course book for incoming students

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course book for incoming students
University of Applied Sciences Worms
International Center
University of Applied Sciences Worms I Erenburger Str. 19 I 67549 Worms I Germany
Version Winter Semester 2013/14
1. The diversity of incomings students enhances the educational environment for all
students here on campus and they are real enrichment for the lectures and social life.
2. The incoming students are interested in integrating themselves in the university and
social life here in Worms in order to make their semester abroad here an unique and
life-changing experience.
3. The incoming students are ambassadors for their home university and their country –
here at the university but also in the city of Worms. They respect the property of
others and they take care about their accommodations that the next students are
able to enjoy the same quality like they did.
4. As we are a small university, we are pleased to offer most of the lectures in small
groups. Most of these lectures live from an active participation by the students.
Furthermore, the attendance and participation in classes are important for the final
grade. The incoming students are aware of that and emphasise the regular
attendance and participation in class. If they can not attend a class, they inform their
lecturer in advance.
5. The international students are among the most serious attending our university, and
their academic and personal accomplishments are source of pride to them as
individuals as well as to the institution as a whole. They show the same eagerness in
studying like the regular students especially when they work together as a team to
prepare a common output. They stick to deadlines set by the lecturer or by the
International Center.
6. Any dishonesty related to academic work or records constitutes academic
misconduct including, but not limited to, activities such as giving or receiving
unauthorized aid in exams/cases/assignments improperly obtaining a copy of an
exam/case/assignment, plagiarism, misrepresentation of information, etc. Penalties
range from loss of credit for a particular assignment to failing grade in the entire
course.
We as the International Center do everything we could to support you during your
semester abroad here. If you have any problems please come to us in time and we try to
find a solution together with you.
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1. Read closely this course book and choose your courses
2. Avoid overlapping in your course choice
Class attendance is important, therefore please keep in mind to avoid OVERLAPPING in
your course choice, which are possible as you can choose courses of different faculties and
different courses of studies (s. overview p. 6).
Overlapping with the courses IC-1, IC-2, IC-3, IC-5 and IC-6 are no problem as these are
blocked courses with foreign guest lecturer, who come especially for this course to
Germany. Therefore, possible overlapping with regular courses are in this case not
avoidable.
Please take care by yourself by checking the LSF-system (instructions s. page 8ff. and in our
mandatory info meeting 25th September), that your individual course choice works without
overlapping!
You get your RZ-Account (computer center online account) and your student ID card as soon
as you hand in all necessary documents for enrolment at our University (after your arrival in
Worms). This will be the case on 24th September. However, you can already check your
course choice regarding overlapping in LSF without logging in with the RZ account. The only
difference is that you can not save your personal schedule. This is only possible when you
are logged in with your RZ account.
3. Course choice list
Fill out your course choice list and sign it (see p. 7 & handout) – deadline for handing in the
course choice list in the International Center is Friday 27th September 2013 till 12am
(office M 105). You have time to change courses till 11th October 2013 12am (M 105).
We administer your course list in our office, if you need to make changes please come to our
office and update your course choice list. As this list is the basis for the course- and exam
enrolment and for preparing your transcript of records, it has to be always up-to-date!!!
4. Course registration
We enrol you for each of your selected courses (maximum of 30 Credits Points (ECTS) per
semester excl. language courses). You do not have to register for courses in the LSF system
by yourself, because this is technically not possible for you as an exchange student!
5. Course changes
If you need to change courses after the lecture start on 30th September, you have to ask
the lecturer if a later joining of his or her course is possible! If it is possible, please come
directly to our office (M 105) and update your course list, otherwise we are not able to
prepare your transcript of records. Please do not forget to ask your home university
concerning the recognition/acceptance of these courses ( Learning Agreement).
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6. Deadlines
The deadline to decide if you take part in the exams of each course will be
Friday 29th November 2013 12am. Between 11th October 2013 and 29th November 2013
12am you can drop a course with the grade "w" for withdraw, which will be listed in your
transcript of records. After the 29th November a default of appearance at an exam leads
directly to the grade 5,0 (failed).
The International Center, will register you for each exam in each study program! You do not
have to register in the LSF system by yourself, because this is technically not possible for you
as an exchange student.
7. Language Courses
We offer several language courses, which are of course free of charge. We recommend the
enrolment in a GERMAN LANGUAGE COURSE, depending on your personal level, in order to
promote the integration and the experience you can make during your semester abroad
here. Furthermore, you can increase your own multilingualism. We offer these courses on
every language level and of course at no additional charge. Therefore, take the chance and
learn or improve German as a foreign language.
8. Important things to know in general
Please keep in mind that you need for the Master level courses (graduate courses, shortcut:
M.A.) a higher qualification level in order to be able to follow the lecture and to complete
the course successfully! Therefore, you have to have at least 120 Credit Points (ECTS)
finished at your home university as well as knowledge in this specific topic.
Please do not buy any books listed in the course descriptions below before the lecture starts
(lecturer tells you if it is necessary) – unless it is explicitly written in the course description!
Please double check the lecture details (date, time and rooms) daily as those might be
subject to change.
4
A) Please inform yourself frequently in the LSF campus intranet system about the exact
time, rooms and about possible changes in the exam schedule.
B) Please arrive to the exam room at least 15 minutes before the scheduled start of the
exam.
C) Please have your student card with you for identification (put it in a clearly visible place
on your table).
D) Before the exam starts, please take all the things you need for the exam (pens, calculator
(if allowed), something to drink, etc.) out of your bag and put your bag and your jacket in the
front or in the back of the room. You are not allowed to keep these things at your table.
E) You are not allowed to use a pencil (except the lecturer explicitly says so).
F) If you are ill on an exam day, you have to submit a medical certificate or signed letter
from a doctor that certifies your illness on this day within three days after the exam. If you
fail to submit proof of illness, you will fail the exam (exam mark of 5.0).
G) When completing the field labelled "Studiengang" (= Study program) on your exam,
please enter “Exchange Student”.
H) If you need to use the restroom during an exam, please note that you have to inform the
supervising person in charge.
I) Cellphones are not allowed during an exam. Please leave your cellphone in your bag and
mute it. If you need to know the time, please bring a watch or ask the supervision person in
charge.
J) Please make sure, that you sign the list of participants during the exam. If your name is
not on the list, please add it and sign.
5
Matriculation
Number
6
7
8
Switch
language
User-ID
RZ-Account
Password
9
Here you can find your courses, if you can’t find a certain lecture by title,
try it via “teacher” (= lecturer). Furthermore, you can refine your search if you select a certain
“Department” (= faculty/course of studies):
IC = International Relations Office (IRO)
IM = drop down “Wirtschaftswissenschaften” select “International Management”
IBA = drop down “Wirtschaftswissenschaften” select “Internationale
Betriebswirtschaft und Außenwirtschaft”
T = Touristik/Verkehrswesen
Or if accessible you can search for lectures by the “Number of the lecture”.
Here you can check the daily schedule for rooms - please check this every day!
Here you can find changes and cancellations - please check this
every day!
10
Tick mark “preselect” and press “Schedule preselected”
11
If you changed something in your personal schedule, press “save schedule” in order to save every
change for your next login! If you added all of your chosen courses you see your personal schedule
for the entire semester – by using the drop-down menue “view options” you can select a certain
week. Possible overlapping will be marked red.
