir. Attendance at concerts and contests is required.
Concert Women--SHS Only
45200F
10, 11, 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
Prerequisite: Teacher approval.
This course is for students needing additional fundamental musical training before entering a performing group.
Emphasis is on tone production, rhythm skills, scale development, and general musical knowledge. Attendance at all
performances is required.
Unity--SHS Only
11, 12 [Non-Credit Course]
Unity is an auditioned group selected in May for the following school year. Unity performs for school events, civic and community
organizations. In addition, Unity presents the annual SHS Renaissance Christmas Feast. All rehearsals are after school hours.
All Unity members must be members of the A Capella choir.
Male Chorus--SHS Only
45200B
10, 11, 12  -  1 year, 1 credit
Prerequisite:  Teacher approval.
Emphasis is on performance of men’s music. This course is for students needing improvement and musical skills and
vocal
development.
Camerata Singers--HBHS Only
45204Z
10, 11, 12  -  1 year, 1 credit
Prerequisite: Teacher approval.
Emphasis is on the study of music through performance of choral literature from all periods.  The choir participates in
concerts, clinics, contests, regional, state, national, and international events. The choir is musically active throughout
the year. Attendance at concerts and contest is required.
Strata Singers--HBHS Only
45204S
10, 11, 12  -  1 year, 1 credit
Prerequisite:  Teacher approval.
Emphasis is on performance and individual student improvement.  This ensemble is active in the same concerts and
events as the Camerata Singers. Attendance at all performances is required.
27
Male Chorus--HBHS Only
45204B
10, 11, 12  -  1 year, 1 credit
Prerequisite:  Teacher approval.
Emphasis is on performance and individual student improvement. This ensemble is active in the same concerts and events
as the Camerata Singers. Attendance at concerts and contests is required.
Bel Canto--HBHS Only
45204B
10, 11, 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
Prerequisite: Teacher approval.
Emphasis is on the study of music through performance of choral literature from all periods. The choir participates in
concerts, clinics, contests, regional, state, national, and international events. The choir is musically active throughout
the year. Attendance at concerts and contests is required.
Select Singers--HBHS Only
45204S
10, 11, 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
Prerequisite: Teacher approval.
Emphasis is on performance and individual student improvement. This ensemble is active in the same concerts and
events as the Camerata Singers. Attendance at concerts and contests is required.
Art
Intro to 2-D Art
450080
10, 11, 12 - 1 semester, ½ credit
Prerequisite: None. (Fall only at HBHS)
This course is designed to provide students with the minimum requirement for the Fine Arts credit. Students will become
familiar with the basics of drawing, painting, and other two-dimensional media. The works of past and present artists,
art careers, and other cultures will be presented. A fee is required.
Intro to 3-D Art
450090
10, 11, 12 - 1 semester, ½ credit
Prerequisite: None. (Spring only at HBHS)
This course is designed to provide students with the minimum requirement for the Fine Arts credit. Students will
experience a variety of sculpture materials while learning the foundations of art. A fee is required.
AP Studio Art 2-D
559050
12 - 1 year, 1 credit
Prerequisite: Full year of Art III and teacher recommendation.
In this course, highly motivated students develop a portfolio of 24 2-D artworks (paintings, drawings, photographs,
collages, printmaking, etc.) under the guidelines of the College Board. At the end of the year, instead of a written
examination, each student is required to submit a digital portfolio of twelve works that reflect a variety of artistic
concerns, as well as a series of twelve works exploring a personal idea or theme. Five of these 24 works are mailed to
the College Board as well, for assessment. AP Studio Art is considered a college-level course; due to the demanding
requirements, the need for a strong personal interest in art, excellent individual work habits, and a willingness to work
several hours outside of the class are essential for success, along with a willingness to work with others in building the
community in the art classroom. Students will present their works publicly in a spring exhibition. A fee is required.
AP Studio Art 3-D
559060
12 - 1 year, 1 credit
Prerequisite: Full year of Art III and teacher recommendation.
In this course, highly motivated students develop a portfolio of sculptures, under the guidelines of the College Board.
At the end of the year, instead of a written examination, each student is required to submit a digital portfolio of works
that reflect a variety of artistic concerns, and a digital portfolio of works exploring a personal idea or theme. AP Studio
Art is considered a college-level course; due to the demanding requirements, the need for a strong personal interest in
art, excellent individual work habits, and a willingness to work several hours outside of the class are essential for
success, along with a willingness to work with others in building the community in the art classroom. Students will
28
present their works publicly in a spring exhibition. A fee is required.
Art I
450000
10, 11, 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
Prerequisite: None.
Art I is designed for students who have a strong interest in art. Painting, drawing, print making, and sculpture media
will be explored. Students will gain confidence in using design principles to create original, personal works of art. The
works of past and present artists will be presented, and students will gain fluency in the universal language of art. A
fee is required.
Art II
450030
10, 11, 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
Prerequisite: Full year of Art I.
Art II is a full-year course designed for students who have successfully completed a full year of Art I. Art II students will
further develop skills and expand their knowledge of art. Students will create original, complex compositions that
reflect personal growth and communicate ideas through a variety of materials and processes. A fee is required.
Art III
450040
11, 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
Prerequisite: Full year of Art II.
Art III is a full-year course designed for students who have successfully completed Art II. Students will continue to
develop art skills, but with more emphasis on art expression. Students will learn about the works of past and present
artists and about art in a variety of cultures. Students will exhibit their artworks, assemble a portfolio, and create a
series of artworks on a topic they choose themselves. A fee is required for this course.
Art IV
450050
12 - 1 year, 1 credit
Prerequisite: Full year of Art III.
Art IV is a portfolio-based course with an individualized approach to lessons. Students will learn to make choices that
allow them to search for their own ways of expression, while challenging them to improve their skills and knowledge
about art. Students will learn to conduct their learning experiences much as working artists do, with independent
research and idea development. Their works will represent a broad variety of design and media skills and different
ways of expressing, as well as exploring a single topic on a series. Among the challenges presented will be learning
practical ways of scheduling regular time for art, and students should expect to spend several hours weekly outside of
the class in order to succeed in this course. A fee is required.
AP Studio Art Drawing
559048
12 - 1 year, 1 credit
Prerequisite: Full year of Art III and teacher recommendation.
In this course, highly motivated students develop a portfolio under the guidelines of the College Board. At the end of
the year, instead of a written examination, each student is required to submit a digital portfolio of twelve works that
reflect a variety of artistic concerns, as well as a series of twelve works exploring a personal idea or theme. Five of
these 24 works are mailed to the College Board as well, for assessment. AP Studio Art is considered a college-level
course; due to the demanding requirements, the need for a strong personal interest in art, excellent individual work
habits, and a willingness to work several hours outside of the class are essential for success, along with a willingness to
work with others in building the community in the art classroom. Students will present their works publicly in a spring
exhibition. A fee is required.
Theatre
Theatre I
493540
10, 11, 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
This is an introduction to theatre. Class time is spent learning the basics of drama performance. Units include:
improvisation, voice and movement, pantomime, monologues, acting and script reading. This class is for the student
who would like to overcome stage fright and get a taste of what theater is all about.
29
Theatre II
493550
11, 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
Perquisite: Theatre I and teacher recommendation.
This class is a continuation of Theatre I. Students will cover units in acting techniques, theatre terminology, theatre history,
portfolio, script writing, radio, TV, film and interpretation. Students are encouraged to participate in play performances.
Theatre III
493590
12- 1 year, 1 credit
Prerequisite: Theatre II and teacher recommendation.
This class is for students with a serious interest in theatre. Students polish their talents in performance and technical theater
and continue to work on their portfolio and audition scenes to prepare for college scholarships as well as serving as actual
production staff. Students assume more individual responsibility for production and participation as performers, technicians
and theatre management crews. Grading is based on participation and accomplishment of duties assigned.
Health & Physical Education
All physical education courses follow state frameworks.
Health
480000
10, 11, 12 - 1 semester, ½ credit
Basic health offers information for healthy living. The course includes wellness, mental health, stress management and suicide
prevention, physiology of exercise, information on diabetes, cancer and cardiovascular diseases, training in CPR, family life
education, sexually transmitted diseases, and the effects of tobacco, alcohol, and drugs on the body. This course is required
for graduation.
Life Sports: Bowling--SHS Only
48500N
10, 11, 12 - 1 semester, ½ credit
Bowling offers basic instruction in fundamentals and techniques of bowling. The first nine weeks are used to learn to keep
score, establish average and handicap, and develop techniques. The second nine weeks are competition. Note: Bowling
instruction requires that students go by school bus to local bowling lanes. The cost is $1 per day to bowl.
General PE
485000
10, 11, 12 - 1 semester, ½ credit or 1 year, 1 credit
This course consists of general physical education activities, i.e. volleyball, tennis, soccer, basketball, weight training, social dance,
badminton.
Athletics
Information for All Sports and Performing Groups:
A physical exam is required before ALL tryouts. Parents must attend the parent meeting. All students must have a
coaches' approval to sign up. Students must meet the guidelines of the Arkansas Activities Association (grades, age,
residence, etc.) and policies of the Athletic Department. Practices may be before school, after school, or weekends.
Some travel may be required. All teams are competitive. Random drug testing is required. All athletics follow state
frameworks. Some require the purchase of special equipment by the student.
Sophomore Football
48502O
10 - 1 semester, ½ credit
Preseason practice begins the first week of August and lasts until school starts. The junior varsity and sophomores play
a nine game schedule with area schools.
30
Varsity Football
48502O
11, 12 - 1 semester, ½ credit
All interested boys should sign up for seventh period football. Preseason practice begins the first week of August and lasts
until school starts. The junior varsity and sophomores play a nine game schedule with area schools. The varsity plays a ten
game schedule and competes in the 7A West Conference.
Physical Training
48502Y
10, 11, 12 - 1 semester, ½ credit
This course develops the upper and lower body through a rigid running and weight training program. Fundamentals in
exercise, conditioning, nutrition, muscle development, and motor skills are emphasized. There is weight-training
competition with area schools.
Boys’ Cross Country/ Girls Cross Country
48502R
10, 11, 12 -1st sem. only, ½ credit
All boys and girls should sign up for seventh period cross country for the fall semester. Practice begins before the school
year in August. A full schedule will be established for competition. Check with coach concerning date for free physicals.
Boys’ Basketball/
Girls’ Basketball
48502B
48502F
10, 11, 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
All students interested should sign up for seventh period basketball. Tryouts are set in the spring by the coaches. A full schedule of
competition will be established for sophomore, junior varsity, and varsity teams.
Girls’ Volleyball
48502V
10, 11, 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
This sport is open to girls in grades 10-12. A tryout period will be held in March or in April of this school year. Practice
begins in August before school starts. There is a 16-20 game schedule including weekend tournaments. The team is
limited to the top 25-30 players. Volleyball meets before school and is scheduled for 1st period.
Boys’ Track
Girls’ Track
48502K
48502L
10, 11, 12 - 1 semester, ½ credit
All boys and girls interested should sign up for seventh period track second semester. A full schedule of competition will
be established.
Girls’ Fast-Pitch Softball
48502J
10, 11, 12 - 1 semester, ½ credit
This sport is open to all girls in grades 9 - 12. Any girl trying out for the team must meet the guidelines set forth by the
Arkansas Activities Association (grades, age, residence, etc.) and policy set forth by the High School athletic department.
The tryout period will be in May for the next year. The top 20-25 players are chosen for the varsity and junior varsity team.
A full schedule of competition will be established.
Boys’ Soccer
Girls’ Soccer
48502I
48502H
10, 11, 12
SHS - 1 semester, ½ credit, Spr. Sem.
HBHS - 1 year, 1 credit
All interested boys and girls should sign up for soccer when announced. Tryouts for these teams are held during the fall.
A full schedule of competition will be established.
31
Boys’ Baseball
48502A
10, 11, 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
All interested boys should sign up for baseball second semester. Tryouts for the team will be held in November. A full
schedule of competition will be established.
Tennis
48502T
10, 11, 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
The Tennis Team is open to all high school students’ grades 9-12. Students trying out for tennis team must meet the
Arkansas Activities Association guidelines and Springdale Athletic Department policy. Try-outs will be held in April for
the next school year and students must have a medical physical to try-out. Practice begins in August before school
starts. Tennis is 7th period during the school year and students must be willing to stay after school for practices and
scheduled matches. Varsity Tennis Boys is the top 6 players and Varsity Tennis Girls is the top 6 players. JV Boys and JV
Girls play when additional match time permits during the season.
Golf
48502G
Fall Only
9, 10, 11, 12 - 1 semester, ½ credit
The High School Golf Team is a competitive sport. There is competition with area schools, along with, conference and
state matches. The team is limited to the top 12 - 14 players. Only six students are eligible for the team. 9th graders
are eligible to try out for the team. Tryouts will be held in April and practices begin in August before school begins.
Men’s & Women’s Swimming
48502S
9, 10, 11, 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
In this competitive sport, open to all men and women in grades 9-12, swimmers practice the four competitive strokes, turns, and starts.
At season’s peak team members will swim 2-3 miles per practice. All interested students should speak to the coach, sign-up, and tryout
at least one month prior to the beginning of the season. There is a timed, skill-based tryout prior to the beginning of the season; the
top 25-32 swimmers are chosen to make up the team. A competition schedule will be established.
Wrestling
48502W
10, 11, 12 - 1 semester, ½ credit
This sport is open to students in grades 9 - 12. Any student trying out for the team must meet the guidelines set forth by
the Arkansas Activities Association (grades, age, residence, etc.) and policy set forth by athletic department. The tryout
period will be in the fall for the next year’s team and announced at the schools. The top athletes are chosen for the varsity
and junior varsity team. A full schedule of competition will be established.
Bowling
48502N
9, 10, 11, 12 - 1 semester, ½ credit
This sport is open to all boys and girls in grades 9 - 12. Any student trying out for the team must meet the guidelines set
forth by the Arkansas Activities Association (grades, age, residence, etc.) and policy set forth by the athletic
department. The tryout period will be in the fall and announced at the schools, it is a winter sport. The top players are
chosen for the varsity and junior varsity teams both boys and girls. A full schedule of competition will be established.
Dance Team
48500D
10, 11, 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
The composition of each group is determined by tryouts. Tryouts for the following year are in the spring. In order to be
in the tryouts in the spring, students must have been in attendance from the beginning of the semester.
Cheerleading Team
48500C
10, 11, 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
The composition of each group is determined by tryouts. Tryouts for the following year are in the spring. In order to be
in the tryouts in the spring, students must have been in attendance from the beginning of the semester.
32
Information Technology
The IT Academy and the IT Department are NWACC partners. Many of the courses listed below can provide college
credit. See the NWACC section for more details.
Accounting, Finance, and Management
Computerized Accounting I
492100
10, 11, 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
Fee: $5/2 reams of paper per semester.
Students will learn basic accounting principles required in keeping accurate financial records for a business. Students
will learn how to record and analyze the daily activities of a business. Students will create financial statements such as
Income Statements, Balance Sheets, Bank Reconciliation Statements and Capital Statements. Microsoft Excel software
is used to create computerized business forms. This course is an entry level course for all students with an interest in
business. This course is available to all students who meet the prerequisite.
IT Academy: Required course for Accounting and Management majors; elective for all IT majors.
Computerized Accounting II
492110
11, 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
Prerequisite: Computerized Accounting I
Fee: $5/2 reams of paper per semester.
The accounting principles learned in Accounting I will be expanded and further developed using more complex business
situations. They will be applied to the departmental and corporate systems. This class is totally computerized--using
spreadsheets and accounting software. This is a good choice for any student who plans to major in business or work in
an accounting or financial field.
Required course for IT Accounting major; elective for all IT majors.
Enterprise Management I/II*
492170/492180
11, 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
*NWACC Articulated Course
Students will learn business principles such as:
International Business: Learning about the business culture in other countries.
Marketing: How to sell your products/services effectively.
Economics: Meeting the needs of consumers in the marketplace; Management: Decision making, leadership,
and planning skills.
Finance: Analyzing financial services and statements, including insurance.
Technology: Develop computer skills in using Microsoft Office software to create business documents and
presentations.
It is recommended that students also enroll in Computerized Accounting I.
IT Academy: Required course for Management major; elective for all IT majors. IB students who plan to take IB Business & Management
HL should enroll in this course during the 10th or 11th grade.
IB Business & Management HL - SHS only
592209 - HL Year 1
(See IB section for details.)
592200 - HL Year 2
Personal Finance - SHS only
496020
10, 11, 12 - 1 semester, ½ credit
The intent of this course is to inform students how individual choices directly influence occupational goals and future
earnings potential. Real world topics covered will include income, money management, spending and credit, as well as
saving and investing. Students will design personal and household budgets, utilize checking and savings accounts, gain
knowledge in finance, debt and credit management, and evaluate and understand insurance and taxes. This course
provides a foundation for making informed personal financial decisions.
33
Introduction to Finance - HBHS only
492240
10, 11, 12 - 1 semester, ½ credit
Prerequisite: CA 1.
Introduction to Finance focuses on the individual’s role and financial responsibilities as a student, citizen, consumer,
and active participant in the business world. It informs students of their various financial responsibilities. This course
is designed to be taught in a one-semester format. Topics covered include: Money Management, Budgeting, Credit
Management, and Financial Security (Saving and Investing).
Business Law I - SHS only
492070
10, 11, 12 - 1 semester, ½ credit
This is a one-semester course designed to acquaint the student with the many applications of law governing our business
and personal affairs in today's legal environment and dynamic marketplace. Topics will include criminal law, civil (tort)
law, enforcement procedures and the courts, regulatory law for business firms, consumer protection, and contract law.
Business Law II - SHS only
492080
10, 11, 12 - 1 semester, ½ credit
This is a one-semester course covering standards of law which govern our business and personal affairs in today's legal
environment and dynamic marketplace. It is designed to help students better understand the business world in which
they live, gain confidence in conducting business, and be better prepared to recognize legal problems in management
of an enterprise. Topics will include credit and bankruptcy, employment and agency, forms of business organization,
real and personal property, and insurance.
Software Applications
All Students: Computer Applications I and II cover the fundamental computer skills needed to do well in high school and
college and needed in all careers. At many universities computer applications classes are no-credit courses. Students
are expected to be able to use word processing, spreadsheet, database, presentation, and sometimes web-page software
when they enter college.
Computer Applications I*
492490
10, 11, 12 - 1 semester, ½ credit
Software: Office 2010
Prerequisite: Keyboarding.
*NWACC Articulated Course
Students learn the fundamental word processing skills necessary to produce simple documents of various types using
bullets, numbered lists, special characters, borders and shading, special fonts, and paragraph and line formatting.
Internet searching and research skills are heavily stressed in this course to help prepare them for other classes. Students
are trained to use e-mail accounts properly. They learn to create and edit simple spreadsheets using the basic formulas
and functions. They also create and present a PowerPoint research project. All students should take this course. This
course is available to all students who meet the prerequisite.
*Students who are ELL Levels 1 or 2 should not take this course since it requires a substantial amount of re ading.
IT Academy: Required course.
Computer Applications II*
492500
10, 11, 12 - 1 semester, ½ credit
Software: Office 2010
Prerequisite: Computer Applications I.
*NWACC Articulated Course
Students learn intermediate spreadsheet skills, including formatting using styles, using common functions, and producing
technical graphs and charts. They continue in word processing learning to create sections, envelopes, labels, tables,
columns, graphic elements, styles, templates, and mail merges. Students learn beginning database skills including
creating tables, forms, reports, filters and queries. Projects include a spreadsheet/graphing research project, a resume
and letter of application, and a web site. All students should take this class to have the computer skills needed to do
well in their other classes, college, and careers. This course is available to all students who meet the prerequisite.
IT Academy: Required course.
34
Computer Applications III*
492510
10, 11, 12 - 1 semester, ½ credit
Software: Office 2010
Prerequisite: Computer Appl. II
*NWACC Articulated Course
Using FrontPage, students will create their own web sites. Students will learn beginning desktop publishing skills using
Publisher by creating business cards, newsletters, letterheads, and flyers. Students will also concentrate on possible
certification in Word and PowerPoint. They have three culminating real-world projects: a capstone project using
Publisher, Word and Access; an all-inclusive desktop publishing project; and a 10-minute presentation to the class using
advanced PowerPoint features. This course is available to all students who meet the prerequisite.
IT Academy: Elective course for all IT majors.
Web Technologies* (SHS only)
492670
10, 11, 12—1 year, 1 credit
Prerequisite: CA II.
*NWACC Articulated Course
This course is an exploration of all of the elements of good web page design. Students will begin by creating web pages
coding in HTML, XHTML and CSS. Students will investigate several Adobe software packages to enhance web sites such
as:
Adobe Photoshop to create and edit graphics
Adobe Flash to create animations and web banners
Adobe Premiere to create and edit videos and audio
Students will learn how to use web design software, Adobe Dreamweaver, to create interactive web pages. Students
will also use multimedia equipment such as digital cameras, camcorders, video capture devices and more. Students
will complete several real-world projects such as Flash videos, web pages, and the Senior Slide Show shown at the Senior
Assembly. Students will concentrate on possible certification in Dreamweaver. This course is available to all students
who meet the prerequisite.
IT Academy: Required course for Web Design major; elective for all majors.
Adv. Database Applications*
492140
10, 11, 12—1 semester, ½ credit
Prerequisite: CA II.
Software: Access 2010 and SQL
*NWACC Articulated Course
Students with advanced knowledge of database are widely sought after in today’s era of huge databases as evidenced
in companies such as Wal-Mart, Wal-Mart vendor companies, JB Hunt, Tyson, and the like. Students will work with
multiple table operations, forms and reports. Students will learn advanced database features to manipulate and present
data through advanced queries, calculated controls, macros, switchboards, subforms, subreports, joins, relationships,
and more. This course covers the integration of database systems and WWW pages. Students will also be provided the
technical skills to write basic SQL queries. Students will complete several real-world projects. This course is available
to all students who meet the prerequisite. Students will concentrate on possible certification in Access.
IT Academy: Required course for Web Site Design, Information Support Systems and Services and Marketing Research majors; elective
for all IT majors.
Adv. Spreadsheet Applications*
492450
10, 11, 12—1 semester, ½ credit
Prerequisite: CA II.
Software: Microsoft Excel 2010
*NWACC Articulated Course
In today’s world students must not only be able to use advanced spreadsheet tools, they must be able to analyze the
data to maximize a company’s profits. In this course, students will define and solve financial, logical, and financial
problems using Excel. Students will design, create, update and maintain workbooks, professional charts, templates,
macros, pivot tables. Students will write formulas, link and consolidate multiple worksheets, create lookup tables, and
explore other advanced features. Emphasis will be on the student’s ability to analyze business data to make decisions
about products, projects and strategic forecasting using real-world data. Students will concentrate on possible
35
certification in Excel. This course is available to all students who meet the prerequisite.
IT Academy: Required course for Accounting and Management majors; elective for all IT majors.
Programming and Computer Science
Students who plan to take AP Computer Science (Java) and IB Computer Science HL (Java) should take Pre-AP
Computer Science - Alice AND Java (or College Board Computer Science Principles) in the tenth grade to allow for
AP Computer Science in the 11th grade and IB Computer Science HL in the 12th. College Board Computer Science
Principles, AP Computer Science A, and IB Computer Science carry a 5-point A and count towards Honor Graduate
status.
College Board Computer Science Principles - SHS only
560010
10, 11, 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
Prerequisite: Enrollment in any Pre-AP or AP class.
This course is counted as an honors course with weighted credit and counts as an AP class toward Honor Graduate
status. It serves as a prerequisite for AP Computer Science A. SHS is one of ten high schools in the US piloting this
course for the College Board.
This course is for all students, whether or not computer science is their career interest. It is neither a computer
applications course nor a pure programming course, although both will be used in class projects. It will introduce the
student to the central ideas of computer science. Team projects using many technologies that develop critical thinking
skills and an understanding of the big ideas of computer science in our society will be used. Students write web pages,
work with graphics, write Android apps for phones and tablets, program robots, create animations in Scratch, explore
beginning Java, and use Access to explore “big data” to find trends.
IT Academy: This course can be substituted for Pre-AP Computer Science Alice and/or Java requirement.
Pre-AP Computer Science - Alice (Introduction to Object-Oriented Programming)* SHS only
492687
Prerequisite: Algebra I with C or better.
10, 11, 12 - 1 semester, ½ credit
CA I is NOT a prerequisite for this class.
*NWACC Articulated Course
This course teaches beginning programming in a fun, exciting manner. Students will program 3D worlds populated with
objects, creatures, and people resulting in animations and simple interactive video games. Students learn fundamental
programming logic and techniques with instructions that correspond to standard statements in Java, C++, and other
production languages. This course is designed to be a non-threatening beginning course for all students, including those
students who might be leery of a highly technical course.
IT Academy: Required course for Programming and Software Development, Web Design, and Information Support and Services majors;
elective for all IT majors.
Pre-AP Computer Science - Java (Programming I - Java)
492397
10, 11, 12 - 1 semester, ½ credit
Prerequisite: Geometry or Algebra II.
CA I is not a prerequisite for this class.
Emphasis is on fundamental programming concepts using good design and programming techniques that will transfer to
other languages. This course is for students who plan to major in business. IT, computer science, engineering and other
technology fields. This course requires good logic skills.
IT Academy: Can serve as required course for Programming & Software Dev. major; elective for all IT majors.
AP Computer Science A*
560058
11, 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
Software: Java
Prerequisite: Algebra II AND Pre-AP CS-Alice & Java OR CB Computer Science Principles OR Teacher Recommendation.
*NWACC Articulated Course
This course is the equivalent of the first-year course in computer science at colleges and universities. It emphasizes
36
object-oriented programming methodology as well as the study of algorithms, data structures, and abstraction. Students
who score sufficiently high on the AP exam may be granted college credit from participating universities. This course is
for students planning on majoring in computer science, engineering, IT, mathematics or other technical fields. This
course is available to all students who meet the prerequisite.
IT Academy: Can serve as required course for Programming and Software Development major; elective for all IT majors.
IB Computer Science - SHS Only*
560060 - HL Year 1
12 - 1 year, 1 credit
Prerequisite: AP Computer Science
(See the IB Section for more detail.)
*NWACC Articulated Course
560069 - HL Year 2
Information Support & Services
IT Infrastructure (SHS only)
492600
11, 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
Prerequisite: CA II.
Students will learn to troubleshoot PC issues. They will learn most of the A+ certification skills needed to build,
maintain, and update PCs. Students will also learn fundamental networking concepts in a hands-on environment.
IT Academy: Required for Infrastructure major and may count as an elective toward other IT Academy majors. (This course is open to
non-academy students, although IT Academy students will receive first priority.)
Senior Tech Seminar
(SHS only)
492550
12 - 1 year, 1 credit
Prerequisites: Adv. IT Courses Application, AND Teacher Approval.
In this project-based course, you are assigned actual technology projects from the school district and local businesses. This
class is responsible for the high school web site which can be accessed, for Springdale High School and this publication. The
projects may include creating presentations, creating advanced databases, etc. Students who are chosen will be expected
to maintain high ethical standards and produce timely, quality work as well as behave in a responsible, dependable manner.
Students who do not meet these criteria, have excessive absences, or have disciplinary issues may be dropped from the class
with an “F” or no credit.
IT Academy: Elective for all IT majors.
Advertising and Graphic Design
Fundamentals of Advertising and Graphic Design
494150
10, 11 - 1 year, 1 credit
Prerequisites: None.
Introduction to Advertising and Graphic Design focuses on creating computer graphics for print or the web. The emphasis is
on Adobe Photoshop and Adobe Illustrator. Students gain an extensive working knowledge of these programs and use them to
create computer graphics, art, T-shirt designs, photo restorations, and much more. Students will also use other software
packages including Maya 3D animation software. This course is extremely beneficial for students going into art, advertising,
animation, photography or web design.
Intermediate Advertising and Graphic Design
494170
11, 12 - 1 year, 1 credits
Prerequisites: Introduction to Advertising and Graphic Design or teacher approval.
Intermediate Advertising and Graphic Design teaches advanced skills in Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator. Projects include
graphic design, photo manipulation, corporate IDs, T-shirt design, web site design, and more.
Advanced Advertising and Graphic Design
494130
11, 12- 1 year, 1 credit
Prerequisites: Intermediate Advertising & Graphic Design.
37
Advanced Advertising and Graphic Design is for the serious third-year graphics student. The course allows for
independent projects and the preparation of a portfolio.
3D Animation - SHS only
493870
10, 11, 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
Prerequisite: None.
The 3D Animation student will study the techniques and tools for producing basic 3D models and animations. The course
combines the traditional understanding of animation with the high tech tools available in today’s 3D software. Students
will build the basic skills needed for modeling, manipulation, and special effects and animation.
Marketing and Work-Based Learning
Marketing
492330
10, 11, 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
This course merges traditional marketing with electronic environments. Students will learn the concepts, principles, and skills common
to marketing. Topics include the four “P’s” of Marketing: Pricing, Product Planning/Development, Promotion, and Place. In addition,
they will learn how to ethically and legally use the Internet, e-mail, search engines, and other electronic forms of communication as
a marketing tool. While enrolled in this course, students are expected to be a dues-paying member of DECA, an association of marketing
students. Students may also participate in a work-based learning experience for additional school credit. This course is available to all
students who meet the prerequisite.
IT Academy: Required course for E-Commerce major and may count as an elective for other majors.
Marketing Management
492350
11, 12 – 1 year, 1 credit
Prerequisite: None.
Marketing Management develops decision-making skills through the application of marketing and management
principles. It focuses on organizational models, conflict resolution, finance, advertising, buyer behavior, technology,
and social aspects. While enrolled in this course, students are expected to be a dues-paying member of DECA, an
association of marketing students. Students may also participate in a work-based learning experience for additional
school credit.
IT Academy: Elective for all majors.
Marketing Apprenticeship
492346 - 6th Period
11, 12 - 1 year, 1 or 2 credits
492347 - 7th Period
Prerequisite: Enrollment in E-Marketing, Marketing or Marketing Mgmt.
Students will be allowed to leave campus early to work at an approved marketing job, earning up to 2 credits per year.
It is the student’s responsibility to find an appropriate job. The supervising teacher will provide assistance with job
leads. Grading consists of quarterly conferences between the employer and supervising teacher. Students must have
at least a 2.0 GPA, a good discipline and attendance record, and work a minimum of 135-270 hours per semester.
Students are required to join DECA, a vocational student organization for marketing students. See the counseling office
for an application.
Professional & Technical
Travel and Tourism - SHS only
Introduction to Hospitality
492250
10, 11, 12 - 1 semester, ½ credit
This is a one-semester course that provides students with an overview of the hospitality industry and career
opportunities within the industry. Students learn operation procedures in front office operations, guest services,
marketing and sales, back office functions, ownership and management, food, beverages, and housekeeping
38
management.
Introduction to Travel and Tourism
492260
10, 11, 12 - 1 semester, ½ credit
This is a one-semester in-depth study of worldwide travel, transportation, and tourism. Students are introduced to
the industry as a whole and the job opportunities that are available. The course covers resource allocation,
technology, and social, organizational, and technological systems.
Travel Destinations
492460
10, 11, 12 - 1 semester, ½ credit
This is a one-semester course that provides a working knowledge of the geography of the earth as it relates to travel
and tourism. Focus is on the attractions of place, patterns and processes of world tourism, geography and travel and
tourism in North America, Mexico, Central America, the Caribbean, South America, Europe, the Middle East, Africa,
Asia, Australia, New Zealand and the South Pacific.
International Travel
492230
10, 11, 12 - 1 semester, ½ credit
This is a one-semester course that provides detailed coverage of international air travel, geography, international air
fares and ticketing procedures, travel requirements, travel in Europe, Russia, Asia, and the Pacific, ecotourism
analysis, and broadening of global horizons to maximize cultural understanding.
Drafting
Drafting and Design/CADD
494700
10, 11, 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
Drafting and Design focuses on the basic knowledge and skills required to produce engineering and architectural
drawings. Emphasis is on the development of competencies related to the use of drafting equipment, the production of
beginning-level engineering drawings, the production of beginning-level architectural drawings and the implementation
of computer-aided drawing. This course has a strong emphasis in CADD (computer aided drawing).
Architectural Drafting and Design/CADD
494710
11, 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
Prerequisite: C or better in Drafting & Design or teacher permission.
MUST BE TAKEN WITH ARCHITECTURAL DRAFTING AND DESIGN/CADD LAB.
This course is a natural follow-up to Drafting and Design/CADD since it uses the same skills, but broadens the application
of various fields in industry. Architectural Drafting focuses on the knowledge and skills required to plan and prepare
scaled pictorial interpretations of plans and design concepts for residential buildings. Emphasis is on the development
of competencies related to solving drafting and problems that require the individual to understand and apply a wide
range of technical knowledge and critical thinking skills.
Architectural Drafting & Design/CADD Lab
494720
11, 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
Prerequisite: CAN ONLY BE TAKEN CONCURRENTLY WITH ARCHITECTURE DRAFTING AND DESIGN/CADD.
This lab is a necessity for the architecture student to have time to fully develop the drafting skills and design skills
required for a competent architect. Projects will include the production of scale models. The computer drafting and
design programs have a steep learning curve; thus, the extra time is crucial.
Engineering, Architecture, & CADD
The Engineering Academy has a partnership with Project Lead The Way at Arkansas Tech University.
These are technical classes that count as an elective and are available to all students and Academy students.
39
Principles of Engineering (POE)
495490
10, 11, 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
10th for Academy members
If you like to build things, use power tools and computers this class is for you. In this class you will build with simple
machines, create scale models, learn about materials and how to test them and explore and use motors, lights, circuitry,
gears and pneumatics. This is a course that helps students understand the field of engineering/engineering technology.
Exploring various technology systems and manufacturing processes help students learn how engineers and technicians use
math, science and technology in an engineering problems solving process to benefit people. The course also includes
concerns about social and political consequences of technological change. College credit available.
Civil Engineering and Architecture (CEA) - SHS only
495440
11, 12, 11th for Academy members - 1 year, 1 credit
Students will discover the differences and similarities between civil engineering and architecture. They will explore the
historical impacts of important developments and how they have influenced the progress of humankind. Students will
develop projects from ground level through completion with both the civil engineering and the architecture of facilities
and structures and how they work together.
Engineering CAD 1 - HBHS only
494740
11, 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
Prerequisite: Drafting and Design.
Students will develop competencies related to solving drafting and design problems that require understanding and
application of a wide range of technical knowledge and critical-thinking skills. This course is designed to allow students to
produce drawings using three dimensional computer models.
Engineering CAD 1 Lab - HBHS only
494750
11, 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
The lab provides an opportunity for the engineering student to draw three dimensional computer models as well as
building physical models of bridges and robotic parts. Students will explore basic elements of engineering design.
Engineering Design and Development - SHS only
495470
12 Academy - 1 year, 1 credit
Prerequisite: POE, CEA, and Academy Member.
This is an engineering research course in which students work in teams to research, design and construct a solution to an
open-ended engineering problem of their choosing. Students apply principles developed in the preceding courses to include
software applications, build and test of design solutions, and are guided by a community mentor. They must present
progress reports, submit a final written report and defend their solutions to a panel of outside reviewers at the end of the
school year. Students will do a final presentation of their design to community members, technical advisors, peers and
other interested parties.
Robotics and 3D Modeling (CIM) - SHS only
495450
11, 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
In this class you will learn how to program a robot arm, use a CNC milling machine and how to integrate the two together
to make a totally automated cell. You will make things such as boxes and molds. This is a course that applies principles
of robotics and automation. The course builds includes computer solid modeling skills such as using a 3-D program
Inventor. Students use CNC equipment to produce actual models of their three-dimensional designs. Fundamental
concepts of robotics used in automated manufacturing, and design analysis are included. College credit available.
Digital Electronics - SHS only
495460
10, 11, 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
If you are interested in computers, robotics and electronics this is a class for you. You will learn how to design circuits,
test and build them. You will program a small robot, put your name in lights and learn all basic designing skills. This is a
project based course in applied logic that encompasses the application of electronic circuits and devices. Computer
simulation software is used to design digital circuitry prior to the actual construction of circuits and devices. Students
learn how integrated digital circuits work, how to design a circuit, how to simulate and then build and test their designs.
Examples of student designs, which are designed and built by the students, are alarm systems, traffic light systems, clocks,
displays, vending machine systems and many more. Students also learn how to program chips such as gals and
40
microprocessors to perform similar tasks including maneuvering a small robot. College credit available.
3D CADD Design - Introduction to Engineering Design - SHS only
495480
10, 11, 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
If you like computers and designing things on them this is the class for you. You will use Inventor to design different
systems and then print them on the 3-D printer. This is a course that teaches problem-solving skills using a design
development process. Models of product solutions are created analyzed and communicated using solid modeling
computer design software. This 3-D software, Inventor, is used to animate designs and analyze them. Students use it
to analyze systems and then build them. College credit available.
Aerospace Engineering (AE)
494980
12 - 1 year, 1 credit
AE explores the evolution of flight, navigation and control, aerospace materials, propulsion, space travel, and orbital
mechanics. In addition, this course presents alternative applications for aerospace engineering concepts. Students
analyze, design, and build aerospace systems. They apply knowledge gained throughout the course in a final
presentation about the future of the industry and their professional goals.
Construction Technology - HBHS only
Construction Fundamentals
494480
10, 11 - 1 year, 1 credit
$30 lab fee
(Strongly encouraged 10th grade)
This is the introductory course for students interested in the many areas of the construction industry. The course
provides a solid foundation for learning the following major trade areas: carpentry, electrical wiring, plumbing,
bricklaying, concrete work, and drywall installation. The course explains how the construction industry is organized and
how to successfully gain employment. It also covers the need-to-know information for the daily activities associated
with working in the construction industry, including safety, basic math, use of tools, and blueprint reading. SkillsUSA
Leadership Training will also be covered in order for the students to learn techniques valuable and securing employment
in any field. Students will have the opportunity to earn their NCCER credentials and 10 hours OSHA card.
Carpentry
494460
11, 12 - 1 year, 2 period block class, 2 credits $30 lab fee
Prerequisite: C or better in Construction Fundamentals or Teacher approval.
This is a two-period long block class. It will cover the basics of home construction: the materials used, tool and job site
safety, common construction methods and terminology from site layout to finished product. SkillsUSA leadership training
will also be covered in order for the students to learn techniques valuable in securing employment in any field. An
excellent attendance record will be necessary as there will be a considerable amount of “hands-on” project work.
Advanced Construction I
494500
Only 11-12 - one semester, 1 credit,
This is a two-period block class for one semester.
$30 lab fee.
A project based course designed to develop advanced carpentry and electrical skills. Projects include home building,
school-based and community construction as well as many other opportunities to be determined by the instructor.
Advanced Construction II
494510
Only 11-12 one semester, 1 credit.
This is a two-period block class for one semester.
$30 lab fee
A project based course designed to develop advanced carpentry and plumbing skills. Projects include home building,
school-based and community construction as well as many other opportunities to be determined by the instructor.
41
Furniture and Cabinet Making
494850
11, 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
Prerequisite: Construction Fundamentals.
Students will design, construct, and install cabinets and casework that aligns with industry standards and can prepare
students to enter this occupational field. Students will work closely with local industry professionals to insure that
industry guidelines are aligned with the demands of business requirements. Students will have the opportunity to earn
NCCER credentials for this class.
Television Production
Television Productions is the creative hub for the Springdale Public Schools. Students in Television Production can work on
everything from sports to movies, from commercials to news stories. Students in this program can work behind the scenes or on
the air on our Cable Channel that airs in ALL of Northwest Arkansas. Any student who enrolls in any TV course during the year
pays one $20 lab fee per year regardless of the number of courses taken during the year. Due to the expense of the equipment
and the fact that TV students represent the school in everything they do, only students who are responsible, have good
attendance, and who are seriously interested should sign up for the introductory course.
Fundamentals of Television
493420
1 year, 1 credit
Required course before taking any other TV course
Students will learn the fundamentals of videotaping, camera handling, rules of photographic composition, editing on
Macintosh computer, television journalism, and introduction to reporting, anchoring, and studio production. Students
will also get an introduction to the production side of video. Students will get an opportunity to create news stories,
commercials, short films and learn how to carry themselves in a professional setting. Students must take fundamentals
of television to enter into any other class in the program.
Intermediate Television (School News)
493430
HBHS - Har-Ber Wildcat News
SHS - Bulldog News
1 year, 1 credit
(May be taken more than one year for additional credit.)
Prerequisite: Fundamentals of Television AND selection by the instructor.
Students produce a daily television announcement/ news/magazine program which will be aired on local cable as well
as closed circuit TV within the school. Students may specialize in one or two aspects of television production, but all
students are required to produce independent stories for inclusion in the program. Students are required to work one
evening production per semester.
TV Broadcasting Advanced
493440
(Wildcat Entertainment) - HBHS
(Bulldog Alley) - SHS
1 year, 1 credit
(May be taken more than one year for additional credit.)
Prerequisite: Fundamentals of Television AND selection by the instructor.
Students create and produce short movies for our cable channel and varieties of film festivals. Production of this show
will utilize writing, acting, video, and editing capabilities. Students who take this class need to be self-motivated,
creative, and willing to work before or after school. Our film programs are recognized regionally and statewide.
Television Lab
493450
HBWN Productions - HBHS
1 year, 1 credit (May be taken more than one year for additional credit.)
Prerequisite: Fundamentals of Television AND selection by the instructor.
Students in this class will focus on the production aspect of the video Industry. Students will focus on working with client
based commercial projects, shooting and editing live events and working on longer form productions for school based
events.
Television Lab
493450
42
(Bulldog Alley, Bulldog News, and DogBite) - SHS
1 year, 1 credit
(May be taken more than one year for additional credit.)
Prerequisite: Fundamentals of Television AND selection by the instructor.
Students create and produce Bulldog Alley, Bulldog News, and DogBite. Bulldog News produces a show about events
and activities at Springdale High School. Bulldog Alley showcases short films, music videos, and stop motion projects
produced by students enrolled in the program. DogBite is a production that concentrates on reality-style filming in the
world of culinary arts. Students will use the lab to gain higher knowledge of production skills used in shooting, graphics
remote productions, and editing. Students will be required to cover some evening games and special events.
Springdale District TV*
495530
12 - 1 year, 2 credits
Block 2-hour class
Prerequisite: Seniors only, Fundamentals of Television AND selection by the instructor
*Available for both SHS and HBHS Seniors*
Springdale District TV is your opportunity to apply your skills in a real life setting. Located on Emma Street you will work
inside the Springdale School District Communications offices making television shows for the Springdale Television
channel. This class is the capstone experience to your television broadcasting skills. Students will apply pre-production,
production, and post production skills to industry standard job descriptions. This class is a block class. Students have
the choice to take a morning or afternoon block. Students will work with the Media Coordinator, Communications
Director and ESL Communications Director. Students will also have many opportunities to work alongside industry
professionals and create products for community members.
Agriculture
The SHS Agriculture Academy is for students who wish to learn job skills in the agriculture or food industry. These
courses concentrate on animal systems, plant systems, mechanical systems, and food science. Students in the SHS
Agriculture Academy are required to enroll in SHS Agriculture Academy English and Math courses and at least one
agriculture class per semester. Agriculture courses are open to all students.
Survey of Agricultural Systems - HBHS Only
491150
10, 11, 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
A foundation course for all agriculture programs of study. Topics covered include general agriculture, FFA, leadership,
supervised agricultural experiences, animal systems, plant systems, agribusiness systems, food production and
processing, biotechnology, natural resources systems, environmental service systems, power, structural, and systems.
Horticulture
Introduction to Horticulture Science
491280
10, 11, 12 - 1 semester, ½ credit
Introduction to Horticulture will focus on plant identification, propagation, greenhouse management, and lots of hands-on
activities. It will prepare students to move on to more advanced courses like Floriculture, Landscape and Greenhouse
Management.
Greenhouse Management
491270
10, 11, 12 - 1 semester, ½credit
Greenhouse Management will take up where Horticulture left off. Students will learn in detail the skills to operate a
commercial greenhouse including how to order, plant, manage and market greenhouse plants.
Nursery/Landscape - HBHS only
491330
10, 11, 12 -1 semester, ½ credit
Nursery/Landscape will help students interested in a career in landscape design, installation, or maintenance, Students will
learn the elements and principles of design work, as well as how to properly install and maintain landscape plants, edging,
43
mulch, irrigation and much more.
Floriculture-SHS only
491240
10, 11, 12 - 1 semester, ½ credit
Floriculture will help students learn the elements and principles of floral design. Students will learn to create their own
floral designs using artificial, dry and cut flowers. Students will learn how to do corsage work, vase work, and floral
foam container work in addition to work with dry and artificial materials. Students will be required to supply some
materials for their floral work. Items like ribbon, dry flowers, and containers will be required in order to complete lab
assignments. There may be a fee associated with required assignments that use fresh flowers.
Agricultural Food Science
Agricultural Food Science I - SHS Only
10, 11, 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
This is a course that teaches the processes and techniques involved in the development of food products. A heavy
emphasis will be placed on projects designed to actually create new food products and go through the process of making
the product market-ready. Students will be expected to think creatively about new food products that would sell, and
then practically follow the processes to make the creative element into a reality.
Agriculture Food Science II - SHS Only
11, 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
This is a course designed to teach students how to turn raw food ingredients into a finished food product that is ready
to sell. An emphasis will be placed on marketing, advertising, and business concepts, as well as on food preparation,
taste testing, and market evaluation. Students will work in a lab setting to create new foods, and then use marketing
concepts to create an advertising campaign that maximizes profits and sales.
Animal Sciences
Animal Science I
491180
10, 11, 12 - 1 semester, ½ credit
Students will participate in hands-on real-world activities to help them gain knowledge in the areas of the livestock
animal industry, proper handling of livestock animals, basic anatomy and physiology of livestock animals, and the
nutrition of livestock animals. Livestock animals include sheep, cattle, pigs, horses, chickens and goats.
Animal Science II
491200
10, 11, 12 - 1 semester, ½ credit
Students will participate in hands-on real-world activities to help them gain knowledge in the areas of livestock animal
reproduction, livestock animal genetics, livestock animal health and livestock animal products and marketing. Livestock
animals include sheep, cattle, pigs, horses, chickens and goats.
Advanced Animal Science (Beef Science)
49101B
10, 11, 12 - 1 semester, ½ credit
Beef Science offers students a chance to identify and learn about over 30 breeds of beef cattle. Additionally, students
will learn how to manage, feed, and care for beef cattle. Students will perform procedures on cattle, prepare beef
products to eat, and design livestock facilities.
Advanced Animal Science (Poultry Science)
49101P
10, 11, 12 - 1 semester, ½ credit
Poultry Science will allow students to understand the largest industry in Arkansas, the Poultry Industry. This class also
introduces students to identification, selection, and management of poultry. This hands-on class will incubate and grow
poultry within Animal Science lab at the school. Additionally, processing and marketing ideas will also be introduced.
44
Advanced Animal Science (Equine Science)
49101H
10, 11, 12 - 1 semester, ½ credit
Equine Science is the study of horses. Students will learn to identify breeds, colors, and types of horses. This class also
includes laboratory exercises where students will learn basic horse care, understand anatomy and physiology, and know
how to select horses and different types of horse tack.
Veterinary Science – HBHS only
491370
10, 11, 12 – 1 semester, ½ credit
Students will learn skills need to become a veterinary assistant. Students learn basic veterinary medical terminology,
restraining methods, breeds of animals, tools used in veterinary medicine, and basic symptoms for diseases that affect
livestock and small animals. There will be many hands on activities where students will have the opportunity to work
with live animals.
Agriculture Mechanics
Agricultural Electricity
491040
10, 11, 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
Students learn the principles of electricity and wiring systems, their relationships, and their applications to agriculture.
Students also learn about electrical safety, recognize and use the tools and equipment of this occupation, learn Ohm’s
Law and the basic theory of electricity, the uses of electricity and conductors, cables and devices, and wire circuits
safely and correctly.
Agricultural Power Systems - SHS only
491400
10, 11, 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
The course covers technological skills in operating, maintaining, and repairing small gasoline engines as they are related
to the agriculture industry. Students get a working knowledge of 2- and 4-cycle gasoline engines. Each student must
supply his/her own Briggs & Stratton engine and is required to put the knowledge gained to use by completely tearing
down the engine and reconstructing it. In the course of this reconstruction, the students perform various tests on the
component parts.
Agricultural Metals--SHS only
491380
10, 11, 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
This includes compressed gas and electric principles used for welding, brazing, cutting, and heating metals as they
relate to agriculture. The first semester includes the principles of oxyacetylene welding and arc welding. Identification
of tools and equipment used in the welding trade, operation of equipment, and safety in both processes are included.
The second semester includes more difficult welding and cutting skills. Metal Inert Gas (MIG) and Tungsten Inert Gas
(TIG) welding are introduced.
Small Engine Technology - HBHS only
491350
10, 11, 12 - 1 semester, ½ credit
The course examines the use of small engines in all areas of agriculture. The major topics covered in this course include
small engine selection, maintenance, repairs, and employment skills.
Agriculture Mechanics- SHS only
491390
10, 11, 12
No prerequisites
This course connects scientific principles with mechanical skills. The course will develop understanding and skills in the
traditional areas of agricultural mechanics including the following: safety, construction, metal technology, small
engines, graphics, tool maintenance, woodworking, concrete and masonry, electricity, plumbing, and. Supervised
experience and FFA will be integrated, as appropriate throughout the course.
Family & Consumer Sciences
The Family and Consumer Science Department is an NWACC partner. Some of the courses listed below can provide
45
college credit. See the NWACC section for more details.
Family and Consumer Science
493080
10, 11, 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
This core course gives students the basic information and skills necessary to be effective within the family and within a changing
and complex society. Emphasis is on the development of competencies related to Family, Career, and Community Leaders of
America; relationships; arrangement of personal-living space; wardrobe planning and selection; garment care and construction;
selection of toys and age-appropriate play activities for children; health and safety procedures related to child care; nutrition
and food selection; meal planning, preparation, and service; home and money management as well as the use of credit cards
and banking services. Students should have a full understanding of basic life skills. This is a required course to be a FACS
vocational completer.
Childcare Management
Child Development*
493020
10, 11, 12 - 1 semester, ½ credit
*NWACC Articulated Course - Requires Child Development AND Parenting
This course helps students understand the challenges and responsibilities of guiding physical, social, emotional, and
intellectual development of children. Understanding children, their needs and the forces which influence them, helps
students gain self-understanding. Concepts emphasized in the course include preparation for parenthood, prenatal and
postnatal care, childbirth through the age of 12, and health and safety of children. An A or B in Child Development and
Parenting together compose a NWACC college credit course.
Parenting*
493210
10, 11, 12 - 1 semester, ½ credit
*NWACC Articulated Course - Requires Child Development AND Parenting
Students are aware of responsibilities of parents and rights of parents and children. Units taught include: providing a
good environment at all stages of development; costs of rearing children; causes and types of child abuse; guidance;
parenting children with special needs; and child care services. An A or B in Child Development and Parenting together
compose a NWACC college credit course.
Childcare/Guidance Management and Services*
493010
SHS: 11, 12 - 1 year, 2 credits (2 Period Block Class)
Prerequisite: Child Development or Parenting and teacher recommendation/application required.
HBHS: 11, 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