12
https://moodle.fh-worms.de/moodle/
Some of the courses in moodle might be password-protected – please ask your lecturer for the
password.
Switch language
Login
Contains
courses
for you
13
International Management (IM) & Distribution Management (HM)
International Management (IM) & Handelsmanagement (HM)
Ms. Susanna Ripp
Office: N 114
Tel:
06241-509 234
E-mail: [email protected]
International Business Administration and Foreign Trade (IBA)
Internationale Betriebswirtschaft und Außenwirtschaft (IBA)
Ms. Christin Voyé
Office: N 231
Tel:
06241-509 479
E-mail: [email protected]
Tourism and Travel Management
Touristik/Verkehrswesen
Ms. Pia Orth-Reich
Office: K 14
Tel:
06241-509 117
E-mail: [email protected]
Mr. Jürgen Kaiser
Office: K 14
Tel:
06241-509 120
E-mail: [email protected]
International Language Office (ILO)
Ms. Céline Maser
Office: M 106
Tel:
06241-509 292
E-mail: [email protected]
International Center (IC)
Ms. Martina Brodhäcker
Office: M 105
Tel:
06241-509 166
E-mail: [email protected]
14
International Center (IC)
IC-1
IC-2
IC-3
IC-4
IC-5
IC-6
Business Strategy and Controlling in International Business
Introduction to International Accounting
Advertising and IBP
European Studies
Intercultural Management - The Arab World
Consumer Behavior
4
Costs $42.95
4
4
Book
2
4
4
Book
International Management (IM)
IM-1.2
IM-3.2
IM-6.3
IM-7.1
IM-7.2
IM-10.1
IM-10.3
IM-11.1
IM-11.2
IM-22.4
IM-1.1 (M.A.)
IM-1.3.1 (M.A.)
IM-1.3.2 (M.A.)
IM-1.3.3 (M.A.)
IM-2.3.1.1 (M.A.)
IM-2.3.1.2 (M.A.)
IM-2.3.2.1 (M.A.)
Strategy
Basics of International Economics
Spanish (Beginner Course)
Organization
Leadership Development
Business Communication
Research and Study Skills
French 2
Spanish 2
Intercultural Challenge 1
Strategic Planning
Crafting Strategy
Organizational Learning
Dynamic Strategy & Strategic Renewal
Retail Strategy
Managing Corporate Distress
Strategic Sourcing & Retail Procurement
3
3
2
2
Ltd.
3
4
3
5
5
6
6
Adv. Level + Ltd.
3
Adv. Level + Ltd.
3
Adv. Level + Ltd.
3
Adv. Level + Ltd.
4
Adv. Level + Ltd.
5
Adv. Level + Ltd.
4
Adv. Level + Ltd.
International Business Administration and Foreign Trade (IBA)
IBA-10.1
IBA-23.1
IBA-23.2
IBA-23.3
IBA-23.4
IBA-35.1
IBA-35.2
IBA-12.1
IBA-13.1
IBA-14.1
IBA-15.1
IBA-16.1
IBA-20.1
IBA-21.1
IBA-22.1
Microeconomics
Intercultural Management Asia
Intercultural Management East Europe
Intercultural Management Iberoamerica
Intercultural Management Middle East & Arab World
International Entrepreneurship
Innovation Management
Business English 1 Basic Business Terminology
Business English 2 Advanced Business English in Use
Business English 3 Presentations
Business English 4 International Business Studies
Business English 5 Intercultural Studies Europe &
Anglophone World
Business Spanish 4
Business Spanish 5
Business Spanish 6
2,5
Ltd.
2
2
2
2
5
2,5
3,75
Ltd.
3,75
Ltd.
3,75
Ltd.
5
Ltd.
2,5
Ltd.
5
Ltd.
2,5
Ltd.
2,5
Ltd.
15
IBA-1.1 (M.A.)
IBA-2.1 (M.A.)
IBA-3.1 (M.A.)
IBA-5.1 (M.A.)
IBA-5.2 (M.A.)
IBA-6.1 (M.A.)
IBA-7.1 (M.A.)
IBA-7.2 (M.A.)
IBA-8.1 (M.A.)
IBA-9.1 (M.A.)
IBA-10.1 (M.A.)
IBA-11.1 (M.A.)
IBA-12.1 (M.A.)
IBA-14.1 (M.A.)
IBA-15.1 (M.A.)
Strategies of Internationalization
Selected Problems of International Trade
International Economics
International Project Management
Business Ethics & Corporate Compliance
Advanced Human Resource & Organisation Management
International Marketing Management
Customer Relationship Management
E-Commerce
International Logistics & Transportation Management
International Entrepreneurship
Intellectual Property Management
Foreign Trade Consulting
International Finance, Advanced Corporate Finance
& Value Investing
Advanced International Controlling
International Business Cases
T-BAA 202
T-BAA 203
T-BAA 221
T-BAA 222
T-BAA 401
T-BAA 402
T-BAA 412
T-121
T-131
T-141
T-151
Statistics
Research Methods and Presentation Skills
Accountancy and Financial Reports
Marketing and Sales Management
Airport Management
Air Cargo and Logistics Management
Pricing and Revenue Management
English for tourism professionals I
Business English I
English for tourism professionals II
Business English II
IBA-13.1 (M.A.)
1
Guest Speakers
4
Adv. Level + Ltd.
4
Adv. Level + Ltd.
2
Adv. Level + Ltd.
2
Adv. Level
6
Adv. Level
3
Adv. Level + Ltd.
3
Adv. Level + Ltd.
6
Adv. Level + Ltd.
6
Adv. Level + Ltd.
6
Adv. Level + Ltd.
6
Adv. Level + Ltd.
6
Adv. Level + Ltd.
6
Adv. Level + Ltd.
6
Adv. Level + Ltd.
4
Adv. Level + Ltd.
Tourism & Travel Management
3
3
6
6
5
5
5
2
2
2
2
Business Foreign Languages (ILO)
ILO-1
ILO-2
ILO-3
ILO-4
ILO-5
ILO-6
ILO-7
ILO-9
ILO-10
ILO-11
ILO-12
ILO-13
ILO-14
ILO-15
ILO-16
ILO-17
ILO-18
ILO-19
Business English I
Business English II
Mandarin Chinese I
Mandarin Chinese II
Mandarin Chinese III
Mandarin Chinese IV
Mandarin Chinese V
Russian I
Russian II
Russian III
Russian IV
Russian V
Russian VI
Arabic I
Arabic II
Arabic III
Arabic IV
Arabic V
4,5
4,5
6
6
6
6
3
6
6
6
6
3
3
6
6
6
6
3
16
German as a foreign language (ILO)
ILO-21
ILO-22
ILO-23
ILO-24
ILO-25
DaF A1 Incomings (German A1-level)
DaF A2 Incomings (German A2-level)
DaF III (A2/B1) (German B1-level)
DaF IV (B1/B2) (German B2-level)
DaF V (B2/C1) (German C1-level)
6
6
6
6
6
To enrol for courses with course language German you need
at least language level B1/B2 in German
International Management (IM) / Handelsmanagement (HM)
IM
Deutschsprachige Kurse in den Studiengängen IM/HM
 bitte Rücksprache mit Martina Brodhäcker
Internationale Betriebswirtschaft und Außenwirtschaft (IBA)
IBA
Deutschsprachige Kurse im Studiengang IBA
 bitte Rücksprache mit Martina Brodhäcker
Tourism and Travel Management
T
Deutschsprachige Kurse im Fachbereich Touristik
 bitte Rücksprache mit Martina Brodhäcker
17
Course Code
Course title
IC-1
Business Strategy and Controlling in International
Business
Course title in LSF
Business Strategy and Controlling in International
Business
Entrance requirements
None
Name of lecturer
N.N.
Info
International Center
Questions concerning content
Martina Brodhäcker
e-Mail: [email protected]
Teaching language
English
4 CP
Number of allocated ECTS points
Type of test/requirements for allocation of Your course grade will be based on the following
credit points
components:
Team performance on Glo-Bus simulation: 40%
Exam 1 on selected chapters: 25%
Exam 2 on selected chapters: 25%
Participation in simulation: 10%
TOTAL: 100%
Qualification goals of course
Due to the fact that participation in the simulation is
critical to your company’s success, your participation
as evaluated by the members of your team counts
10% of your grade.
To develop your capacity to think strategically about a
company, its business position, and how it can gain
sustainable competitive advantage.
To give hands-on experience individually and in
group settings in crafting business strategy,
reasoning carefully about strategic options, using
what-if analysis to evaluate action alternatives, and
initiating the changes necessary to keep the strategy
responsive to newly emerging market conditions.
Content of course
To develop your powers of managerial judgment, help
you learn how to assess business risk, and provide
you with a stronger understanding of the competitive
challenges of a global market environment.
Business Strategy and Controlling in International
Business is an integrative problem-solving course
focusing on top management and the total
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organization and requiring students to address issues
related to strategy formulation and control in a global
economy. The course utilizes an Internet-based
business simulation that requires students to make
coordinated decisions across functional areas
(production, marketing, and finance), craft a
company-wide strategy, and be responsible for
bottom-line performance. Playing the business
simulation will give students immediate hands-on
practice in applying the concepts, making decision
from a company-wide perspective, and evaluating the
tradeoffs between a short-term versus long-term
performance.
The theme of the course is that a company achieves
sustained success if and only if its managers (1)
formulate an astute "game plan" and (2) implement
and execute the game plan with some proficiency.
The course shall try to "prove" how and why doing a
good job of strategy formulation and strategy
implementation nearly always produces good
business performance.
Teaching and learning methods of course
Special features (e.g. online part,
excursions, guest lectures etc.)
Literature
(set reading/additional recommended
literature)
Remarks
The problems and issues of strategy formulation and
implementation cover the whole spectrum of business
and management. Strategic management requires
dealing with many variables and situational factors at
once. Weighing the pros and cons of strategy entails
a total enterprise perspective and a talent for judging
just how all of the relevant factors add up to shape
what actions need to be taken.
Lecture and Glo-Bus simulation
Online course, no lectures in Worms
PDFs of chapters 1-5 from Essentials of Strategic
Management, 3e, John E. Gamble and Arthur A.
Thompson, Jr. – no fee required (if you enrol for this
course you can get the printouts in M-105)
Library FH Worms: Signature O 70735
Glo-Bus, 2013 Edition (www.glo-bus.com) by Arthur
A. Thompson, Jr., Gregory J. Stappenbeck, and Mark
A. Reidenbach, McGraw-Hill – Cost $42.95 per
student
Number of students limited! Online course – no
lectures in Worms!
Costs for Glo-Bus 2013 Edition: $ 42.95 per
student! Payable via credit card! Payment in cash
not possible! As soon as you are enrolled in that
course you receive further information by email.
01.10. - 13.10.: Read Essentials of Strategic
Management, Chapters 1 - 3
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14.10.: Exam 1 (time & room to be announced)
15.10. - 28.10.: Read Essentials of Strategic
Management, Chapter 4 - 5
29.10.: Exam 2 (time & room to be announced)
30.10. - 03.11.: Read Glo-Bus Participants Guide
10.11. 6 pm: Practice Year 6 Decision 1 due/Glo-Bus
Quiz 1 available after 18:05 for one week.
17.11. 6 pm: Actual Decision 1 – Year 6 due/Glo-Bus
Quiz 1 due today at 18:00.
18.11. 6 pm: End of Practice Period (Data reset to
Year 6 at 18:00 and practice results are no longer
available)
24.11. 6 pm: Decision 2 – Year 7
01.12. 6 pm: Decision 3 – Year 8
08.12. 6 pm: Decision 4 – Year 9
15.12. 6 pm: Decision 5 – Year 10
22.12. 6 pm: Decision 6 – Year 11
05.01. 6 pm: Decision 7 – Year 12
12.01. 6 pm: Decision 8 – Year 13
17.01. 6 pm: Decision 9 – Year 14
24.01. 6 pm: Decision 10 – Year 15
Beginning 01.10.: students should read Chapters 15 and the Glo-Bus Participant’s Guide in preparation
for the Year 6 Practice decision.
GLO-BUS is a global simulation where the focus is
on competitive strategy. GLO-BUS is a completely
online exercise where teams of students run a digital
camera company in head-to-head competition against
companies run by other class members. Company
operations parallel those of actual digital camera
companies. Just as in the real-world, companies
compete in a global market arena, selling digital
cameras in four geographic regions – Europe-Africa,
North America, Asia-Pacific, and Latin America.
Company co-managers must make decisions relating
to R&D, component usage, camera performance,
product line breadth, production operations, work
force compensation, outsourcing, pricing, sales and
marketing, and finance. The challenge is to craft and
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execute a competitive strategy that results in a
respected brand image, keeps your company in
contention for global market leadership, and produces
good financial performance as measured by earnings
per share, return on investment, stock price
appreciation, and credit rating.
All aspects of GLO-BUS parallel the functioning of the
real-world digital camera market, thus allowing you
and your co-managers to (1) think rationally and
logically in deciding what to do and (2) get valuable
practice in making a variety of different business
decisions under circumstances that mirror real-world
competitive conditions.
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Course Code
Course title
Course title in LSF
Entrance requirements
Name of lecturer
Info
Questions concerning content
Teaching language
Number of allocated ECTS points
Type of test/requirements for
allocation of credit points
IC-2
Introduction to International Accounting
Introduction to International Accounting
None
Prof. Derek Cook
International Center (IC)
Martina Brodhäcker
e-Mail: [email protected]
English
4 CP
Course evaluation:
Assignment:
20%
Participation in class:
10%
Exam
40%
Final paper
30%
Total:
Qualification goals of course
100%
The purpose of this course is to provide students with some
background on international accounting and financial
reporting. It is not a technical accounting course and will be
suitable for non-accounting students, provided that they
have completed an introductory course in financial
accounting and finance and have some familiarity with
corporate financial statements.
For those with limited accounting background, who need a
quick review of the basics of financial accounting, the
following link provides access to some review material.
http://media.wiley.com/product_data/excerpt/73/EHEP0005
/EHEP000573.pdf
This PDF file is also posted on the course website, along
with other reading material and sample financial statements
that will be discussed in the class. Here is the link to my
course website:
http://dcookinternational.pbworks.com/.
You will be given log in information after you register for the
course.


To understand how the move of a company into
international markets affects the accounting
requirements of the firm.
To familiarize students with the differences in
accounting standards and financial reporting from one
country and region to another and to understand the
22
sources of those differences.