*NWACC Articulated Course
To be eligible for this class you have to have taken Child Development and Parenting or be enrolled in these classes in
conjunction with Childcare. Membership in FCCLA is required. Membership is $15. Students enrolled in this class are also
required to purchase a class T-shirt. Application and instructor approval is required for this course.
Contents include: employability skills, career opportunities in child care, duties of child care workers, types of child care
programs, facilities, legal aspects of the field, health and safety of children, guiding children’s behavior, and experiences in
childcare management. This course is for students desiring to enter teaching, early childhood occupations. Childcare lab
experience is required. This course gives students free college credit at NWACC upon completion and an A or B in the course.
If requirements are met, certification as a childcare teacher assistant, or aide, can be obtained from the Arkansas Dept. of
Workforce Development.
Food Services
Foods and Nutrition*
493110
1 semester, ½ credit
*NWACC Articulated Course
Note: At SHS, students signing up for this course should list Nutrition and Wellness as an alternate course.
The first quarter is devoted to nutrition, meal-planning and preparation of a variety of foods, good consumer practices,
protective measures for food safety, kitchen management, and occupational opportunities in food service. The second quarter
46
emphasizes the lab and food preparation, including quick breads, microwave cooking, pastas, fruits and vegetables, eggs, and
desserts.
Nutrition and Wellness – SHS only
493200
10, 11, 12 – 1 semester, ½ credit
Nutrition and Wellness enables students to analyze the interaction of nutrition, foods, and fitness for overall wellness
of individuals and families throughout the lifespan. In this course students will develop nutrition and fitness habits to
make wise decisions regarding healthy living and prevention of disease through these practices. As active learners,
students develop higher order thinking skills and academic skills in the areas of math, science, language arts and social
studies through the evaluation of relevant nutrition and wellness information. This course is recommended for all
students regardless of their career cluster or pathway, in order to build basic nutrition and wellness knowledge and
skills, and is especially appropriate for students with interest in human services, wellness/fitness, health, or food and
nutrition related career pathways.
Chemistry of Food - HBHS Only
493130
10, 11, 12 – 1 semester, ½ credit
Prerequisite: Foods and Nutrition or C in Science.
$5 lab fee
This hands-on course helps students understand specific facts and principles about food science, food safety and the
nutritional components of food. It is a lab-oriented class that includes careers in food science, food-processing
regulations, safe handling of food and effects of food on a chef, restaurant manager, food service marketer, health
inspector or dietician. Must participate in FCCLA.
Introduction to Culinary Arts - SHS only
493250
10, 11, 12 – 1 semester, ½ credit
Prerequisite: 2.0 GPA or instructor approval.
Introduction to Culinary Arts is a semester course (18 weeks) designed to introduce students to the culinary arts profession.
Emphasis in this course is given to the development of basic competencies related to the culinary arts profession, basic menus
and recipes, standardization and kitchen procedures. Upon completion of this course, students will be introduced to skills
needed for employability, customer relations, menu planning, recipe use, weights and measures, conversions, budgeting,
safety and sanitation, organization for efficiency and lab procedures. The students will have the opportunity to compete in
the Skills USA Culinary Arts Competition.
Culinary Arts I & II-SHS only
493260/493270
11 - 1 year, 2 credits
12 - ONLY with prior teacher approval
(2 period block course)
Prerequisite: Introduction to Culinary Arts, 2.0 GPA or instructor approval.
Culinary Arts I--First Semester: This course is designed to expand students’ knowledge in the culinary arts profession.
Emphasis in this course is given to the study of kitchen staples, principals of cooking soups, stocks and sauces, dairy
products, eggs, fruit and vegetables, grains and pasta cookery, meat cookery and principles of baking. Upon completion
of this course, students should have attained basic skills needed for entry level employment in the food service industry,
customer relations, purchasing and storage of foods, cooking techniques and principles of baking.
Culinary Arts II-Second Semester: Emphasis in this course is given to the study of advanced culinary arts to include:
sauces; grade-manager; advanced meat preparation; advanced poultry preparation; fish and shellfish; candy making;
chocolate; advanced baking and pastries; plating, presentation and garnishing; and career opportunities.
The students will have the opportunity to compete in the Skills USA Culinary Arts Competition.
ProStart I & II - SHS only
493220 - ProStart I
12 -1 year, 1 credit
493230 - ProStart II
Prerequisite: Foods & Nutrition and Introduction to Culinary Arts and teacher approval.
ProStart is a School-to-Career initiative that prepares students for the adult working world by offering on-the-job
experience before graduation. This two-year industry-based course prepares students for careers in the restaurant and
food service industry. Students gain valuable restaurant and food service skills through their academic and workplace
experiences. Students who complete ProStart I, ProStart II and 400 hours of hospitality related work experience, are
eligible to take the national ProStart exam, and if passed, receive national HBA/ProStart certification. The students will
47
have the opportunity to compete in the Skills USA Culinary Arts Competition.
ProStart OJT - SHS only
493060
11, 12- 1 year, 1 or 2 credits
Students must be enrolled in the ProStart Program. They will earn one credit per year for a total 185 hours toward their
required 400 work hours in a food industry or restaurant. The student will gain actual on-the-job training in a restaurant
or the fast food industry.
General Family and Consumer Sciences
Clothing Management I
493030
10, 11, 12 - 1 semester, ½ credit
Students develop skills to manage their individual and family wardrobes, for decision making as a clothing consumer, and
for understanding the role of the clothing and textile industry in the economy. Emphasis is on clothing selection; the
clothing needs of the family; wardrobe coordination; clothing care; characteristics of fibers; types of fabrics and fabric
finishes; laws and regulations for textiles industry; use and care of sewing supplies and equipment; fabric selection; clothing
construction techniques; jobs and careers; computer use and the effects of technology on the industry. After the first nine
weeks, the focus shifts to a lab-oriented classroom with students constructing garments at their own expense.
Clothing Management II
493060
10, 11, 12 - 1 semester, ½ credit
Prerequisite: Clothing Management I.
Experiences in the Clothing Management II course are designed to assist students in further developing skills necessary
for the management and construction of individual and/or family garments and projects. Basic construction techniques
will be integrated throughout the course in various projects. One or more intermediate level projects will be created
using correct construction techniques. A $20 lab fee is required.
Human Relations - SHS only
493150
10, 11, 12 - 1 semester, ½ credit
Human Relations focuses on the development of skills needed in order to build and maintain successful relationships in
the home, community, and workplace. Emphasis is given to the development of competencies related to personality
development, decision-making, communication, relationships outside the family, and careers in the field of human
relations. Upon completion of this course, the student should have a better understanding of self; know how to
communicate effectively; and be able to establish and maintain effective relationships with family members, peers and
others.
Educational Professions
The Teaching program of study at Springdale and Har-Ber High Schools is a rigorous 10-12th grade program with an
emphasis on careers in Education. It is designed to foster growth of students who have expressed an interest in teaching
and to prepare them for success in college.
Goal: To entice students to pursue the rewarding career of teaching.
Mission: Inspire...Lead...Teach
Entrance into the Teaching program of study requires an application, two teacher recommendations, and a 2.5 GPA.
Students must be on grade level in both literacy and math.
The Teaching program of study offers the following to students:
Monthly guest speakers to explore postsecondary and career options
Resume and Letter of Application building
Field trips to institutions of higher education such as: UCA, UA, NWACC and UA Global Campus
Workplace learning opportunities - job shadowing of classroom teachers and 15 hours per year of observation in elementary,
middle, and junior highs and volunteer work in schools
48
Orientation to Teaching I
493240
10, 11, 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
Are you interested in becoming a teacher? If the answer is yes or if you are just curious, then this is the course for you.
You will learn what it is like to be a teacher. You will design lesson plans, learn how to do bulletin boards, research
different teaching strategies, and be creative in lesson delivery. The history of education in America will be taught as
well as studying current educational issues, policies, and practices.
Orientation to Teaching II
493290
11, 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
Prerequisite: Orientation to Teaching I.
The first semester, Education Technology, introduces computer applications for use in any classroom or training setting
to impact learner achievement. The second semester, Educational Methods and Assessment, emphasizes models of
instruction, concepts of measurement, and skills of assessment to enhance learner achievement. Students plan and
practice a variety of teaching strategies in a classroom lab environment, using the Arkansas Frameworks as a basis for
content standards and assessment methods. Students document rubric development, research skills, reflective practice,
and interactive communication in professional portfolios.
Medical Professions
The Medical Professions Academy and the Medical Professions Department are NWACC partners. Some of the courses
listed below can provide college credit. See the NWACC section for more details.
Medical Professions Education is designed to provide students who are interested in any medical profession with a
foundation for completion of a technical certification, an associate degree, or higher levels of education in any of over
200 medical fields.
Introduction to Medical Professions Education
10, 11, 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
SHS only
10, 11, 12 - 1 semester, ½ credit
HBHS only
495340
(Non-academy students must take this course to be eligible for National Medical Honor Society membership.)
This course provides a foundation to the student considering health care as a profession. Focus includes an overview of
anatomy and physiology, related disorders and treatments, medical ethics, application of common medical terminology
and abbreviations, human growth and development, legal responsibilities, patients’ rights, and exploration of medical
careers.
Medical Procedures I
495330
10, 11, 12 - 1 semester, ½ credit
(Non-academy students must take this course to be eligible for National Medical Honor Society membership.)
Students in this course study basic theory for hands-on skills practiced in the classroom’s clinical laboratory. Students
learn about medical terms and abbreviations, classification of disease, infection control, safety, vital signs, first aid,
medical charting, and medical math.
Medical Procedures II - HBHS only
495390
10, 11, 12 - 1 semester, ½ credit
Required for National Medical Honor Society membership
This course builds on the student’s knowledge obtained in Medical Procedures I. Students in this course study dental
assistant skills, laboratory assistant skills, medical assistant skills, nurse assistant skills, physical therapy techniques, animal
health care and medical information systems.
Medical Terminology*
495360
11, 12 - 1 semester, ½ credit
(Non-academy students must take this course to be eligible for National Medical Honor Society membership.)
49
*NWACC Articulated Course
This course introduces prefixes, suffixes, and word roots used in the language of medicine. Topics include medical
vocabulary and the terms that relate to the anatomy, physiology, pathological disorders, and treatment of diseases
involving each body system. Previous medical professions classes or enrollment in anatomy and physiology would be
helpful. Open to juniors and seniors only.
Emergency Medical Responder - SHS only
494140
11, 12 - 1 semester, ½ credit
The students will learn skills to provide aid and care to sick and injured people. They will learn CPR, bleeding control, and
splinting. They will also learn the causes and treatment of many medical emergencies such as asthma attacks, allergic
reactions, strokes and chest pain. EMR is the first step in a career in Emergency Medical Services that can be followed up
with EMR Basic and then to Paramedic.
Abnormal Psychology - SHS only
495370
11, 12 - 1 semester, ½ credit
(Non-academy students must take this course to be eligible for National Medical Honor Society membership.)
This course examines the nature of impaired mental functioning and abnormal behavior. An overview of defense
mechanisms, appropriate terminology, thought disorders, personality disorders, depression, and schizophrenia will be
provided. Discussion of treatment modalities will concentrate upon the relationship between medical perspectives and
mental health.
Human Behavior and Disorders - HBHS only
495320
11, 12 – 1 semester, ½ credit
(Non-academy students must take this course to be eligible for National Medical Honor Society membership.)
This course provides students with a general overview of mental health from the perspective of the health care community
that includes history of mental health, research methods, major theories, and applications of the knowledge to the problems
and challenges faced by today’s health care professionals. Other areas addressed are: biological foundations of behavior,
consciousness, memory, learning, emotion, personality, psychological disorders, and methods of therapy.
Medical Professions Senior Seminar (Capstone) - SHS only
590110
1 semester, ½ credit
(Required for National Medical Honor Society)
Prerequisites: All other courses in Medical Professions Education (MPE) program as follows: Introduction to Medical
Professions Education (2 semesters), Medical Procedures (1 semester), Medical Terminology (1 semester), Abnormal
Psychology (1 semester), and Anatomy and Physiology (2 semesters) (dual credit for MPE and science)
This is the final Medical Professions Education (MPE) course required to become a medical professions vocational completer. The
overall goal is integration of medical courses with professional medical standards of practice. Both in class and out of class projects
culminate in a senior project and final presentation. Use of computer technology, language, communication, and interpersonal
skills will be utilized. A 16-hour preceptorship is required with selected medical professional in the community.
Law & Public Safety
Only students who have been selected to the Law and Public Safety Academy are allowed to take the courses listed in this
section. To apply, one must complete an application and have teacher recommendations, a 3.0 or better GPA, and good
attendance. This is an instructional program that prepares individuals to perform the duties of police and public safety
officers.
Introduction to Criminal Justice - SHS only
49462L
10 - 1 year, 1 credit
Students must be accepted into the Law Academy to be eligible for the course.
This course provides a basis for the student considering a career in the field of criminal justice. Focus includes an
overview of the criminal justice system, crime and its consequences, and an exploration of related careers.
50
Law Enforcement I - SHS only
49463L
11 - 1 year, 1 credit
Prerequisite: Introduction to Criminal Justice.
Students must be accepted into the Law Academy to be eligible for the course.
This course provides an in-depth look at necessary job skills and tasks for the police patrolman, including such topics as
accident investigation, traffic stops, and report taking.
Criminal Law/Senior Seminar (Capstone) - SHS only
49461L
12 - 1 year, 1 credit
This course covers a broad range of Arkansas criminal law as well as landmark court decisions in the United States. The second
semester of this course combines all aspects of the criminal justice system in an extensive mock crime investigation and
prosecution. This is the senior year of the Law Academy.
EAST
(Environmental and Spatial Technology)
EAST I
560010
10, 11, 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
Prerequisite: Approval by EAST Facilitator through an application process (including an attendance report, transcript
and teacher recommendations).
A course designed for students to use state of the art computer technology to solve “real world” problems either
independently or in teams. Students are engaged daily in a student-centered, project-based approach to problem
solving. Students are expected to construct their own learning using resources traditionally found in the business
environment such as user guides to software applications, software support services and peer-to-peer learning. Solutions
to these real world problems may require student mastery in one or more of the following technology areas: computeraided design, 3-D modeling, surveying and mapping (including working with global positioning systems), geographic
information systems, programming, database applications, web page design, digital photo/video editing and virtual
reality development.
EAST II
560020
10, 11, 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
Prerequisite: EAST I and approval by EAST facilitator.
A course designed to build on the students’ experiences in EAST I by providing opportunities for students to be engaged
in project-based problem solving. EAST II students will be expected to engage EAST I students in philosophy and workings
of the EAST Lab and instruct them on the hardware and software in the lab. EAST II students will be role models for new
EAST I students and should act as such. EAST II students will be expected to be active participants in the creation and
implementation of community service projects throughout the year.
EAST III
560030
12 - 1 year, 1 credit
Prerequisite: EAST I and II and approval by EAST facilitator.
EAST III is a continuation of coursework designed to build on the students’ experiences in previous EAST classes by providing
opportunities for students to continue to be engaged in community service-learning project-based approach to problem
solving. A “work like” environment is maintained with high expectations in the classroom in order that students will gain
a better understanding of what will be expected of them in the business world. The focus in this course shifts to peer group
leadership, lab maintenance and administration, and sophisticated service projects.
JAG
51
(Jobs for Arkansas Graduates)
JAG
493770
12 - 1 year, 1 credit
Prerequisite: Consent of the coordinator and teacher recommendations. Must be enrolled in a Career and Technical
class during their junior year. Student must also agree to take a Career and Technical course their senior year that
follows the vocational course of study they chose during their junior year. Students must also agree to join the Career
and Technical student organization associated with their Career and Technical class.
Students must meet specific state guidelines to be eligible for this program. These guidelines can be provided by the
teacher/coordinator. Job-related instruction is given in JAG, and students enrolled in this program must agree to
participate in follow-up for one year after graduation. JAG helps students graduate from high school, obtain successful
employment after graduation and/or attend post-secondary institutions.
JAG I
493780
11 - 1 year, 1 credit
(See above description)
JAG II
493790
12 - 1 year, 1 credit
SECOND YEAR JAG ONLY
(See above description)
JAG On-the-Job Training
493800, 493805, 493806, 493807
11, 12 - 1 year, 1-3 credits
Prerequisite: Approval of the coordinator and enrollment in the JAG program.
Grading is coordinated between employer and coordinator. Up to 3 credits per year may be earned in this program.
Community Service
By Application Only
Community service classes are available to students for elective credit. Students may earn one credit of community
service per year. Students who complete a community service class will receive a “pass” or “fail” grade (no letter grade
is assigned). Student attendance is very important in the selection process. Please see the respective Department
Chairs for application materials. Students who do community service must have 6 additional classes.
Community Service - Counseling
10, 11, 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
Prerequisite: By application and counselor approval only.
Students enrolled in the Counseling Center assist the counselors in the routine operation of the Counseling Center. Duties
include delivering messages, serving as “Welcomer” to new students, assisting students with college and career
information, and performing other tasks as directed. Applicants must have and maintain excellent attendance and may
NOT be in academic distress.
Community Service - Media
10, 11, 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
Prerequisite: By application only AND approval of media specialist.
Students enrolled in the Media Center assist the media specialists in the routine operation of the library.
52
Computer Tech Assistant - SHS only
10, 11, 12 - 1 semester, ½ credit
Prerequisite: A or B in course in which students are assisting or its equivalent and teacher approval.
Students serve as a lab assistant in a computer class. Duties include helping students who are having difficulty with the
hardware and software problems, tutoring students who have been absent or who are having difficulty in the class, and other
activities. See business technology teachers for an application.
Service Learning
12 - 1 year, 1 credit
Prerequisite: Application.
This course is to develop the civic and volunteer skills of seniors in preparation for their graduation from high school.
Students will create community partnerships as well as participate in the tutoring of younger children with the
Springdale School District. The course will help prepare students for civic duty as adults and establish an identity and
ownership in the community (with a later goal of hoping to keep these successful students in the community as adults).
The course will be used as a tool for public relations and awareness for Springdale High School students working to
better their community. Students will study the needs of the community and work toward annual goals of completing
service projects. Twenty students will be chosen by an application process to be conducted by the teacher and the
principal. Students must complete 75 hours of service outside of the classroom to receive elective credit. The students
will receive a letter grade.
Science Lab Assistant
10, 11, 12 - 1 year, 1 credit; 1 semester, ½ credit
Prerequisite: A or B in course in which students are assisting or its equivalent and teacher approval.
Students serve as a lab assistant in a science class. Duties include troubleshooting problems, helping students who are
having difficulty, tutoring students who have been absent and other activities.
ELL Tutor
10, 11, 12 - 1 semester, ½ credit
Prerequisite: A or B in course in which students are assisting or its equivalent and teacher approval.
Students serve as a lab assistant in an ELL class. Duties would include troubleshooting problems, helping students who
are having difficulty, tutoring students who have been absent and other activities.
More Opportunities...
G/T Seminar
Prerequisite: Approval of the academic area teacher at the High School and of the G/T Coordinator.
This course offers independent study credit for students who wish to go beyond the course offering at the high school.
The student and a sponsoring teacher within the chosen academic area develop a plan to follow for credit to be given.
The credit earned appears on the student’s transcripts as a G/T Seminar grade.
Concurrent Enrollment Off Campus
10, 11, 12
The concurrent enrollment program provides enrichment and program acceleration opportunities for outstanding high
school students who have demonstrated the ability to do satisfactory college level work while still enrolled in high
school. The University of Arkansas and Northwest Arkansas Community College consider part-time concurrent
enrollment for students in grades 9 through 12.
Split Training Option
11, 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
One unit of elective credit is available for students in grades 11 and 12 who participate in the “Split Training Option,” a
program offered by the Army National Guard.
53
Tutoring
Before and after school tutoring is available for students. Please contact your child’s teacher or counselor for times
and locations.
Night School
Night School is a credit recovery program offered in the evening, Monday - Thursday. 1/2 credit can be earned per
session. A student must submit an application approved by his /her counselor. Tuition may be charged at the time the
application is submitted. Applications are available in the high school counseling center.
IB World School –
SHS only
The International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma Programme is an internationally recognized rigorous pre-university
curriculum that is studied over a two-year period, 11th and 12th grade years. Students have an opportunity to earn the
IB Diploma in addition to the Springdale High School Diploma. This can be accomplished by successfully completing
internal and external assessments in six different IB subjects; writing an extended essay based on independent research
that is mentored by a faculty member, completing creative, action, and service activities (CAS), and studying a critical
thinking course called Theory of Knowledge. This educational program provides an opportunity for students to develop
skills for becoming a productive, caring citizen in a global, technological society.
Acceptance into the International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme is achieved through an application and interview
process. Due to the academic demands of the curriculum, students who are applying should have earned at least C’s in
their academic work.
The following course descriptions are from the respective official IB Course Guides.
Group 1 Subject: Studies in Language and Literature
IB English A HL: Literature
1st Year: 517109
Grades 11, 12 - 2 years, 2 credits
2nd Year: 517209
Prerequisite: By application only.
IB Language A1 English - HL is a two-year, junior and senior English course emphasizing the study of written language and
literary analysis. The literature studied in this course and the assessments will satisfy IB syllabus requirements for the
Language A1 Higher Level program. Students will perform written and oral assessments which will be internally graded by
the teacher and externally graded by an IB examiner. Students will analyze, synthesize, and evaluate drama, poetry,
novels, and other prose in British, American, and World literature. The course will emphasize thematic and philosophical
connections as well as differences in literary periods, styles, and contexts.
Group 2 Subjects: Language Acquisition
Note: Students must choose at least one of these languages to study for the two years. A second course may be selected
as the student's IB 6th course or elective.
IB French Ab Initio SL
540189
Grade 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
Prerequisite: French II.
Language Ab Initio SL French is a language learning course for beginners designed to be studied over two years. The first
year is French 2. The main focus of the course is on the acquisition of the language required for everyday social
interaction. The course aims to develop a variety of linguistic skills and a basic awareness of the culture(s) using the
language. The course will follow the IB core syllabus and language-specific (French) syllabi in order to prepare students
54
for IB examinations during their senior year.
IB French B SL
541079
Grades 11 or 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
Prerequisite: French III.
This intense, accelerated course involves listening, reading, speaking, writing, and culture components in French. Students
work individually and in groups to analyze, debate, and discuss a variety of issues and texts in French to prepare for the IB
French exams.
IB Spanish B HL
1st Year: 540139
Grades 11, 12 - 2 years, 2 credits
2nd Year: 540149
Prerequisites: Spanish II or Spanish for Native Speakers.
IB Spanish B HL 1 - This is the first part of a two-year IB course. This intense, accelerated course Involves listening, reading,
speaking, writing and culture components in Spanish. Students work individually and in groups to analyze, debate, and
discuss a variety of issues and texts in Spanish to prepare for the IB Spanish exams the following year.
IB Spanish B HL 2 - This is the second part of a two-year IB course. The same strategies used in instructing the first course
will be utilized in the second year as well. This course will focus on communication and media, global issues, and social
relationships as they pertain to Spanish speaking countries and our community. Additionally, students will study two pieces
of Spanish literature, selected by the instructor. The IB assessments conducted in the second year include a written
assessment, an individual oral presentation, and open-response exams administered in May.
IB Spanish B SL
1st Year: 540029
Grades 11 or 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
Prerequisites: Spanish II.
The course involves intense language acquisition through listening, reading, speaking, writing, and culture. Students are
encouraged to communicate in Spanish using both vocabulary and grammar skills learned from previous levels of study.
They will perform individual and group work to build upon and improve communication skills in the Spanish language.
IB Spanish Ab Initio SL
540159
Grade 12 only - 1 year, 1 credit
Prerequisites: Spanish II.
Language Ab Initio SL Spanish is a language-learning course for beginners designed to be studied over two years. The focus of
the course is on the acquisition of the language required for everyday social interaction. The course aims to develop a variety
of linguistic skills and a basic awareness of the culture(s) using the language. The course will follow the IB core syllabus and
language-specific (Spanish) syllabi in order to prepare students for IB examinations.
IB German Ab Initio SL
542089
Grade 12 only – 1 year, 1 credit
Prerequisite: German II.
Language Ab Initio German SL is a language-learning course for beginners designed to be studied over two years. The
first year of the course is German II. The focus of the course is on the acquisition of the language required for everyday
social interaction. The course aims to develop a variety of linguistic skills and a basic awareness of the culture(s) using
the language. The course will follow the IB core syllabus and language-specific (German) syllabi in order to prepare
students for IB examinations.
Group 3 Subjects: Individuals and Societies
IB History of the Americas HL 2: Twentieth Century World History
570059
Grade 12 – 1 year, 1 credit
Prerequisite: AP US History.
IB History of the Americas HL – 2: Twentieth Century World History Topics is the second year of a two-year study with
emphasis on the Cold War and causes, practices and effects of war. Additionally, Twentieth Century World History
Topics focuses on select periods of American, Canadian, and Latin American history for an in-depth study. Rather than
providing a survey, the course allows the student to investigate certain sections of history through classroom instruction,
55
independent reading, and research. Students will learn skills that apply to the study of history in any context, but with
a particular focus towards those needed for a research project and for the twentieth century world history. This course
prepares students for the International Baccalaureate exam.
IB Psychology HL
579039
Grade 12 – 1 year, 1 credit
Prerequisite: AP Psychology.
IB Psychology HL is a two-year course focusing on the study of behavior and mental processes. The first year of the
course is a blend that follows the IB syllabus along with the AP Psychology syllabus. The second year of the course
focuses exclusively on the IB syllabus and consists of three core approaches of psychology: biological, cognitive, and
socio-cultural. Students will also study two specialized areas of psychology in depth. The research component of the
class includes qualitative research methods and a simple experimental study. The research study allows students to
conduct an experiment that consists of the manipulation of variables, use of descriptive and inferential statistics, and
analytical thinking in their analysis.
IB Geography HL
579199
Grades 12 — 1 year, 1 credit
Prerequisite: AP Human Geography
IB Geography HL is a two-year course. The first year course is a blended course that follows the IB syllabus along with
the AP Human Geography syllabus. In the second year, students study both physical and human geography and acquire
skills of both scientific and socio-economic methodologies. Students will examine key global issues, such as poverty,
sustainability and climate change through the use of case studies and examples. Students will develop an understanding
of the interrelationships between people, places, spaces, and the environment. The course explores the following three
optional themes: 1) leisure, sport, and tourism, 2) extreme environments, 3) the geography of food and health. As part
of their IB assessment, students will conduct fieldwork, leading to one written report on a fieldwork question,
information collection, and analysis with evaluation.
IB Business and Management HL
1st Year: 592209
Grades 11, 12— 2 years, 2 credits
2nd Year: 592200
IB Business and Management is a 2-year course that prepares students to develop an understanding of business theory,
as well as an ability to apply business principles, practices and skills. The course considers the diverse range of business
organizations and activities and the cultural and economic context in which business operates. Emphasis is placed on
strategic decision-making and the day-to-day business functions of marketing, production, human resource
management, finance. The business and management course aims to help students understand the implications of
business activity in a global market. It is designed to give students an international perspective of business and to
promote their appreciation of cultural. To receive weighted credit students must take the IB exam in May of their senior
year.
Group 4: Experimental Sciences
IB Biology SL
592039
Grades 11 or 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
Prerequisite: Students are encouraged to participate in a preparatory two-week workshop to be held during the summer.
IB Biology SL is a lab intensive science course designed to prepare students for the IB exam that will be administered in
May. This course will provide an in-depth view of the biological world. After completing this course, students will be
able to understand the complexity of life on earth. Course topics include cells, biochemistry, genetics, ecology and
evolution, human health, nutrition and physiology, cells and energy, neurobiology and behavior. Laboratories,
experimental design, lecture/discussion and cooperative learning strategies will help the students understand various
topics.
IB Chemistry SL
521049
Grades 11, 12 – 1 year, 1 credit
Prerequisite: A strong math background including Algebra 2 is highly recommended. Students are encouraged to
participate in a preparatory three week workshop to be held during the summer.
This course is a rigorous pre-university course that is designed to help the student develop a secure knowledge of a
limited body of facts and at the same time a broad general understanding of the subject. IB requirements include a core
56
curriculum in chemistry, three optional topics, and forty hours of laboratory work including an interdisciplinary project.
The core curriculum includes stoichiometry, atomic theory, periodicity, bonding, states of matter, energetics, kinetics,
equilibrium, acids and bases, oxidation and reduction, and organic chemistry. One of the following options must be
studied in depth: human biochemistry, environmental chemistry, industrial chemistry, or nuclear chemistry. Students
will be assessed through the lab reports, examinations, and the interdisciplinary project.
IB Computer Science HL
1st year: 560060
Grades 11, 12 – 2 years, 2 credits
2nd year: 560069
Prerequisites: Algebra 2, keyboarding, and highly recommended that Intro to Object Oriented Programming has been
studied.
This course is a two-year rigorous pre-university course. The first year is the AP Computer Science course. Students must
enroll in that course in order to be eligible for the second year of the IB Computer Science HL class. This course serves
as an introduction to computers and the study of managing and processing information. The emphasis is on solving real
world problems by means of computer programming (software engineering). Students will learn thoroughly the Java
programming language and apply those skills in exploring how computers work. Some topics covered include objectoriented design techniques, file management, data structures, classes, objects, graphics, debugging, hardware
components, and social implications. The course includes an in depth treatment of the AP Simulation Case Study. During
the second year, the students will develop a computer program product for a chosen client.
Group 5: Mathematics
Mathematics SL
539079
Grades 11 or 12 - 1 years, 1 credit
Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus.
IB Mathematics SL is a one year course. In order to perform successfully on the IB external assessment for this course,
knowledge of the following topics is required: Algebra, functions, equations, circular functions and trigonometry,
matrices, vectors, statistics, probability, and calculus. The graphing calculator (TI-84) will be used extensively and
continuously throughout the course. The IB syllabus will be covered for preparation of the IB test given at the end of
the year.
IB Math Studies SL
539069
Grades 11 or 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
Prerequisite: Algebra 2.
This is a one year course that teaches the following seven topics: 1) number and algebra, 2) functions, 3) descriptive
statistics, 4) statistical applications, 5) sets, logic, and probability, 6) geometry and trigonometry, and 7) introductory
differential calculus. The IB syllabus for this course will be followed in order to effectively prepare the students for the
IB Mathematics Studies SL external assessment which is administered during the spring semester. While preparing for
the external assessment, students will utilize the SI (System International) units of length, mass and time, and their
derived units. Additionally, each student will create a research project, which represents the internal assessment for
this course that includes the collection of information or the generation of measurements, and the analysis and
evaluation of that information and measurements.
Group 6: The Arts
IB Theatre Arts SL
559819
Grades 11 or 12 - 1 year, 1 credit
Prerequisite: None.
The purpose of this one-year course is to expose the students to multiple selections of world dramatic literature, stage
performance, directing, design, stage movement, play analysis, and a variety of theatrical practices and performances
theories. As always, the IB syllabus for this course will be followed. Several of the students’ papers and projects will be
scored both by their classroom instructor and by International Baccalaureate assessors.
IB Visual Arts SL
559829
Grades 11 or 12 – 1 year, 1 credit
57
Prerequisite: Submission of Art Portfolio for review to the IB Art Teacher.
The IB Visual Art SL class is comprised of two components, studio work representing 60% of the course and
investigative workbook work representing 40%. In studio work, the student:
Synthesize art concepts and skills in works that are personal, socio culturally, and aesthetically meaningful,
Demonstrate true purposeful exploration using an inquiring approach to a variety of visual phenomena,
Solve formal and technical problems encountered in studio practice,
an
Exhibit technical skills and an appropriate use of media,
Produce works of art with imagination and creativity
In the investigative workbook work the student will:
Demonstrate clearly in visual and written terms how personal research has led to an understanding of the topics or
concepts being investigated,
Analyze critically the meaning and aesthetic qualities of art forms using an informed vocabulary,
Show some awareness of the cultural, historical and social dimensions of themes in more than one cultural context,
Examine the visual and functional qualities of art from their own and other cultures for meaning and significance
IB assesses the student through a review of selected entries from the student’s investigative workbook and through an
exhibition that is judged by a visiting visual arts examiner, following an interview of the student about his work.
Center of the Hexagon: Theory of Knowledge
IB Theory of Knowledge
11th: 596209 second semester
Grades 11 and 12 - second semester 11, first semester 12
12th: 596209 first semester
Prerequisite: By application only.
Theory of Knowledge, capstone of the IB curriculum, provides a connection for the learner to synthesize the approaches
to understanding gained over the course of the IB study. The course raises questions about the nature and origins of
knowledge, and in so doing seeks a cross-curricular understanding of how a learner learns and, ultimately, knows.
Students will pursue a wide range of readings to be examined in a Socratic Seminar setting combining literature, history,
science, mathematics, fine arts, psychology, and philosophy, among others.
NorthWest Arkansas Community College
Articulated Courses
Students must make an A or B in the course, enroll at NWACC with 12 months of graduation, and
complete the proper NWACC credit request. NWACC will grant free college credit to students
who meet the criteria.
Springdale & Har-Ber High Schools
NWACC Course Description
NWACC Course Number
Childcare Guidance and Mgmt Services
Child Development and Parenting
Medical Terminology
Computer Applications I - III
Computer Applications I - II
Credit Hours
Foundations & Theories in Early Childhood Education
CHED 1103
3
Child Growth and Development
CHED 2033
3
Medical Terminology
AHSC 1001
1
Introduction to Computer Information Systems
CISQ 1103
3
Word Processing Information
CISM 1603
3
58
Computer Applications I
Advanced Spreadsheet
Enterprise Management I-II
Springdale High School Only
Nutrition and Wellness
AP Computer Science A
IB Computer Science HL
Pre-AP Computer Science - Alice
Advanced Database
Web Technologies
Har-Ber High School Only
Programming I-II: Visual Basic
Computer Basics
CISM 1003
3
Spreadsheet Analysis
CISM 1503
3
Introduction to Business
MGMT 1003
3
Nutrition and Health
HLSA 2103
3
JAVA Programming
PROG 1403
3
Advanced Programming Topics
PROG 2803
3
Introduction to Programming Logic
PROG 1003
3
Database Management
CISM 1403
3
Web Page Design
CISM 2123
3
Photoshop
CSIM 1223
3
Visual Basic Programming
PROG 1103
3
Early College Experience Online Courses
Early College Experience (ECE) strives to provide access to higher education to a diverse student population. In addition
to college courses taught on site and through Compressed Interactive Video (CIV), ECE offers online courses. The
following courses will be offered during the academic year 2014-2015.
Students must have a cumulative 3.0 GPA and one of the following minimum scores: ACT Reading, 19; Compass Reading,
82; SAT Critical Thinking, 480; PSAT Critical Thinking, 48, PLAN Reading, 15; or EXPLORE Reading, 14.
Fall
Art Appreciation (3 credits)
Fundamentals of Communication (3 credits)
History of the America People to 1877 (3 credits)
Introduction to Hospitality (3 credits)
Medical Terminology (1 credit)
Wellness Concepts (2 credits)
Spring
History of the American People, 1877 to present (3 credits)
Hospitality Marketing (3 credits)
Introduction to Occupational Safety and Health (3 credits)
General Psychology (3 credits)
Nutrition in Health (3 credits)
For registration information consult the NWACC web site.
Arkansas Department of Higher Education Required Courses for a College Degree
59
All students must take the following core courses to satisfy requirements, no matter what their major:
6 hours of English Composition (Composition I and II)
3 hours Math – College Algebra (more if required by major)
8 hours of Science (Bachelor of Arts degree requires 12 hours)
3 hours of U.S. History or Government.
6 additional hours of Social Sciences
6 hours of Fine Arts
If you have any questions concerning concurrent classes, please contact the Guidance Office.
Concurrent Classes
Concurrent Classes offer the opportunity for students to complete some of the core requirements for college while
remaining in a high school setting. Before enrolling for a concurrent class, individuals should check core course
requirements for the universities or colleges of their choice. Students should also check the required courses needed
for the field or fields of study they are planning to study.
Admissions Requirements
A signed and completed concurrent enrollment application is required at the time of registration.
A current high school transcript showing an overall GPA of 3.00 or higher.
College level placement test scores on the EXPLORE, PLAN, ACT, SAT, or COMPASS are required prior to registration.
Scores vary depending on current class.
Admissions Conditions
Concurrently enrolled high school students will be expected to earn a grade of C or better in each college course
attempted in order to continue concurrent enrollment at NWACC.
Students must submit concurrent enrollment applications prior to each semester of concurrent enrollment.
Benefits
Receive college credit at most colleges and universities.
Receive one unit of high school course credit for every semester college class.
Cost is half that of a regular college class.
Develops college-type study skills.
Smaller class sizes and more individualized attention compared to on-campus college classes.
English
English Composition I and II
519900/519905
12 - 1 year, 1 credit
Books must also be purchased. Cost is half that of NWACC per credit hour.
English Composition I
ENGL 1013
1 semester, 1 credit
Prerequisite: Cumulative 3.0 GPA and a 19 ACT score in writing (75 COMPASS).
(3 college credits)
This course emphasizes the writing of clear, concise, developed academic prose. Students are expected to follow
Standard Edited English to understand paragraph development, and to write a research assignment involving integration
of sources.
60
English Composition II
ENGL 1023
1 semester, 1 credit
Prerequisite: Completion of English Composition I with a C or better.
(3 college credits)
Students in this course use the writing process introduced in English Composition I literature, and literature as an
academic subject for analysis, interpretation, critical appraisal, and research. (3 college credits)
Mathematics
College Algebra will be taught first semester with College Trigonometry offered second semester.
Prerequisite for all math classes: Students must have a 3.0 GPA and ACT 21 or better or SAT 500 or better, COMPASS
65 or better, or PLAN 21 AND completed Algebra II with a C or better. Students must also have a Reading score of 19
on the ACT or 83 on the Compass.
Fees: Tuition is one half that of NWACC.
College Algebra
539900
12 - 1 semester, 1 credit
Prerequisites: Cumulative 3.0 GPA and appropriate placement test score.
(4 college credits)
**Students will be required to purchase a graphing calculator (TI-83 or TI-84), text book, and pay tuition.
An overview of the fundamental concepts of algebra. Topics include linear and quadratic equations and inequalities;
the Cartesian plane and graphing using graphing utility functions, graphs and models; polynomial and rational functions;
exponential and logarithmic functions; systems of equations, inequalities and matrices; and sequences and series.
College Trigonometry
539907
12 - 1 semester, 1 credit
(3 college credits)
Prerequisite: College Algebra or a 24 on the math section of the ACT.
A graphing calculator is required for this course.
College Trigonometry is a survey of basic trigonometric concepts. It is required for students who will take Calculus I
and or College Physics. It is designed to transfer as 3 credit hours of Plane Trigonometry.
Career & Technical Courses
Career and Technical courses are offered at several locations throughout NW Arkansas. Students are responsible for
making their own arrangements for transportation to and from these classes. There is no tuition cost to students.
Dental Assisting
M - F from 2:15 - 3:45 pm
Dental Assisting is a one-year program offered at the Regional Technological Center in Fayetteville. Students who
complete this program earn 9 college credits at NWACC, which count toward NWACC’s 36 hour Dental Assisting
certification.
Medical Clinical Internship/Specialization/Dental I
Fall Semester
Prerequisite: Acceptance into the program by application and interview with instructor.
This course reviews anatomy and physiology, with a comprehensive study of the head and neck. The student’s
understanding of the morphological and functional interrelationships of the anatomical structures is vital to their ability
to logically apply solutions to clinical problems. This course is designed to give the student information on dental
morphology, oral histology, oral embryology, and dental anatomical structures, as well as the functional relationship of
the teeth within dentition.
61
Medical Clinical Internship/Specialization/Dental II
Spring Semester
An introduction to basic dental terminology, dental equipment, instruments, infection control processes, and procedures
associated with the dental office. Students learn the process of four handed dentistry through demonstrations and
hands on practice. The study of therapeutics includes a brief history of drugs, methods of administration, drug effects,
and commonly used drugs in the treatment of oral lesions, anxiety, and panic control. This course also stresses the
philosophy of preventive dentistry including a thorough discussion of plaque formation, oral hygiene, diet and nutrition,
and systemic and topical fluids.
Medical Professions
M - F from 7:30-9:00 am
Medical Professions courses are offered at NWACC in Bentonville. Students earn 3 college credits for CNA and 3 college
credits for PCA+. Both courses count toward NWACC’s 36 hour Nursing Assistant certification. Students must have the
following in place prior to beginning classes: criminal background check, tuberculosis test, and drug screening. The
total cost for all three is approximately $180.
Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA)
Fall Semester
Prerequisites: Intro to Medical Professions, Medical Terminology, and Human Anatomy and Physiology.
The Certified Nursing Assistant Program is designed to meet the industry driven demand for Certified Nursing Assistants.
This course provides the student with an introduction to health care, didactic instruction, hands on skills and clinical
training. Specifically, basic nursing skills including vital signs, personal care skills and Alzheimer’s and Dementia training
are covered. This course prepares the successful student to sit for the Arkansas Certified Nursing Assistant Exam.
Students who complete the course successfully will receive 3 hours of college credit for NWACC.
Patient Care Plus (PCA+)
Spring Semester
Prerequisite: Successful completion of CNA course.
The PCA+ Certificate Program is designed to meet the industry driven demand for Certified Nursing Assistants trained
in advanced patient care techniques and that possess the knowledge, skills, and abilities to excel as a vital member of
the health care team. This course expands on the student’s knowledge of health care and introduces advanced
patient care skills through hands on lab and clinical training at area hospitals. Students who complete the course
successfully will receive 3 hours credit for NWACC.
62
63
Las Escuelas Públicas de Springdale
2014-2015
Estimados Padres y Estudiantes:
Por favor revisen la política de graduación de la secundaria. Graduarse de las Escuelas Públicas de
Springdale es responsabilidad de los estudiantes y de los padres. El personal de la escuela puede dar
consejos acerca de los cursos que se ofrecen, pero el éxito depende del estudiante. No se le permitirá a
ningún estudiante participar en la ceremonia de graduación si no ha cumplido con los requisitos
necesarios antes de la fecha de la ceremonia.
Los maestros de la preparatoria son la mayor fuente de información cuando se seleccionan las clases para
el siguiente año escolar. En adición, cada sitio web de las escuelas preparatorias contiene información de
los cursos y programas que se ofrecen. Por favor consulten con los maestros, administradores o personal de
la preparatoria para aprender más acerca de los cursos que se ofrecen. Si surgen preguntas, llamen o email
a su escuela para recibir más información. La persona apropiado regresará la llamada o programará una
cita, así pueden tomar mejores decisiones en la elección de las clases. No se ofrecerán cursos en los que
no se registren suficientes estudiantes.
Por favor haga planes para asistir la Conferencia CAP (Orientación Vocacional) para elegir el horario del
estudiante el próximo año. La conferencia estará en su escuela:
Har-Ber High School
se reunirán el 31 de marzo y el 1° de abril de 4:30 – 7:30pm
Springdale High School
se reunirán el 2 y 3 de abril de 4:30 – 7:30pm
Todas las escuelas tendrán Conferencias CAP en el 4 de abril de 7:45am a 3:15pm.
Recomendamos que estudiantes y padres trabajen juntos en la selección de los cursos no solo del próximo
año, sino de los cuatro años de secundaria y preparatoria.
Sin tomar en cuenta los planes que tiene el estudiante para después de la graduación, se recomienda que
cada año se inscriban en clases de Inglés, Matemáticas, Ciencias y Ciencias Sociales.
Sinceramente,
Administradores, Maestros y Personal de la Escuela Secundaria
Springdale High School
Mr. Peter Joenks, Principal
[email protected]
www.springdalehs.sharpschool.net/
750-8832 Fax – 750-8811
Har-Ber High School
Dr. Danny Brackett, Principal
[email protected]
www.springdalehb.sharpschool.net/
750-8777 Fax – 306-4250
64
Requisitos Para Graduarse
Smart Core (24 unidades)
Inglés
4 unidades
Inglés
9º, 10º, 11º y 12º grado
Comunicación Oral
½ unidad
Matemáticas
4 unidades
Algebra I
Geometría
Algebra II
Elegir entre: Temas Avanzadas y Modelado en Matemáticas, Pre-Cálculo, Algebra III o Matemáticas de Colocación
Avanzada en Estadísticas, Calculo AB, Calculo BC, Algebra Universitaria o Trigonometría Universitaria. (Los créditos
paralelos comparables pueden ser sustituidos cuando sea aplicable). Nota: Los estudiantes deben inscribirse en un
curso de matemáticas cada semestre durante el tiempo que estén en la preparatoria.
Ciencias Naturales
3 unidades con laboratorio
Elegir entre:
Ciencia Física
Biología requisito
Química
Física o
Principios de Tecnología I y II
Estudios Sociales
3 unidades
Civismo o Gobierno Americano ½ unidad
Economía
½ unidad
Historia Mundial
1 unidad
Historia de E.U.
1 unidad
Educación Física
½ unidad
Salud y Seguridad
½ unidad
Bellas Artes
½ unidad
Enfoque en Carreras/Optativas
8 unidades
Core (24 unidades)
Inglés
4 unidades
Inglés 9º, 10º, 11º y 12º grado
Comunicación Oral
½ unidad
Matemáticas
4 unidades
Algebra o su equivalente,
1 unidad
Geometría o su equivalente
1 unidad
Además dos unidades adicionales de matemáticas que se fundan en base a conocimientos y destrezas de algebra y
geometría.
Ciencia
3 unidades con laboratorio
Elegir entre:
Al menos una (1) unidad de Biología
Al menos una (1) unidad de Ciencias Físicas
Estudios Sociales
3 unidades
Civismo/Gobierno Americano ½ unidad
Economía
½ unidad
Historia Mundial
1 unidad
Historia de E.U.
1 unidad
Educación Física
½ unidad
Salud y Seguridad
½ unidad
Bellas Artes
½ unidad
Enfoque en Carreras/Optativas
8 unidades
65
Honores
Más Altos Honores:
Terminación del programa de International Baccalaureate O
haber cursado seis (6) unidades crédito en Colocación Avanzada.
Altos Honores
Terminación de cuatro (4) unidades crédito en colocación avanzada o unidades de IB
Honores
Terminación de dos (2) unidades crédito en colocación avanzada o unidades de IB
MÁS
Los siguientes requisitos básicos:
Promedio General de Calificación de 3.50 8 semestres
4 unidades crédito de Inglés
4 unidades crédito de Matemáticas
(Incluyendo Álgebra I y 2, Geometría y una clase de matemáticas superiores a Álgebra 2)
3 unidades crédito de Ciencia
(Incluyendo al menos 2 laboratorios de ciencia: Biología, Química o Física o un curso en Colocación Avanzada)
3 unidades crédito de Estudios Sociales
(Incluyendo Historia Americana, Historia Mundial, Civismo o Gobierno Americano, Economía)
2 créditos de la misma Lengua Mundial
½ crédito de Comunicación Oral, Salud, Educación Física y Bellas Artes
Otras Notas de Graduación
Se obtiene media unidad por cada curso cada semestre.
Para todos los estudiantes en Smart Core, se requieren dos unidades de Ciencia Física (Ciencia Física, Química o Física)
y una unidad de Biología.
Además de la terminación de los cursos de estudio, los estudiantes requieren terminar con éxito los exámenes estatales
de fin-de-curso. (Decreto 2243).
Los estudiantes deben inscribirse en clases de Matemáticas e inglés cada año.
Graduación Anticipada
Los requisitos para graduarse pueden cumplirse en menos de cuatros años. Para poder graduarse con anticipación, el estudiante debe presentar una
carta de petición firmada por los padres/tutores antes de comenzar su último año escolar. Los cursos por correspondencia no deben tomarse en
lugar del último semestre escolar.
Número de Horas en Clase*
Se requiere que todos los estudiantes asistan a las preparatorias de Springdale por 7 periodos al día.
*Excepciones a lo de arriba:
Los estudiantes del onceavo y doceavo grado que estén inscritos en algún programa de trabajo aprobado deben asistir
a la escuela por un mínimo de 4 periodos al día.
Los estudiantes de quinto año de preparatoria solo requieren estar inscritos en el número y en el tipo de cursos necesarios para
llenar los requisitos para graduación.
La Escuela de Verano y los cursos para Recuperación de Crédito pueden tomarse para propósitos de
recuperación solamente.
66
Sistema de Calificación
Los créditos se basan un Unidades Carnegie según las normas del North Central Association. Por lo tanto, un curso de un semestre
equivale a media unidad Carnegie. Un curso de un año completo equivale a una (1) unidad Carnegie.
Puntos de
Calificación
A= 4
B= 3
C= 2
D= 1
F= 0
IB/AP Puntos
de Calificación**
A= 5
B= 4
C= 3
D= 2
F= 0
Escala
de Calificación
90-100
80-89
70-79
60-69
59 o menos
** Solo para los cursos designados como College Board Colocación Avanzada e International Baccalaureate Programme.
Preparándose para el Futuro
Las Investigaciones y la experiencia de estudiantes, facultad y personal administrativo indican que los estudiantes que
toman clases obligatorias sólidas tienen mejores calificaciones y tienen mayor éxito en las instituciones de nivel
superior. Se recomiendan mucho los cursos de Colocación Avanzada y/o de Bachillerato Internacional. Para incrementar
las posibilidades de tener éxito, se recomienda que a los estudiantes a tomen las siguientes clases en la escuela
preparatoria.
Inglés – Cuatro unidades
Ciencia – Cuatro unidades, incluyendo una de Biología con dos de las siguientes: Ciencia Física, Química o Física. Una
cuarta unidad puede ser una ciencia optativa.
Matemáticas – Cuatro unidades incluyendo Álgebra I, II, y Geometría y una clase de matemáticas avanzadas (superiores
a Álgebra II)
Estudios Sociales – Cuatro unidades, incluyendo una de Historia Americana, una de Historia Mundial, ½ unidad de
Civismo y ½ unidad de Economía y otra optativa de estudios sociales.
Lenguas Mundiales – Dos unidades de la misma lengua mundial.
Preparándose para y
Pagando la Universidad
Consultar la sección Planeando tus Cursos de Preparatoria para seleccionar los cursos que preparen mejor
a sus hijos para su futuro.
Tomar el PSAT, ACT, Compass y otros exámenes en el tiempo recomendado.
Tomar cursos rigurosos incluyendo clases de CA.
Hablar con el consejero de la preparatoria regularmente.
Revisar las fechas límite para los Seniors (12° grado) para asegurarse que se encuentran dentro de los plazos
establecidos.
67
¿Qué exámenes debería tomar?
PSAT/NMSQT
2ª semana de octubre
Registrarse en el Centro de Consejería
Estudiantes de 11º grado-Calificar para la Competencia por la Beca al Mérito Nacional
Estudiantes de 10º grado – solo para práctica
(Esta cuota queda condonada para los estudiantes de 10º grado como parte de la Iniciativa AAIMS)
ACT
Se ofrece 5 veces al año
Se recomienda a los estudiantes de 12º grado tomarlo en el otoño
Se recomienda a los estudiantes de 11º grado tomarlo en la primavera
Se registren en línea www.actstudent.org o chequea con el Centro de Consejería por paquetes de inscripción.
Los estudiantes que califican por Lonche Gratis o Precio Reducido deben chequear con el
Centro de Consejería por una exención de cuotas.
(El examen ACT incluye un inventario de interés, información biográfica y cuatro exámenes de desarrollo educativo que
usarán las universidades para admisión, colocación en los cursos y selección de becas).
El ACT es para aquellos estudiantes que han terminado o se han inscrito en un programa de preparación universitaria.
SAT I – Examen de Razonamiento
SAT II- Examen de Materias
Se ofrece 5 veces
Se exhorta a los estudiantes de 12º grado a tomarlo en el otoño y a los de 11º grado a tomarlo en la primavera
Los paquetes de inscripción están en el Centro de Consejería o pueden registrarse en línea www.collegeboard.com
(El Examen SAT I es primordialmente un examen de opción múltiple que mide las habilidades verbales y matemáticas.
Algunas universidades también requieren el examen de materias SAT II).
Examen COMPASS
COMPASS es un sistema de evaluación extenso del ACT adaptado a la computadora que ayuda a colocar a los
estudiantes en los cursos universitarios apropiados y maximiza la información necesaria para asegurar el éxito del
estudiante.
Ofrecido en NWACC y NTI
Pónganse en contacto con su Centro de Consejería para registrarse
Becas de Arkansas
El Departamento de Educación Superior de Arkansas ofrece becas y subvenciones a estudiantes de 12º grado que
califiquen. Para obtener la información completa, visita la página Web del Departamento de Arkansas, encontrarás todo
lo que necesites saber acerca de la ayuda financiera del Estado de Arkansas www.adhe.edu.
Beca del Desafío Académico de Arkansas (Lotería)
La Nueva Beca del Desafío Académico de Arkansas (Lotería) está disponible para estudiantes de 12º grado de la escuela
preparatoria y para estudiantes no tradicionales que residen en Arkansas. Los estudiantes de 12º grado de la escuela
preparatoria deben tener un promedio general de calificación por lo menos de 2.50 en el programa Smart Core O una
puntuación compuesta de 19 en el ACT O el equivalente en el examen COMPASS.
Nota: Se requerirá completar el programa Smart Core con un GPA de 2.5 para ser considerado para esta beca.
68
Todos los estudiantes que soliciten la Beca del Desafío Académico de Arkansas (Lotería) DEBEN llenar la FAFSA (Solicitud
Gratuita para Ayuda Estudiantil Federal) Y la solicitud para la Beca del Desafío Académico de Arkansas (Lotería) en
www.adhe.edu. Las fechas límite para las solicitudes son 1º de enero y 1º junio.
Programa para la Beca del Gobernador de Arkansas
El Programa para la Beca del Gobernador de Arkansas está disponible para estudiantes de 12º grado de la escuela preparatoria
que tengan 27 en el ACT o 1220 en el SAT o un promedio general de calificación de 3.5. Hasta 300 Estudiantes Distinguidos $4,000 anualmente - son premiados- La fecha límite para la solicitud es el 1º de febrero. Para solicitarla vayan a la página
Web www.adhe.edu.
Becas para Deportes, Becas y Ayuda Financiera para Estudiantes Atletas
Se puede acceder a NCAA Clearinghouse llamando gratuitamente al 1-877-262-1492 o en el sitio Web
www.ncaaclearinghouse.net. Clearinghouse está disponible para estudiantes y padres para proporcionar información general
acerca de los requisitos de elegibilidad inicial de la División I y la División II NCAA. Es responsabilidad de los padres y el
estudiante atleta conocer todos los requisitos de elegibilidad para poder registrarse en NCAA Clearinghouse. Abajo se
encuentra un Hoja de Referencia Rápida para ayudarlos a CONOCER LAS REGLAS:
Cursos Básicos
La División I NCAA requiere 16 cursos básicos.
La División II NCAA requiere 14 cursos básicos.
Los Resultados de los Exámenes y el Promedios General de calificaciones para cada división se registran anualmente en
la página Web de la Clearinghouse.
DIVISIÓN I & II
Regla 16 Cursos Básicos
4 años de inglés
3 años de Matemáticas (Álg. 1 o superior)
2 años de Ciencias Naturales/Física (1 año de laboratorio de Ciencia)
1 año adicional de inglés Matemáticas o Ciencias Naturales/Física
2 años de Ciencias Sociales
4 años de cursos adicionales (de cualquiera de las áreas mencionadas arriba o lengua mundial o religión/filosofía no doctrinal)
Lista de Verificación de Fechas para la Universidad
La siguiente guía proporciona una lista esquemática de las actividades a considerar en cada nivel de grado
a medida que te vas preparando para la universidad. Para más información, consulta a tu consejero.
Grado 10