To discuss the problems with multiple accounting
standards around the world for global investors and
multinational firms.
 To explore the forces at work to move the world to one
set of international financial reporting standards and to
examine the advantages / disadvantages of such a
move.
 To look at the status of the move from national to
international standards in several countries.
There are three components to this course – overview:

Content of course
November 1 to December 13:
Independent review of articles and videos related to the
course topic, as well as comparison of financial statements
of various international firms. There is one written
assignment to be completed and submitted during this
period:
Assignment (see below) is to be handed in to me at the
beginning of our class at FH Worms on December 16th. It
consists of a set of questions to be answered based on
your review of a list of articles and videos provided, and
any other sources of information that you are able to locate.
December 16th to 20th: In-class lecture time at FH Worms
to review course material followed by a final exam.
16th December 09.00-12.00 o’clock (lecture)
17th December 09.00-12.00 o’clock (lecture)
18th December 09.00-12.00 o’clock (lecture)
20th December 09.00-12.00 o’clock (final exam)
The attendance on all dates is mandatory. Please check
the LSF for the rooms.
December 21st to January 19th: Completion of a final paper
to be submitted by email not later than January 19, 2014.
Details regarding the assignment and final paper:
Assignment (20%) – To be handed in at beginning of
class on December 16th:
1. Accounting involves measuring and then reporting
financial information about a company. How is
international accounting different from domestic
accounting? Hint: Do not just discuss IFRS. Think about
this as if you were an accountant who changed jobs
from a local company to a large international company.
How would your accounting work change? What new
things would you have to deal with as an accountant in
an international company compared to a local
company? (one page)
23
2. There is a movement around the world towards the
establishment of a common set of accounting and
financial reporting standards. Briefly explain the market
forces and historical events that have led to this
widespread view that common global standards are
necessary (one page).
3. How will the move to a common global set of
accounting and financial reporting standards affect
professional accountants currently working in the
accounting field, as well as new people entering the
field of accounting? (one page)
4. Review the article “IFRS: Beyond the Standards” and
discuss the issues reviewed in this article that you think
will be factors in reaching a workable set of global
accounting standards. (one page)
Final Paper (30%) – Due January 19, 2014
Write a short essay (between 4 and 5 pages double spaced
plus a reference page) on the following topic:
Much of the world is moving toward a common set of global
accounting standards. Discuss the benefits of having one
set of accounting and financial reporting standards around
the world, with particular reference to investors and
multinational firms. What are the disadvantages of moving
toward a set of global standards and what barriers need to
be overcome to achieve the goal of standardization?
Please ensure that you include a reference page
summarizing all of your sources of information. I will be
watching closely for plagiarism so it is vital that your essay
reflects your own work and not material copied from other
sources. Proven plagiarism will result in a mark of zero on
the assignment. This assignment is to be submitted to me
by email ([email protected]) not later than midnight on
January 14, 2014.
Teaching and learning methods of
course
Special features (e.g. online part,
excursions, guest lectures etc.)
Literature
(set reading/additional
recommended literature)
Lectures in class
Online course parts
The following articles are posted on my course website:









IFRS Backgrounder (US Perspective)
IFRS Don’t Wave the White Flag
Financial Accounting Goes Global
Tower of Babel
The Human Side of IFRS
Are Global Standards Bad for America
Global Accounting Comes of Age
IFRS: Beyond the Standards
The Advent of the International Financial Reporting
24
Standards: A Catalyst for Changing Global Finance
These videos will also provide useful background as you
think about the assignment:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SgKKcV2Mv3E
(Deloitte – What is IFRS?)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=toUWjtGa_1I
(Global Accounting Rules – interview)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8N9W5ajDd54
(Introduction to IFRS – US perspective)
http://bcove.me/y3y6cdeh
(IFRS – Adopting Global Standards – US perspective)
http://bcove.me/phqy3r18
(IFRS and global accounting standards – US Securities &
Exchange Commission perspective)
http://bcove.me/eznl5im3
(Controller for Ford Motor Company talking about the
benefits of IFRS)
Remarks
Number of students limited!
25
Course Code
Course title
Course title in LSF
Entrance requirements
Name of lecturer
Info
Questions concerning content
Teaching language
Number of allocated ECTS points
Type of test/requirements for
allocation of credit points
IC-3
Advertising & IBP
Advertising and IBP
None
Prof. Dr. Mohan K. Menon
University of South Alabama, Mobile, USA
e-Mail: [email protected]
International Center (IC)
Martina Brodhäcker
e-Mail: [email protected]
English
4 CP
Your learning of the course content and your performance
will be assessed with help of exams and learning activities
(if any). The exam will include multiple choice question and
essay questions (if time permits) based on materials
provided. In order to ace this class, you should have the
motivation to keep up with subject matter by reviewing and
studying class discussion materials. For important details
regarding the exam, please download the “sample exam”
file from the site www.menons.net.
Evaluation Items (the exact book chapters for each exam
will be announced):
Quizzes
Exam 1
Exam 2
Exam 3
Total
100 points
100 points
100 points
100 points
400 points
In order to pass you have to reach at least 50%.
Academic Dishonesty: Any dishonesty related to
academic work or records constitutes academic misconduct
including, but not limited to, activities such as giving or
receiving unauthorized aid in exams/cases/assignments
improperly obtaining a copy of an exam/case/assignment,
plagiarism, misrepresentation of information, etc. Penalties
range from loss of credit for a particular assignment to
failing grade in the entire course.
26
Qualification goals of course
This course is designed to enhance your understanding
and appreciation of the message and media utilized to
communicate with those at the center of all
marketing/business activities – the consumer. It fosters
your understanding of how to communicate and
connect/interact with consumers using both traditional and
digital media. Whether or not you are seeking a career in
marketing/advertising/public relations, knowledge of the
"whys" and "hows" of marketing communication is
paramount to understanding business.
By the end of the term, you should be able to demonstrate:
1. Understanding of the world of advertising and
integrated marketing/brand communications;
2. Understanding of the ethical and regulatory issues
affecting advertising and IMC;
3. Understanding of creative strategies and tactics
utilized in the area;
4. Understanding of the use of both traditional and
newer media to interact with customers
Content of course
Class discussion schedule: Visit www.menons.net for
details. Some of these topics might be discussed in person
when I visit Worms during the winter. Details of the trip and
in-class discussions will be provided later.
Learning Philosophy and Policy: You can accomplish the
learning objectives in this course by a combination of tasks
including:
• Reading/studying content from the textbook and PPT
slides and class discussion notes;
• Reviewing discussion questions;
• Completing other learning activities, if any;
• Relating course content to the real world via examples.
This is a VOLUME course. Therefore, you need to keep up
with the subject matter on a daily basis. Given the online
format of this course and associated time constraints, you
need to be dedicated to the self-study aspect of the course.
Teaching and learning methods of
course
Literature
(set reading/additional
recommended literature)
Lectures in class, videos on moodle
Mandatory textbook for this lecture:
Textbook Titel: Marketing Communications SP13
Author: Thomas O’Guinn, Chris Allen and Richard Semenik
Edition: 6th
ISBN 10: 0538473320
ISBN 13: 9780538473323
Publisher: Cengage/South Western
Accessible in our library, please ask at the information desk
27
Remarks
+ PPT slides uploaded
Number of students limited!
Lectures in Worms:
Tuesday 17.12. from 12.15-13.15 o’clock
Wednesday 18.12. from 14.15-15.15 o’clock
Thursday 19.12. from 14.15-15.15 o’clock
Attendance mandatory!
Rooms to be announced (LSF)
Dates of the exams to be announced. If you are not
able to take an exam on the scheduled date, there will
be no possibility to take it on another date.
The Fine Print (for in-class sessions):
During my class sessions in Worms, discussions with your
neighbors that distract or disturb the class or me will lead to
forfeiture of 2 points for each instance. If you have a
question or need clarifications, please ask me rather than
disturbing your neighbors.
The PPT slides are in pdf in order for you to download/print
and hand-write class discussion notes!! Therefore, keep
your laptops closed. No Laptop usage allowed during class
sessions!!
Switch off your cell phones / smartphones / PDAs / PSPs /
Blackberries / iPods / iPhones / iPads and other hand-held
devices while in class if you do not want to lose 5 points for
each disturbance. Also, do not use your gadgets for
anything during test/exams – no receiving/sending calls, no
text messaging, no image viewing, no calculating (unless
approved), etc.
28
Course Code
Course title
Course title in LSF
Entrance requirements
Name of lecturer
Info
Questions concerning content
Teaching language
Number of allocated ECTS points
Type of test/requirements for
allocation of credit points
Content and gooals of course
IC-4
European Studies
European Studies
None
Erich Stather
International Center (IC)
Martina Brodhäcker
e-Mail: [email protected]
English
2 CP
Presentations
This lecture will analyse the 'The Political System of the
European Union:
Theoretical Structure, concentrating on the European
Union's (EU)
Decision making
Policy process
„How the European Union works“
Teaching and learning methods of
course
Literature
(set reading/additional
recommended literature)
Remarks
This course, especially for students from abroad, will
introduce in the basic rules and principles of European
governing. It deals with the main institutions of the
European Union, how they work and it describes the
different balances of power inside the Union. Who decides
what and with which legitimacy? Is the power in the hands
of the EU-institutions or in the hands of the national
governments and parliaments?
And of course this course handles the actual financial and
economic crisis of the EUZ and the Eurozone and all the
proposals to solve the crisis.
Lectures in class
Will be announced in class
Lectures (attendance mandatory):
Tuesday 05th November 2013 from 1.15pm - 4.15pm
Tuesday 03rd December 2013 from 1.15pm - 4.15pm
Tuesday 10th December 2013 from 1.15pm - 4.15pm
Rooms to be announced (LSF)
Number of students is limited!
29
Course Code
Course title
Course title in LSF
Entrance requirements
Name of lecturer
Info
Questions concerning content
Teaching language
Number of allocated ECTS points
Type of test/requirements for
allocation of credit points
Content and gooals of course
IC-5
Intercultural Management – The Arab World
The Arab World
None
Dr. Ali Tarabay (Lebanese International University, Beirut)
International Center (IC)
Martina Brodhäcker
e-Mail: [email protected]
English
4 CP
Exam
Where is the Arab Spring leading the Middle East? What
will be the longer-term outcome of the popular protests that
have shaken the region since the beginning of 2011? Did
the uprisings or the so-called ‘revolution’ accomplish all of
its goals or were its ambitions curtailed? Since the
beginning of the year 2011, political unrest and demands
for democratization in the Arab region have been spelled
out after years of political and socio-economic stagnation.
These protests and uprisings have hit - to various degrees all countries of the region and were a clear result of the
rapidly deteriorating living conditions and the prevalence of
corruption practices in most of these countries.
The Arab Spring had been carried out in the first days by
the energy of the young, well educated marginalized and
unemployed individuals. Afterwards by the energy and
expectations of the middle class and later nearly all societal
groups joined. The Arab uprisings that have swept across
the Arab countries have fundamentally altered the social,
economic and political outlook of the region and its
relations with the outside world including Europe. For
reasons of geographic proximity, historical reasons and
strategic interests, the political destiny of this region is
inevitably linked with that of Europe.
Teaching and learning methods of
Course outline:
 Change in the Arab world: Why now?
 The Arab Spring
 Arab People Look for Political Change to articulate
a New World
 Inter-Arab relations and the Struggle for Syria
 The US, Europe and the Arab/Persian Gulf
 The World is Changing
 Concluding remarks
Course content is adapted to current developments in that
area.
Lectures in Class
30
course
Literature
Remarks
Will be announced in class
Number of students limited!
Lecture in Worms
16th December from 3pm-6pm
17th December from 3pm-6pm
The attendance on these two dates is mandatory.
31
Course Code
Course title
Course title in LSF
Entrance requirements
Name of lecturer
Info
Questions concerning content
Teaching language
Number of allocated ECTS points
Type of test/requirements for
allocation of credit points
IC-6
Consumer Behavior
Consumer Behavior
None
Prof. Dr. Mohan K. Menon
University of South Alabama, Mobile, USA
e-Mail: [email protected]
International Center (IC)
Martina Brodhäcker
e-Mail: [email protected]
English
4 CP
Your learning of the course content and your performance
will be assessed with help of exams and learning activities
(if any). The exam will include multiple choice question and
essay questions (if time permits) based on materials
provided. In order to ace this class, you should have the
motivation to keep up with subject matter by reviewing and
studying class discussion materials. For important details
regarding the exam, please download the “sample exam”
file from the site www.menons.net.
Evaluation Items (the exact book chapters for each exam
will be announced):
Quizzes
Exam 1
Exam 2
Exam 3
Total
100 points
100 points
100 points
100 points
400 points
In order to pass you have to reach at least 50%.
Academic Dishonesty: Any dishonesty related to
academic work or records constitutes academic misconduct
including, but not limited to, activities such as giving or
receiving unauthorized aid in exams/cases/assignments
improperly obtaining a copy of an exam/case/assignment,
plagiarism, misrepresentation of information, etc. Penalties
range from loss of credit for a particular assignment to
failing grade in the entire course.
32
Qualification goals of course
This course is designed to enhance your understanding
and appreciation of the focal point of all marketing /
business activities – the consumer. The course facilitates
your learning of how consumers behave in order to acquire
and dispose products and services. Knowledge of buyer
behavior is fundamental and forms the basis for all
marketing and business activities. Whether or not you are
seeking a marketing career, knowledge of the "whys" and
"hows" of buyer behavior is paramount to understanding
business. Note: Course content discussions, based on
reported research on samples of consumers, might be
different from your own thought process or behavior.
By the end of the term, you should be able to demonstrate:
1. Understanding of the effects of internal and external
influences on consumption behavior;
2. Understanding of the consumer decision making
process;
3. Understanding of dynamics of behavior beyond
consumption;
4. Understanding of ethical issues.
Content of course
Class discussion schedule: Visit www.menons.net for
details. Some of these topics might be discussed in person
when I visit Worms during the summer. Details of the trip
and in-class discussions will be provided later.
Learning Philosophy and Policy: You can accomplish the
learning objectives in this course by a combination of tasks
including:
• Reading/studying content from the textbook & PPT slides
and class discussion notes;
• Reviewing discussion questions;
• Completing other learning activities, if any;
• Relating course content to the real world via examples.
This is a VOLUME course. Therefore, you need to keep up
with the subject matter on a daily basis. Given the online
format of this course and associated time constraints, you
need to be dedicated to the self-study aspect of the course.