Agosto
Ten en mente que las universidades competitivas se impresionan más por calificaciones respetables en cursos
desafiantes que por calificaciones sobresaliente en cursos menos dificiles.
Revisa tus créditos para asegurar que estas a tiempo para cumplir con los requisitos de graduación.
Consulta el sitio web de la universidad para asegurar que tus cursos cumplen con sus requisitos de admisión.
Considera participar en clubes/actividades.
Septiembre

Regístrate para tomar el PSAT si has tomado o estas tomando geometría. Considera participar en un
programa de preparación para el PSAT.
69


Repasa para el PSAT. Estudia el Boletín Estudiantil del PSAT/NMSQT y exámenes antiguos. Usa sitios web,
programas de la computadora y material impreso para estudiar.
Involúcrate en clubes/actividades escolares.
Octubre

Toma el PSAT. En el formulario del examen, marca la casilla que te pondrá en la lista de correo para recibir
información universitaria.
Diciembre/Enero

Estudia el reporte de tus resultados en el PSAT. Compara los errores con la respuesta correcta.
Durante el año






Continúa tomando los cursos apropiados. Las investigaciones muestran que la participación en cursos
académicamente desafiantes es la mejor preparación para los exámenes de admisión a la universidad y para
el éxito en la misma.
Mantén buenas calificaciones.
Recopila y revisa información acerca de universidades.
Investiga los costos de varios programas universitarios.
Continúa revisando las opciones de carrera. El sitio web del ACT (www.actstudent.org) tiene una excelente
guía de planeación de seis pasos en la sección Life Roles para padres para ayudarte con este importante
proceso.
Toma el inventario de interés si está disponible.
Grado 11

Agosto




Mayo/Junio
Los atletas que planean practicar deportes a nivel universitario necesitan registrarse en la cámara de
compensación de NCAA. El sitio es www.ncaastudent.org.
Ten un buen comienzo este semestre. Tus calificaciones de 11º grado son muy importantes. Toma tantos
cursos académicos como te sea posible.
Revisa tus créditos para asegurar que estas a tiempo para cumplir con los requisitos de graduación.
Si es posible, reduce los intereses de tu carrera a uno o dos campos.
Continúa haciendo servicio comunitario voluntario.
Septiembre





Regístrate para tomar el PSAT.
Comienza a pensar más seriamente a qué tipo de universidad te gustaría asistir. Utiliza los recursos
mencionados anteriormente en esta guía para encontrar la escuela correcta para ti. El sitio web del
College Board puede ayudarte a empezar.
Ingresa a Tassel Time para encontrar opciones de cómo pagar la universidad. Pregunta a tu consejero o en el
Centro de Orientación Vocacional como iniciar la sesión.
Regístrate en una clase de preparación para el PSAT si está disponible.
Repasa para el PSAT. Estudia el Boletín Estudiantil del PSAT/NMSQT y exámenes antiguos. Usa programas de
la computadora, sitios web y material impreso para estudiar. Considera participar en un programa de
preparación.
Octubre

Toma el PSAT para el reconocimiento Nacional al Mérito Académico. En el formulario del examen, marca la
casilla que te pondrá en la lista de correo para recibir información universitaria.
Octubre/Noviembre

Escribe a las universidades que te interesan.
Diciembre


Estudia la información de la universidad.
Recopila información de becas y programas de ayuda financiera.
Enero/Febrero


Si planeas solicitar una beca ROTC o ingresar a una academia de servicio, pide paquetes de solicitud.
Revisa los plazos de inscripción para el SAT, ACT, y otros exámenes que se consideren apropiados y toma
clases de preparación si están disponibles.
Marzo/Abril

Planea un programa de estudio para el 12º grado con tu consejero. Aprende acerca de las oportunidades para
obtener crédito universitario por colocación avanzada. Toma tantos cursos académicos como sea posible.
Regístrate para exámenes de ingreso a la universidad.
Mayo/Junio



Participa en programas de preparación para el SAT/ACT
Toma el SAT o ACT.
Toma Exámenes de Aprovechamiento.
70


Continúa desarrollando fuertes hábitos de estudio.
Explora oportunidades de inscripción para crédito universitario dual.
Verano (Antes del 12º Grado)





Selecciona las mejores cinco o diez universidades que sientas que satisfacen mejor tus necesidades. Trata de
reducir tu lista a cinco o seis para agosto. Asegúrate de incluir una escuela “con certeza”, dos o tres “buenos
prospectos” y “un sueño”.
Visita universidades. Solo tienes dos días para visitar universidades durante tu 12º grado.
Mantén un registro de ventajas y desventajas de cada universidad.
Solicita catálogos, solicitudes, información de ayuda financiera e información específica acerca de tu
principal área de estudio.
En agosto, comienza a pensar acerca de tus alusiones personales para los ensayos de admisión a la
universidad. Reflexiona sobre experiencias interesantes que has tenido. Piensa en cómo podrías explicar de
qué manera eres diferente a otros estudiantes.
Grado 12
Las repetidas referencias a las fechas de varios exámenes SAT y ACT no quieren decir que debas tomarlos cada vez que
se convocan. Tú debes determinar cuáles fechas son las más apropiadas para ti, teniendo en cuenta los plazos de
inscripción. Si necesitas ayuda con esta decisión, por favor asegúrate de consultar con tu consejero.
Agosto

Revisa tus créditos. Asegúrate que tienes todos los cursos requeridos y los créditos para graduación. Haz el
ajuste que sea necesario en tu horario para cumplir con los requisitos de graduación o con los requisitos
particulares de la universidad a la que deseas asistir. Piensa en brindar servicio voluntario a la comunidad.
Septiembre














Reúnete con tu consejero para revisar tu expediente. Relaciónalo con los requisitos de ingreso de las
universidades que estás considerando. Haz una lista de tus actividades y reconocimientos. Actualiza esta lista
durante el otoño.
Regístrate y toma los exámenes de admisión a la universidad si no lo has hecho todavía.
Elige un mínimo de tres a cinco universidades a las que solicitarás. Tu selección debe de incluir al menos una
que sientas que definitivamente te va a aceptar. Los atletas deben hablar con sus respectivos entrenadores
acerca de su capacidad para estar al nivel de la universidad.
Visita a los website de las universidades para cumplir su aplicación. Tu universidad tal vez acepte la
“solicitud común” que es usada por muchos colegios y universidades. Consulta en la oficina de consejería.
Comienza a pensar más seriamente acerca de tus necesidades de ayuda financiera. Calcula tu Contribución
Familiar Esperada (ESF) y considera si necesitaras una beca, subvención, préstamo o programa de
trabajo/estudio. Puedes encontrar ayuda en la dirección del sitio web proporcionada anteriormente en esta
guía.
Comienza pronto a solicitar becas y subvenciones. Puedes solicitarlas durante el año, pero comienza ahora.
Revisa los catálogos de la universidad y los sitios web para las solicitudes de admisión, vivienda, ayuda
financiera, exámenes de ingreso requeridos (SAT o ACT) y plazo para solicitar los formularios de ayuda
financiera (FAFSA). Si eres candidato para decisión anticipada, presenta tu solicitud a tiempo para cumplir
con el plazo. También, asegúrate de revisar la ÚLTIMA fecha aceptable para el examen de un candidato a
decisión anticipada. Los padres y los estudiantes necesitan estar al tanto de las obligaciones contractuales
para decisiones anticipadas.
Regístrate para tomar el examen de ingreso a la universidad correspondiente.
Habla con maestros y otras personas que te conozcan bien y a quienes les pedirías que te dieran una carta de
recomendación.
Prepara un currículo vitae para ayudar a cualquier persona a la que le solicites una carta de recomendación.
Programa tus visitas a la universidad. Revisa el calendario escolar para las fechas en las que no tengas clases,
además de los días festivos. Usa estos. Llama con anticipación para hacer una cita.
Reúnete con representantes de las universidades cuando visiten tu escuela.
Mantén buenas calificaciones.
Distribuye solicitudes y formularios de recomendación que sirvan de guía para que los consejeros y maestros
finalicen sus secciones. (A los maestros y consejeros se les pide que escriban numerosas cartas de
recomendación; siempre dales al menos cuatro semanas para que terminen las recomendaciones.)
Octubre



Haz más visitas a universidades.
Organiza el envío del expediente académico y recomendaciones para universidades. Proporciona un sobre con
dirección y estampilla postal si es necesario.
Comienza a llenar los formularios de solicitud. Muchas universidades requieren respuestas en forma de
ensayo. Tómate suficiente tiempo para que realices un buen trabajo. Solicita que un maestro de inglés revise
tu ensayo en la gramática, ortografía, puntuación, estilo, etc. (otra vez, da suficiente tiempo para que el
maestro lo revise y haga sugerencias.)
71


Cumple con los plazos de solicitud para decisión anticipada (usualmente 10 de noviembre), vivienda, becas o
ayuda financiera.
Toma/toma nuevamente el SAT/ACT si es necesario.
Noviembre



Continúa estudiando con ímpetu porque las calificaciones de tu primer semestre del 12º grado son muy
importantes.
Investiga la calidad de los departamentos en las universidades que más te gustan. Haz preguntas a
estudiantes cuando las visites. Si estás interesado en programas preprofesionales, revisa el registro de
colocación para la universidad.
Llena las solicitudes para admisión a las universidades. Da seguimiento a las cartas de recomendación.
Solicita el expediente académico cuando sea necesario. Saca una copia a TODOS los formularios antes de
mandarlos. Mándalos para cumplir con plazo.
Diciembre




Enero


Revisa otra vez las fechas para asegurarte de que has seguido cada paso en el proceso de admisión a la
universidad.
Solicita que los resultados del SAT o ACT sean enviados a todas las universidades a las que has hecho
solicitud. Si no las anotaste cuando te registraste para el examen, llena un formulario especial para
resultados a universidades adicionales. Estos formularios están en los sitios web del ACT/SAT.
Espera la notificación de aceptación de las decisiones anticipadas para el 15 de diciembre. Si no eres
aceptado, presenta tu otra solicitud INMEDIATAMENTE.
Pídele a tus padres que comiencen a reunir su información financiera.
Llena tu FAFSA tan pronto te sea posible después del 1º de enero. El sitio web de FAFSA es www.fafsa.ed.gov
(Calcula la información de impuestos solicitada si tus formularios de impuestos están incompletos. Es mejor
si tu familia hace sus impuestos para finales del mes.) Pon atención a las fechas límite ya que algunos
estados tienen fechas anticipadas a otros. Conserva una foto copia para tus archivos.
Investiga acerca de becas y préstamos. Ingresa a Tassel Time para más información.
Febrero


Marzo



Abril








Mayo







Mantén tus calificaciones altas….termina firme…recuerda que serás aceptado en la universidad.
Revisa las fechas límite para la subvención de ayuda financiera/becas. Muchas formas vencen el 1º de marzo.
Revisa las fechas para los exámenes de Colocación Avanzada si es necesario.
Revisa los nuevos consejos del College Board y del pizarrón de anuncios acerca de las fechas límite para las
becas.
Asegúrate de que todas las becas se han completado y mandado por correo.
Busca las notificaciones de aceptación. El 15 de abril es la fecha más popular para que algunas universidades
competitivas notifiquen a los estudiantes. Hazle saber a tu consejero que ha pasado.
Elige tu universidad y escribe a la universidad una carta de aceptación, la cual debe de ser recibida antes del
1º de mayo.
Escribe a las otras universidades para rechazar su aceptación (también antes del 1º de mayo).
Si estás en la lista de espera para que te mantengan en consideración, asegúrate de informar a la
universidad.
Si te rechazan en todas las universidades, ¡no entres en pánico! Hay varias alternativas, Ve a tu consejero.
Finaliza los planes para vivienda, ayuda financiera y/o becas.
Haz cualquier deposito requerido por la institución a la que planeas asistir. Generalmente, el 1º de mayo es
la fecha límite nacional para los depósitos del periodo de otoño.
Si corresponde, regístrate para los exámenes de Colocación Avanzada. Anota las universidades que quieres
que reciban tus resultados.
Toma una decisión final para un colegio o universidad si no lo has hecho aún. Completa todos los detalles
concernientes a la admisión a la universidad.
Notifica a tu consejero la universidad de tu elección final y si has obtenido alguna beca (académica, atlética,
artística, dramática o musical).
Solicita que tu expediente académico final sea enviado a la universidad de tu elección.
Toma los Exámenes de Colocación Avanzada.
Asiste a la Práctica de Asamblea y Graduación.
Regístrate en el Centro de Consejería para que tu expediente académico final sea enviado a todas las
universidades de tu elección.
Devuelve todos los libros, equipo y uniformes. Paga cualquier multa y remueve cualquier retención de tu
archivo o diploma.
Junio
72
FELIZ GRADUACIÓN
Julio/Verano antes del Primer Año de Universidad