Teaching and learning methods of
course
Literature
(set reading/additional
recommended literature)
Lectures in class, videos on moodle
Mandatory textbook for this lecture:
Textbook Titel: Consumer Behavior
Author: Leon Schiffman and Leslie Kanuk
Edition: 10th
ISBN 10: 0135053013
ISBN 13: 9780135053010
Publisher: Pearson / Prentice Hall
Accessible in our library, please ask at the information
desk.
33
Remarks
+ PPT slides uploaded
Number of students limited!
Lectures in Worms:
Tuesday 17.12. from 13.30-14.30 o’clock
Wednesday 18.12. from 15.30-16.30 o’clock
Thursday 19.12. from 15.30-16.30 o’clock
Attendance mandatory!
Rooms to be announced (LSF)
Dates of the exams to be announced. If you are not
able to take an exam on the scheduled date, there will
be no possibility take it on another date.
The Fine Print (for in-class sessions):
During my class sessions in Worms, discussions with your
neighbors that distract or disturb the class or me will lead to
forfeiture of 2 points for each instance. If you have a
question or need clarifications, please ask me rather than
disturbing your neighbors.
The PPT slides are in pdf in order for you to download/print
and hand-write class discussion notes!! Therefore, keep
your laptops closed. No Laptop usage allowed during class
sessions!!
Switch off your cell phones / smartphones / PDAs / PSPs /
Blackberries / iPods / iPhones / iPads and other hand-held
devices while in class if you do not want to lose 5 points for
each disturbance. Also, do not use your gadgets for
anything during test/exams – no receiving/sending calls, no
text messaging, no image viewing, no calculating (unless
approved), etc.
34
Course Code
Course title
Course title in LSF
Lecturer
Info
Questions concerning content
Teaching language
Number of allocated ECTS
points
Course workload
Breakdown of workload
IM-1.2
Strategy
1.2 Basics in Int. Bus. Man. - Strategy
Ralf Friedrich
International Management B. A.
Susanna Ripp
e-Mail: [email protected]
English
3 CP
90 h
Lecture:
Contact time
Self-study
(preparation &
follow-up)
30 h
30 h
Excercise:
10 h
Exam preparation:
20 h
Sum:
30 h
Total:
Hours per week
Type of test/requirements for
allocation of credit points
Content of course
60 h
90 h
2 h (total 30 h)
Exam
Introduction to the basics of corporate (strategic) planning,
overview of corporate planning instruments:
I. Objectives of corporate planning
1. Changes within corporate environment
2. Changes within enterprises
3. Derivated terms of planning
4. Planning targets
II. Areas of analysis and analytical instruments
1. Environmental analysis
(stakeholder approach, system approach)
2. Analysis of the company
2.1. SWOT
2.2. Product life cycle
2.3. Experience curve
2.4. Portfolio analysis
III. Choice of strategy
1. Growth strategies
2. Cost leadership strategies
3. Quality and innovation strategies
4. Decentralised business strategies
5. Strategy evaluation
IV. Strategy implementation
1. Business plan
35
2. Balance scorecard
5. Organizational structure for implementing strategy
Teaching and learning
 Lecture with exercises and self-learning periods
methods of course
 Internet-assisted
 Analysis and discussion of specific topics based on case
studies
 Flexible learning modules
Special features (e.g. online
Course related material can be downloaded via Moodle
part, excursions, guest lectures (learning platform).
etc.)
Current issues will be published via Moodle as well.
Set reading
 Barney, J. B. and Hesterly, W. S., Strategic Management
and Competitive Advantage: Concepts and Cases, USA:
Prentice-Hall, 2006.
 Katsioloudes, M. I., Strategic Management: Global
Cultural Perspectives for Profit and Non-Profit
Organizations, USA: Butterworth Heinemann, 2006.
 Katsioloudes, M. I., Gobal Strategic Planning, USA:
Butterworth Heinemann, 2002.
 Bea/Haas, Strategisches Management, Stuttgart 2001
 Hahn/Taylor, Strategische Unternehmensführung,
Heidelberg 1997
 Kaplan/Norton, Balanced Scorecard, Stuttgart 1997
Additional recommended
 Ehrmann, Harald, Unternehmensplanung, 5. Auflage Kiehl
literature
Verlag 2007
 Daft, Richard L.; Kendrick, Martyn; Vershinina, Natalia,
Management, Cengage Learning 2010
Remarks
None
36
Course Code
Course title
Course title in LSF
Lecturer
Entrance requirements
Info
Questions concerning content
Teaching language
Number of allocated ECTS
points
Course workload
Breakdown of workload
Hours per week
Type of test/requirments for
allocation of credit points
Content of course
Teaching and learning
methods of course
Set reading
Additional recommended
literature
Remarks
IM-3.2
Basics of International Economics
3.2 Int. Economics - Basics of Int. Economics
Dr. Dr. Knödler
None
International Management B. A.
Susanna Ripp
e-Mail: [email protected]
English
3 CP
90 h
Lecture:
30 h
Exam incl. preparation:
15 h
Self-study:
45 h
3 h (total 30 h)
Written examination
1. Basics of microeconomics
1.1 Market behavior of individual consumers
1.2 Market behavior of corporate suppliers
2. Basics of macroeconomics
2.1 Money market
2.2 Labour market
Lecture
3. Mankiw et al., Economics
4. Blanchard, Macroeconomics
5. Varian, Microeconomics
6. Pindyck/Rubinfeld, Microeconomics
None
37
Course Code
Course title
Course title in LSF
Lecturer
Entrance requirements
Info
Questions concerning content
Teaching language
Number of allocated ECTS
points
Type of test/requirements for
allocation of credit points
Content of course
Teaching and learning
methods of course
Set reading / additional
recommended literature
Remarks
IM-6.3
Spanish (Beginner Course)
6.3 Vorkurs Spanisch
Prof. Dr. Christiane Dümmler
None in Spanish, but ability to understand German
International Management B. A.
Susanna Ripp
e-Mail: [email protected]
German into Spanish
2 CP
Regular attendance + examination (written test)
Introduction to the Spanish language (level A1)
Book (with instructions and explanations in German
language): Vía rápida (Klett Verlag)
Lecture
Course start: 2nd October (compulsory attendance!)
Course day: Wednesdays 8.15am - 9.45am
Room: to be announced (LSF)
Additional credits can be obtained by extra work – to be
agreed upon with the lecturer
38
Course Code
Course title
Course title in LSF
Lecturer
Entrance requirements
Info
Questions concerning content
Teaching language
Number of allocated ECTS
points
Course workload
Breakdown of workload
IM-7.1
Organization
7.1 Leadership and Organization - TL Organization
Prof. Dr. Jörg Funder
None
International Management B. A.
Susanna Ripp
e-Mail: [email protected]
English
2 CP
60 h
Contact
Self-study
27 h
15 h
--
--
Exam preparation:
3h
15 h
Sum:
30 h
30 h
Lecture:
Study/excursion:
Total:
Hours per week
Type of test/requirements for
allocation of credit points
Content of course
Learning goals
60 h
2 h (total 30 h)
Written examination
To acquire knowledge of organization as a tool and as a
management task; overview of organization approaches,
theory and tools.
 understanding core issues of organizational design
 understand basic organizational theories and their use to
solve core organizational issues
 learn about specific organizational requirements of
companies within the industrial goods & services sector
 learn to deal with scientific texts
Lecture
Teaching and learning
methods of course
Special features (e.g. online
Discussion of current topics based on organization theories
part, excursions, guest lectures discussed in class
etc.)