Cuando recibas tus calificaciones del Examen de Colocación Avanzada, si aún no has solicitado que los
resultados sean enviados a la universidad a la que asistirás, solicita al College Board que lo haga.
Participa en el programa de orientación de la universidad a la que asistirás. Este puede ser en la primavera o
justo antes de periodo de otoño.
Busca las oportunidades para registrarte previamente en las clases del periodo de otoño. Aprende acerca de
los recursos y las instalaciones del campus.
Recursos:
Solicitud Gratuita de Ayuda Federal para Estudiantes: www.fafsa.ed.gov
Departamento de Educación Superior de Arkansas: www.adhe.edu
Autoridad de Préstamos estudiantiles de Arkansas: www.fundmyfuture
Información General de la Universidad: www.tasseltime.com
Centro de Aprendizaje Archer
El Centro de Aprendizaje Archer está diseñado para preparar adecuadamente a los estudiantes de preparatoria para la
carrera o universidad que deseen. Esto se alcanza por medio de instrucción personalizada, clases pequeñas, uso de
tecnología y contratación de maestros dedicados y completamente certificados.
Admisión:
A diferencia de la mayoría de escuelas, los estudiantes deben hacer solicitud para asistir al Centro de Aprendizaje
Archer. Los estudiantes son elegidos en base a sus necesidades académicas, sociales y personales. Los estudiantes
pueden obtener hasta ocho unidades de crédito por año.
Cantidad de Alumnos por Clase:
Por política del Estado, las clases en el Centro de Aprendizaje Archer están limitadas a quince estudiantes. El bajo
promedio de estudiantes por maestro permite a todos los alumnos recibir instrucción personalizada de maestros
dedicados.
Tecnología:
El Centro de Aprendizaje Archer está comprometido a preparar estudiantes para el Siglo 21. El año pasado, el distrito
hizo una gran inversión en tecnología. La escuela está equipada con más de 100 computadoras nuevas. Además, casi la
mitad de los salones están equipados con Pizarras Digitales Interactivas Promethean. Estas herramientas promueven la
participación del estudiante, la enseñanza mediante múltiples medios y la interacción del alumno.
Facultad:
Todos los maestros en el Centro de Aprendizaje Archer están certificados para enseñar su materia. Todos ellos participan
un mínimo de 60 horas en desarrollo profesional al año.
Apoyo en la Enseñanza:
73
Para ayudar a maestros y estudiantes, el Centro de Aprendizaje Archer cuenta con personal de apoyo en matemáticas,
lectura-escritura y ELL. Estas personas promueven las prácticas de enseñanza, el análisis de información de los
estudiantes y los Estándares Estatales de Normas Básicas.
Colaboración de la Comunidad:
En el Centro de Aprendizaje Archer, creemos que el aprendizaje se extiende más allá del salón de clase. La escuela
tiene muchos socios en el Noroeste de Arkansas. Estos socios incluyen la Universidad de Arkansas, el Centro Jones para
Familias y muchos negocios locales. Estas asociaciones apoyan las necesidades de los estudiantes en su totalidad
mientras se preparan para su educación postsecundaria.
La Misión de Archer:
La facultad del Centro de Aprendizaje Archer en colaboración con padres y miembros de la comunidad, proporcionará
un medio ambiente seguro y atenderá las necesidades del estudiante en su totalidad, por medio de su participación en
un proceso de aprendizaje riguroso y relevante que los preparará para la universidad y la carrera, para tener estilos
de vida saludables y para ser miembros productivos de la sociedad.
Plan de Cuatro Años
Planea tus próximos cuatro años:
Lee cuidadosamente los requisitos de graduación en la página anterior.
El programa Smart Core es el mejor para muchos estudiantes.
Lee los requisitos para Graduarse con Honores.
Recuerda que debes tomar un semestre de salud, educación física, bellas artes y comunicación oral durante los años de
preparatoria.
Elige al menos dos años de la misma lengua mundial si quieres graduarte con honores. Este es también un requisito para
algunas becas.
Toma tantos cursos de Colocación Avanzada y un programa tan riguroso como puedas.
Consulta las secciones departamentales en las siguientes páginas. Selecciona tus clases optativas dependiendo de tus
opciones de carrera.
Mira hacia el futuro y asegúrate de cumplir los requisitos previos para los cursos que quieras tomar los siguientes años.
Planeación del Horario de 10º Grado:
Todos los estudiantes deben poder usar bien el software de la computadora. Consideren tomar Aplicaciones a la
Computadora I y II durante el 10º grado. Esto también cumple el requisito previo para clases de computación
avanzadas.
Los estudiantes que planean Graduarse con Honores necesitan tomar 2 años de la misma lengua Mundial.
Muchas áreas de estudio tienen una secuencia de 3 años en los cursos. Los siguientes cursos necesitan tomarse durante
el 10º grado si los estudiantes desean terminar la secuencia completa de cursos:
Arte - Arte I (año)
Construcción – Fundamentos de Construcción (año) – Solo HBHS
Artes Culinarias – Alimentos y Nutrición (sem.) e Introducción a las Artes Culinarias (sem.) – Solo SHS
EAST – EAST I (año)
Artes Gráficas – Fundamentos de la Publicidad y el Diseño Gráfico (año)
Programación/IT – Ciencias de la Computación Col. Pre-Avan. – Alice (1er sem.) y Ciencias de la Computación Col. PreAvan. Java (2º sem.)
Producción de Televisión – Fundamentos de la Televisión (año)
Teatro – Teatro I (año)
Hay muchas otras clases optativas abiertas para estudiantes de 10º grado listadas en las siguientes páginas
74
Cursos de Preparatoria
Grados 10 - 12
Escuela Preparatoria Har-Ber
Springdale
Escuela Preparatoria
Preparación para ACT/PSAT
Preparación para PSAT
999990
10, 11, 12 – 1 semestre, ½ crédito
Este curso preparará a los estudiantes para tomar el examen PSAT/NMSQT, una excelente preparación para la prueba
de razonamiento del SAT. Con esto, y otros requisitos, los estudiantes podrían participar en los programas de becas de
National Merit Scholarship Corporation. Los estudiantes dedicarán nueve semanas a la sección de inglés del examen y
nueve semanas a la sección de matemáticas. Esta clase se enfocará en el aprendizaje y práctica de las técnicas para
tomar exámenes, así como en la revisión del contenido para mejorar los resultados. En el programa también estarán
incluidos temas como administración del tiempo, alivio de la ansiedad y habilidades generales para tomar exámenes.
Los estudiantes tomarán exámenes de práctica oficiales administrados previamente y se supervisará su progreso. Esta
clase se les recomienda a los estudiantes que van ir a la universidad.
Preparación para ACT
999990
10, 11, 12 – 1 semestre, ½ crédito
Este curso preparará a los estudiantes para tomar el examen ACT para aceptación en la universidad. Los estudiantes
dedicarán nueve semanas a la sección de inglés del examen y nueve semanas a la sección de matemáticas. Esta clase
se enfocará en el aprendizaje y práctica de las técnicas para tomar exámenes, así como en la revisión del contenido
para mejorar los resultados en el ACT. En el programa también estarán incluidos temas como administración del tiempo,
alivio de la ansiedad y habilidades generales para tomar exámenes. Los estudiantes tomarán exámenes de práctica
oficiales administrados previamente y se supervisará su progreso. Esta clase se les recomienda a los estudiantes que van
ir a la universidad y que tienen planeado tomar el ACT.
Inglés
Inglés 10
411000
10 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Abierto para todos los estudiantes.
Inglés 10 es un curso para los estudiantes de décimo grado. Se espera que los estudiantes lean trabajos de ficción, no
ficción, poesía y drama, además que estudien los elementos de literatura. Los estudiantes estarán expuestos a una
diversidad de estrategias de lectura y se les harán evaluaciones comunes en contenido, práctica y lectura literaria. Al
terminar el 4° Sem, los estudiantes escribirán y desarrollarán un análisis literario completo, usando la literatura
estudiada en el curso y tomarán un examen final para demostrar comprensión en la lectura.
Literatura y Composición Col. Pre-Avanz. 10
411007
10 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Los estudiantes trabajan cada semana: leyendo y respondiendo a una variedad de obras literarias; escribiendo en una variedad
de formas para diversas audiencias y con diferentes propósitos, incluyendo varios ensayos de análisis crítico cada trimestre;
75
estudiando una unidad de vocabulario cada semana; manteniendo un cuaderno; manteniendo una carpeta; repasando
gramática, expresión y mecánica de composiciones; haciendo por lo menos un proyecto grande.
Inglés 11
412000
11- 1 año, 1 crédito
Abierto a todos los estudiantes.
En Inglés 11, los estudiantes repasan la gramática y la expresión, reciben instrucción en literatura americana (por
ejemplo: ficción, poesía, drama y ensayo) y en composición (por ejemplo: párrafo, tema y análisis de literatura). Se
ofrecen dos cursos de Inglés 11 – Regular y Avanzado. Cada curso tiene el mismo contenido general; sin embargo, los
cursos varían en cuanto a los materiales utilizados, el ritmo y la intensidad de estudio.
Lenguaje y Composición CA
517038
1 año, 1 crédito
Lenguaje y Composición Colocación Avanzada es un curso de nivel universitario. Los estudiantes leen prosa de varios de
periodos, disciplinas y contextos; escriben en una variedad de formas para diversas audiencias y con diferentes
propósitos; aprenden a analizar el estilo y aplican dicho análisis a la prosa; hacen un trabajo de investigación según las
normas del MLA; estudian vocabulario; repasan gramática, expresión y mecánica de composiciones; se preparan para el
examen APLAC que se administra en mayo.
Inglés 12
413000
12 - 1 año, 1 crédito
Abierto a todos los estudiantes.
En Inglés 12, los estudiantes repasan la gramática y la expresión, reciben instrucción en literatura mundial (por ejemplo
ficción, poesía, drama, y ensayo) y en composición (por ejemplo ensayo, resumen, carta de negocio y currículo vitae,
trabajos de investigación y análisis literario). Se ofrecen dos cursos de Inglés 12 – Regular y Avanzado. Cada curso tienen
el mismo contenido general; sin embargo, los cursos varían en cuanto a los materiales utilizados, el ritmo y la intensidad
de estudio.
Literatura y Composición CA
517048
1 año, 1 crédito
Literatura y Composición Colocación Avanzada es un curso de nivel universitario. Los estudiantes, leen y responden a una
variedad de obras literarias; escriben un mínimo de cinco ensayos de análisis crítico cada trimestre; estudian una unidad de
diez palabras de vocabulario cada semana y toman un examen acumulativo cada trimestre; mantienen una carpeta; aprenden
a analizar los elementos del estilo y aplican dicho análisis a cuentos, novelas, poesía y drama; mejoran las destrezas de
capacidad analítica; estudian gramática, expresión y la mecánica de composiciones; trabajan para mejorar su calificación en
el examen ACT; se preparan para el examen de CA que se administra en mayo.
Composición en Inglés I y II (Crédito paralelo)
519900/519905 - SHS
12 – 1 año, 2 créditos
(Ver la sección del NWACC p125, 126)
Clases Optativas de Lengua y Literatura
Oratoria
Comunicación Oral
414000
10, 11, 12 – 1 semestre, ½ crédito
Este curso cumple con los requisitos para graduación de la preparatoria. Cubre las siguientes áreas: el proceso de la
comunicación, oratoria pública, interpretación verbal, resolución de problemas y comunicación en masas.
Oratoria Competitiva I/Comunicación Oral
414050
10, 11, 12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Este curso se ofrece a los estudiantes interesados en participar en oratoria competitiva. Las áreas de concentración incluyen
interpretación dramática y humorística, actuación solo y con pareja, teatro de lectura e interpretación de poesía y prosa. Los
76
estudiantes practican la comunicación en diferentes situaciones grupales. Los estudiantes aprenden a preparar notas, a
resumir discursos y practican como dar discursos. Con el apoyo de un maestro de oratoria, los estudiantes escogen y preparan
selecciones para competencias. Se exhorta a los estudiantes a participar en las competencias, pero no es requisito. Los
estudiantes deben cumplir con las reglas de AAA.
Oratoria Competitiva II
414050
11, 12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Requisito previo: Aprobación del maestro.
Los estudiantes participan en torneos de competencia de niveles avanzados. Trabajan en proyectos más avanzados y pueden
participar en el Congreso Estudiantil de Arkansas. Se requiere la participación en los torneos. Los estudiantes deben cumplir
con las reglas de AAA.
Oratoria Competitiva III
414070
12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Requisito previo: Aprobación del maestro.
Este curso es para estudiantes preparados para competir en torneos a nivel de campeonato. Los estudiantes también
fungen como compañeros de apoyo para competidores menos avanzados. Se requiere la participación en los torneos.
Los estudiantes deben cumplir con las reglas de AAA.
Periodismo
Periodismo I
493680
10, 11, 12 - 1 semestre, ½ crédito
Periodismo I es un curso de un semestre diseñado para introducir a los estudiantes al mundo de los medios de
comunicación. Los estudiantes en Periodismo I se convierten en consumidores analíticos de los medios de comunicación
y la tecnología para mejorar sus destrezas de comunicación. La escritura, tecnología y medios visuales y electrónicos se
utilizan como herramientas de aprendizaje mientras los estudiantes crean, aclaran, critican y producen comunicación
efectiva. Los estudiantes aprenderán guías periodísticas para la escritura, diseño y fotografía, lo cual incluye
objetividad, responsabilidad y credibilidad.
Periodismo II
415010
10, 11, 12 - 1 año, 1 crédito
(Puede tomarse los 3 años para crédito)
Requisito previo: B o mejor calificación en Periodismo I o la aprobación del maestro.
Periodismo II es un curso de dos semestres diseñado para proporcionar a los estudiantes un estudio intermedio de las
aplicaciones de los medios de comunicación más allá de Periodismo I. Los estudiantes progresarán en su conocimiento
académico a través de los roles de reporteros, fotógrafos, vendedores de anuncios y miembros del equipo de
mercadeo. Los estudiantes aprenderán a aplicar las guías periodísticas para la escritura y el diseño, lo cual incluye
objetividad, responsabilidad y credibilidad. En este curso, los estudiantes publicarán electrónicamente un periódico
escolar de calidad con el principal propósito de proporcionar un medio de comunicación entre estudiantes, facultad,
administración, consejo escolar, padres y comunidad.
Periodismo III
415020
10, 11, 12 - 1 año, 1 crédito
(Puede tomarse los 3 años para crédito)
Requisito previo: B o mejor calificación en Periodismo II o la aprobación del maestro.
Periodismo III es un curso de dos semestres diseñado para sumergir a los estudiantes en el proceso de la producción a
través de un estudio avanzado de producción de medios de comunicación. Los estudiantes utilizarán el conocimiento
académico obtenido en Periodismo I y II para asumir roles de liderazgo y/o convertirse en escritores, diseñadores y
fotógrafos avanzados. Los estudiantes se apegarán a las guías periodísticas para la escritura y el diseño, lo cual incluye
objetividad, responsabilidad y credibilidad. Este curso es un estudio intermedio de la producción y publicación
periodística. Estos estudiantes participarán en el proceso de publicación desde la fase de lluvia de ideas hasta la
distribución final del producto.
Anuario I
493690
77
10, 11, 12 - 1 semestre, ½ crédito
Este curso se concentra en la redacción de artículos, formato y diseño del anuario, desarrollo del tema, cobertura,
contenido, planeación y principios de fotografía. Los estudiantes aprenden las técnicas para producir un anuario
escolar moderno. La experiencia práctica incluye entrevistas, fotografía y el aspecto comercial del anuario de la
escuela preparatoria. Al terminar exitosamente este curso, los estudiantes pueden solicitar la membresía de personal
del Anuario.
Anuario II
493700
10, 11, 12 - 1 año, 1 crédito
(Puede tomarse los 3 años para crédito)
Requisito previo: Introducción al Anuario o la aprobación del maestro.
Anuario II es un curso de dos semestres diseñado para proporcionar a los estudiantes un estudio intermedio de las
aplicaciones de los medios de comunicación más allá de Anuario I. Los estudiantes progresarán en su conocimiento
académico a través de los roles de reporteros, fotógrafos, vendedores de anuncios y miembros del equipo de
mercadeo. Los estudiantes aprenderán a aplicar las guías periodísticas para la escritura y el diseño, lo cual incluye
objetividad, responsabilidad y credibilidad. En este curso, los estudiantes son responsables de la producción total del
anuario de la escuela preparatoria. Utilizando tecnología informática avanzada, los estudiantes comercializan,
diseñan, ilustran, copian y editan el anuario de la escuela.
Anuario III
493710
10, 11, 12 - 1 año, 1 crédito
(Puede tomarse los 3 años para crédito)
Requisito previo: Introducción al Anuario II o la aprobación del maestro.
Anuario III es un curso de dos semestres diseñado para sumergir a los estudiantes en el proceso de la producción a través
de un estudio avanzado de producción de medios de comunicación. Los estudiantes utilizarán el conocimiento académico
obtenido en Anuario I y II para asumir roles de liderazgo y/o convertirse en escritores, diseñadores y fotógrafos
avanzados. Los estudiantes se apegarán a las guías periodísticas para la escritura y el diseño, lo cual incluye objetividad,
responsabilidad y credibilidad. Anuario III es un estudio intermedio de la producción y publicación del anuario. Estos
estudiantes participarán en el proceso de publicación desde la fase de lluvia de ideas hasta la distribución final del
producto.
Lenguas Mundiales
Los cursos de idioma mundial se recomiendan como parte del plan de Preparación para la Universidad y la Carrera.
Todos los cursos de idiomas mundiales y Español por Herencia y para Nativos califican para crédito en idioma mundial.
No son requeridos dos anos consecutivos del mismo idioma para graduación, pero son muy recomendados para la
aceptación en la universidad. Las Escuelas de Springdale esperan que los estudiantes que comienzan cursos de idiomas
en 8°, 9° y 10° grado continúen tomándolos hasta su 12° grado.
Idiomas Modernos I, II, III y IV proveen instrucción básica en la pronunciación, comprensión auditiva, vocabulario y
gramática y conllevan a una mayor competencia comunicativa y cultural en el idioma específico. Se introducen culturas
lingüísticas, tradiciones y eventos actuales al nivel apropiado a través de lecturas, grabaciones de audio/visual y otros
materiales auténticos seleccionados. Las áreas de escuchar, hablar, escribir, juegos de rol y actividades de grupo están
diseñadas para instruir, reforzar y conectar destrezas de lenguaje específicas. Idiomas Modernos I, II, III y IV incluye
aplicaciones, solución de problemas, habilidades de pensamientos de alto nivel y evaluaciones basadas en el desempeño
y proyectos. Esta descripción de curso aplica para Español, Francés y Chino niveles I - IV.
Francés I
441000
9, 10, 11, 12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Francés II
441010
10, 11, 12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Requisito previo: C en Francés I.
78
Francés III
441030
10, 11, 12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Requisito previo: C en Francés II.
Francés IV
441040
10, 11, 12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Requisito previo: C en Francés III.
Alemán I
442000
10, 11, 12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Alemán II
442010
10, 11, 12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Requisito previo: C en Alemán I.
Alemán III
442030
11, 12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Requisito previo: C en Alemán II.
Alemán IV
442040
11, 12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Chino Mandarin I
447000
10, 11, 12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Español I
440000
8, 9, 10, 11, 12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Español II
440020
9, 10, 11, 12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Requisito previo: C en Español I.
Español III
540030
10, 11, 12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Requisito previo: C en Español II.
Español IV
540040
10, 11, 12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Requisito previo: C en Español III o en SHNS I - III, examen de colocación, y la recomendación del maestro.
Español por Herencia y para Nativos (SHNS) I, II y III están planeados para los hispanohablantes nativos (aquellos criados
en un ambiente usando principalmente un idioma diferente a inglés) y para quienes tienen el español por herencia
(aquellos criados en un ambiente en el que ese idioma fue el más hablado en casa). El curso provee una revisión profunda
del idioma español y es llevado totalmente en español. Los estudiantes mejoran sus destrezas literarias a través de
amplias y variadas actividades de escritura y de la exposición a una variedad de literatura hispana, periódicos, revistas,
películas y asuntos actuales. Las destrezas del idioma mejoran por medio de presentaciones orales, debates y
discusiones en clase de situaciones tanto formales como informales. Se presentan la cultura y las tradiciones para
profundizar la apreciación de los estudiantes al idioma nativo. SHNS I, II y III incluyen aplicaciones, resolución de
problemas, capacidad de razonamiento superior y basado en el desempeño, evaluaciones de composición abierta con
rúbricas. Los estudiantes deben estar familiarizados con el español.
79
Español para Hispanohablantes I
540101
9, 10, 11, 12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Requisito previo: Examen de colocación y/o la recomendación del maestro.
Español para Hispanohablantes II
540112
10, 11, 12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Requisito previo: C en SHNS I, examen de colocación, y/o la recomendación del maestro.
Español para Hispanohablantes III
540123
10, 11, 12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Requisito previo: C en SHNS II, examen de colocación, y/o la recomendación del maestro
Lengua y Cultura Española CA (Colocación Avanzada)
540078
10, 11, 12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Requisito previo: C en Español III, IV, SHNS I, II o III, y la recomendación del maestro de Idioma y Cultura en Español CA
Este curso toma un enfoque holístico para la competencia lingüística y reconoce la compleja interrelación de la
comprensión y la comprensibilidad, uso de vocabulario, control del idioma, estrategias de comunicación y conciencia
cultural. Promueve la fluidez y la precisión en el uso del lenguaje y no para sobre enfatizar en la precisión gramatical a
expensas de la comunicación. Los estudiantes desarrollan conciencia y apreciación de los productos, prácticas y
perspectivas, aprenden estructuras del idioma en su contexto y las usan para transmitir el significado, se involucran en
la exploración de la cultura en contextos tanto contemporáneos como históricos. Al comunicarse, los estudiantes
demuestran comprensión de la cultura, incorporan temas interdisciplinarios, hacen comparaciones entre el idioma nativo
y el idioma específico, y entre las culturas y el uso del idioma específico en situaciones reales. Para facilitar el estudio
del idioma y la cultura, el curso se enseña en español.
Literatura y Cultura Española CA (Colocación Avanzada)
540088
12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Requisito previo: Idioma Español CA y la recomendación del maestro de Literatura y Cultura en Español CA.
Este curso está diseñado para proporcionar a los estudiantes una experiencia de aprendizaje equivalente a un curso
universitario introductorio de literatura escrita en español. El curso introduce a los estudiantes al estudio formal de un
organismo representativo de textos del Español Peninsular, Latino Americano y Literatura Hispana de E.U. y ofrece
oportunidades para que los estudiantes demuestren su competencia en el español. A los estudiantes se les ofrecen continuas
y variadas oportunidades para desarrollar sus competencias en toda la gama de habilidades lingüísticas, con especial
atención en la lectura crítica y escritura analítica, se les anima a reflexionar sobre las muchas voces y culturas incluidas
en un organismo rico y diverso de literatura escrita en español. Los estudiantes progresarán en la comprensión de la lectura
para leer con sensibilidad crítica, histórica y literaria, y podrán aplicar las habilidades adquiridas en este curso a otras
muchas áreas de aprendizaje y vida.
Estudios Sociales
Historia Mundial
471000
10, 11, 12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Este curso es un estudio de los eventos y las fuerzas que ha formado la vida humana desde el comienzo de la historia
registrada. Los eventos y fuerzas estudiados son de naturaleza política, social y económica. Los estudiantes que planean
participar en el International Baccalaureate Programme (IB) de la SHS deben terminar Historia Mundial o Historia Mundial
CA durante su año de Sophomore (10º grado).
Historia Mundial CA
571028
10, 11, 12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Este curso desarrolla una mejor comprensión de la evolución del proceso global. Enfatiza en el contacto e interacción
entre las diferentes sociedades humanas en los últimos mil años. El curso se enfoca en la comprensión de precedentes
culturales, institucionales y tecnológicos, que, además de la geografía, preparan el escenario humano para las nuevas
sociedades de hoy. Las metas se realizan a través de una combinación del conocimiento objetivo y destrezas analíticas
apropiadas. Ver la sección 47100 (Historia Mundial) para información relacionada al IB.
80
Historia Americana
470000
10, 11, 12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Este curso es requerido para la graduación.
Este curso es un estudio de nuestro patrimonio histórico con énfasis desde la Guerra Civil hasta el presente.
Historia de Estados Unidos CA
570028
10, 11, 12 –1 año, 1 crédito
Los estudiantes pueden tomar este curso de CA aunque ya hayan tomado la clase de Historia de Estados Unidos regular.
Este curso de estudio cubre el descubrimiento y la colonización del Nuevo Mundo hasta la era moderna. El enfoque
principal está en los aspectos políticos, sociales y económicos de la historia americana. La porción de la composición se
concentra en el análisis literario, ensayos acerca de la orientación histórica y resúmenes de trabajos históricos. Está
diseñado para proporcionar a los estudiantes las destrezas analíticas y el conocimiento basado en los hechos necesarios
para tratar de una manera crítica con los problemas y materiales de la historia de Estados Unidos. El programa prepara
a los estudiantes para cursos universitarios intermedios y avanzados. Este curso está diseñado para ayudar a los
estudiantes a desarrollar las destrezas necesarias para llegar a una conclusión basada en un juicio informado, razones
presentes, evidencias claras y persuasivamente en formato de debate o ensayo.
Civismo
472000
10, 11, 12 – 1 semestre, ½ crédito
Curso requerido para graduación.
Este es un curso de un semestre diseñado para introducir a los estudiantes a los derechos y responsabilidades asociados
con ser americano. El mayor énfasis estará en la participación ciudadana en nuestro sistema democrático para aprender
acerca de los principales objetivos de los deberes y responsabilidades cívicos en nuestra comunidad y nuestra nación.
Gobierno
472000
10, 11, 12 –1 año, 1 crédito
Este curso cubre los partidos políticos y el proceso electoral presidencial; los poderes y la influencia dela presidencia
de hoy en día; el Congreso y como funciona; la Reforma del Congreso. También se incluye: los Estados Unidos y el
mundo de hoy.
Gobierno y Política de Estados Unidos CA
572048
11, 12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Esta clase ofrece la oportunidad de obtener crédito universitario tomando los exámenes de CA. Ambos semestres
incluyen conceptos reales y analíticos en el gobierno y la política. Las áreas de contenido para el primer semestre de la
clase Gobierno y Política CA: Estados Unidos, son las siguientes; eventos actuales, desarrollo constitucional, el ejecutivo,
el legislativo, el judicial, burocracia, partidos políticos, grupos de presión y libertades civiles. El segundo semestre,
Gobierno y Política CA: Comparativo, se enfoca en el desarrollo del gobierno y en eventos actuales de Inglaterra, Rusia,
China, Irán, Nigeria y México.
Psicología
474400
10, 11, 12 – 1 semestre, ½ crédito
Esta es una clase de introducción a la psicología. Enfatiza el estudio científico del comportamiento del hombre. Se
enfoca en los conceptos y la terminología de las siguientes áreas: aprendizaje, memoria, personalidad, estrés,
comportamiento anormal y estados alterados. El estudiante debe estar preparado para leer, escribir, trabajar en
grupos, hacer presentaciones y pensar.
Psicología CA
579128
11, 12 –1 año, 1 crédito
El propósito del curso de Psicología CA es introducir el estudio sistemático y científico del proceso de comportamiento
y mental de los seres humanos y otros animales. Se incluyen los factores, principios y fenómenos psicológicos asociados
con cada uno de los principales sub campos de la psicología. Los estudiantes también aprenden acerca de la ética y los
métodos psicológicos usados en la ciencia y la práctica.
81
Geografía Humana CA
579088
10, 11, 12 - 1 año, 1 crédito
El propósito de este curso es introducir a los estudiantes al estudio sistemático de patrones y procesos que han moldeado
el entendimiento humano, el uso y la transformación de la superficie de la Tierra. Los estudiantes emplean conceptos
espaciales y análisis de paisaje para examinar la organización social humana y sus consecuencias ambientales. Los
estudiantes observarán como la población mundial ha convertido el espacio terrestre en su lugar, dejando una huella
humana sobre la tierra. Por ejemplo, los alumnos estudiaran la cultura popular, las tendencias de la población, migración
e inmigración y desarrollo urbano.
Sociología
474500
10, 11, 12 – 1 semestre, ½ crédito
Sociología es el estudio de las poblaciones humanas, el comportamiento social y la interacción de grupos. Los temas
explorados son: el racismo y grupos minoritarios, adolescencia, roles del género sexual y estereotipos sexuales, la
explosión de la población, cultos y propaganda, el crimen y la violencia.
Economía
474300
10, 11, 12 – 1 semestre, ½ crédito
Economía es un curso de un semestre diseñado para ayudar a los estudiantes a obtener comprensión en los principios económicos
básicos e instituciones incluyendo escasez, sistemas económicos, oferta y demanda, bancos, Reserva Federal, inflación,
desempleo y el papel del gobierno en la economía. Se espera que los estudiantes participen en la clase de varias maneras,
incluyendo pero no limitándose a, tomar notas, trabajar en grupos, realizar asignaciones escritas y proyectos de clase. Los
recursos básicos de la clase son libros de texto así como lecturas proporcionadas por el instructor.
Macroeconomía y Microeconomía CA
579130/579140
11, 12 - 1 año, 1 crédito
Este curso se enfocará en la naturaleza del sistema económico en su conjunto. El énfasis estará en el estudio de temas que
abarcan ingreso nacional, inflación y desempleo para medir el crecimiento económico nacional y la economía internacional.
La segunda parte se enfoca en el proceso de toma de decisiones de los individuos y las empresas dentro del sistema
económico. El énfasis estará en la naturaleza y función de los mercados de productos. También se prestará atención a los
mercados de factores y al papel del gobierno en la promoción de la eficiencia y la equidad en el mercado. Se espera que
todos los estudiantes inscritos tomen los exámenes de Micro y Macro CA.
PodClass Omni – Solo SHS
579040
11, 12 – 1 semestre, ½ crédito
En esta clase es conveniente pero no necesario que los estudiantes tengan acceso a la tecnología personal iTouch/iPhone
con el propósito de descargar archivos de audio. Los estudiantes necesitarán traer sus propios auriculares.
Esta clase es un estudio de la interconectividad de cosas que los estudiantes tal vez no se habrían enterado que estaban
conectadas y los giros inesperados de la conectividad. Por ejemplo: ¿Cómo el foco o bombilla llevó a la creación de Crisco?
¿Cómo puede la cirugía del cerebro producir un corredor de clase mundial? ¿Cómo puede Cheese Doodles ser un catalizador
para el gozo total y completo?
La clase usa archivos de audio como fuente de material y utilizará múltiples temas con énfasis en el aprendizaje
personalizado tomando como base el lugar donde los lleven los archivos de audio. De la extensa variedad de fuentes de
información disponibles, los estudiantes que tomen la clase podrían descubrir una orientación profesional en la cual nunca
habían pensado. Los archivos de audio incluyen “…. historias que te conmueven, te desafían y te hacen pensar…tus oídos son
el portal a otro mundo.”
Matemáticas
Se requieren cuatro créditos de matemáticas para cada estudiante y deben cumplirse en el transcurso de los grados
9, 10, 11 y 12 (uno por año). * Nota: Todos los estudiantes cursando el último grado deben estar inscritos en una
clase de matemáticas.
Geometría
431000
10 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Requisito previo: Álgebra I
Los estudiantes que requieran más tiempo pueden ser colocados en una clase integrada, solo con la recomendación del
maestro.
82
Geometría es el curso que sigue a Álgebra I. Los alumnos estudian las figuras geométricas básicas mientras desarrollan la
comprensión en la estructura formal y la prueba de geometría. Este curso ayuda al estudiante a desarrollar las destrezas
de pensamiento lógico necesarias en matemáticas avanzadas
Geometría Avanzada
431007
Solo 10º grado – 1 año, 1 crédito
Requisito previo: Álgebra Avanzada 2 y la recomendación del maestro.
Los estudiantes requieren tomar el EOC.
Este curso está abierto para estudiantes que han tomado Álgebra II o Álgebra Avanzada II y no han tomado Geometría.
Los estudiantes requieren tomar el examen de Fin de Curso de Geometría al final del año. Este curso cubre todos los
temas en Geometría con énfasis adicional en temas especiales de Álgebra II.
Enlace a Álgebra II
435000
11, 12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Requisito previo: Los estudiantes deben completar satisfactoriamente el curso de Álgebra I, pero no Álgebra II. Los
estudiantes pueden inscribirse paralelamente a Geometría pero no paralelamente a Álgebra II.
(No es una clase de preparación universitaria)
Enlace a Álgebra II fue desarrollado con el propósito de proporcionarles a los estudiantes que han terminado Álgebra I,
bajo los Marcos Curriculares del Programa de Matemáticas de Arkansas (AMCF) de 2004, enmendado en 2006, el
fundamento adicional de matemáticas que necesitan para tener éxito en el curso de Álgebra II de los Estándares Estatales
de Normas Básicas para Matemáticas (CCSS-M).
Las expectativas de aprendizaje para cada estudiante de Enlace a Álgebra II son:
reforzar los conceptos lineales que fueron incluidos previamente en el curso de Álgebra I;
dominar los conceptos cuadráticos y exponenciales no incluidos en los Marcos Curriculares del Programa de Álgebra I
del Departamento de Educación de Arkansas, a través del modelo de funciones y resumiendo, representando e
interpretando datos; o
introducir conceptos superiores para preparar a los estudiantes para que tengan éxito en Álgebra II CCSS-M.
Los maestros son responsables de incluir los ocho Estándares para la Práctica de Matemáticas encontrados en CCSS-M.
Enlace a Álgebra II no requiere aprobación del Departamento de Educación de Arkansas.
Álgebra II
432000
10, 11, 12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Requisito previo: Álgebra I.
Este curso proporciona al estudiante que va ir a la universidad el conocimiento fundamental necesario de las destrezas
básicas para un curso de álgebra a nivel universitario. Sin embargo, se recomienda Álgebra Avanzada II para los
estudiantes que piensan especializarse en un campo que requiera antecedentes de estudios de matemáticas. Álgebra II
no sirve como requisito previo para Precálculo.
Álgebra Avanzada II
432007
11 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Requisito previo: A en Álgebra I y Geometría con la recomendación del maestro.
Este curso es un estudio profundo del álgebra necesaria para matemáticas avanzadas como Precálculo y Cálculo CA.
Álgebra Avanzada II se recomienda para los estudiantes que piensan especializarse en el campo de las ciencias,
ingeniería o matemáticas.
Precálculo
433000
11, 12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Requisito previo: Álgebra I, Geometría, Álgebra Avanzada II, y la recomendación del maestro. Álgebra II no cumple con los
requisitos.
Este curso es para los estudiantes interesados en continuar sus estudios en matemáticas u otros campos relacionados. Se
enfatiza en el estudio de funciones trigonométricas, geometría analítica, algunas destrezas de álgebra avanzada y otros temas
relacionados. Se recomienda una calculadora de gráficas para este curso.
83
Álgebra III
439070
11, 12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Requisito previo: Álgebra I, Geometría y A o B en Álgebra II o C en Álgebra II con la recomendación del maestro.
El propósito es preparar a los estudiantes que van ir a la universidad pero que no piensan especializarse en matemáticas.
El énfasis radica en mejorar y extender las destrezas algebraicas. Este curso le da al estudiante conocimiento funcional
de Algebra Universitaria.
Conceptos y Modelos Avanzados en Matemáticas
439050
11, 12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Requisito previo: Álgebra I, Geometría, Álgebra II.
Este curso se basa en Álgebra I, Geometría y Álgebra II para explorar conceptos y relaciones matemáticas más allá de
Álgebra II. Se hará hincapié en la aplicación de modelos como proceso de selección y uso de las matemáticas y
estadísticas adecuadas para analizar, comprender mejor y mejorar las decisiones en el análisis de situaciones empíricas.
Cálculo CA AB
534048
12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
11, 12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Requisito previo: Precálculo.
Cálculo CA AB es un curso de matemáticas de nivel universitario que cubre cálculo integral y diferencial único y variable.
Este curso es equivalente a un semestre de cálculo en la mayoría de las universidades. Todos los estudiantes requieren
tener una calculadora de gráficas y se espera que tomen el examen de CA.
Cálculo CA BC
534058
11,12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Requisito previo: Cálculo CA AB.
Cálculo CA BC es una extensión de Cálculo CA AB. Este curso cubre temas de cálculo integral y diferencial único y
variable incluyendo series y parámetros, funciones polares y vectores. BC es equivalente a dos semestres de cálculo en
la mayoría de las universidades.
Estadísticas CA
539038
11, 12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Requisito previo: Álgebra Avanzada II o Álgebra II con una A y la recomendación del maestro.
Estadísticas CA es una introducción a los conceptos comunes de la estadística, incluyendo cada aspecto de colección de
datos, análisis e interpretación. Estas técnicas se utilizan en una variedad de campos de estudio. Se requiere que todos
los estudiantes tengan una calculadora de gráficas y que toman el examen de CA. Los estudiantes pueden inscribir en
esta clase simultáneamente con Precálculo o Calculo CA.
Álgebra Universitaria Crédito Paralelo
539900
(Ver la sección de NWACC p125, 126)
Matemáticas Finitas Crédito Paralelo
539905
(Ver la sección de NWACC p125, 126)
Ciencias
El Distrito Escolar de Springdale recomienda que los estudiantes que desean ir a la universidad consideren tomar
Biología, Química y Física durante la preparatoria. Los estudiantes deben considerar tomar uno o dos cursos
adicionales de ciencias como clases optativas.
Biología
420000
10, 11 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Biología es el curso de ciencias estándar para los estudiantes del 10º grado. El ADE requiere un curso de biología para
graduación en Arkansas. Como Química y Física requieren destrezas de matemáticas más avanzadas, usualmente se
84
toman en el 11º o 12º grado. Este curso se centra en el laboratorio e investiga los temas más importantes de la ciencia
biológica, incluyendo, la naturaleza de la célula, la química de los sistemas vivientes, herencia y estudio del ADN,
anatomía y fisiología de plantas y animales, la evolución, clasificación de cosas vivientes y temas científicos y sociales
relacionados con la biología. Este curso incluye actividades en grupo, presentaciones orales y trabajo de campo en el
Lake Fayetteville Environmental Study Center.
Biología Colocación Avanzada
520038
SHS - 10, 11, 12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
HBHS - 11, 12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Requisito previo: Biología Colocación Pre-Avanzado o A en Biología.
Nota: Biología 42000 es requisito para graduación y debe cursarse antes de inscribirse en Biología CA.
Este curso es equivalente a dos semestres universitarios del curso introductorio de biología. El diseño del curso también
desarrollará avanzadas destrezas de investigación y razonamientos, tales como el diseño de un plan para recopilar y
analizar información, aplicar rutinas matemáticas y conectar conceptos a través de dominios.
Anatomía y Fisiología
494030
11, 12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Requisito previo: Mínimo una C en Biología.
Este curso avanzado se concentra en la anatomía y fisiología humana. Mientras las estructuras y funciones de los
sistemas del cuerpo son cubiertas en discusiones de clase, se incluye la disección detallada de animales. Este curso es
para estudiantes interesados en el campo de la medicina o quienes piensan estudiar ciencias biológicas avanzadas en la
universidad.
Ciencia Ambiental
424020
(No es una clase de preparación universitaria)
10, 11, 12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Esta clase es un laboratorio de investigación con enfoque en el estudio de las ciencias del medio ambiente, las ciencias
naturales, y la meteorología con una perspectiva en las interacciones ecológicas y en el uso que el hombre le da a la tierra
y a sus recursos. Además, se incorporan al curso temas científicos, sociales, geográficos y económicos con énfasis en el
estudio de casos específicos.
Ciencia Ambiental CA
523038
12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Requisito previo: El curso de Ciencia Ambiental CA es una excelente opción para cualquier estudiante interesado que
ha terminado dos años de ciencias de laboratorio en la escuela preparatoria - un año de Biología y un año de ciencias
físicas. Debido al análisis cuantitativo que se requiere en el curso, los estudiantes deben de haber tomado al menos un
año de algebra. También es conveniente (pero no necesario) un curso en ciencias de la Tierra.
El objetivo del curso de Ciencias Ambientales CA es proporcionar a los estudiantes los principios científicos, conceptos
y metodología requeridos para comprender la interrelación del mundo natural, identificar y analizar problemas
ambientales tanto naturales como ocasionados por el hombre, evaluar los riesgos relativos asociados con estos problemas
y examinar soluciones alternativas para resolverlos o prevenirlos.
Geología
425013
(No es una clase de preparación universitaria)
11, 12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Esta es una clase que se enfoca en la Tierra y en lo que la rodea. Los temas de interés serán la composición de una
historia de la Tierra y las fuerzas que la han cambiado y la han formado. Temas adicionales incluirán los océanos y el
espacio exterior.
Física
422000
10, 11, 12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Requisito previo: A o B en Álgebra I, completar Geometría o la aprobación del maestro de Física.
Este es un estudio de la materia y la energía, que incluye movimiento (mecánica), calor (termodinámica), sonido, luz,
electricidad, magnetismo y teoría atómica. Se enfatiza en la resolución de problemas. Se llevan a cabo experimentos y
demostraciones para facilitar el entendimiento de los conceptos estudiados. Se recomienda esta clase para estudiantes que
requieren tomar física o ciencia física para las áreas de arquitectura, enfermería, ciencias biológicas, agricultura, pedagogía,
85
silvicultura, ciencias de los alimentos y computadoras.
Física BI Colocación Avanzada
522038
11, 12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Requisito previo: C en Álgebra Avanzada II o C en Física o aprobación del maestro de CA.
Es equivalente al primer semestre de un curso universitario de algebra basada en física. El curso cubre mecánica Newtoniana
(incluyendo dinámica rotacional e impulso normal); trabajo, energía, fuerza, ondas mecánicas y sonido. También introducirá
los circuitos eléctricos.
Física B2 Colocación Avanzada
522038
11, 12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Requisito previo: C en Álgebra Avanzada II o C en Física o aprobación del maestro de CA.
Este curso es equivalente al segundo semestre de un curso universitario de algebra basada en física. El curso cubre mecánica
de fluidos, termodinámica, electricidad y magnetismo, óptica y física atómica y nuclear.
Física Mecánica C - Colocación Avanzada
522058
10, 11, 12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Requisito previo: Estar tomando actualmente Cálculo AB CA, BC, o la aprobación del maestro.
Las instrucciones serán proporcionadas en seis áreas de contenido: Cinemática, Leyes de Movimiento de Newton, trabajo,
energía y fuerza; sistemas de partículas e impulso lineal, movimiento circular y rotación, oscilación y gravedad. Este curso
está diseñado para estudiantes que planean seguir la carrera de ingeniería, arquitectura, física, química, ciencias
matemáticas y ciencias de computación avanzadas. Los estudiantes tomarán el examen de CA para obtener crédito para la
universidad y/o colocación avanzada en la universidad.
Física Electricidad y Magnetismo C - Colocación Avanzada
522048
10, 11, 12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Requisito previo: Estar tomando actualmente Cálculo AB CA, BC, o la aprobación del maestro.
Los estudiantes desarrollaran una profunda comprensión de los principios fundamentales de la física en electricidad y
magnetismo mediante la aplicación de estos principios a situaciones físicas complejas que combinen múltiples aspectos de
la física en lugar de presentar conceptos de manera aislada. Los estudiantes desarrollaran destrezas de pensamiento crítico
a través de la aplicación de métodos de cálculo diferencial e integral para formular principios físicos y resolver problemas
físicos complejos.
Química
21000
10, 11, 12 – 1 año, un crédito
Requisito previo – Inscripción en Geometría o en un curso más avanzado de matemáticas.
*10º grado admitido después de completar Biología Colocación Pre-Avanzada en 9º grado. Deben también estar inscritos
en Geometría.
Esta clase es un laboratorio de investigación con enfoque en el estudio de la química como una ciencia. Los estudiantes
recopilan información relacionada a la estructura de la materia y buscan colocar esta información en patrones llenos de
significado. Experimentos en el laboratorio demuestran los principios químicos cubiertos en el trabajo de clase. El uso de
álgebra básica es esencial en el curso.
Química Colocación Pre-Avanzada
421007
10, 11, 12 – 1 año, un crédito
Requisito previo: C o mejor calificación en Biología Col. Pre-Avanzada en 9º grado o la aprobación del maestro.
Química Col. Pre-Avanzada es un curso de química de primer año diseñado para satisfacer las necesidades del estudiante
que planea continuar en el área de ciencia CA (especialmente Química CA) o tomar una clase de química universitaria.
Química Colocación Avanzada
521038
11, 12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Requisito previo – Calificación mínima de una C en Química I. Se recomienda que el estudiante tenga antecedentes sólidos
en matemáticas, incluyendo álgebra.
Este curso es el equivalente al primer año de química general a nivel universitario; así que, los estudiantes que completan
86
el curso y pasan el examen de CA reciben crédito universitario para la clase. Este curso se diferencia de la clase de química
regular en el tipo de libro de texto utilizado, la cobertura de temas, el énfasis en calculaciones químicas, la formulación
de principios matemáticos y el tipo de trabajo en laboratorio. Se enfatiza en oxidación-reducción, estequiometría,
equilibrio, cinética, termodinámica, experimentación y técnicas de investigación. Se requiere un proyecto de
investigación. También es requisito tomar el examen de CA para crédito universitario y/o colocación avanzada en el
programa de la carrera universitaria.
Bellas Artes
Música
**La siguiente descripción es para todas las selecciones del Programa de Música Instrumental. Para inscribirse, deben tener la
recomendación de los directores de la banda. En las presentaciones de la banda de la escuela preparatoria se enfatiza en la
música instrumental. La banda se presenta en los juegos de fútbol americano, concursos de marcha, desfiles, conciertos de
Navidad, etc. Se hace hincapié en la participación y en la calidad al marchar y al interpretar.
Se requiere la asistencia a todas las presentaciones.
Banda Sophomore
45104I
(Instrumental II)
10 -1 año, 1 crédito
Requisito previo: Recomendación del director de banda de la Escuela Secundaria.
*Este curso consiste en Banda de Marcha combinado con Sinfónica, Concierto, Varsity o Métodos de Banda.
Banda Junior
45105I
(Instrumental III)
11– 1 año, 1 crédito
Requisito previo –Recomendación del director de la banda.
*Este curso consiste en Banda de Marcha combinado con Banda Sinfónica, Banda de Concierto, Varsity o Métodos de
Banda.
Banda Senior
45106I
(Instrumental IV)
12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Requisito previo - Recomendación del director de la banda.
*Este curso consiste en Banda de Marcha combinado con Banda Sinfónica, Banda de Concierto, Varsity o Métodos de
Banda.
*Conjuntos de Música Instrumental
Banda de Marcha – La Banda de Marcha se presenta durante el medio tiempo de todos los juegos de fútbol americano que se llevan a
cabo en casa. La banda viaja a todos los juegos fuera de casa cuando hay transporte disponible. La Banda de Marcha participa en
varios concursos durante el primer semestre. Se requiere la asistencia a todas las presentaciones.
Banda Sinfónica - Tocan música de alto nivel; estudian instrumentos de viento y literatura de orquestas de todos los periodos
musicales. Se enfatiza en las interpretaciones musicales y el mejoramiento individual. Este conjunto participa en festivales
musicales de la región y a nivel estatal. Se requiere la asistencia a todas las presentaciones.
Banda de Concierto – Se enfatiza en la ejecución musical de banda y en el progreso del estudiante individual. Este conjunto participa
en los mismos conciertos y festivales que la Banda Sinfónica. Se requiere la asistencia a todas las presentaciones.
Varsity – Se enfatiza en la ejecución musical y en el progreso del estudiante individual. Este grupo participa en los mismos conciertos
y festivales que Banda Sinfónica y Banda de Concierto. Se requiere la asistencia a todas las presentaciones
Métodos de Banda – Este curso es para estudiantes que necesitan entrenamiento musical fundamental adicional. Se enfatiza en
producción de tono, destrezas de ritmo, desarrollo de escalas y conocimiento musical general. Se requiere la asistencia a todas
las presentaciones
87
Banda de Jazz I
45104J
10 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Requisito previo: Solo audición.
La Banda de Jazz se presenta en todos los juegos de básquetbol de casa y en algunos conciertos durante el año. Algunas
veces se requiere viajar. Se enfatiza en los estilos jazz, blues, funk y rock, así como en técnicas de improvisación.
Banda de Jazz II
45105J
11 – 1 año, 1 crédito
(Ver la descripción arriba.)
Banda de Jazz III
5106J
12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
(Ver la descripción arriba.)
Teoría de la Música Colocación Avanzada
559018
11, 12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Requisito previo: Banda, Coro o 2 años de piano (debe leer tonos, reconocer la duración de las notas y saber o poder
aprender fácilmente las destrezas básicas del teclado).
Este curso está diseñado para que aquellos estudiantes interesados en la carrera de música puedan aprender lo básico de la
teoría de la música y la composición. Este curso también es importante para los estudiantes que quieren continuar sus estudios
de música después de la preparatoria. Los estudiantes serán entrenados en el desarrollo de la habilidad auricular, composición
básica y teoría básica de la música en acuerdo con la descripción del curso del College Board Advanced Placement Program
Theory. Este curso preparará a los estudiantes para el examen de CA.
Coro a Capela - solo SHS
452030
10, 11, 12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Requisito previo – Aprobación del maestro.
Enfatiza en el estudio de la música a través de la presentación de literatura coral de todos los periodos. El coro participa
en conciertos, seminarios, concursos y eventos regionales, estatales, nacionales e internacionales y está musicalmente
activo durante el año. Se requiere la asistencia a conciertos y concursos.
Colla Voce – Mujeres - solo SHS
45203L
10, 11, 12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Requisito previo – Aprobación del maestro.
Enfatiza en la presentación y el progreso individual del estudiante. Este grupo está activo en los mismos conciertos y
eventos que A Capella Choir. Se requiere la asistencia a conciertos y concursos.
Coro Selecto 10˚ grado - solo SHS
45200S
10 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Requisito previo – Aprobación del maestro.
Enfatiza en la presentación y el progreso individual del estudiante. Este grupo está activo en los mismos conciertos y
eventos que A Capella Choir. Se requiere la asistencia a conciertos y concursos.
Concierto Mujeres - solo SHS
45200F
10, 11, 12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Requisito previo – Aprobación del maestro.
Este curso es para estudiantes que necesitan entrenamiento musical básico adicional antes de ingresar a un grupo
interpretativo. Se enfatiza en la producción de tono, destrezas de ritmo, desarrollo de escalas y conocimiento musical
general. Se requiere la asistencia a todas las presentaciones.
Unity - solo SHS
11, 12 – [Curso sin crédito]
Unity es un grupo seleccionado por medio de audiciones llevadas a cabo en mayo para el siguiente año escolar. Unity se
88
presenta en eventos escolares, cívicos y comunitarios. Además, Unity presenta el Banquete Renacimiento Anual de
Navidad de SHS. Todos los ensayos son después de la escuela. Todos los miembros de Unity deben ser miembros del coro
A Capella.
Coro de Hombres - solo SHS
45200B
10, 11, 12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Requisito previo – Aprobación del maestro.
El énfasis está en la interpretación musical de estudiantes hombres. Este curso es para estudiantes que necesitan
mejorar las destrezas musicales y el desarrollo vocal.
Cantantes Camerata - solo HBHS
45204Z
10, 11, 12 - 1 año, 1 crédito
Requisito previo – Aprobación del maestro.
Enfatiza en el estudio de la música a través de la presentación de literatura coral de todos los periodos. El coro participa
en conciertos, seminarios, concursos y eventos regionales, estatales, nacionales e internacionales. Este coro está
musicalmente activo durante el año. Se requiere la asistencia a conciertos y concursos.
Cantantes Strata - solo HBHS
45204S
10, 11, 12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Requisito previo – Aprobación del maestro.
Enfatiza en la presentación y el progreso individual del estudiante. Este grupo está activo en los mismos conciertos y concursos
que Camerata Singers. Se requiere la asistencia a todas las presentaciones.
Coro de Hombres - solo HBHS
45204B
10, 11, 12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Requisito previo – Aprobación del maestro.
Enfatiza en la presentación y el progreso individual del estudiante. Este grupo está activo en los mismos conciertos y
concursos que Cantantes Camerata. Se requiere la asistencia a los conciertos y concursos.
Bel Canto - solo HBHS
45204B
10, 11, 12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Requisito previo – Aprobación del maestro.
El énfasis está en el estudio de la música a través de presentaciones de literatura coral de todos los periodos. El coro
participa en conciertos, clínicas, concursos y en eventos regionales, estatales e internacionales. El coro está
musicalmente activo durante todo el año. Se requiere la asistencia a conciertos y concursos.
Cantantes Selectos - solo HBHS
45204S
10, 11, 12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Requisito previo – Aprobación del maestro.
Enfatiza en la presentación y el progreso individual del estudiante. Este grupo está activo en los mismos conciertos y
concursos que Cantantes Camerata. Se requiere la asistencia a todas las presentaciones.
Arte
Introducción al Arte de 2D
450080
10, 11, 12 – 1 semestre, ½ crédito
Requisito previo: Ninguno.
(Otoño solamente en HBHS.)
Este curso está diseñado para proporcionar a los estudiantes los requisitos mínimos para el crédito en Bellas Artes. Los
estudiantes se familiarizarán con lo básico del dibujo, pintura y otros medios de dos dimensiones. Se presentará el
trabajo de artistas del pasado y del presente, carreras de arte y otras culturas. Se requiere una cuota.
89
Introducción al Arte de 3D
450090
10, 11, 12 – 1 semestre, ½ crédito
Requisito previo: Ninguno.
(Primavera solamente en HBHS.)
Este curso está diseñado para proporcionar a los estudiantes los requisitos mínimos para el crédito en Bellas Artes. Los estudiantes
experimentarán una variedad de materiales de escultura mientras aprenden los fundamentos del arte. Se requiere una cuota.
Arte Estudio de 2D Colocación Avanzada
559050
12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Requisito previo: Un año completo de Arte III y la recomendación del maestro.
En este curso, estudiantes altamente motivados desarrollan una carpeta de 24 2D trabajos (pinturas, dibujos,
fotografías, collages, obras gráficas, etc.) bajo las directrices del Consejo Universitario. Al terminar el año, en lugar
de un examen escrito, se requiere que cada estudiante entregue una carpeta digital de doce trabajos que refleje una
variedad de temas artísticos, además de una serie de doce trabajos explorando alguna idea o tema personal. Cinco de
esos 24 trabajos serán enviados por correo al Consejo Universitario para evaluación. Arte Estudio de 2D CA se considera
una clase de nivel universitario; debido a la demanda de requisitos, la necesidad de un fuerte interés personal en arte,
excelentes hábitos de trabajo individual y la voluntad de trabajar varias horas fuera del salón de clase son esenciales
para el éxito, así como tener la disposición de trabajar con otros para edificar la comunidad en el salón de arte. Los
estudiantes presentarán su trabajo públicamente en una exhibición en la primavera. Se requiere una cuota.
Arte Estudio de 3D Colocación Avanzada
559060
12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Requisito previo: Un año completo de Arte III y la recomendación del maestro.
En este curso, estudiantes altamente motivados desarrollan una carpeta de esculturas bajo las directrices del Consejo
Universitario. Al terminar el año, en lugar de un examen escrito, se requiere que cada estudiante entregue una carpeta
digital de trabajos que refleje una variedad de temas artísticos, además de una serie de trabajos explorando alguna
idea o tema personal. Arte Estudio de 3D CA se considera una clase de nivel universitario; debido a la demanda de
requisitos, la necesidad de un fuerte interés personal en arte, excelentes hábitos de trabajo individual y la voluntad de
trabajar varias horas fuera del salón de clase son esenciales para el éxito, así como tener la disposición de trabajar con
otros para edificar la comunidad en el salón de arte. Los estudiantes presentarán su trabajo públicamente en una
exhibición en la primavera. Se requiere una cuota.
Arte I
450000
10, 11, 12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Requisito previo: Ninguno.
Arte I está diseñado para los estudiantes que tienen gran interés en el arte. Se explorarán la pintura, el dibujo, el grabado
y la escultura. Los estudiantes ganarán confianza usando principios del diseño para crear trabajo artístico personal y
original. Se presentará el trabajo de artistas del pasado y del presente y los estudiantes ganarán fluidez en el lenguaje del
arte universal. Se requiere una cuota.
Arte II
450030
10, 11, 12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Requisito previo: Un año completo de Arte I.
Arte II es un curso de un año completo diseñado para los estudiantes que han terminado satisfactoriamente un año
completo de Arte I. En Arte II, los estudiantes desarrollarán destrezas y expandirán su conocimiento de arte. Ellos
crearán composiciones originales y complejas que reflejen crecimiento personal y comunicación de ideas a través de
una variedad de materiales y procesos. Se requiere una cuota.
Arte III
450040
11, 12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Requisito previo: Un año completo de Arte I.
Arte III es un curso de un año completo diseñado para los estudiantes que han terminado satisfactoriamente un año
completo de Arte II. Los estudiantes continuarán desarrollando destrezas artísticas, pero con más énfasis en la expresión
artística. Ellos aprenderán acerca del trabajo de artistas del pasado y del presente y acerca del arte en una variedad
de culturas. Los estudiantes exhibirán sus trabajos, ensamblarán una carpeta de trabajos y crearán una serie de trabajos
artísticos en un tema que ellos elijan. Se requiere una cuota para este curso.
90
Arte IV
450050
12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Requisito previo: Un año completo de Arte III.
Arte IV es un curso basado en una carpeta de trabajos con un acercamiento individualizado a las lecciones. Los
estudiantes aprenderán a tomar decisiones que les permitan buscar sus propios medios de expresión mientras son
desafiados a mejorar sus destrezas y conocimientos de arte. Los estudiantes aprenderán a conducir sus experiencias de
aprendizaje trabajando como lo hacen los artistas, con investigaciones independientes y desarrollo de ideas. Sus trabajos
representarán una extensa variedad de diseños, destrezas y diferentes maneras de expresión, así como la exploración
de un solo tema en una serie. Entre los desafíos presentados, ellos aprenderán maneras prácticas de programar tiempo
regular para el arte, los estudiantes deben pasar varias horas a la semana trabajando fuera del salón de clase para tener
éxito en este curso. Se requiere una cuota.
Arte Estudio de Dibujo Colocación Avanzada
559048
12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Requisito previo: Un año completo de Arte III y la recomendación del maestro.
En este curso, estudiantes altamente motivados desarrollan una carpeta de trabajos bajo las directrices del Consejo
Universitario. Al terminar el año, en lugar de un examen escrito, se requiere que cada estudiante entregue una carpeta
digital de doce trabajos que refleje una variedad de temas artísticos, además de una serie de doce trabajos explorando
alguna idea o tema personal. Cinco de esos 24 trabajos serán enviados por correo al Consejo Universitario para
evaluación. Arte Estudio CA se considera una clase de nivel universitario; debido a la demanda de requisitos, la necesidad
de un fuerte interés personal en arte, excelentes hábitos de trabajo individual y la voluntad de trabajar varias horas
fuera del salón de clase son esenciales para el éxito, así como tener la disposición de trabajar con otros para edificar la
comunidad en el salón de arte. Los estudiantes presentarán su trabajo públicamente en una exhibición en la primavera.
Se requiere una cuota.
Drama
Teatro I
493540
10, 11, 12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Esta clase es una introducción al teatro. En la clase se aprende lo básico de la interpretación dramática. Las unidades incluyen:
improvisación, voz y movimiento, pantomima, monólogos, actuación y lectura de guiones. Esta clase es para el estudiante que
quiere vencer el miedo al escenario y darse una idea de los que es el teatro.
Teatro II
493550
11, 12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Requisito previo: Teatro I y la recomendación del maestro.
Esta clase es una continuación de Teatro I. Los estudiantes cubrirán unidades en técnicas de actuación, terminología teatral,
historia del teatro, carpetas de trabajo, escritura de guiones, radio, tv, filmación e interpretación. Se recomienda que los
estudiantes participen en representaciones teatrales.
Teatro III
493590
12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Requisito previo: Teatro II y la recomendación del maestro.
Esta clase es para estudiantes con un serio interés en el estudio del teatro. Los estudiantes refinan sus talentos en
representaciones y teatro técnico, continúan trabajando en sus carpetas de trabajo y en audición de escenas en preparación
para becas universitarias; además, sirven como personal de producción. Los estudiantes asumen más responsabilidades
individuales por la producción y participación como actores, técnicos y equipo de dirección teatral. La calificación está basada
en la participación y en el cumplimento de trabajos asignados.
Salud y Educación Física
Todos los cursos de Educación Física siguen el sistema estatal.
Salud
480000
91
10, 11, 12 – 1 semestre, ½ crédito
Salud básica ofrece información para una vida saludable. Este curso incluye bienestar, salud mental, control de estrés y
prevención de suicidio, fisiología del ejercicio, información sobre la diabetes, cáncer y enfermedades cardiovasculares,
entrenamiento en reanimación cardio pulmonar (CPR), educación sobre la vida familiar, enfermedades de transmisión sexual
y los efectos del tabaco, alcohol y drogas en el cuerpo. Este curso es un requisito para graduación.
Deportes: Boliche - solo SHS
48500N
10, 11, 12 – 1 semestre, ½ crédito
Boliche ofrece instrucción básica en los fundamentos y técnicas del boliche. Durante las primeras nueve semanas se aprende
a llevar el marcador, establecer un promedio y a desarrollar técnicas. Las siguientes nueve semanas son de competencia.
NOTA: La instrucción de boliche requiere que los estudiantes utilicen el autobús escolar para transportarse al boliche
local. El costo es de $1 por día para jugar boliche.
EF General
485000
10, 11, 12 – 1 semestre, ½ crédito o 1 año, 1 crédito
Este curso consiste en actividades de Educación Física en general. Por ejemplo: voleibol, tenis, fútbol, básquetbol, pesas,
baile, bádminton.
Deportes
Información para todos los deportes y grupos de presentación:
Se requiere un examen físico antes de cualquier prueba de aptitud.
Los padres deben asistir a la junta de padres.
Todos los estudiantes deben tener la aprobación de los entrenadores para registrarse
Los estudiantes deben cumplir las normas de la Asociación de Actividades de Arkansas (calificaciones, edad, residencia,
etc.) y las políticas del Departamento de Deportes.
Las prácticas pueden ser antes o después de la escuela o los fines de semana.
Pueden requerirse algunos viajes.
Todos son competitivos.
Se llevan a cabo exámenes de drogas al azar.
Todos los deportes siguen los esquemas estatales.
Algunos requieren que el estudiante compre equipo especial.
Fútbol Americano Sophomore (10˚ grado)
48502O
10 – 1 semestre, ½ crédito
Las prácticas previas a la temporada empiezan la primera semana de agosto y terminan cuando comienzan las clases.
Los junior varsity y los sophomore tienen programados nueve partidos con las escuelas del área.
Fútbol Americano Varsity
48502O
11,12 - 1 semestre, ½ crédito
Todos los estudiantes interesados deben registrarse para fútbol americano en el 7º periodo. Las prácticas previas a la
temporada empiezan la primera semana de agosto y terminan cuando comienzan las clases. Los junior varsity y los
sophomore tienen programados nueve partidos con las escuelas del área. El varsity tiene programados nueve o diez
partidos y compite en 7A West Conference.
Entrenamiento Físico
48502Y
10, 11, 12 - 1 semestre, ½ crédito
Este curso desarrolla la parte superior e inferior del cuerpo a través de un rígido programa de entrenamiento con pesas
y corriendo. Se enfatiza en los fundamentos del ejercicio, condición, nutrición, desarrollo muscular y en las destrezas
motoras. Hay competencias de entrenamiento con pesas con otras escuelas del área.
Campo Traviesa Hombres/Mujeres
48502K
10, 11, 12 – solo primer semestre, ½ crédito
Todos los estudiantes deben registrarse para campo traviesa en el 7º periodo para el segundo semestre. Se establecerá
un horario completo para competencias.
92
Baloncesto Hombres
Baloncesto Mujeres
48502B
48502F
10, 11, 12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Todos los estudiantes interesados deben registrarse para básquetbol en el 7º periodo. Las pruebas serán programadas
en la primavera por los entrenadores. Un horario completo de competencias se establecerá para los equipos sophomore,
junior varsity y varsity.
Voleibol Mujeres
48502V
10, 11, 12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Este es un deporte abierto para todas las mujeres de 10º - 12º grado. Un periodo de pruebas de aptitud se llevará a cabo
en marzo o abril de este año escolar. Las prácticas empiezan en agosto, antes de que comience la escuela. Están
programados de 16-20 juegos incluyendo torneos en fines de semana. El equipo se limita a las mejores 25-30 jugadoras.
El equipo de voleibol se reúne antes de que comiencen las clases y está programado para el primer periodo.
Atletismo Hombres
Atletismo Mujeres
48502K
48502W
10, 11, 12 - 1 semestre, ½ crédito
Todos los estudiantes interesados deben registrarse para atletismo segundo semestre en el 7° periodo. Se establecerá
un horario completo de competencias.
Lanzamiento Rápido Mujeres
48502J
10, 11, 12 – 1 semestre, ½ crédito
Este deporte está abierto a todas las mujeres de 9º-12º grado. Cualquier mujer que participe en las selecciones del
equipo debe cumplir con las normas establecidas por la Asociación de Actividades de Arkansas (promedios, edad,
residencia, etc.) y la política del Departamento de Deportes de la preparatoria. Las pruebas de aptitud se llevarán
a cabo en mayo de este año escolar. Se elige a las mejores 20-25 jugadoras para el equipo varsity y junior varsity.
Se establecerá un horario completo de competencias.
Fútbol Hombres
Futbol Mujeres
48502I
48502H
10, 11, 12
SHS - 1 semestre, ½ crédito, Semestre de Primavera
HBHS - 1 año, 1 crédito
Todos los interesados deben registrarse para fútbol cuando sea anunciado. Las pruebas para estos equipos se llevan a
cabo durante el otoño. Se establecerá un horario completo de las competencias.
Béisbol Hombres
48502A
10, 11, 12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Todos los hombres interesados deben registrarse para béisbol segundo semestre. Las pruebas para el equipo se llevarán
a cabo en noviembre. Se establecerá un horario completo de las competencias.
Tenis
48502T
10, 11, 12
SHS - 1 semestre, ½ crédito
HBHS - 1 año, 1 crédito
El Equipo de Tenis está abierto para todos los estudiantes de preparatoria grados 9-12. Los estudiantes que hacen la
prueba para formar parte del equipo de tenis deben cumplir con las normas establecidas por la Asociación de Actividades
de Arkansas y la política del Departamento de Deportes. Las pruebas para el próximo año escolar se llevarán a cabo en
abril y los estudiantes deben tener un examen físico para poder hacer la prueba. Las prácticas empiezan en agosto antes
de que comience la escuela. Tenis es el 7º periodo durante el año escolar y los estudiantes deben estar dispuestos a
quedarse después de la escuela para practicar y para cumplir con los partidos programados. El equipo de Varsity de
hombres lo conforman los mejores 6 jugadores y el de mujeres, las mejores 6 jugadoras. JV hombres y JV mujeres
juegan cuando hay tiempo para partidos adicionales durante la temporada.
Golf - Otoño solamente
48502G
93
9, 10, 11, 12 – 1 semestre, ½ crédito
El Equipo de Golf de la Preparatoria es competitivo. Hay competencias con escuelas del área y también con la federación
deportiva y el estado. El equipo está limitado a los mejores 12-14 jugadores. Solo seis estudiantes son elegibles para el
equipo. Los estudiantes de 9º grado son elegibles para las pruebas de aptitud del equipo. Las pruebas se llevarán a cabo
en abril y las prácticas empiezan en agosto antes de que comience la escuela.
Natación Hombres y Mujeres
48502S
9, 10, 11, 12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
En este deporte competitivo, abierto a todos los estudiantes de 9º - 12º grado, los nadadores practican los cuatro estilos
competitivos y giros. En el apogeo de la temporada, los miembros del equipo nadan 2-3 millas en cada práctica. Todos
los estudiantes interesados deben hablar con el entrenador, anotarse y hacer una prueba por lo menos un mes antes del
comienzo de la temporada. Hay una prueba de destrezas básicas en la que se toma el tiempo antes del comienzo de la
temporada; los mejores 25-32 estudiantes formarán el equipo. Se establecerá un horario para las competencias.
Lucha Grecorromana
48502W
9, 10, 11, 12 – 1 semestre, ½ crédito
HBHS - lo ofrece después de la escuela.
Este deporte está abierto para los estudiantes de 9º -12º grado. Cualquier estudiante que haga las pruebas debe cumplir
con las normas establecidas por la Asociación de Actividades de Arkansas (calificaciones, edad, residencia, etc.) y la
política establecida por el departamento de deportes. El periodo de pruebas para el próximo año será en el otoño y se
anunciará en las escuelas. Los mejores jugadores serán seleccionados para los equipos varsity y junior varsity. Se
establecerá un horario completo para competencias.
Boliche
48502N
9, 10, 11, 12 – 1 semestre, ½ crédito
Este deporte está abierto para hombres y mujeres de 9º -12º grado. Cualquier estudiante que haga las pruebas debe
cumplir con las normas establecidas por la Asociación de Actividades de Arkansas (calificaciones, edad, residencia, etc.)
y la política establecida por el departamento de deportes. El periodo de pruebas será en el otoño y se anunciará en las
escuelas, este es un deporte de invierno. Los mejores jugadores serán seleccionados para los equipos varsity y junior
varsity de hombres y de mujeres. Se establecerá un horario completo para competencias.
Equipo de Ejercicios Sincronizado y Aeróbic
48500D
10, 11, 12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
La composición de cada grupo se determina por medio de pruebas de aptitud. Las pruebas para el siguiente año se hacen
en la primavera. Para poder participar en estas pruebas, los estudiantes deben haber asistido desde el comienzo del
semestre.
Porristas
48500C
10, 11, 12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
La composición de cada grupo se determina por medio de pruebas de aptitud. Las pruebas para el siguiente año se hacen
en la primavera. Para poder participar en estas pruebas, los estudiantes deben haber asistido desde el comienzo del
semestre.
Información Tecnológica
La Academia de IT y el Departamento de IT trabajan en colaboración con NWACC. Muchos de los cursos mencionados
abajo pueden ofrecer crédito universitario. Ver la sección de NWACC para más detalles.
Contabilidad, Finanzas y Administración
Contabilidad Computarizada I
492100
10, 11, 12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Cuota para materiales: $5 o 2 paquetes de papel por semestre.
Los estudiantes aprenderán los principios básicos de contabilidad requeridos para mantener los datos financieros necesarios
94
para un negocio. Aprenderán a registrar y analizar las actividades diarias de un negocio. Crearán estados financieros como
Estado de Ingreso, Hoja de Balance, Conciliación Bancaria y Estados de Capital. Se utiliza Microsoft Excel para crear formas
computarizadas para el negocio. Este curso es el acceso para todos los estudiantes interesados en negocios. Este curso está
disponible para todos los estudiantes que cumplan con los requisitos previos. Academia de IT: Curso requerido para
Contabilidad IT y Administración IT; optativas para todas las especialidades de IT.
Contabilidad Computarizada II
492110
11, 12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Requisito previo: Contabilidad I.
Cuota para materiales: $5 o 2 paquetes de papel por semestre.
Los principios de contabilidad aprendidos en Contabilidad I se expandirán y se desarrollarán más a fondo utilizando
situaciones de negocios más complejas. Se aplicarán al sistema departamental y corporativo. Esta clase es totalmente
computarizada--utilizando hojas de cálculo y software especializado en contabilidad. Esta clase es recomendable para
el alumno que piensa estudiar la carrera de administración de empresas o que piensa trabajar en el campo de la
contabilidad o las finanzas. Curso requerido para Contabilidad IT; optativas para todas las especialidades de IT.
Administración de Empresas I/II*
492170/492180
11, 12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Cuota para materiales: $5 o 2 paquetes de papel por semestre.
*Curso Articulado con NWACC
Los estudiantes aprenderán los principios del mundo de los negocios como:
Negocio Internacional: Aprender sobre la cultura de los negocios en otros países;
Mercadotecnia: Como vender eficazmente sus productos o servicios;
Economía: Satisfacer las necesidades del consumidor en el mercado;
Administración de Empresas: Tomar decisiones, liderazgo, destrezas de planeación;
Finanzas: Analizar servicios y estados financieros, incluyendo seguros;
Tecnología: Desarrollar destrezas de computadora utilizando Microsoft Office para crear documentos y
presentaciones. Se recomienda que los estudiantes también se inscriban en Contabilidad Computarizada I.
Academia de IT: Curso requerido para Administración; optativa para todas las especialidades de IT. Los estudiantes de
IB que planean tomar Negocios y Administración IB HL deberían inscribirse en este curso durante el 10º u 11º grado.
Negocios y Administración IB HL – solo SHS
592209 - HL Year 1
(Ver la sección de IB para detalles).
592200 - HL Year 2
Finanzas Personales - solo SHS
496020
10, 11, 12 - 1 semestre, 1/2 crédito
El objetivo de este curso es informar al estudiante como las decisiones individuales influencian directamente las metas
profesionales y potenciales de futuros ingresos. Los temas del mundo real que se cubren incluyen ingresos, administración de
dinero, gastos y crédito, ahorro e inversión. Los estudiantes diseñarán presupuestos personales y del hogar, utilizarán cuentas
de cheques y de ahorros, obtendrán conocimiento en finanzas, administración de deudas y crédito, evaluarán y comprenderán
los conceptos de seguro e impuestos. Este curso provee una base para tomar buenas decisiones financieras.
Introducción a las Finanzas – solo HBHS
492240
10, 11, 12 – 1 semestre, ½ crédito
Requisito previo: AC 1.
Introducción a las Finanzas se enfoca en el rol y las responsabilidades financieras del individuo como estudiante,
ciudadano, consumidor y participante activo en el mundo de los negocios. Informa a los estudiantes acerca de sus
responsabilidades financieras. Este curso está diseñado para enseñarse en un semestre. Los temas que se cubren son:
Administración del Dinero, Presupuesto, Administración del Crédito y Seguridad Financiera (Ahorros e Inversiones).
Derecho Mercantil I – solo SHS
492070
10, 11, 12 – 1 semestre, ½ crédito
Este es un curso de un semestre diseñado para familiarizar al estudiante con las muchas aplicaciones de las leyes que
gobiernan nuestros negocios y nuestros asuntos personales en el entorno legal y el mercado dinámico de hoy en día. Los
95
temas incluirán leyes criminales, leyes de responsabilidad civil, procedimientos de ejecución y juzgados, leyes
reguladoras de firmas comerciales, protección de los consumidores y derecho contractual.
Derecho Mercantil II – solo SHS
492080
10, 11, 12 – 1 semestre, ½ crédito
Este es un curso de un semestre que cubre los estándares de las leyes que gobiernan nuestros negocios y nuestros asuntos
personales en el entorno legal y el mercado dinámico. Esta diseñado para ayudar a los estudiantes a comprender mejor
el mundo de los negocios en el que viven, obtener confianza en el manejo de los negocios y estar más preparados para
reconocer los problemas legales en la administración de una empresa. Los temas incluirán crédito y bancarrota, empleo
y agencia, formas de organización de negocios, bienes muebles e inmuebles y seguro.
Aplicaciones del Software
Todos los Estudiantes: Aplicaciones a la Computadora I y II cubre las destrezas de computación necesarias para tener
éxito en la preparatoria y la universidad, además de ser necesarias en todas las carreras. En muchas universidades las
clases de aplicaciones a la computadora son cursos sin crédito. Se espera que los estudiantes puedan usar procesamiento
de textos, hoja de cálculo, base de datos, presentación y algunas veces software de páginas Web cuando ingresan a la
universidad.
Aplicaciones a la Computadora I*
492490
10, 11, 12 – 1 semestre, ½ crédito
Software: Office 2010 (Word, Excel y PowerPoint)
Requisito previo: Mecanografía
Cuota para materiales: $5 o 2 paquetes de papel para copias.
*Curso Articulado de NWACC
Los estudiantes aprenden las destrezas fundamentales para producir documentos sencillos de varios tipos usando
ilustraciones, listas numeradas, caracteres especiales, márgenes y sombras, letras especiales y formato en párrafo y en
línea. Las destrezas de búsqueda e investigaciones en Internet son muy importantes en este curso ya que ayudan a los
estudiantes a prepararse para otras clases. Los estudiantes son entrenados para usar su cuenta de correo electrónico
apropiadamente. Ellos aprenden a crear y revisar hojas de cálculo sencillas utilizando formulas y funciones básicas.
También crean y presentan un proyecto de investigación en PowerPoint. Todos los estudiantes deberían tomar esta
clase. Este curso está disponible para todos los estudiantes que cumplan los requisitos previos.
*Los estudiantes ELL nivel 1 o 2 no deben de tomar este curso ya que requiere una cantidad substancial de lectura.
Academia IT: Curso obligatorio.
Aplicaciones a la Computadora II*
492500
10, 11, 12 – 1 semestre, ½ crédito
Software: Office 2010 (Word, Excel Access y PowerPoint)
Requisito previo: Aplicaciones a la Computadora (Informática) I
Cuota: $5 o 2 paquetes de papel para copias
*Curso Articulado de NWACC
Los estudiantes aprenden destrezas intermedias de hoja de cálculo, incluyendo formato usando estilos, funciones comunes
y produciendo gráficas y cuadros técnicos. Continúan con procesamiento de textos aprendiendo a crear secciones, sobres,
etiquetas, tablas, columnas, elementos gráficos, estilos, plantillas y fusión de correo. Los estudiantes aprenden destrezas
básicas de base de datos, incluyendo creación de tablas, formas, reportes, filtros y consultas. Se incluye un proyecto de
investigación de hoja de cálculo/gráfica, un currículo vitae, una carta de solicitud y un sitio Web. Todos los estudiantes
deberían tomar esta clase para tener las destrezas de computación necesarias para tener éxito en otras clases, la
universidad y la carrera. Este curso está disponible para todos los estudiantes que cumplan con el requisito previo.
Academia IT: Curso obligatorio.
Aplicaciones a la Computadora III*
492510
10, 11, 12 – 1 semestre, ½ crédito
Software: Office 2010
Requisito previo: Aplicaciones a la Computadora II.
96
Cuota: $5 o 2 paquetes de papel
*Curso Articulado de NWACC
Usando FrontPage, los estudiantes crearán sus propios sitios Web. Los estudiantes aprenderán destrezas básicas de
autoedición usando Publisher para crear tarjetas de presentación, boletines, membretes y volantes. Los estudiantes
también se concentrarán en la posible certificación en Word y PowerPoint. Ellos tendrán tres proyectos culminantes
basados en el mundo real: un proyecto final usando Publisher, Word y Access; un proyecto todo incluido de autoedición
y una presentación a la clase de 10 minutos empleando conceptos avanzados de PowerPoint. Este curso está disponible
para todos los estudiantes que cumplan con el requisito previo.
Academia IT: Curso optativo para todos las especialidades de IT.
Tecnologías Web* - solo SHS
492670
10, 11, 12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Requisito previo: AC II.
Cuota: $5/2 paquetes de papel por semestre.
*Curso Articulado de NWACC
Este curso es una exploración de todos los elementos del buen diseño de una página Web. Los estudiantes comenzarán
creando páginas Web con codificación HTML, XHTML y CSS. Los estudiantes investigarán varios paquetes del software
Adobe para mejorar los sitios Web, tales como:
Adobe PhotoShop para crear y editar gráficas
Adobe Flash para crear animaciones y formatos publicitarios Web
Adobe Premiere para crear y editar videos y audio
Los estudiantes aprenderán como usar los software de diseño Web, Adobe, Dreamweaver para crear páginas Web
interactivas. Los estudiantes también usarán equipo multimedia como cámaras digitales, videocámaras, dispositivos
de captura de video y más. Los estudiantes realizarán varios proyectos del mundo real tales como videos Flash,
páginas Web y la Exposición de Diapositivas de los Seniors (estudiantes de 12º grado) que se presentan en la Asamblea
de los Seniors. Los estudiantes se concentrarán en la posible certificación en Dreamweaver. Este curso está disponible
para todos los estudiantes que cumplan con el requisito previo.
Academia IT: Curso requerido para la especialidad de Diseño Web; optativo para todas las especialidades.
Aplicaciones Avanzadas de Bases de Datos *
492140
10, 11, 12 – 1 semestre, ½ crédito
Requisito previo: AC II
Software: Access 2010 y SQL
Cuota: $5 o 2 paquetes de papel
*Curso Articulado de NWACC
Los estudiantes con conocimiento avanzado en base de datos son altamente solicitados en la era actual donde existen
grandes bases de datos en compañías como Wal-Mart, compañías vendedoras de Wal-Mart, JB Hunt, Tyson y otras similares.
Los estudiantes trabajarán con múltiples tablas de operaciones, formas y reportes. Los estudiantes aprenderán conceptos
avanzados de bases de datos para manipular y presentar información a través de búsquedas avanzadas, controles
calculados, macros, tableros, subformas, subreportes, uniones, relaciones y más. Este curso cubre la integración de
sistemas de bases de datos y páginas WWW. También se les proporcionarán a los estudiantes las destrezas técnicas para
escribir SQL básico. Los estudiantes realizarán varios proyectos del mundo real. Este curso está disponible para todos los
estudiantes que cumplan con el requisito previo. Los estudiantes se concentrarán en la posible certificación en Access.
Academia IT: Curso requerido para las especialidades de Diseño Web, Información de Sistemas y Servicios de Apoyo e Investigación de
Mercados; optativo para todas las especialidades de IT.
Aplicaciones Avanzadas a la Hoja de Cálculo*
492450
10, 11, 12 – 1 semestre, ½ crédito
Requisito previo: AC II.
Software: Microsoft Excel 2010
Cuota: $5 o 2 paquetes de papel.
*Curso Articulado con NWACC
En el mundo actual, los estudiantes no solo deben ser capaces de usar herramientas avanzadas en hojas de cálculo,
también deben poder analizar los datos para maximizar las ganancias de una compañía. En este curso, los estudiantes
definirán y resolverán problemas financieros y lógicos usando Excel. Los estudiantes diseñarán, crearán, actualizarán y
mantendrán libros de trabajo, gráficas profesionales, plantillas, macros, tablas dinámicas. Los estudiantes escribirán
97
formulas, enlazarán y consolidarán hojas de cálculo múltiples, crearán tablas de datos y explorarán otros conceptos
avanzados. El énfasis estará en la habilidad del estudiante para analizar la información de negocios y tomar decisiones
acerca de productos, proyectos y estrategias de previsión utilizando datos del mundo real. Los estudiantes se
concentrarán en la posible certificación en Excel. Este curso está disponible para todos los estudiantes que cumplan el
requisito previo.
Academia IT: Curso requerido para Contabilidad y Administración; optativo para todas las especialidades de IT.
Programación y Ciencias de la Computación
Los estudiantes que planean tomar Ciencias de la Computación CA (Java) y Ciencias de la Computación IB HL (Java)
deben de tomar Ciencias de la Computación Colocación Pre-Avanzada – Alice Y Java (o Principios de Ciencias de la
Computación College Board) en décimo grado para que se les permita tomar Ciencias de la Computación CA en 11º grado
y Ciencias de la Computación IB HL en el 12º. Principios de Ciencias de la Computación College Board, Ciencias de la
Computación CA A y Ciencias de la Computación IB tienen un valor de 5 puntos en el promedio y cuentan para Graduarse
con Honores.
Principios de Ciencias de la Computación College Board - solo SHS
560010
10, 11, 12 - 1 año, 1 crédito
Requisito previo: Inscripción en cualquier clase de Colocación Pre-Avanzada o Avanzada.
Cuota $5/2 paquetes de papel.
*Este curso tiene el crédito de un curso de honores y cuanta como una clase de colocación avanzada para Graduarse con
Honores. Sirve como requisito previo para Ciencias de la Computación A CA. SHS es una de las diez escuelas en los EU
con este curso piloto para el College Board.
Este curso es para todos los estudiantes, tengan o no ciencias de la computación como su interés profesional. No es un
curso de aplicaciones a la computadora ni un curso de pura programación, aunque ambos serán usados en proyectos de
clase. Introducirá a los estudiantes a las ideas centrales de las ciencias de la computación. Se realizarán proyectos de
equipo usando muchas tecnologías en las que se desarrollarán destrezas de pensamiento crítico y comprensión de las
grandes ideas de las ciencias de la computación en nuestra sociedad. Los estudiantes escriben páginas Web, trabajan
con gráficas, escriben aplicaciones Android para teléfonos y tabletas, programan robots, crean animaciones, exploran
principios de Java y usan Access para explorar “grandes datos” o para encontrar tendencias.
Academia IT: Este curso puede ser substituido por Ciencias de la Computación Colocación Pre-Avanzada Alice y/o Java.
Ciencias de la Computación Colocación Pre-Avanzada – Alice* - solo SHS
492687
(Introducción a la Programación Orientada a Objetos)
Requisito previo: Álgebra I con una C o mejor calificación.
10, 11, 12 – 1 semestre, 1/2 crédito
Cuota para materiales: $5 o 2 paquetes de papel
Nota: AC I no es un requisito previo para esta clase.
*Curso Articulado de NWACC
Este curso enseña programación a principiantes en una manera divertida y emocionante. Los estudiantes programarán
palabras 3D cargadas con objetos, criaturas y gente resultando en animaciones y videojuegos interactivos sencillos. Los
estudiantes aprenderán programación lógica fundamental y técnicas con instrucciones que correspondan a
recopilaciones estándar en Java, C++ y otros lenguajes de producción. Este curso está diseñado para ser un curso
principiante inofensivo para todos los estudiantes, incluyendo aquellos que pueden estar temerosos de un curso
altamente tecnológico.
Academia de IT: Curso requerido para Programación/Desarrollo del software y para las especialidades en Programación
y Diseño de Página Web; optativa para todas las especialidades de IT.
Ciencias de la Computación Colocación Pre-Avanzada - (Programación de Java)
492397
10, 11, 12 – 1 semestre, 1/2 crédito
Requisito previo: Mecanografía y Geometría o Álgebra II.
Aplicaciones a la Computadora I no es un requisito previo para esta clase.
Cuota para materiales: $5 o 2 paquetes de papel para copias.
El énfasis de la clase está en los conceptos fundamentales de programación utilizando buen diseño y técnicas de programación
que transfieren a otros lenguajes. Este curso es para estudiantes que piensan estudiar administración de empresas, ciencias
computacionales, ingeniería u otros campos de la tecnología. Este curso requiere buen uso de la lógica. Academia de IT:
98
Puede servir como un curso requerido para la especialidad en Sistemas de Información o Programación/Desarrollo del Software,
optativa para todas las especialidades de IT.
Ciencias de la Computación A CA*
560058
11, 12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Software: Java
Requisito previo: Álgebra II Y Alice y Java Colocación Pre-Avanzada O Principios de Ciencias de la Computación CB O la
aprobación del maestro.
Cuota: $5/2 paquetes de papel por semestre.
*Curso Articulado con NWACC
Este curso es el equivalente al curso del primer año de computación en la universidad. Enfatiza en la metodología de
programación orientada a objetos así como en el estudio de algoritmos, estructuras de datos y abstracción. Los
estudiantes que sacan un promedio suficientemente alto en el examen de CA pueden recibir crédito en las universidades
que participan en el programa. Este curso es para los estudiantes que planean estudiar ciencias de la computación,
ingeniería, IT, matemáticas u otros campos técnicos. Este curso está disponible para todos los estudiantes que cumplan
con los requisitos previos.
Academia de IT: Puede servir como curso requerido para Sistemas de Información o especialidad en
Programación/Desarrollo del Software; optativa para todas las especialidades de IT.
Ciencias de la Computación IB* – solo SHS
560060 - Year 1
12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Requisito previo: Ciencias de la Computación CA.
(Ver la sección de IB para más detalles)
*Curso Articulado de NWACC
560069 - Year 2
Información de Apoyo y Servicios
Infraestructura IT - solo SHS
492600
11, 12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Requisito previo: Aplicaciones a la Computadora II.
Cuota: $5/2 paquetes de papel por semestre.
Los estudiantes aprenderán a identificar problemas de la PC. Aprenderán la mayoría de las destrezas de certificación A+
necesarias para construir, mantener y actualizar la PC. Los estudiantes también aprenderán los conceptos de la red
informática en un medio ambiente práctico. Este curso está abierto para estudiantes que no están en la academia, aunque
los estudiantes de la Academia de IT recibirán prioridad.
Academia de IT: Requerido para la especialidad en Infraestructura y puede contar como optativa para otras
especialidades de la Academia de IT.
Seminario de Tecnología - solo SHS
492550
12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Requisito previo: Solicitud de Cursos de IT avanzados Y aprobación del maestro.
En este curso basado en proyectos, se asignan proyectos de tecnología actual del distrito escolar y de negocios locales.
Esta clase es responsable de la página Web de la Escuela Preparatoria de Springdale, a la cual se puede acceder para la
Escuela Preparatoria de Springdale y para esta publicación. Los proyectos pueden incluir crear presentaciones, crear
bases de datos avanzadas, etc. Se espera que los estudiantes elegidos mantengan un nivel alto de estándares éticos y
que sean eficientes en la producción de trabajos de alta calidad, que se comporten de una manera responsable y
confiable. Los estudiantes que no cumplan con este criterio, que tengan faltas excesivas o que tengan problemas
disciplinarios, serán dados de baja de la clase con una calificación de “F” o no crédito.
Academia IT: Optativa para todas las especialidades de IT.
Publicidad y Diseño Gráfico
Fundamentos de la Publicidad y Diseño Gráfico
494150
10, 11 – 1 año, 1 crédito
99
Requisito previo: Ninguno.
Introducción a la Publicidad y al Diseño Gráfico se enfoca en la creación de gráficas en la computadora para imprimir o
para la Web. El énfasis está en Adobe Photoshop y Adobe Illustrator. Los estudiantes obtienen un amplio conocimiento
del trabajo de estos programas y los usan para crear gráficas en la computadora, arte, diseño de playeras, restaurar
fotografías, ilustraciones y mucho más. Los estudiantes también usarán otros paquetes de software incluyendo el
software de animación Maya 3D. Este curso es extremadamente benéfico para estudiantes de arte, publicidad,
animación, fotografía y diseño de páginas Web.
Publicidad y Diseño Gráfico Intermedio
494170
11, 12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Requisito previo: Introducción a la Publicidad y al Diseño Gráfico o la aprobación del maestro.
Publicidad y Diseño Gráfico Intermedio enseña destrezas avanzadas en Adobe Photoshop e Illustrator. Los proyectos
incluyen diseño gráfico, manipulación de fotografías, IDs corporativas, diseño de playeras, diseño de páginas Web y más.
Publicidad y Diseño Gráfico Avanzado
494130
11, 12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Requisito previo: Publicidad y Diseño Gráfico Intermedio.
Publicidad y Diseño Gráfico Avanzado es el 3er año de gráficas para estudiantes serios. El curso permite proyectos
independientes y la preparación de una carpeta.
Animación 3D - solo SHS
493870
10, 11, 12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Requisito previo: Ninguno.
En Animación 3D el alumno estudiará las técnicas y herramientas para producir modelos y animaciones básicas de 3D.
El curso combina el entendimiento tradicional de animación con las herramientas de alta tecnología disponibles en los
software de 3D actuales. Los estudiantes obtendrán las destrezas básicas necesarias para modelar, manipular, animar y
dar efectos especiales.
Mercadotecnia y Aprendizaje Basado en el Trabajo
E-Marketing
492330
10, 11, 12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Cuota: $5/2 paquetes de papel por semestre.
Este curso combina la mercadotecnia tradicional con medio ambientes electrónicos. Los estudiantes aprenderán los
conceptos, principios y destrezas comunes de la mercadotecnia. Los temas incluyen las cuatro “P’s” de la
Mercadotecnia: Pricing (Precios), Product Planning /Development (Planeación/Desarrollo del Producto) Promotion
(Promoción) y Place (Lugar). Además, aprenderán como usar ética y legalmente el Internet, correos electrónicos,
motores de búsqueda y otras formas electrónicas de comunicación como herramientas de mercadotecnia. Mientras están
inscritos en este curso, se espera que los estudiantes sean miembros titulares de DECA, una Asociación para Estudiantes
de Mercadotecnia. Los estudiantes también pueden participar en una experiencia basada en el trabajo para obtener
crédito escolar adicional. Este curso está disponible para todos los estudiantes que cumplan con los requisitos previos.
Academia de IT: Curso requerido para la especialidad de E-Commerce y cuenta como una clase optativa para otras
especialidades.
Administración de Mercadotecnia
492350
11, 12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Requisito previo: E-Marketing o Mercadotecnia.
Cuota: $5 o 2 paquetes de papel por semestre.
Administración de Mercadotecnia desarrolla las destrezas para tomar decisiones a través de la aplicación de principios de
mercadotecnia y administración. Se enfoca en los modelos de organización, resolución de conflictos, finanzas, publicidad,
comportamiento de los compradores, tecnología y aspectos sociales. Mientras están inscritos en este curso, se espera que
los estudiantes sean miembros titulares de DECA, una asociación para estudiantes de mercadotecnia. Los estudiantes
también pueden participar en una experiencia basada en el trabajo para obtener crédito escolar adicional. Academia IT:
Optativa para todas las especialidades de IT.
100
Mercadotecnia Aprendizaje Basado en el Trabajo
492346 - Period 6
11, 12 – 1 año, 1 o 2 créditos
492347 - Period 7
Requisito previo: Inscripción en E-Marketing, Mercadotecnia o Administración de Mercadotecnia.
A los estudiantes se les permitirá salir de la escuela temprano para trabajar en un oficio de mercadotecnia aprobado,
obteniendo hasta 2 créditos por año. Es responsabilidad del estudiante encontrar el trabajo apropiado. El maestro
supervisor proporcionará asistencia con la orientación del trabajo. La calificación consiste en conferencias trimestrales
entre el empleador y el maestro supervisor. Los estudiantes deben tener al menos un GPA de 2.0, buena disciplina, buen
registro de asistencia y un mínimo de 135-270 horas por semestre. Los estudiantes requieren incorporarse a DECA, una
organización vocacional estudiantil para estudiantes de mercadotecnia. Vean a la oficina de conserjería para obtener una
solicitud.
Profesionales y Técnicas
Viajes y Turismo - solo SHS
Introducción a la Hospitalidad
492250
10, 11, 12 - 1 semestre, ½ crédito
Este es un curso de un semestre que provee a los estudiantes un panorama general de la industria de la hospitalidad y las
oportunidades de una carrera en la industria. Los estudiantes aprenden los procedimientos de operación en la recepción,
servicios a los huéspedes, mercadotecnia y ventas, funciones de la parte administrativa, alimentos, bebidas y
administración de la limpieza de habitaciones.
Introducción a los Viajes y al Turismo
492260
10, 11, 12 - 1 semestre, ½ crédito
Este es un estudio profundo de un semestre en viajes en todo el mundo, trasportación y turismo. Los estudiantes son
introducidos a la industria en conjunto y a las oportunidades de trabajo disponibles. El curso cubre asignación de recursos,
tecnología, social, organización y sistemas tecnológicos.
Destinos Turísticos
492460
10, 11, 12 - 1 semestre, ½ crédito
Este es un curso de un semestre que provee conocimiento práctico de la geografía de la tierra relacionada a los viajes y al
turismo. El enfoque está en las atracciones del lugar, patrones y procesos del mundo del turismo, geografía, viajes y turismo
en Norte América, México, Centro América, el Caribe, América del Sur, Europa, el Medio Este, África, Asia, Australia, Nueva
Zelanda y el Pacífico Sur.
Viajes Internacionales
492230
10, 11, 12 - 1 semestre, ½ crédito
Este es un curso de un semestre que provee cobertura detallada de transporte aéreo internacional, geografía, tarifas aéreas
internacionales y procedimientos de venta de boletos, requerimientos de viaje, viajar en Europa, Rusia, Asia y el Pacífico,
análisis de ecoturismo y ampliación de horizontes globales para maximizar el entendimiento cultural.
Dibujo
Dibujo y Diseño/CADD
494700
10, 11, 12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Dibujo y Diseño se enfoca en el conocimiento básico y las destrezas necesarias para producir dibujos de ingeniería y
arquitectura. Se enfatiza en el desarrollo de competencias relacionadas al uso del equipo para dibujo, la producción
de dibujos de ingeniería de nivel básico, la producción de dibujos básicos de arquitectura y la implementación del dibujo
en computadora.
Dibujo y Diseño Arquitectónico /CADD
494710
11, 12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Requisito previo: C o mejor calificación en Dibujo y Diseño o aprobación del maestro.
101
DEBE TOMARSE CON DIBUJO ARQUITECTÓNICO Y DISEÑO/LAB CADD.
Este curso es el que sigue a Dibujo y Diseño /CADD y utiliza las mismas destrezas pero amplía la aplicación de varios
campos industriales. Dibujo Arquitectónico se enfoca en el conocimiento y las destrezas necesarias para planear y
preparar interpretaciones ilustradas a escala y diseños conceptuales para edificios residenciales. Se enfatiza en el
desarrollo de competencias relacionadas a solucionar problemas de dibujo y de diseño que requieren que el individuo
entienda y aplique un rango amplio de conocimiento técnico y destrezas de pensamiento crítico.
Dibujo y Diseño Arquitectónico/ Lab CADD
49720
11, 12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Requisito previo: SOLAMENTE PUEDE TOMARSE PARALELAMENTE CON DIBUJO Y DISEÑO ARQUITECTÓNICO/CADD.
Este laboratorio es necesario para que los estudiantes de arquitectura tengan tiempo de desarrollar totalmente las
destrezas de dibujo y diseño requeridas para un arquitecto competente. Los proyectos incluirán la producción de
modelos a escala. Los programas de dibujo y diseño por computadora tienen una muy pronunciada curva de aprendizaje;
por lo tanto, el tiempo extra es crucial.
Ingeniería, Arquitectura y CADD
La Academia de Ingeniería trabaja en colaboración con el Proyecto Lead The Way de Arkansas Tech University.
Estas son clases técnicas que cuentan como optativas y están disponibles para todos los estudiantes y para estudiantes
de la Academia.
Principios de Ingeniería (POE)
495490
10, 11, 12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
10° para los miembros de la academia.
Si te gusta construir cosas, usar herramientas eléctricas y computadoras, esta clase es para ti. En esta clase construirás
con máquinas sencillas, crearás modelos a escala, aprenderás acerca de materiales y como probarlos, además explorarás
y usarás motores, luces, circuitos, marchas y neumáticos. Este es un curso que ayuda a los estudiantes a entender el
campo de la ingeniería/tecnología de la ingeniería. Explorando varios sistemas de la tecnología y procesos de
manufacturación, los estudiantes aprenden cómo los ingenieros y los técnicos usan las matemáticas, la ciencia y la
tecnología en un proceso de resolución de problemas de ingeniería para beneficio de la gente. El curso también incluye
preocupaciones acerca de las consecuencias sociales y políticas del cambio tecnológico. Crédito para la universidad
disponible.
Ingeniería Civil y Arquitectura (CEA) - solo SHS
495440
11, 12, Academia 11 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Los estudiantes descubrirán las diferencias y semejanzas entre la ingeniería civil y la arquitectura. Ellos explorarán los
impactos históricos de desarrollos importantes y como han influenciado en el progreso de la humanidad. Los estudiantes
desarrollarán proyectos de instalaciones y estructuras desde el nivel del suelo hasta su finalización, tanto de ingeniería
civil como de arquitectura y descubrirán como trabajan juntas.
Ingeniería CAD I - Solo HBHS
494740
11, 12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Requisito Previo: Dibujo y Diseño.
Los estudiantes desarrollarán habilidades para resolver problemas relacionados con el dibujo y el diseño, las cuales
requieren la comprensión y aplicación de un amplio conocimiento técnico y destrezas de razonamiento analítico. Este
curso está diseñado para permitir a los estudiantes elaborar dibujos usando modelos tridimensionales por computadora.
Laboratorio de Ingeniería CAD 1 – solo HBHS
494750
11-12, 1 año, 1 crédito
El laboratorio proporciona la oportunidad para que los estudiantes de ingeniería dibujen modelos tridimensionales por
computadora así como la oportunidad de construir modelos físicos de puentes y partes robóticas. Los estudiantes
explorarán los elementos básicos de la ingeniería del diseño.
102
Ingeniería del Diseño y Desarrollo — solo SHS
495470
Academia 12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Requisito previo: POE, CEA, y ser Miembro de la Academia.
Este es un curso de investigación de ingeniería, en el cual los estudiantes trabajan en equipos para investigar, diseñar, construir
y solucionar un problema de ingeniería de su elección. Los estudiantes aplican los principios desarrollados en cursos anteriores
para incluir aplicaciones del software, construir y probar soluciones de diseños, son guiados por un mentor de la comunidad.
Ellos deben presentar reportes de progreso, un reporte final escrito y defender sus resoluciones ante un panel de revisión
externa al final del año escolar. Los estudiantes harán una presentación final de sus diseños a los miembros de la comunidad,
asesores técnicos, compañeros y otras personas interesadas.
Robótica y Modelos 3D (CIM) - solo SHS
495450
11, 12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
En esta clase aprenderán a programar el brazo de un robot, a usar una fresadora CNC y como integrar las dos para hacer
una célula totalmente automatizada. Harán cosas como cajas y moldes. Este es un curso que aplica principios de robótica
y automatización. El curso incluye destrezas de computación para construir modelos sólidos usando un programa 3-D
Inventor. Los estudiantes usan equipo CNC para producir modelos actuales de sus diseños tridimensionales. Están
incluidos los conceptos fundamentales de robótica usados en la manufacturación automatizada y en el diseño de análisis.
Crédito para la universidad disponible.
Electrónica Digital (DE) — solo SHS
495460
10, 11, 12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Si estás interesado en computadoras, robótica y electrónica, esta clase es para ti. Aprenderás como diseñar circuitos,
probarlos y construirlos. Programarás un pequeño robot, crearás tu nombre con luces y aprenderás todas las destrezas
básicas del diseño. Este es un curso basado en proyectos de lógica aplicada, el cual abarca la aplicación de circuitos y
dispositivos electrónicos. Se usa un software de simulación para diseñar y probar circuitos digitales antes de la
construcción de circuitos y dispositivos. Los estudiantes aprenden como trabajan los circuitos digitales integrados, como
diseñar un circuito, como simular y después construir y probar sus diseños. Algunos ejemplos de los diseños que son
construidos por los estudiantes, son sistemas de alarmas, sistemas de semáforos, relojes, pantallas, sistemas de
máquinas expendedoras y muchos más. Los estudiantes también aprenden como programar chips como gals y
microprocesadores para realizar tareas similares, incluyendo maniobrar un pequeño robot. Crédito para la universidad disponible.
Diseño 3D CADD-Introducción a la Ingeniería del Diseño - solo SHS
495480
10, 11, 12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Si te gustan las computadoras y diseñar cosas, este curso es para ti. Usarás Inventor para diseñar diferentes sistemas y
después imprimirlos en la impresora de 3D. Este es un curso que enseña destrezas de resolución de problemas usando
un proceso de diseño desarrollado. Modelos de soluciones del producto son creados, analizados y comunicados, usando
un software de diseño de modelos sólidos. Este software de 3D, Inventor, es utilizado para animar diseños y analizarlos.
Los estudiantes lo usan para analizar sistemas y después construirlos. Crédito para la universidad disponible.
Ingeniería Aeroespacial (AE)
494980
12 - 1 año, 1 crédito
AE explora la evolución de los vuelos, navegación y control, materiales aeroespaciales, propulsión, viaje espacial y
mecánica orbital. Además, este curso presenta aplicaciones alternativas para los conceptos de ingeniería aeroespacial.
Los estudiantes analizan, diseñan y construyen sistemas aeroespaciales. Ellos aplicarán el conocimiento obtenido en
este curso en una presentación final acerca del futuro de la industria y sus metas profesionales.
Tecnología de la Construcción
Fundamentos de la Construcción-Solo HBHS
494480
10, 11 – 1 año, 1 crédito - $30 cargo por uso de laboratorio
(Muy recomendable para 10° grado)
Este es un curso introductorio para estudiantes interesados en las diferentes áreas de la industria de la construcción.
Este curso provee una base sólida para aprender las áreas más importantes de los oficios de construcción: carpintería,
instalaciones eléctricas, plomería, albañilería, trabajo en concreto e instalación de paredes. Este curso explica cómo
se organiza la industria de la construcción y como obtener exitosamente un empleo. También cubre la información
básica de las actividades diarias asociadas con el trabajo en construcción, incluyendo seguridad, matemáticas básicas,
103
uso de herramientas y lectura de planos. También se cubrirá SkillsUSA entrenamiento de liderazgo para que los
estudiantes aprendan técnicas importantes para obtener trabajo en cualquier campo. Los estudiantes tendrán la
oportunidad de obtener su acreditación en NCCER y la tarjeta de 10 horas de OSHA.
Carpintería - solo HBHS
494460
11, 12 – 1 año, clase integrada de 2 periodos, 2 créditos - $30 cargo por uso de laboratorio
Requisito previo: C o mejor calificación en Fundamentos de la Construcción o aprobación del maestro.
Este curso es una clase integrada de dos periodos. Cubre lo básico de la construcción residencial: los materiales, seguridad de
herramientas y lugar de trabajo, métodos comunes de construcción y terminología desde el diseño hasta el producto terminado.
Se cubre SkillsUSA entrenamiento de liderazgo para que los estudiantes aprendan las técnicas importantes para encontrar
trabajo en cualquier campo. Se necesita un registro de asistencia excelente ya que habrá una considerable cantidad de trabajo
práctico.
Construcción Avanzada I — solo HBHS
494500
Solo 11, 12 –un semestre, 1 crédito
Esta es una clase integrada de dos periodos por un semestre.
$30 de cuota de laboratorio
Un curso basado en proyectos diseñado para desarrollar destrezas de carpintería y electricidad avanzada. Los proyectos
incluyen construcción de casas, construcción basada en la escuela y en la comunidad así como muchas otras
oportunidades determinados por el instructor.
Construcción Avanzada II — solo HBHS
494510
Solo 11, 12 –un semestre, 1 crédito
Esta es una clase integrada de dos periodos por un semestre.
$30 de cuota de laboratorio
Un curso basado en proyectos diseñado para desarrollar destrezas de carpintería y plomería avanzada. Los proyectos
incluyen construcción de casas, construcción basada en la escuela y en la comunidad así como muchas otras
oportunidades determinados por el instructor.
Elaboración de Muebles y Gabinetes – Solo HBHS
94850
11, 12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Requisito previo: Fundamentos de la Construcción.
Los estudiantes diseñarán, construirán e instalarán gabinetes y muebles que cumplan con los estándares de la industria
y que puedan preparar a los estudiantes para ingresar a este campo ocupacional. Los estudiantes trabajarán de cerca
con profesionales de la industria local para asegurar que las regulaciones estén en cumplimiento con la demanda de
requisitos de los negocios. Los estudiantes tendrán la oportunidad de obtener la acreditación en NCCCER para esta
clase.
Producción de Televisión
Producción de Televisión es el centro creativo de las Escuelas Públicas de Springdale. Los estudiantes en Producción de
Televisión pueden trabajar en cualquier cosa desde deportes hasta películas, desde comerciales hasta noticias. Los
estudiantes en este programa pueden trabajar detrás de escenas o al aire en nuestro Canal de Cable que sale al aire en
TODO el Noroeste de Arkansas. Cualquier estudiante que se inscriba en cualquier curso de TV durante el año paga una
cuota de $20 por el uso del laboratorio sin importar el número de cursos que tome durante el año. Debido al costo del
equipo y a que los estudiantes representan a la escuela en todo lo que hacen, solo los estudiantes que son responsables,
con buena asistencia y que están seriamente interesados deben inscribirse en este curso de introducción.
Fundamentos de la Televisión
493420
1 año, 1 crédito
Cuota de laboratorio requerida: $20
Curso requerido antes de tomar cualquier otro curso de TV.
Los estudiantes aprenderán los fundamentos de video grabación, manejo de cámaras, reglas de composición fotográfica,
edición en computadora Macintosh, periodismo de televisión e introducción a reportajes, presentación y estudio de
producción. También serán introducidos a la producción de videos. Ellos tendrán la oportunidad de crear noticias,
104
comerciales, películas cortas y aprenderán como desenvolverse en el ámbito profesional. Los estudiantes deben tomar
Fundamentos de la Televisión para poder inscribirse en cualquier otra clase del programa.
Televisión Intermedia (Noticias de la Escuela)
493430
HBHS-Noticias Har-Ber Wildcat
SHS-Noticias Bulldog
1 año, 1 crédito (Puede tomarse más de un año para crédito adicional)
Requisito previo: Introducción a Producción de TV Y ser seleccionado por el instructor.
Cuota de laboratorio: $20 por año (una sola cuota sin importar el número de clases tomadas)
Los estudiantes producen anuncios/noticias/programas de variedades semanalmente, los cuales saldrán al aire en el
cable local y en el circuito cerrado de TV dentro de la escuela. Los estudiantes pueden especializarse en uno o dos
aspectos de producción de televisión, pero todos deben producir historias independientes para inclusión en el programa.
Los estudiantes deben trabajar en producción una noche por semestre.
Transmisión de TV Avanzada
493440
(Entretenimiento Wildcat) - HBHS
(Bulldog Alley) – SHS
1 año, 1 crédito (Puede tomarse más de un año para crédito adicional)
Requisito previo: Introducción a Producción de TV Y ser seleccionado por el instructor.
Cuota de laboratorio: $20 por año (una sola cuota sin importar el número de clases tomadas)
Los estudiantes crean y producen películas cortas para nuestro canal de cable y varios festivales de filmación. La
producción de este show requerirá destrezas de escritura, interpretación, video y edición. Los estudiantes que tomen
esta clase deben tener iniciativa propia, ser creativos y tener disponibilidad para trabajar antes o después de la escuela.
Nuestros programas cinematográficos son reconocidos a nivel estatal y regional.
Laboratorio de Televisión
493450
Producciones HBWN –HBHS
1 año, 1 crédito (Puede tomarse más de un año para crédito adicional)
Requisito previo: Introducción a Producción de TV Y ser seleccionado por el instructor.
Cuota de laboratorio: $20 por año (una sola cuota sin importar el número de clases tomadas)
Los estudiantes en esta clase se enfocarán en el aspecto de la producción de la industria del video. Se concentrarán en
el trabajo con clientes produciendo proyectos comerciales, filmación y edición de eventos en vivo y trabajarán en
producciones más grandes para eventos escolares.
Laboratorio de Televisión
(Bulldog Alley, Noticiero Bulldog y DogBite)—SHS
493450
1 año, 1 crédito (Puede tomarse más de un año para crédito adicional)
Requisito previo: Introducción a Producción de TV Y ser seleccionado por el instructor.
Cuota de laboratorio: $20 por año (una sola cuota sin importar el número de clases tomadas)
Los estudiantes crean y producen Bulldog Alley, Noticiero Bulldog y DogBite. El Noticiero Bulldog produce un show acerca
de eventos y actividades en la Escuela Preparatoria Springdale. Bulldog Alley exhibe filmaciones cortas, videos musicales
y proyectos stop motion producidos por los estudiantes inscritos en el programa. DogBite es una producción que se
concentra en grabaciones estilo reality en el mundo de las artes culinarias. Los estudiantes utilizarán el laboratorio para
desarrollar sus destrezas de producción usadas en la filmación, producciones gráficas y edición. Los estudiantes deben
cubrir algunos juegos y eventos especiales en la noche.
TV del Distrito de Springdale*
495530
12 - 1 año, 2 créditos
Requisito previo: Solo Estudiantes de 12º grado (Senior), Fundamentos de la Producción de TV Y ser seleccionado por
el instructor.
Cuota de Laboratorio: $20 por año (una sola cuota sin importar el número de clases tomadas)
*Disponible para los estudiantes de 12º grado tanto de SHS como de HBHS*