Set reading
 General
- Buchanan, D. / Huczynski, A. (2010): Organizational
behaviour: an introductory Text, 7th Edition, Prentice
Hall: London
- Douma, S. / Schreuder, H. (2002): Economic
approaches to organizations, 3rd Edition, Prentice Hall:
London.
- Hall, R./ Tolbert, P. (2008): Organizations: structures,
processes and outcomes, Prentics Hall: London
 Scientific Management
- Taylor, F.W. (1911): The principles of scientific
39
management.
 Contingency Theory
Additional recommended
literature
Remarks
- Mintzberg, H., (1979): The structuring of organizations,
Prentice Hall: Englewood Cliffs.
- Chandler, A.D. (1962): Strategy and structure; Chapters
in the history of the American industrial enterprise,
London.
- Burns, T./ Stalker, G,M. (1961): The management of
innovation, London.
- Lawrence, P.R./ Lorsch, J.W. (1967): Organization and
Environment: managing differentiation and integration,
Boston.
 Rational Choice Theory
- Laux, H. / Liermann, F. (1997): Grundlagen der
Organisation, 4. Auflage, Springer: Berlin.
 Behavioralism
- Cyert, R.M. / March, J.G (1963): A behavioral theory of
the firm, Englewood Cliffs.
 NIÖ – Property Rights
- Demsetz, H. (1967): Towards a theory of property
rights, in: American Economic Review, papers and
proceedings, 57, pp. 347-359.
 NIE – TAK
- Williams, O.E. (1983): Markets and hierarchies:
Analysis and antitrust implications, a study in the
economics of internal organization, New York.
 NIE – Principal Agent
- Pratt, J.W./ Zeckhauser, R.J. (1985): Principals and
agents: an overview, in: Pratt, J.W./ Zeckhauser, R.J.
(1985): Principals and agents the structure of business,
Chicester.
 Menard, C./ Shirley, M. (2005): Handbook of New
Institutional Economics, Springer: Berlin.
 Williamson, O. (1995): Organization theory: from Chester
Barnard to the present and beyond, Oxford University
Press: London.
 Relevant Journals, such as
- Journal of Organizational Studies
- Strategic Organization
- Journal of Management
- Human Relations
Number of students limited!
Binding registration till 11th October 2013 12pm (M 105)
via course choice list - A LATER DROPPING OF THIS
COURSE LEADS DIRECTLY TO A 5,0 (FAIL).
40
Course Code
Course title
Course title in LSF
Lecturer
Entrance requirements
Info
Questions concerning content
Teaching language
Number of allocated ECTS
points
Course workload
Breakdown of workload
Hours per week
Type of test/requirements for
allocation of credit points
Content of course
Teaching and learning
methods of course
Set reading
Additional recommended
IM-7.2
Leadership Development
7.2 Leadership Development
Ralf Friedrich
None
International Management B. A.
Susanna Ripp
e-Mail: [email protected]
English
3 CP
90 h
Lecture:
30 h
Exam incl. preparation:
20 h
Self-study:
40 h
2 h (total 30 h)
Written examination
I. Leadership approaches, leadership styles and leadership
definitions
II. Heresy and grievances regarding leadership
III. Leadership approaches and leadership theories
 Scientific-theoretical backround
 Social-fact-paradigm, social-construction-paradigm
 Derived leadership approaches
 Great-men-theory, Ohio leadership studies, Johari
window
 Self-organization/systemic leadership
IV. Leadership tools
 Conferences and team meetings/group dynamics/role
models
 Reports and presentations
 Personal work techniques (time and self management)
 Agreement on objectives and delegation
 Budget and budget planning
 Performance appraisal and feedback
Lecture, case studies
-
Dubrin: Leadership. Research Findings, Practice, and
Skills.
- Von Rosenstiehl/Regnet/Domsch: Führung von
Mitarbeitern, 6. Auflage, Stuttgart 2009
- Femppel/Zander: Praxis der Personalführung, 2. Auflage,
München 2008
Additional recommended literature (books):
41
literature
-
Remarks
Northose: Leadership. Theory and Practice
Yukl: Leadership in Organizations
Schein: Organizational Culture and Leadership
Laufer, H.: Grundlagen erfolgreicher Mitarbeiterführung,
Offenbach 2010
Pinnow, D.: Führen: Worauf es wirklich ankommt, 3.
Auflage, Wiesbaden 2008
Additional recommended literature (journals):
- Management Review
- ZFO
- Personalführung
None
42
Course Code
Course title
Course title in LSF
Lecturer
Entrance requirements
Info
Questions concerning content
Teaching language
Number of allocated ECTS
points
Type of test/requirements for
allocation of credit points
Content of course
Teaching and learning
methods of course
Set reading / additional
recommended literature
Remarks
IM-10.1
Business Communication
Business Communication
Michael Rutter
 Fluency in English, actively at least B2 level
 Ability to read the set book and academic literature in
English
 Entrance test in English for Academic Purposes,
which will take place on Tuesday 01st October at 6pm
in O 206!!!
International Management B. A.
Susanna Ripp
e-Mail: [email protected]
English
4 CP
Four home examinations
The course follows the book “Effective Organisational
Communication”
 Perspectives on communication
 Breaking barriers to communication
 Verbal communication
 Non-verbal communication
 Persuasive communication
 Interactive communication
 Organisational communication
 Advertisements, promotions, news releases and
exhibitions
 Interviews, questioning and listening
 Meetings, teams and negotiations
Lecture, online parts in moodle
Book “Effective Organisational Communication”
Course start: 2nd October (compulsory attendance!)
Course day: Wednesdays 11.45am-1.15pm
Room: O 206
But please check the LSF system regarding changes
1. Attendance preferred, but not absolutely necessary.
2. Students must take the whole of the course and not
just parts of the course.
3. Limited number of students!
4. Necessary materials in moodle.
43
Course Code
Course title
Course title in LSF
Lecturer
Entrance requirements
Info
Questions concerning content
Teaching language
Number of allocated ECTS
points
Hours per week
Type of test/requirements for
allocation of credit points
Content of course
IM-10.3
Research and Study Skills
10. Fach-, Sozial- u. Methodenkompetenz
Michael Rutter
 Fluency in English, actively at least B2 level
 Ability to read set book and academic literature in English
International Management B. A.
Susanna Ripp
e-Mail: [email protected]
English
3 CP
Blocked course from 23rd September-27th September 2013
Presentation of research design
Written paper on research (to be handed in by 15th
December 2013)
Studying at a German Fachhochschule
Studying abroad
Studying in English
Principles of carrying out research
 Research ethics, plagiarism
 Qualitative research approaches (ethnography, action
research, etc.)
 Qualitative research methods and tools of data
collection and documentation
 Analysing data
Academic writing in English
 Formulating research designs
 Writing up reports
 Writing essays for business students
Academic presentations in English
 Presenting research designs
 Presenting research results
Practicals




Teaching and learning
methods of course
Remarks
Observing
Interviewing
Presenting
Defining words and terms
Lecture, online parts in moodle
1. Attendance obligatory.
44
2. Students must take the whole of the course and not
just parts of the course.