TV del Distrito de Springdale es tu oportunidad para aplicar tus destrezas al mundo real. Ubicado en la calle Emma,
trabajarás dentro de las oficinas de Comunicación del Distrito Escolar de Springdale haciendo programas para el canal
105
de Televisión de Springdale.
Esta clase es la culminación de la experiencia educativa para desarrollar tus destrezas en la transmisión de televisión.
Los estudiantes aplicarán destrezas de preproducción, producción y post producción a las descripciones de trabajo de
la industria.
Esta es una clase integrada. Los estudiantes tienen la opción de tomar la clase en la mañana o en la tarde.
Los estudiantes trabajarán con el Coordinador de Media, Director de Comunicaciones y Director de Comunicaciones de
ESL. Los estudiantes también tendrán muchas oportunidades de trabajar con profesionales de la industria y crear
productos para miembros de la comunidad.
Agricultura
La Academia de Agricultura de SHS es para los estudiantes que desean aprender habilidades de trabajo en la agricultura
o la industria alimenticia. Estos cursos se concentran en sistemas de los animales, sistemas de las plantas, sistemas
mecánicos y ciencias de los alimentos. Los estudiantes en la Academia de Agricultura de SHS deben inscribirse en los
cursos de inglés y matemáticas de la Academia de Agricultura de SHS y al menos en una clase de agricultura por semestre.
Los cursos de agricultura están abiertos para todos los estudiantes.
Estudio de los Sistemas Agrícolas – solo HBHS
491150
10, 11, 12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Un curso básico para todos los programas de estudio de agricultura. Los temas incluyen agricultura general, FFA,
liderazgo, experiencias agrícolas supervisadas, sistemas de los animales, sistemas de las plantas, sistemas de la
agroindustria, producción y procesamiento de alimentos, biotecnología, sistemas de los recursos naturales, sistemas de
servicio ambiental, energía, estructura y sistemas.
Horticultura
Introducción a la Ciencia de la Horticultura
491280
10, 11, 12 – 1 semestre, ½ crédito
Introducción a la Horticultura se enfocará en la identificación y propagación de plantas, manejo de invernaderos y muchas
actividades prácticas. Preparará a los estudiantes para pasar a cursos más avanzados como Floricultura, Jardines y Manejo de
Invernaderos.
Manejo de Invernaderos
491270
10, 11, 12 – 1 semestre, ½ crédito
Manejo de Invernaderos empieza donde termina Horticultura. Los estudiantes aprenderán en detalle las destrezas para operar
un invernadero comercial incluyendo ordenar, plantar, manejar y comercializar las plantas de invernadero.
Viveros/Jardines - solo HBHS
491330
10, 11, 12 – 1 semestre, ½ crédito
Viveros/Jardines ayudará a los estudiantes interesados en la carrera de diseño, instalación o mantenimiento de jardines.
Los estudiantes aprenderán los elementos y principios del diseño del trabajo, así como la instalación y el mantenimiento
apropiado de plantas de jardín, irrigación y mucho más.
Floricultura - solo SHS
491240
10, 11, 12 – 1 semestre, ½ crédito
Floricultura ayudará a los estudiantes a aprender los elementos y principios del diseño floral. Los estudiantes aprenderán a
crear sus propios diseños florales usando flores artificiales, secas y cortadas. Aprenderán como hacer un ramillete, un florero
y contenedores florales con hule espuma, además de trabajar con materiales secos y artificiales. Los estudiantes requerirán
materiales para sus trabajos florales. Artículos como listón, flores secas y contenedores serán requeridos para terminar las
asignaciones de laboratorio. Puede haber una cuota asociada con las asignaciones que requieren flores frescas.
Ciencia Agrícola de los Alimentos
106
Ciencia Agrícola de los Alimentos - solo SHS
10, 11, 12 - 1 año, 1 crédito
Cuota de laboratorio $40.00
Este es un curso que enseña los procesos y las técnicas envueltas en el desarrollo de productos alimenticios. Se da gran
énfasis a los proyectos diseñados para crear nuevos productos alimenticios y al proceso que se realiza para tener estos
productos listos para el mercado. Se espera que los estudiantes piensen creativamente acerca de los nuevos productos
alimenticios que venderían, y después, prácticamente seguir los procesos para llevar el elemento creativo a la realidad.
Ciencia Agrícola de los Alimentos II – solo SHS
11, 12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Cuota de Laboratorio $40.00
Este es un curso diseñado para enseñar a los estudiantes como convertir alimentos crudos en productos alimenticios
terminados listos para vender. Se hará hincapié en conceptos de mercadeo, publicidad y negocios; así como en la
preparación de alimentos, degustación y evaluación de mercado. Los estudiantes trabajarán en un ambiente de
laboratorio para crear nuevos alimentos y después usar conceptos de mercadeo para crear una campaña publicitaria
que incremente las ganancias y las ventas.
Ciencia Animal
Ciencias Pecuarias I
491180
10, 11, 12 – 1 semestre, ½ crédito
Los estudiantes participarán en actividades prácticas reales para ayudarles a obtener conocimiento en las áreas de la
Industria Ganadera, Manejo Correcto del Ganado, Anatomía y Fisiología Básica del Ganado y Nutrición del Ganado. El ganado
incluye ovejas, terneros, cerdos, caballos, pollos, y cabras.
Ciencias Pecuarias II
491200
10, 11, 12 – 1 semestre, ½ crédito
Los estudiantes participarán en actividades prácticas reales para ayudarles a obtener conocimiento en las áreas de Reproducción
del Ganado, Genética del Ganado, Salud del Ganado y Productos y Mercadeo del Ganado. El ganado incluye ovejas, terneros,
cerdos, caballos, pollos, y cabras.
Ciencia Animal Avanzada (Ciencia Ganado Vacuno)
49101B
10, 11, 12 – 1 semestre, ½ crédito
Cuota de laboratorio: $5
Ciencia del Ganado Vacuno ofrece a los estudiantes la oportunidad de identificar y aprender acerca de aproximadamente
30 especies de ganado vacuno. Adicionalmente, los estudiantes aprenderán como manejar, alimentar y cuidar al ganado
vacuno. Los estudiantes realizarán procedimientos en ganado, prepararán productos de res para comer y diseñarán
instalaciones para el ganado.
Ciencia Animal Avanzada (Ciencia Avícola)
49101P
10, 11, 12 – 1 semestre, ½ crédito
Cuota de laboratorio: $5
Ciencia Avícola permitirá a los estudiantes entender la industria más grande en Arkansas, la industria de las aves. Esta clase
también introduce a los estudiantes a la identificación, selección y manejo de las aves. Esta clase práctica incubará y criará
aves en el laboratorio de Ciencia Animal de la escuela. Adicionalmente, se introducirán ideas de procesamiento y
mercadotecnia.
Ciencia Animal Avanzada (Ciencia Equina)
49101H
10, 11, 12 – 1 semestre, ½ crédito
Cuota de laboratorio: $5
Ciencia Equina es el estudio de los caballos. El estudiante aprenderá a identificar las razas, colores y tipos de caballos.
Esta clase también incluye ejercicios de laboratorio donde los estudiantes aprenderán el cuidado básico de los caballos,
entenderán su anatomía y fisiología y sabrán como seleccionar diferentes tipos de caballos.
Ciencia Veterinaria – solo HBHS
491370
107
10, 11, 12 – 1 semestre, ½ crédito
Los estudiantes aprenderán las destrezas necesarias para llegar a ser asistentes de veterinario. Aprenderán la
terminología médica veterinaria básica, métodos de restricción, razas de animales, herramientas usadas en la medicina
veterinaria y los síntomas básicos de enfermedades que afectan al ganado y a los animales pequeños. Habrá muchas
actividades prácticas donde los estudiantes tendrán la oportunidad de trabajar con animales vivos.
Mecánica de Agricultura
Electricidad Agrícola
491040
10, 11, 12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Cuota: $15 para materiales y gafas de seguridad
Los estudiantes aprenden los principios de la electricidad y las instalaciones eléctricas, sus relaciones y sus aplicaciones a
la agricultura. Los estudiantes también aprenden acerca de la seguridad eléctrica, a reconocer y utilizar las herramientas
y el equipo de esta profesión, la Ley de Ohm y la teoría básica de la electricidad, el uso de la electricidad y los conductores,
cables y dispositivos, aprenden el Código Eléctrico Nacional y a instalar circuitos con seguridad y correctamente.
Sistemas de Energía Agrícola - solo SHS
491400
10, 11, 12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Cuota: $20 para herramientas de laboratorio y gafas de seguridad
Este curso cubre las destrezas técnicas de operación, mantenimiento y reparación de pequeños motores de gasolina
siempre y cuando estén relacionados a la industria de la agricultura. Los estudiantes obtienen conocimiento funcional
en motores de gasolina de 2 y 4 ciclos. Cada estudiante debe traer su propio motor Briggs & Stratton y se requiere la
aplicación del conocimiento obtenido en el curso para desarmar completamente la máquina y volver a construirla.
Durante la reconstrucción, los estudiantes tendrán varias pruebas de las partes componentes.
Metales Agrícolas - solo SHS
491380
10, 11, 12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Cuota: $20 para materiales y gafas de seguridad
Este curso incluye los principios del gas comprimido y de la electricidad utilizados para soldar, cortar y calentar metales mientras
estén relacionados a la agricultura. El primer semestre incluye los principios de soldadura de oxiacetileno y soldadura de arco.
Se utiliza la identificación de herramientas y equipo de la industria de la soldadura, la operación del equipo y la seguridad en
ambos procesos. El segundo semestre incluye destrezas de soldadura y cortes más difíciles. En esta clase se introduce la
Soldadura de Gas de Metal Inerte (MIG en inglés) y Gas de Tungsteno Inerte (TIG en inglés).
Tecnología de Máquinas Pequeñas
491350
10, 11, 12 – 1 semestre, ½ crédito
El curso examina el uso de máquinas pequeñas en todas las áreas de la agricultura. Los principales temas en este curso
incluyen selección, mantenimiento y reparación de máquinas pequeñas, así como habilidades laborales.
Mecánica Agrícola - solo SHS
491390
10, 11, 12
Ningún requisito previo.
Este curso conecta los principios científicos con las habilidades con mecánicas. El curso desarrollará la comprensión y
las destrezas en las áreas tradicionales de la mecánica agrícola incluyendo los siguiente: seguridad, construcción,
tecnología de metales, máquinas pequeñas, gráficas, herramientas de mantenimiento, carpintería, concreto y
mampostería, electricidad y plomería. Se integrará experiencia supervisada y FFA, según se considere apropiado
durante el curso.
Ciencias de la Familia y el Consumidor
108
*El Departamento de Ciencias de la Familia y el Consumidor trabaja en colaboración con NWACC. Algunos de los cursos
mencionados abajo pueden ofrecer crédito universitario. Ver la sección de NWACC para más detalles.
Ciencia de la Familia y el Consumidor
493080
10, 11, 12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Este curso proporciona al estudiante la información básica y las destrezas necesarias para ser útil dentro de la familia y
dentro de una sociedad compleja y en constante cambio. Se enfatiza en el desarrollo de habilidades relacionadas a la
Familia, Profesión y Lideres de la Comunidad de América; relaciones; arreglo del espacio personal de la vivienda;
planeación y selección de vestuario; cuidado y elaboración de prendas de vestir; selección de juguetes y juegos apropiados
según la edad del niño; procedimientos de salud y seguridad relacionados al cuidado del niño; nutrición y selección de
alimentos; planeación, preparación, y servicio de alimentos; administración del hogar y las finanzas así como el uso de
tarjetas de crédito y servicios bancarios. Los estudiantes deben entender completamente las destrezas de vida básicas.
Este es un curso necesario para ser un vocacional FACS completo.
Administración del Cuidado Infantil
Desarrollo Infantil*
493020
10, 11, 12 – 1 semestre, ½ crédito
*Curso Articulado de NWACC – Requiere Desarrollo del Niño Y Educación para Padres
Este curso ayuda el estudiante a entender los retos y responsabilidades de guiar el desarrollo físico, social, emocional e
intelectual de los niños. Entender a los niños, sus necesidades y las fuerzas que los influencian, ayuda a los estudiantes
a tener auto-comprensión. Los conceptos enfatizados en el curso incluyen la preparación para ser buenos padres, el
cuidado prenatal, postnatal, la salud y la seguridad del niño. Una A o B en Desarrollo Infantil y Educación para Padres
juntos componen un curso con crédito universitario en NWACC.
Educación para Padres*
493210
10, 11, 12 – 1 semestre, ½ crédito
*Curso Articulado de NWACC – Requiere Desarrollo del Niño Y Educación para Padres
Los estudiantes están conscientes de las responsabilidades de los padres y de los derechos de padres e hijos. Las
unidades que se enseñan incluyen: como proveer un buen ambiente en todas las etapas del desarrollo; el costo de criar
a los hijos; las causas y los tipos de abuso infantil; orientación; ser padres de hijos con necesidades especiales y servicios
de cuidado de niños. Una A o B en Desarrollo Infantil y Educación para Padres juntos componen un curso con crédito
universitario en NWACC.
Administración y Servicios del Cuidado Infantil/Orientación*
493010
SHS: 11, 12 – 1 año, 2 créditos
HBHS: 11, 12 - 1 año, 1 crédito
Requisito previo: Desarrollo Infantil y Educación para Padres y la recomendación del maestro/se requiere solicitud
*Curso Articulado de NWACC
Para ser elegible para esta clase debes haber tomado Desarrollo Infantil y Educación para Padres o estar inscrito en
estas clases en conjunto con Cuidado Infantil. Se requiere la membresía en FCCLA. La membresía cuesta $15. Los
estudiantes inscritos en esta clase también deben comprar una playera para la clase. Se requiere una solicitud y la
aprobación del instructor para este curso.
El contenido incluye: habilidades que requiere tener una persona para ser empleada, oportunidades profesionales en el
cuidado de niños, tipos de programas de cuidado de niños, instalaciones, aspectos legales en esta área, salud y seguridad
de niños, orientación en el comportamiento de niños y experiencia en la administración del cuidado de niños. Este curso
es para estudiantes que desean iniciar una profesión en la enseñanza, empleos relacionados con la temprana infancia.
Se requiere experiencia de laboratorio en el cuidado de niños. Este curso les da a los estudiantes un crédito universitario
gratuito en NWACC al terminarlo y obtener una A o una B de calificación. Si se cumple con los requisitos, se puede
obtener una certificación como maestro asistente o ayudante en el cuidado de niños del Departamento del Desarrollo
de Fuerza Laboral de Arkansas.
Servicios de Alimenticios
109
Alimentos y Nutrición*
493110
10, 11, 12 – 1 semestre, ½ crédito
*Curso Articulado de NWACC
Nota: En SHS, los estudiantes que se inscriban en este curso deben de anotar Nutrición y Bienestar como curso
alternativo.
El primer trimestre se enfoca en la nutrición, planeación y preparación de una variedad de alimentos, buenas prácticas del
consumidor, medidas de protección para la seguridad de los alimentos, administración de cocina y oportunidades profesionales
en servicios alimenticios. El segundo trimestre se enfoca en el laboratorio y la preparación de alimentos, incluyendo panes
rápidos, cocinar en microondas, pastas, frutas y legumbres, huevos y postres.
Nutrición y Bienestar – solo SHS
493200
10, 11, 12 – 1 semestre, ½ crédito
Nutrición y Bienestar permite a los estudiantes analizar la interacción de la nutrición, los alimentos y la condición física en el
bienestar general de individuos y familias durante el transcurso de la vida. En este curso los estudiantes desarrollarán hábitos
de nutrición y acondicionamiento físico que les permitan tomar decisiones inteligentes para tener una vida saludable y
prevenir enfermedades por medio de estas prácticas. Como estudiantes activos, ellos desarrollan destrezas de razonamiento
y habilidades académicas superiores en las áreas de matemáticas, ciencia, lengua y literatura, y estudios sociales, por medio
del análisis de información relevante en nutrición y bienestar. Este curso está recomendado para todos los estudiantes sin
importar su interés profesional con el fin de que obtengan el conocimiento y las destrezas básicas en nutrición y bienestar. Es
especialmente apropiado para los estudiantes que tienen interés en servicios humanos, bienestar/acondicionamiento físico,
salud o que tienen un interés profesional relacionado con alimentos y nutrición.
Química de los Alimentos - solo HBHS
493130
10, 11, 12 – 1 semestre, ½ crédito
Requisito previo: Alimentos y Nutrición o C en Ciencia.
Cuota de Laboratorio $5.00
Este curso practica ayuda a los estudiantes a entender factores específicos y principios acerca de la ciencia, la seguridad
y los componentes nutricionales de los alimentos. Es una clase de laboratorio que incluye carreras en ciencia de los
alimentos, regulaciones para su procesamiento, manejo de la seguridad en los alimentos y los efectos de estos en la
salud. Esto es para los estudiantes que están interesados en ser chef, gerente de restaurante, mercadología en el servicio
de alimentos, inspector de la salud o dietista. Deben participar en FCCLA.
Introducción a las Artes Culinarias - solo SHS
493250
10, 11, 12 – 1 semestre, ½ crédito
Requisito previo: GPA de 2.0 o aprobación del instructor.
Introducción a las Artes Culinarias es un curso de un semestre (18 semanas) diseñado para introducir a los estudiantes a
la profesión de las artes culinarias. El énfasis de este curso se da al desarrollo de las habilidades básicas relacionadas a
la profesión de las artes culinarias, menús y recetas básicas, estandarización y productos de cocina. Al término del
curso, se les introducirán a los estudiantes las destrezas necesarias para ser empleados, relacionarse con los clientes,
planear el menú, usar las recetas, pesos y medidas, conversiones, presupuesto, higiene y seguridad, organización para
eficiencia y procedimientos de laboratorio. Los estudiantes tendrán la oportunidad de participar en la Competencia de
Artes Culinarias en Skills USA.
Artes Culinarias I y II - solo SHS
493260 Artes Culinarias I
11 – 1 semestre, 2 créditos
493270 Artes Culinarias II
12 - SOLO con aprobación previa del maestro (curso integrado de 2 periodos).
Requisito previo: Introducción a las Artes Culinarias y GPA de 2.0 o aprobación del instructor.
Cuota: $40.00/$20.00 por semestre
Artes Culinarias I - Primer Semestre: Este curso está diseñado para expandir el conocimiento de los estudiantes en la profesión
de las artes culinarias. En este curso se enfatiza en el estudio de los elementos básicos de cocina, principios para cocinar
sopas, caldos y salsas, productos lácteos, huevos, frutas y vegetales, granos y pastas, carnes y principios para hornear. Al
terminar este curso, los estudiantes deben de obtener las destrezas básicas que se necesitan para pasar al nivel de empleo en
la industria del servicio de alimentos, relación con los clientes, compra y almacenaje de alimentos, técnicas para cocinar y
principios para hornear.
Artes Culinarias II - Segundo Semestre: En este curso se enfatiza en el estudio de las artes culinarias avanzadas que
incluyen: salsas; preparación avanzada de carnes; preparación avanzada de aves; pescados y mariscos; elaboración de
110
dulces; chocolates; preparación avanzada de pasteles; platillos, presentación y guarniciones; además de las
oportunidades para una carrera. Los estudiantes tendrán la oportunidad de participar en la Competencia de Artes
Culinarias en Skills USA.
ProStart I & II - solo SHS
493220 Pro-Start I
12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
493230 Pro-Start II
Requisito previo: Alimentos y Nutrición e Introducción a las Artes Culinarias y aprobación del maestro.
Cuota: $20.00 para bata y gorro de chef
ProStart es una iniciativa de Escuela-para-Carrera que prepara a los estudiantes para el mundo del trabajo a través de
experiencias prácticas antes de graduar de la escuela. Este curso de dos años basado en la industria, prepara a los
estudiantes para carreras en la industria restaurantera y de servicio de alimentos. Los estudiantes obtienen destrezas
requeridas en la industria restaurantera y de servicio de alimentos, a través de su enseñanza académica y su experiencia
en el trabajo. Los estudiantes que terminan ProStart I, ProStart II y 400 horas de prácticas de trabajo relacionado, son
elegibles para participar en el examen Nacional ProStart, si lo aprueban, reciben la certificación nacional HBA/ProStart.
Los estudiantes tendrán la oportunidad de participar en la Competencia de Artes Culinarias en Skills USA.
ProStart OJT - solo SHS
493060
11, 12 – 1 año, 1 o 2 créditos
Los estudiantes deben inscribirse en el Programa ProStart. Obtienen un crédito por año haciendo un total de 185 horas
de las 400 horas que requieren trabajar en la industria restaurantera o de servicio de alimenticios. El estudiante obtiene
entrenamiento práctico en un restaurante o en la industria de comida rápida.
Ciencias Generales de la Familia y el Consumidor
Manejo del Guardaropa I
493030
10, 11, 12 – 1 semestre, ½ crédito
(Costo aproximado para materiales $20)
Los estudiantes desarrollan las destrezas para organizar su guardarropa individual y familiar, para tomar decisiones
como consumidor de ropa y para comprender el rol del vestuario y la industria textil dentro de la economía. Se enfatiza
en la selección del vestuario; las necesidades de vestuario de la familia; la coordinación del vestuario; el cuidado de la
ropa; las características de la fibra textil; los tipos de tela y los acabados; las leyes y normas de la industria textil; el
uso y el cuidado de utensilios y equipo para coser; selección de tela; técnicas de elaboración de prendas; empleos y
carreras; el uso de la computadora y los efectos de la tecnología en la industria textil. Después de las primeras nueve
semanas, el enfoque se orienta más hacia el laboratorio y los estudiantes elaboran prendas a su propio costo.
Manejo del Guardarropa II - solo SHS
493060
10, 11, 12 – 1 semestre, ½ crédito
Requisito previo: Manejo del Guardarropa I.
(Costo aproximado para materiales $20)
El curso Manejo del Guardarropa II está diseñado para ayudar a los estudiantes a desarrollar las destrezas necesarias
para el manejo y la elaboración de vestuario y de proyectos individuales y/o familiares. Se integrarán técnicas básicas
de elaboración en varios proyectos durante el curso. Se crearán uno o más proyectos de nivel intermedio usando las
técnicas de elaboración correctas. Se requiere una cuota de laboratorio de $20.
Relaciones Humanas - solo SHS
493150
10, 11, 12 – 1 semestre, ½ crédito
Relaciones Humanas se enfoca en el desarrollo de las destrezas necesarias para establecer y mantener relaciones
prósperas en el hogar, la comunidad y el lugar de trabajo. El énfasis está en el desarrollo de aptitudes relacionadas a la
formación de la personalidad, toma de decisiones, relaciones fuera de la familia y carreras en el campo de las relaciones
humanas. Al terminar este curso, el estudiante debe de tener un mejor entendimiento de si mismo, saber como
comunicarse eficazmente y poder establecer y mantener relaciones eficaces con los miembros de la familia, compañeros
y otros.
Profesiones Educativas
La Academia de Educación en las Escuelas Preparatorias Springdale y Har-Ber es un programa riguroso para los grados
111
10º - 12º con énfasis en las carreras en Educación. Está diseñada para fomentar el crecimiento de estudiantes que han
expresado interés en la enseñanza y para prepararlos para el éxito en la universidad.
Objetivo: Instar a los estudiantes a ejercer la gratificante carrera de la enseñanza.
Misión: Inspirar…Liderar….Enseñar
Para ingresar a la Academia de Educación se requiere una solicitud, recomendación de dos maestros y un G.P.A. de 2.5.
Los estudiantes deben estar al nivel de grado en lectura-escritura y matemáticas.
La Academia de Educación ofrece lo siguiente a los estudiantes:
•Oradores Invitados mensualmente para explorar la educación postsecundaria y las opciones de carrera.
•Elaboración de un Currículum Vitae y Carta de Solicitud.
•Viajes a instituciones de educación superior, tales como UCA, UA, NWACC y UA Campus Global.
•Oportunidades de aprendizaje en lugares de trabajo – observación del trabajo de maestros y 15 horas por año de
observación en escuelas primarias, intermedias y secundarias; además, trabajo voluntario en las escuelas.
Introducción a la Enseñanza
493240
10, 11, 12 - 1 año, 1 crédito
¿Estás interesado en ser maestro? Si la respuesta es sí o si solo tienes curiosidad, entonces este curso es para ti.
Experimentarás que se siente ser maestro. Diseñarás planes para lecciones, aprenderás como hacer tableros de anuncios,
investigarás diferentes estrategias de enseñanza y como ser creativo en la aplicación de las lecciones. Se enseñará la
historia de la educación en América, así como, temas educativos, políticas y prácticas actuales.
Introducción a la Enseñanza II
493290
11, 12 - 1 año, 1 crédito
Requisito previo: Introducción a la Enseñanza
El primer semestre, Educación Tecnológica, introduce aplicaciones a la computadora para usarlas en cualquier salón de
clase o lugar de entrenamiento para impactar el aprovechamiento del estudiante. El segundo semestre, Métodos Educativos
y Evaluación, enfatiza en los modelos de instrucción, conceptos de medición y destrezas de evaluación para incrementar
el aprovechamiento. Los estudiantes planean y practican una variedad de estrategias de enseñanza en un ambiente de
salón de clases, usando los Esquemas Conceptuales de Arkansas como base del contenido estándar y los métodos de
evaluación. Los estudiantes documentan el desarrollo de rúbricas, destrezas de investigación, prácticas reflexivas y
comunicación interactiva en carpetas profesionales.
Profesiones Médicas
*La Academia de Profesiones Médicas y el Departamento de Profesiones Médicas trabajan en colaboración con NWACC.
Algunos de los cursos mencionados abajo pueden ofrecer crédito universitario. Ver la sección de NWACC para más detalles.
La Educación en Profesiones Médicas está diseñada para proporcionar a estudiantes interesados en cualquier profesión
médica una base para completar una certificación técnica o educación a niveles más avanzados en más de 200 campos de
la medicina.
Introducción a la Educación de Profesiones Médicas
495340
10, 11, 12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Los estudiantes que no son de la Academia deben tomar este curso para obtener la membresía en la Sociedad Nacional Médica de
Honor.
Este curso provee una base al estudiante que está considerando la carrera de salud como profesión. El enfoque incluye
una visión general de la anatomía y fisiología, desordenes relacionados y su tratamiento, la ética médica, la aplicación
de terminología médica común y las abreviaturas, el crecimiento y el desarrollo humano, responsabilidades legales,
derechos de los pacientes y la exploración de carreras médicas.
Procedimientos Médicos I
495330
10, 11, 12 – 1 semestre, ½ crédito
Los estudiantes que no son de la Academia deben tomar este curso para obtener la membresía en la Sociedad Nacional
112
Médica de Honor.
En este curso, los alumnos estudian la teoría básica para desarrollar destrezas prácticas realizadas en el laboratorio
clínico del salón de clase. Los estudiantes aprenden acerca de términos y abreviaturas médicas, clasificación de
enfermedades, control de infección, signos vitales, primeros auxilios, cuadros médicos y matemáticas médicas.
Procedimientos Médicos II - solo HBHS
495390
10, 11, 12 – 1 semestre, ½ crédito
Los estudiantes que no son de la Academia deben tomar este curso para obtener la membresía en la Sociedad Nacional Médica de
Honor.
Este curso fortalece el conocimiento obtenido por los estudiantes en Procedimientos Médicos I. En este curso, los
alumnos estudian destrezas de asistente dental, destrezas de asistente de laboratorio, destrezas de asistente médico,
destrezas de asistente de enfermería, técnicas de terapia física, cuidado de la salud animal y sistemas de información
médica.
Terminología Médica*
495360
11, 12 – 1 semestre, ½ crédito
Los estudiantes que no son de la Academia deben tomar este curso para obtener la membresía en la Sociedad Nacional Médica
de Honor.
*Curso Articulado de NWACC
Este curso introduce prefijos, sufijos y las raíces de palabras utilizadas en el lenguaje de la medicina. Los temas incluyen
el vocabulario médico y los términos relacionados con anatomía, fisiología, trastornos patológicos y el tratamiento de
enfermedades que involucran cada sistema del organismo. Sería de gran ayuda haber tomado clases de profesiones
médicas o inscribirse en anatomía y fisiología. Esta clase está abierta solo para estudiantes de 11º y 12º grados.
Respuesta Médica de Emergencia – Solo SHS
494140
11, 12 – 1 semestre, ½ crédito
Los estudiantes aprenderán destrezas para proporcionar ayuda y cuidado a enfermos y heridos. Aprenderán RCP, control de
hemorragias y entablillado. También aprenderán las causas y tratamiento de muchas emergencias médicas tales como
ataques de asma, reacciones alérgicas, derrame cerebral y dolor en el pecho. RME es el primer paso para una carrera en
Servicios Médicos de Emergencia que puede seguir con RME Básico y luego con Paramédico.
Psicología Anormal - solo SHS
495370
11, 12 – 1 semestre, ½ crédito
Los estudiantes que no son de la Academia deben tomar este curso para obtener la membresía en la Sociedad Nacional
Médica de Honor.
Este curso examina las características del funcionamiento mental afectado y el comportamiento anormal. El curso le da al
estudiante una visión de los mecanismos de defensa, terminología apropiada, trastornos del pensamiento, trastornos de
personalidad, depresión y esquizofrenia. El tema de las modalidades de tratamiento se concentra en la relación entre
perspectiva médica y salud mental.
Comportamiento y Desordenes Humanos - solo HBHS
495320
11, 12 – 1 semestre, 1/2 crédito
Los estudiantes que no son de la Academia deben tomar este curso para obtener la membresía en la Sociedad Nacional Médica
de Honor.
Este curso proporciona a los estudiantes un panorama general de la salud mental desde la perspectiva de la comunidad
al cuidado de la salud, que incluye, historia de salud mental, métodos de investigación, teorías mayores y la aplicación
del conocimiento a los problemas y retos enfrentados por los profesionales al cuidado de la salud de hoy en día. Otras
áreas cubiertas son: fundaciones biológicas de comportamiento, conciencia, memoria, aprendizaje, emociones,
personalidad, desordenes psicológicos y métodos de terapia.
Seminario Alto Nivel de Profesiones Médicas (Culminación)- solo SHS
590110
1 semestre, ½ crédito
(Requerido por la Sociedad Nacional Médica de Honor)
Requisitos previos: Todos los otros cursos del programa de Educación de Profesiones Médicas (MPE): Introducción a la
Educación de Profesiones Médicas (2 semestres), Procedimientos Médicos (1 semestre), Terminología Médica (1
semestre), Psicología Anormal (1 semestre) y Anatomía y Fisiología (2 semestres) (crédito dual para MPE y ciencia).
113
Este es el curso final de Educación de Profesiones Médicas (MPE) requerido para ser un vocacional en profesiones
médicas. El objetivo general es la integración de cursos médicos con los estándares de prácticas profesionales médicas.
Tanto los proyectos de clase como los de fuera de ésta, culminan con un proyecto de alto nivel y una presentación final.
Se utilizará tecnología informática, destrezas de comunicación y destrezas interpersonales. Se requieren 16 horas de
prácticas con médicos profesionales seleccionados en la comunidad.
Academia de Leyes y Seguridad Pública
Solo a los estudiantes que han sido seleccionados para la Academia de Leyes y Seguridad Pública se les permite inscribirse
en los cursos listados en esta sección. Para ser elegible, deben llenar una solicitud y tener recomendaciones de sus
maestros, un promedio de 3.0 o mejor y buena asistencia. Este es un programa educativo que prepara individuos para
desempeñar el trabajo de policía y agentes de seguridad pública.
Introducción a la Justicia Criminal - solo SHS
49462L
10 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Los estudiantes deben ser aceptados en la Academia de Leyes para ser elegibles para este curso.
Este curso provee una base para el estudiante que está considerando hacer una carrera en el campo de la justicia criminal.
El enfoque incluye una visión general del sistema de justicia criminal, el crimen y sus consecuencias y una exploración de
profesiones relacionadas.
Implementación de Leyes I - solo SHS
49463L
11 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Requisito previo: Introducción a la Justicia Criminal
Los estudiantes deben ser aceptados en la Academia de Leyes para ser elegibles para este curso.
Este curso ofrece una visión profunda de las destrezas necesarias para el trabajo y las tareas de la policía a cargo de las
patrullas, incluyendo temas como investigación de accidentes, paradas de tráfico y tomar reportes.
Leyes Criminales/Seminario para Seniors (Curso Culminante) - solo SHS
49461L
12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Este curso cubre un amplio rango de las leyes criminales de Arkansas, así como de las decisiones históricas de los
tribunales de los Estados Unidos. El segundo semestre de este curso combina todos los aspectos del sistema de justicia
criminal en una simulación extensiva de una investigación criminal y su juicio. Este es el año de senior (12º grado) en
la Academia de Leyes.
EAST
(Tecnología Ambiental y Espacial)
EAST I
460010
10, 11, 12—1 año, 1 crédito
Requisito previo: Aprobación del coordinador de EAST a través de una de solicitud (incluyendo un informe de la asistencia,
una constancia de calificaciones y recomendaciones de los maestros).
Un curso diseñado para que los estudiantes utilicen el arte de la tecnología de la computación para solucionar problemas del
“mundo real” independientemente o en equipos. Los estudiantes se comprometen diariamente a realizar proyectos centrados
en la resolución de problemas. Se espera que los estudiantes construyan sus propios recursos de aprendizaje encontrados
tradicionalmente en el ambiente de los negocios, por ejemplo, guías del usuario a aplicaciones del software, servicios de
apoyo para el software y aprendizaje compañero a compañero. Las soluciones a estos problemas del mundo real pueden
requerir el dominio de los estudiantes en una o más de las siguientes áreas de la tecnología: diseño computarizado, modelos
tridimensionales, topografía y cartografía (incluyendo el trabajo con los sistemas de posición global), sistemas de información
geográficos, programación, aplicación a la base de datos, diseño de páginas Web, edición de fotografía/videos digitales y
desarrollo de la realidad virtual.
EAST II
560020
10, 11, 12—1 año, 1 crédito
Requisito previo: EAST I y aprobación del coordinador de EAST.
114
Un curso diseñado para cimentar en los estudiantes las experiencias de EAST I, proporcionando oportunidades para que los
estudiantes realicen proyectos basados en la resolución de problemas. Se espera que los estudiantes de EAST II compartan con
los estudiantes de EAST I la filosofía y el funcionamiento del laboratorio y los instruyan en el uso del hardware y el software del
laboratorio. Los estudiantes de EAST II serán el modelo para los nuevos estudiantes de EAST I y deben comportarse como tal.
Se espera que los estudiantes de EAST II sean parte activa en la creación e implementación de proyectos de servicio a la
comunidad durante todo el año.
EAST III
560030
12—1 año, 1 crédito
Requisito Previo: EAST I, II y ser aprobado por el coordinador de EAST.
EAST III es la continuación de un curso de estudio diseñado para cimentar las experiencias de los estudiantes obtenidas es
cursos previos de EAST, proporcionándoles la oportunidad de continuar comprometiéndose en el aprendizaje basado en
proyectos de servicio comunitario, enfocándose en la resolución de problemas. Se mantiene un medio ambiente “parecido al
trabajo” con altas expectativas en el salón de clase para que los estudiantes tengan un mejor entendimiento de lo que se
espera de ellos en el mundo de los negocios. El enfoquen de este curso cambia a liderazgo de grupo, mantenimiento y
administración de laboratorio y proyectos de servicio sofisticados
JAG
(Puestos De Trabajo Para Los Graduados Arkansas)
JAG
493770
12 - 1 año, 1 crédito
Requisito previo: Consentimiento del coordinador y recomendación del maestro. Deben estar inscritos en una clase de
carrera o técnica durante el 11º grado. El estudiante también debe estar de acuerdo en tomar una clase vocacional en
el 12º grado que siga el plan de estudios que eligió en el 11º grado. Los estudiantes deben estar de acuerdo en
incorporarse a la organización estudiantil C/T asociada con su clase C/T.
Los estudiantes deben cumplir con normas específicas del Estado para ser elegibles para este programa. El maestro o
coordinador puede dar las normas al estudiante. En JAG se da instrucción relacionada al trabajo y los estudiantes
inscritos en el programa deben estar de acuerdo en continuar por un año más después de la graduación. JAG ayuda a
los estudiantes a graduarse de la preparatoria, obtener empleo después de la graduación y/o asistir a alguna institución
de estudios post-secundarios.
JAG I
493780
11- 1 año, 1 crédito
(Ver la descripción arriba.)
JAG II
493790
12 - 1 año, 1 crédito
SOLO JAG SEGUNDO AÑO
(Ver la descripción arriba.)
JAG Entrenamiento en el Trabajo
493800, 493805, 493806, 493807
11, 12 - 1 año, 1-3 créditos
Requisito previo: Aprobación del maestro y estar inscrito en el programa JAG.
Las calificaciones se coordinan entre la empresa y el coordinador. Se pueden obtener hasta 3 créditos por año en este
programa.
Servicio Comunitario
Sólo por solicitud
Las clases de servicio comunitario están disponibles para que los estudiantes obtengan crédito optativo. Los estudiantes
pueden obtener un crédito por servicio comunitario al año. Los estudiantes que terminan una clase de servicio comunitario
reciben una calificación de “aprobado” o “reprobado” (no se asigna una calificación en letra). La asistencia es muy
115
importante en el proceso de selección. Favor de dirigirse al jefe del departamento indicado para pedir los materiales de
solicitud. Los estudiantes que no desempeñan servicio comunitario deben tener 6 clases adicionales.
Mentor de Compañeros
10, 11, 12 - 1 año, 1 crédito
Requisito previo: Sólo por solicitud y aprobación del consejero.
Los estudiantes inscritos en el Centro de Consejería ayudan a los consejeros con la operación diaria del centro de
consejería. Algunas de las responsabilidades son entregar recados, dar la bienvenida a nuevos estudiantes, ayudar a los
estudiantes con información de carreras y universidades y otras tareas según les indiquen. Los candidatos deben tener
excelente asistencia y no deben tener dificultades académicas.
Asistente de la Biblioteca
10, 11, 12 - 1 año, 1 crédito
Requisito previo: Sólo por solicitud y aprobación del especialista de la biblioteca.
Los estudiantes inscritos por ser Asistentes de Biblioteca ayudan a los especialistas en la operación diaria de la biblioteca.
Asistente de Computación - solo SHS
10, 11, 12 - 1 semestre, ½ crédito
Requisito previo: A o B en el curso al cual están asistiendo los estudiantes o su equivalente y aprobación del maestro.
Los estudiantes trabajan como asistentes en una clase de computación. Las responsabilidades incluyen ayudar a estudiantes
que tienen dificultades con la computadora o con los programas, ayudar a los estudiantes que han faltado a clase o que tienen
problemas con sus tareas, además de realizar otras actividades. Hablen con los maestros de tecnología de negocios para
conseguir una solicitud.
Asistente del Laboratorio de Ciencia
10, 11, 12 - 1 año, 1 crédito; 1 semestre, ½ crédito
Requisito previo: A o B en el curso al cual están asistiendo los estudiantes o su equivalente y aprobación del maestro.
Los estudiantes trabajan como asistentes de laboratorio en una clase de ciencia. Las responsabilidades incluyen resolver
problemas, ayudar a estudiantes que tienen dificultades y ayudar a los estudiantes que han faltado a clase o que tienen
problemas con sus tareas, además de realizar otras actividades.
Tutor ELL - solo SHS
10, 11, 12 - 1 semestre, ½ crédito
Requisito previo: A o B en el curso al cual están asistiendo los estudiantes o su equivalente y aprobación del maestro.
Los estudiantes trabajan como asistente de laboratorio en una clase de ESL. Las responsabilidades incluyen resolver
problemas, ayudar a estudiantes que tienen dificultades y ayudar a los estudiantes que han faltado a clase o que tienen
problemas con sus tareas, además de realizar otras actividades.
Aprendizaje a través del Servicio - solo SHS
Grado 12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Requisito previo: Solicitud.
Este curso es para desarrollar las destrezas cívicas y de voluntariado de los seniors (12º grado) en preparación para su
graduación de la escuela preparatoria. Los estudiantes crearán sociedades comunitarias y participarán en tutoría para
niños más pequeños en el Distrito Escolar de Springdale. El curso ayudará a preparar a los estudiantes para deberes
cívicos y a establecer la identidad y la participación en la comunidad como adultos (con el objetivo de que después se
mantengan estos estudiantes como adultos exitosos en la comunidad). El curso será usado como herramienta para
establecer relaciones públicas y crear conciencia para que los estudiantes de la Escuela Preparatoria de Springdale
trabajen para mejorar su comunidad. Estudiarán las necesidades de la comunidad y trabajarán en objetivos anuales
para completar proyectos de servicio. Serán elegidos veinte estudiantes por medio de un proceso de solicitud para ser
guiados por el maestro y el director. Los estudiantes deben completar 75 horas de servicio fuera del salón de clases para
recibir crédito optativo.
Más Oportunidades
116
Seminario G/T (Dotados y Talentosos)-Solo SHS
Requisito previo: Aprobación del maestro de la Preparatoria y del coordinador del programa de G/T.
Este curso ofrece crédito de estudios independientes para estudiantes que desean tomar cursos más avanzados de los
que se ofrecen en la preparatoria. El estudiante colabora con un maestro para desarrollar un plan de estudios para
recibir crédito en el área académica elegida. El crédito aparece en el expediente académico como crédito por Seminario
G/T.
Inscripción Simultánea Fuera del Campus
10, 11, 12
El programa de inscripción simultánea ofrece enriquecimiento y oportunidades de estudios acelerados para estudiantes
destacados que demuestran la habilidad de hacer trabajos a nivel universitario mientras están inscritos en la preparatoria. La
Universidad de Arkansas y el Northwest Arkansas Community College consideran la inscripción simultánea de tiempo parcial
para estudiantes de los grados 9º-12º.
Opción División de Entrenamiento
11, 12 - 1 año, 1 crédito
Una unidad de crédito optativa está disponible para estudiantes en los grados 11º y 12º que participan en “Opción de División
de Entrenamiento” un programa ofrecido por la Guardia Nacional de las Fuerzas Armadas.
Escuela Nocturna
La Escuela Nocturna es un programa para recuperación de créditos ofrecido en las tardes, de lunes a jueves. Se puede obtener
1/2 crédito por cada sesión. El estudiante debe presentar una solicitud aprobada por su consejero. La cuota de inscripción
puede pagarse al momento que se presenta la solicitud. Las solicitudes están disponibles en el centro de consejería de la escuela
preparatoria.
Tutoría
Hay tutoría disponible para los estudiantes antes y después de la escuela. Por favor póngase en contacto con el maestro
o consejero de su hijo para saber el horario y el lugar.
Escuela Mundial IB –
solo SHS
El Programa de Bachillerato Internacional (IB) es un programa pre-universitario de estudios rigurosos internacionalmente
reconocido que se estudia en un periodo de dos años, 11º y 12º grado. Los estudiantes tienen la oportunidad de obtener
un Diploma de IB en adición al diploma de Escuela Preparatoria. Esto puede realizarse por medio de la terminación
exitosa de las evaluaciones internas y externas en seis diferentes materias de IB; escribiendo un ensayo extenso basado
en investigaciones independientes que son patrocinadas por algún miembro de la facultad, terminando actividades
creativas, de acción y de servicio (CAS); y estudiando un curso de pensamiento crítico llamado Teoría del Conocimiento.
Este programa educativo proporciona a los estudiantes una oportunidad para desarrollar destrezas para llegar a ser
ciudadanos productivos en una sociedad tecnológica global.
La aceptación al Programa de Bachillerato Internacional se obtiene a través de un proceso de solicitud y entrevista.
Debido a las demandas académicas del programa, los estudiantes que lo solicitan deben tener al menos C ‘s en su trabajo
académico.
Las siguientes descripciones de los cursos son de la Guía Oficial de Curso BI.
Grupo 1 Materia: Estudios en Lenguaje y Literatura
Lenguaje IB A1 Inglés HL
Primer año: 517109
Grados 11-12 - 2 años, 2 créditos
Segundo año: 517209
Requisitos previos: Solo por solicitud.
Lenguaje IB A1-HL es un curso de inglés para los años de junior y senior que enfatiza en el estudio del lenguaje escrito
117
y en el análisis literario. La literatura estudiada en este curso y las evaluaciones deben satisfacer los requisitos del
programa de estudios para Lenguaje A1 Nivel Alto. Los estudiantes realizarán evaluaciones orales y escritas que serán
calificadas internamente por los maestros y externamente por un examinador de IB. Los estudiantes analizarán,
sintetizarán y evaluarán drama, poesía, novela y prosa en literatura británica, americana y mundial. El curso enfatizará
en conexiones temáticas y filosóficas, así como en las diferencias en periodos literarios, estilos y contextos.
Grupo 2 Materias: Idioma Mundial
Nota: Los estudiantes deben elegir uno de estos idiomas para estudiarlo por dos años.
Francés IB Ab Initio SL
540189
Grado 12 - 1 año, 1 crédito
Requisito previo: Francés 2.
Idioma Francés Ab Initio SL es un curso de aprendizaje del idioma para principiantes, diseñado para ser estudiado por
dos años. El primer año es francés 2. El enfoque principal del curso está en la adquisición del idioma requerido para la
interacción social diaria. El propósito del curso es desarrollar una variedad de destrezas lingüísticas con conocimiento
básico de la cultura (s), usando el idioma. El curso seguirá el programa básico de IB del idioma específico (francés) para
preparar a los estudiantes para los exámenes de IB.
Francés IB B SL
541079
Grados 11 o 12 - 1 año, 1 crédito
Requisito previo: Francés 3.
Este intenso y acelerado curso, envuelve: habilidades al escuchar, leer, hablar, escribir y los componentes culturales
del francés. Los estudiantes trabajan individualmente y en grupo para analizar, debatir y discutir una gran variedad de
temas y textos en francés para prepararse para los exámenes de francés IB.
Español IB B HL
Primer año: 540139
Grados 11, 12 - 2 años, 2 créditos
Segundo año: 540149
Requisito previo: Español 2 o Español para Nativos
Español IB B HL 1 - Esta es la primera parte de un curso de IB de dos años. Este intenso y acelerado curso, envuelve:
habilidades al escuchar, leer, hablar, escribir y los componentes culturales del español. Los estudiantes trabajan
individualmente y en grupo para analizar, debatir y discutir una gran variedad de temas y textos en español para
prepararse para los exámenes de español IB el próximo año.
Español IB B HL 2 - Esta es la segunda parte de un curso de IB de dos años. Las mismas estrategias usadas en las
instrucciones del primer curso serán utilizadas en el segundo ano. Este curso se enfocara en la comunicación y los
medios de comunicación, asuntos globales y relaciones sociales pertenecientes a los países de habla hispana y a nuestra
comunidad. Además, los alumnos estudiaran dos artículos de literatura en español, seleccionados por el instructor. Las
evaluaciones de BI realizadas en el segundo ano incluyen una evaluación escrita, una presentación oral individual y
exámenes de respuesta abierta administrados en mayo.
Español IB B SL
540029
Grados 11 o 12 - 1 año, 1 crédito
Requisito previo: Español 3.
El curso envuelve la adquisición de español por medio de escuchar, leer, hablar, escribir y los componentes culturales.
Se anima a los estudiantes comunicarnos en español utilizando tanto las habilidades de vocabulario y gramático
aprendido anteriormente. Ellos trabajaran individualmente y en grupo para aumentar y mejorar las destrezas en la
lengua española. En adición, los estudiantes van a analizar, debatir y discutir una gran variedad de temas y textos en
español para prepararse para los exámenes de español IB.
Español IB Ab Initio SL
540159
Grado 12 solo - 1 año, 1 crédito
Requisito previo: Español 2.
Español IB Ab Initio SL es un curso para aprender el idioma como principiantes, diseñado para ser estudiado por dos
años. El primer parte de este curso es Español 2. El enfoque de este curso está en la adquisición del idioma requerido para
la interacción social diaria. El objetivo del curso es desarrollar una variedad de destrezas lingüísticas y una conciencia básica
de la cultura(s) usando el idioma. El curso seguirá el programa IB básico y el programa de lenguaje específico (espanol) para
118
preparar a los estudiantes para los exámenes IB.
Alemán IB Ab Initio SL
542089
Grado 12 solo – 1 año, 1 crédito
Requisito previo: Alemán II.
La clase de alemán Ab Initio SL es un curso para aprender el idioma como principiantes, diseñado para ser estudiado por dos
años. El enfoque de este curso está en la adquisición del idioma requerido para la interacción social diaria. El objetivo del
curso es desarrollar una variedad de destrezas lingüísticas y una conciencia básica de la cultura(s) usando el idioma. El curso
seguirá el programa IB básico y el programa de lenguaje específico (alemán) para preparar a los estudiantes para los exámenes
IB.
Grupo 3 Materias: Individuos y Sociedades
Historia de las Américas IB HL – 2: La Historia Mundial del Siglo Veinte
570059
Grado 12 solo - 1 año, 1 crédito
Requisito previo: Historia EU CA.
Historia IB HL –Historia de las Américas 2: Temas de Historia Mundial del Siglo Veinte es el segundo año de un estudio de
dos años con énfasis en la Guerra Fría y sus causas, prácticas y efectos. Adicionalmente, los Temas de la Historia Mundial
del Siglo veinte se enfocan en el estudio profundo de periodos selectos de la historia americana, canadiense y de latino
americana. En vez de proporcionar un informe, el curso permite al estudiante investigar ciertas secciones de la historia a
través de la instrucción en el salón de clases, lectura independiente e investigación. Los estudiantes aprenderán destrezas
que aplicarán al estudio de la historia en cualquier contexto, pero con un enfoque particular hacia aquello necesitado para
un proyecto de investigación y para la Historia Mundial del Siglo Veinte. Este curso prepara al estudiante para el examen
de Bachillerato Internacional.
Psicología IB HL
579039
Grado 12 solo – 1 año, 1 crédito
Requisito previo: Psicología CA.
Psicología IB SL es un curso de dos años que se enfoca en el estudio sistemático del comportamiento y entendimiento.
El primer año del curso es una mezcla del programa IB básico con la programa de Psicología CA. El segundo año del
curso enfoque exclusivamente en el programa IB, con las siguientes tres perspectivas: biológica, cognoscitiva y de
aprendizaje. También, los estudiantes estudiarán dos áreas psicológicas de profundidad. Como ciencia empírica, la
Psicología incorpora muchas formas de metodología de investigación. Los estudiantes examinarán métodos de
investigaciones cuantitativas, éticas y estadísticas descriptivas, mientras realizan su estudio experimental simple. Se
estudiará un área opcional, determinada por el instructor. Las elecciones opcionales incluyen psicología comparativa,
cultural, de salud, vida, psicodinámica o social.
Geografía IB HL
579199
Grado 12 solo – 1 año, 1 crédito
Requisito previo: Geografía Humana CA.
Geografía IB HL es un curso de dos años. El primer año es una mezcla de la programa IB básico y Geografía Humana CA.
En el segundo año, estudian geografía física y humana y adquieren destrezas de ambos metodologías científicas y socioeconómico. Los estudiantes examinarán temas globales como la pobreza, sostenibilidad, y el cambio climático por el
medio de estudios y ejemplos. Los estudiantes desarrollaran un entendimiento de las interrelaciones de gente, lugares,
espacios y el ambiente. Este curso explora los tres siguientes temas opcionales: 1) el ocio, el deporte y el turismo, 2)
ambientes extremos, 3) la geografía de comida y salud. Como parte de su evaluación IB, los estudiantes conducirán
trabajo del campo concluyendo en un reporte de una pregunta, colecta de data y análisis con evaluación.
Negocios y Administración IB HL
Primer año: 592209
Grados 11, 12 – 2 años, 2 créditos
Segundo año: 592200
Negocios y Administración IB es un curso de 2 años que prepara a los estudiantes para que desarrollen un entendimiento
de la teoría de los negocios, así como su habilidad para aplicar principios, prácticas y destrezas de negocios. El curso
considera los diversos grados de las organizaciones y actividades de los negocios y el contexto cultural y económico en el
cual operan los negocios. El énfasis está colocado en la toma de decisiones estratégicas y en las funciones diarias de los
negocios en mercadotecnia, producción, administración de recursos humanos, finanzas. El curso de negocios y
119
administración tiene como objetivo ayudar a los estudiantes a entender las implicaciones de las actividades de los negocios
en un mercado global. Está diseñado para dar a los estudiantes una perspectiva internacional de negocios y promover su
apreciación cultural. Para recibir crédito, los estudiantes deben tomar el examen IB en mayo de su año de senior (12º
grado).
Grupo 4: Ciencias Experimentales
Biología IB SL – 1
592039
Grado 11 o 12 - 1 año, 1 crédito
Requisito previo: Los estudiantes son animados a participar en una clase preparatoria de dos semanas ofrecido en el
verano.
Biología IB SL es un curso de laboratorio intensivo y está diseñado para preparar a los estudiantes para tomar el examen
de IB que será administrado en Mayo. El curso proporcionará una vista profunda del mundo biológico. Después de
terminar este curso, los estudiantes tendrán un mejor entendimiento de la complejidad de la vida en la tierra. Los
temas del curso incluyen células, bioquímica, genética, nutrición humana, salud humana y piscología, neurobiología,
compartimiento y evolución. Los laboratorios, el diseño experimental, la lectura/discusión y las estrategias de
aprendizaje cooperativo ayudarán a los estudiantes a entender varios temas.
Química IB SL
521049
Grados 11, 12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Requisito previo: Fuertes antecedentes en matemáticas incluyendo Álgebra 2 es muy recomendable. Los estudiantes
son animados a participar en una clase preparatoria de dos semanas ofrecido en el verano.
Este es un curso pre-universitario riguroso que está diseñado para ayudar a los estudiantes a desarrollar un conocimiento
seguro de un cuerpo limitado de factores y al mismo tiempo una extensa comprensión general de la materia. Los
requisitos IB incluyen un programa básico en química, tres temas opcionales y cuarenta horas de trabajo de laboratorio,
incluyendo un proyecto interdisciplinario. El programa básico incluye estequiometría, teoría atómica, periodicidad,
enlaces, estados de la materia, energética, cinética, equilibrio, ácidos y bases, oxidación y reducción y química
orgánica. Una de las siguientes opciones debe ser estudiada profundamente: bioquímica humana, química ambiental,
química industrial o química nuclear. Los estudiantes serán evaluados por medio de reportes de laboratorio, exámenes
y proyectos interdisciplinarios.
Ciencias de la Computación IB HL
Primer año: 560060
Grados 11, 12 – 2 años, 2 créditos
Segundo año: 560069
Requisitos previos: Álgebra 2, mecanografía y se recomienda mucho que se haya estudiado Introducción a la
Programación Orientada a Objetos.
Este es un curso pre-universitario riguroso de dos años. El primer año es el curso de Ciencias de la Computación CA. Los
estudiantes deben inscribirse en ese curso para que puedan ser elegibles para el segundo año de Ciencias de la
Computación IB HL. Este curso sirve como introducción a las computadoras y al estudio del manejo y procesamiento de
información. El énfasis está en la resolución de problemas de la vida real por medio de la programación de computadoras
(software ingeniería). Los estudiantes aprenderán el lenguaje de programación Java y aplicarán esas destrezas
explorando como trabajan las computadoras. Algunos de los temas cubiertos incluyen técnicas de diseño orientadas a
objetos, manejo de archivos, estructura de datos, clases, objetos, gráficas, depuración, componentes del hardware e
implicaciones sociales. El curso incluye un tratamiento profundo del Caso de Estudio de Simulación CA. Durante el
segundo año, los estudiantes desarrollarán un programa dossier por una cliente.
Grupo 5: Matemáticas y Ciencias de la Computación
Matemáticas IB SL
539079
Grados: 11 o 12 - 1 año, 1 crédito
Requisito previo: Pre-Cálculo.
Matemáticas IB SL es un curso por un ano. Para realizar exitosamente la evaluación externa de IB de este curso, se
requiere conocimiento en los siguientes temas: algebra, funciones, ecuaciones, funciones circulares y trigonometría,
matrices, vectores, estadística, probabilidad y cálculo. La calculadora de gráficas (TI-84) se usará extensa y
continuamente durante el año. Se cubrirá el programa de IB para la preparación del examen de IB presentado en Mayo.
120
Estudios Matemáticos IB SL
539069
Grados: 11 o 12 - 1 año, 1 crédito
Requisito previo: Algebra II.
Este es un curso por un año que cubre los siguientes siete temas: 1) números y algebra, 2) funciones, 3) estadísticas
descriptivas, 4) estadísticas prácticas, 5) conjuntos, lógica y probabilidad 6) geometría y trigonometría, 7) introducción
al cálculo diferencial. El programa de IB para este curso se seguirá en orden para preparar eficazmente al estudiante
para el examen de evaluación externa de Estudios Matemáticos IB SL, que será administrado durante la primavera.
Mientras se preparan para la evaluación externa, los estudiantes utilizarán unidades SI (Sistema Internacional) de
longitud, masa, tiempo y sus unidades derivadas. Adicionalmente, cada estudiante creará un proyecto de investigación
que incluye la colección de información o la generación de medidas y el análisis y evaluación de esa información y
medidas.
Grupo 6: Artes
Teatro Artes IB SL
559819
Grados: 11 o 12 - 1 año, 1 crédito
Requisito previo: Ninguno.
El propósito de este curso de un año es exponer a los estudiantes las selecciones múltiples de la literatura del mundo
dramático, desempeño en el escenario, dirección, diseño, movimiento en el escenario, análisis de obras y de una
variedad de prácticas teatrales y teorías de interpretación. Como siempre, se seguirá el programa de IB para este curso.
Varios de los papeles y proyectos de los estudiantes serán calificados por el instructor del salón de clase y por los
asesores de Bachillerato Internacional.
Artes Visuales IB SL
559829
Grados 11 o 12 – 1 año, 1 crédito
Requisito previo: Presentación de una Carpeta de Arte para ser revisada por el maestro de Arte de IB.
La clase de Artes Visuales IB SL está conformada por dos componentes, el trabajo de estudio que constituye el 60 % del
curso y un libro de trabajo que constituye el 40%.
En trabajo de estudio, el estudiante:







Sintetizará los conceptos y destrezas de arte en trabajos personales, socioculturales y estéticamente significativos.
Demostrará el propósito real de la exploración con enfoque en la indagación de una variedad de fenómenos visuales.
Resolverá problemas formales y técnicos encontrados en el estudio práctico.
Exhibirá destrezas técnicas y el uso apropiado de los medios de comunicación.
Producirá trabajos de arte con imaginación y creatividad.
En el libro de trabajo investigativo, el estudiante:
Demostrará claramente en términos visuales y escritos como la investigación personal ha conducido al
entendimiento de temas o conceptos siendo investigados.
Analizará críticamente el significado de cualidades estéticas de formas de arte usando un vocabulario informado.
Mostrará algo de conocimiento en temas culturales, históricos y sociales en más de un contexto cultural.
Examinará las cualidades visuales y funcionales del arte propia y de otras culturas en cuanto a sentido y relevancia.



IB evalúa a los estudiantes a través de la revisión de artículos seleccionados del libro de trabajo investigativo del
estudiante y a través de la exhibición que será evaluada por un examinador de artes visuales visitante, seguida de una
entrevista al estudiante referente a su trabajo.
Centro del Hexágono: Teoría del Conocimiento
Teoría del Conocimiento IB
11º: 596209
Grados: 11 y 12 - (segundo semestre) 11, (primer semestre) 12
Requisito previo: Solo por solicitud.
12º: 596209
Teoría del conocimiento, complemento del programa de IB, proporciona una conexión con el estudiante para
sintetizar la aproximación al entendimiento obtenida en el curso de estudio de IB. Este curso formula preguntas
acerca de la naturaleza y los orígenes del conocimiento, así hacen búsquedas interdisciplinarias entendiendo cómo la
persona aprende y finalmente, sabe. Los estudiantes buscan una variedad de lecturas para ser examinadas en un
Seminario Socrático estableciendo una combinación en literatura, historia, ciencia, matemáticas, bellas artes,
psicología y filosofía, entre otras.
121
NorthWest Arkansas Community College
(Colegio Comunitario del Noroeste de Arkansas)
CURSOS ARTICULADOS
Los estudiantes deben tener una A o B en el curso, inscribirse en NWACC dentro de los siguientes 12 meses a su
graduación y llenar la solicitud correspondiente para crédito en NWACC. NWACC otorgará crédito universitario gratuito
a los estudiantes que reúnan los requisitos.
Preparatorias Springdale y Har-Ber
Descripción del Curso en NWACC
Número de Curso en NWACC Horas de Crédito
Orientación del Cuidado Infantil y Administración de Servicios
Desarrollo del Niño y Educación para Padres
Terminología Médica
Aplicaciones a la Computadora I – III
Aplicaciones a la Computadora I – II
Aplicaciones a la Computadora I
Hoja de Cálculo Avanzada
Administración Empresarial I – II
Solo Preparatoria Springdale
Nutrición y Bienestar
Ciencias de la Computación A CA
Ciencias de la Computación IB HL
Ciencias de la Computación Col. Pre-Avanz. – Alice
Base de Datos Avanzada
Tecnologías Web
Fundamentos y Teorías en la Educación para la
Temprana Infancia
CHED 1103
3
Crecimiento y Desarrollo Infantil
CHED 2033
3
Terminología Médica
AHSC 1001
1
Introducción a Sistemas Computacionales de
Información
CISQ 1103
3
Información de Procesamiento de Palabras
CISM 1603
3
Computación Básica
CISM 1103
3
Análisis de Hoja de Cálculo
CISM 1503
3
Introducción a los Negocios
MGMT 1003
3
Nutrición y Salud
HLSA 2103
3
Programación JAVA
PROG 1403
3
Conceptos de Programación Avanzada
PROG 2803
3
Introducción a la Programación Lógica
PROG 1003
3
Administración de Base de Datos
CISM 1403
3
Diseño de Página Web
CISM 2123
3
Photoshop
CSIM 1223
3
Solo Preparatoria Har-Ber
122
Programación I-II: Visual Básica
Programación Visual Basic
PROG 1103
3
Cursos ECE por Internet
Experiencia Universitaria Temprana se esfuerza por proporcionar el acceso a la educación superior a la diversa población
estudiantil. Además de los cursos universitarios enseñados o en las instalaciones a través de Video Interactivo
Comprimido (CIV), ECE ofrece cursos por Internet. Los siguientes cursos serán ofrecidos durante el año académico 20122013.
Los estudiantes deben tener un GPA acumulativo de 3.0 y una de las siguientes puntuaciones mínimas: 19 en Lectura en
ACT; 82 en Lectura en Compass; 480 en Razonamiento Analítico en SAT; 48 en Razonamiento Analítico en PSAT; 15 en
Lectura en PLAN o 14 en Lectura en EXPLORE.
Otoño
Apreciación del Arte (3 créditos)
Fundamentos de Comunicación (3 créditos)
Historia de la Población Americana de 1877 (3 créditos)
Introducción a la Hospitalidad (3 créditos)
Terminología Médica (1 crédito)
Conceptos de Bienestar (2 créditos)
Primavera
Historia de la Población Americana de 1877 al presente (3 créditos)
Mercadotecnia de la Hospitalidad (3 créditos)
Introducción a la Seguridad y la Salud Ocupacional (3 créditos)
Psicología General (3 créditos)
Nutrición y Salud (3 créditos)
Para información acerca de la inscripción, consulten la página de Internet de NWACC.
Cursos Requeridos por el Departamento de Educación Superior de
Arkansas para un Título Universitario
Todos los estudiantes deben tomar las siguientes clases obligatorias sin importar su área de especialización.
6
3
8
3
6
6
horas
horas
horas
horas
horas
horas
de inglés –Composición I y II
de matemáticas –Álgebra Colegial (más si lo requiere su área de especialización)
de ciencias – (La licenciatura requiere 12 horas)
de historia de Estados Unidos o Gobierno
adicionales de Ciencias Sociales
de Bellas Artes
Si tienen preguntas sobre el programa de inscripción simultánea, por favor llamen a la Oficina de Consejería.
Clases Simultáneas
Las clases simultáneas ofrecen la oportunidad a los estudiantes de terminar algunas de las clases universitarias
obligatorias mientras están en la preparatoria. Antes de inscribirse en una clase simultánea, los estudiantes deben
verificar las clases obligatorias de la universidad que van a elegir. También deben verificar las clases obligatorias para
123
la carrera que planean estudiar.
Requisitos para Admisión
Se requiere llenar y firmar una solicitud para el programa de inscripción simultánea a la hora de registrarse.
Una constancia de estudios actualizada que muestre un promedio de 3.0 o más alto.
Se requieren las calificaciones del EXPLORE, PLAN, ACT, SAT, o COMPASS antes de registrarse. Las calificaciones varían
dependiendo de la clase.
Condiciones de Admisión
Se requiere que los estudiantes del programa de inscripción simultánea mantengan una C o mejor calificación en cada
curso tomado para poder continuar inscritos en NWACC.
Los estudiantes deben entregar solicitudes para la inscripción simultánea antes de cada semestre de inscripción
simultánea.
Beneficios
Reciben crédito universitario en la mayoría de las universidades.
Reciben una unidad de crédito en el curso de la preparatoria por cada clase semestral de la universidad.
Cuesta la mitad de una clase regular en la universidad.
Desarrollan las destrezas necesarias para estudios universitarios.
Clases más pequeñas y más atención individualizada en comparación con las clases en el campus universitario.
Inglés
Composición en Inglés I y II
519900/519905
12 - 1 año, 1 crédito
Se tienen que comprar los libros.
El costo es la mitad de lo que cuesta una hora de crédito en NWACC.
Composición en Inglés I
ENGL 1013
12 – 1 semestre, 1 crédito
Requisito previo: Promedio acumulativo de 3.0 y una calificación de 19 en escritura en ACT (75 en COMPASS).
(3 créditos universitarios)
Este curso enfatiza en la escritura de prosa académica clara, concisa y desarrollada. Se espera que los estudiantes sigan
los Estándares Editados de Inglés para entender el desarrollo del párrafo y para escribir una tarea de investigación
envolviendo la integración de las fuentes.
Composición en Inglés II
ENGL 1023
12 - 1 semestre, 1 crédito
Requisito previo: Terminación de Composición en Inglés I con una C o mejor calificación.
(3 créditos universitarios)
En este curso, los estudiantes usan el proceso de escritura introducido en Composición en Inglés I y la literatura como
materia académica para análisis, interpretación, evaluación crítica e investigación. (3 créditos universitarios.)
Matemáticas
Álgebra Universitaria se imparte el primer semestre y Trigonometría Universitarias el segundo semestre.
Requisito previo para todas las clases de matemáticas: Los estudiantes deben tener un promedio de 3.0 y 21 o mejor
calificación en el ACT o 500 o mejor calificación en el SAT, 65 o mejor calificación en el COMPASS o 21 en PLAN Y pasar
Álgebra II con C o mejor calificación. También, los estudiantes deben tener una calificación en leer 19 o mejor en el
ACT o 83 en el COMPASS.
Costo: El costo de la colegiatura es la mitad del costo en NWACC.
Álgebra Universitaria
539900
12 – 1 semestre, 1 crédito
Requisito previo: Promedio general de calificaciones acumulativo de 3.0 y resultados del examen convenientes para la
124
colocación. (4 unidades universitarias)
**Los estudiantes requieren comprar una calculadora de gráficas (TI-83 o TI-84), libros de texto y pagar la colegiatura.
Una visión general de los conceptos fundamentales del álgebra. Los temas de la clase incluyen, ecuaciones lineales y
cuadráticas, desigualdades, el plano Cartesiano y gráficas para funciones de utilidad, gráficas y modelos, funciones poli
nominales y racionales, funciones de exponentes y logaritmos, sistemas de ecuaciones, desigualdades y matrices,
secuencias y series.
Trigonometría Universitaria
539907
12 – 1 semestre, 1 crédito
(3 créditos universitarios)
Requisito Previo: Algebra Universitaria o 24 en la sección de matemáticas del ACT.
Se requiere una calculadora de gráficas para este curso.
Trigonometría Universitaria es un estudio de conceptos trigonométricos básicos. Esta clase es requerida para los
estudiantes que tomarán Cálculo I y o Física Universitaria. Está diseñada para transferir 3 horas crédito de Trigonometría
Plana.
Carreras y Cursos Técnicos
Los cursos técnicos y para carreras se ofrecen en varias localidades en el Noroeste de Arkansas. Los estudiantes son
responsables de su transportación a estas clases. No hay costo de colegiatura para los estudiantes.
Asistencia Dental
L-V de 2:15 – 3:45pm
Asistencia Dental es un programa de un año ofrecido en el Centro Regional Tecnológico en Fayetteville. Los estudiantes
que terminen este programa, obtienen 9 créditos en NWACC, los cuales cuentan para las 36 horas necesarias para
obtener la certificación de Asistencia Dental en NWACC.
Prácticas de Clínica Médica/Especialización/Dental I
Semestre de Otoño
Requisito previo: Aceptación en el programa por medio de solicitud y entrevista con el instructor.
Este curso repasa anatomía y fisiología, con un estudio comprensivo de la cabeza y el cuello. Los estudiantes
comprenderán que las interrelaciones morfológicas y funcionales de las estructuras anatómicas son vitales para aplicar
lógicamente soluciones a problemas clínicos. Este curso está diseñado para dar a los estudiantes información en
morfología dental, histología oral, embriología oral y estructuras anatómicas dentales; así como, la relación funcional
de los dientes en la dentición.
Prácticas de Clínica Médica/Especialización/Dental II
Semestre de Primavera
Una introducción a la terminología dental básica, equipo dental, instrumentos, procesos para el control de infecciones
y procedimientos asociados con la oficina dental. Los estudiantes aprenden el proceso de la técnica a cuatro manos por
medio de demostraciones y práctica. El estudio de terapéutica incluye una breve historia de las medicinas, métodos de
administración, efecto de las medicinas y medicinas comúnmente utilizadas en el tratamiento de lesiones orales,
ansiedad y control de pánico. Este curso también hace hincapié en la filosofía de la odontología preventiva incluyendo
una discusión exhaustiva de la formación de placa, higiene oral, dieta y nutrición, líquido tópico y sistemático.
Profesiones Médicas
L-V de 7:30-9:00 am
Los cursos de profesiones médicas son ofrecidos en NWACC en Bentonville. Los estudiantes obtienen 3 créditos
universitarios para CNA y 3 créditos universitarios para PCA+. Ambos cursos cuentan para las 36 horas necesarias para
obtener la certificación de Asistente de Enfermería en NWACC. Los estudiantes deben tener lo siguiente antes de
comenzar las clases: revisión de registro criminal, examen de la tuberculosis y examen de drogas. El costo total de los
tres es aproximadamente $180.
125
Asistente de Enfermería Certificado (CNA)
Semestre de Otoño
Requisito previo: Introducción a Profesiones Médicas, Terminología Médica y Anatomía y Fisiología Humana.
El Programa de Asistente de Enfermería Certificado está diseñado para satisfacer la demanda de Asistentes de
Enfermería Certificados. Este curso les proporciona a los estudiantes la introducción al cuidado de la salud, instrucción
didáctica, destrezas prácticas y entrenamiento clínico. Específicamente, las destrezas básicas de enfermería cubren
signos vitales, destrezas de cuidado personal, Alzheimer y demencia. Este curso prepara satisfactoriamente al estudiante
para presentar el Examen para Asistente de Enfermería Certificado en Arkansas. Los estudiantes que terminen este
curso satisfactoriamente, recibirán 3 horas de crédito para NWACC.
Cuidado del Paciente Plus (PCA+)
Semestre de Primavera
Requisito previo: Terminación satisfactoria del curso de CNA.
El Programa para obtener el certificado de PCA+ está diseñado para satisfacer la demanda de Asistentes de Enfermería
Certificados y entrenados en técnicas avanzadas en el cuidado del paciente y que posean conocimiento, destrezas y
habilidades para sobresalir como miembros vitales del equipo para el cuidado de la salud. Este curso expande el
conocimiento del estudiante en el cuidado de la salud e introduce destrezas avanzadas para el cuidado del paciente a
través de prácticas y entrenamiento clínico en hospitales del área. Los estudiantes que terminan el curso
satisfactoriamente recibirán 3 horas de crédito para NWACC.
126
127

Documentos relacionados