3. Number of students is limited!
4. Materials in moodle.
Course start: 23rd September 2013 (compulsory
attendance!)
Course days:
23rd from 10am-6.30pm and
24th-27th September 2013 from 9am-6.30pm.
Room: O 206
Please check the LSF for changes!
45
Course Code
Course title
Course title in LSF
Lecturer
Entrance requirements
Info
Questions concerning content
Teaching language
Number of allocated ECTS
points
Type of test/requirements for
allocation of credit points
Content of course
IM-11.1
French 2
11.1 Französisch – Wirtschaftssprache 2 (61110)
Prof. Dr. Christiane Dümmler
Good command of the French language (language level B1) +
ability to understand German
International Management B. A.
Susanna Ripp
e-Mail: [email protected]
German into French
5 CP
Regular attendance + examination (written test)
- textes et thèmes d'actualité
- exercices de rédaction
- la conversation télephonique
- la lettre commerciale
- thème de marketing
- les sociétés françaises
- entreprises publiques et privées
- le système scolaire et universitaire en France
- la vie étudiante, stages et première embauche
- comment écrire un CV
- la lettre de motivation
Teaching and learning
methods of course
Set reading / additional
recommended literature
Remarks
- l'entretien d'embauche
Lecture
Course start: 01st October 2013 (compulsory attendance!)
Course day: Tuesdays 2.15pm-3.45pm
AND Wednesdays 11.45am-1.15pm
Room: to be announced (LSF)
Additional credits can be obtained by extra work – to be
agreed upon with the lecturer
46
Course Code
Course title
Course title in LSF
Lecturer
Entrance requirements
Info
Questions concerning content
Teaching language
Number of allocated ECTS
points
Type of test/requirements for
allocation of credit points
Content of course
Teaching and learning
methods of course
Set reading / additional
recommended literature
Remarks
IM-11.2
Spanish 2
11.2 Spanisch - Wirtschaftssprache 2 (61120)
Prof. Dr. Christiane Dümmler
Language level A1 in Spanish, ability to understand German
International Management B. A.
Susanna Ripp
e-Mail: [email protected]
German into Spanish
5 CP
Regular attendance + examination (written test)
Lessons and exercises to achieve language level A2/B1
Book (with instructions and explanations in German
language): Vía rápida (Klett Verlag)
Lecture
Course start: 01st October 2013 (compulsory attendance!)
Course day: Tuesdays 11.45am-1.15pm
AND Wednesdays 10am-11.30am
Room: to be announced (LSF)
Additional credits can be obtained by extra work – to be
agreed upon with the lecturer
47
Course Code
Course title
Course title in LSF
Lecturer
Entrance requirements
Info
Questions concerning content
Teaching language
Number of allocated ECTS
points
Type of test/requirements for
allocation of credit points
Content of course
IM-22.4
Intercultural Challenge 1
Intercultural Issues
Michael Rutter
 Fluency in English, actively at least B2 level
 Ability to read set book and academic literature in English
 Entrance test in English, which will take place on
Tuesday 01st October at 6pm in O 206!!!
International Management B. A.
Susanna Ripp
e-Mail: [email protected]
English
6 CP
Regular attendance
One open-book examination for each section (1, 2 and 3)
1. National Culture and Business:
 Cross-cultural differences in business culture
 Theories of culture
 Analysing culture
 National characteristics
 European values
 Business guide to native country
 Doing business with the Germans
2. Cross-cultural Differences in Consumer Behaviour:
 Influence of culture on consumer behaviour
 Consumer values
 Consumer ethics
 Influence of religion and ideology on consumption
 Frugality
 Social portrait of the European consumer
 Social portrait of the German consumer
 Consumption in Germany
3. Cross-cultural Differences in Business Ethics:
 An ethical enterprise – What is it?
 Universalism versus relativism
 Influence of culture on ethics
 Religion and ethics
 Ethics of business students
 Enterprises and their codes of ethics, business ethics
and corporate strategy
 Corporate social responsibility
 Ethical audits

Case studies
48
Teaching and learning
methods of course
Set reading / additional
recommended literature
Remarks
Lecture
To be announced in class
Course start: 02nd October 2013 (compulsory attendance!)
Lecture day: Wednesdays from 2.15pm-7.15pm
Room: O 206
Please check the LSF for changes!
1. Attendance preferred, but not absolutely necessary
2. Students must take the whole of the course and not just
parts of the course
3. Number of students is limited!
4. Materials in moodle.
49
Course Code
Course title
Course title in LSF
Course parts
Entrance requirements
Name of lecturer(s)
Info
Questions concerning content
Teaching language
Number of allocated ECTS points
Total workload and breakdown (e.g.
self-study + contact time)
Hours per week
Type of test/requirements for
allocation of credit points
Qualification goals of module
IM-1.1 (M. A.)
Strategic Planning
1.1 Strategic Planning (410)
1.1.1 Strategic Planning Process
1.1.2 Strategy Implementation
Higher qualification level – Master degree course!
Prof. Dr. Elie Menassa (Lebanon)
International Management M. A.
Susanna Ripp
e-Mail: [email protected]
English
6 CP
Total workload: 180 h
4 h (total 60 h)
Presentation / case study / journals / test
The goal of this module is the transfer of knowledge for
modern planning instruments in strategic and operative
planning.
Professional competence:
To know and understand the goals, tasks and processes
of management within the scope of planning; transfer of
different strategic and operative tools
Methodological competence:
Application and adaption of the learned contents in the
scope of different international practical cases and case
studies
Content of module
Teaching and learning methods of
module
Key competence:
Ability to develop and to formulate strategies for a
concrete, previously announced practical case with
international context as well as to implement these
strategies against the background of an international
environment; ability to perform strategic and operative
planning for companies independently as well as to
present the solutions professionally in front of an expert
audience.
See course descriptions below
 Dialogued-oriented inputs of lecturer
 Analysis of multi-national planning approaches of
companies
 Group works, team-based projects regarding
strategic analysis and derivation of strategies
 Elaboration of international case studies, in some
cases with cooperation partners
50

Special features (e.g. online part,
excursions, guest lectures etc.)
Literature (set reading/additional
recommended literature)
Remarks
Foreign guest lecturers
Foreign guest lecturers
See course descriptions below
Higher qualification level required!
Number of students limited!
IM-1.1.1 (M.A.) and IM-1.1.2 (M.A.) cannot be divided!
Course is blocked – one week Monday till Saturday
(exact dates to be announced – LSF), every day from
ca. 10am - 4pm
51
Course Code
Course title
Part 1
Lecturer
Teaching language
Number of allocated ECTS
points
Course workload
Breakdown of workload
IM-1.1.1 (M. A.)
Strategic Planning
Strategic Planning Process
Prof. Dr. Elie Menassa
English
3 CP
90 h
Lecture:
30 h
Self-study/ preparation & follow-up of lecture: 20 h
Hours per week
Type of test/requirements for
allocation of credit points
Content of course
Teaching and learning
methods of course
Elaboration of topic:
20 h
Case Study:
20 h
Total:
90 h
2 h (total 30 h)
See module description
I. Framework:
 The St. Gallen management model
 Goals and Tasks of strategic management
 Creating of vision and mission statement
 The 6-stage-concept for construction of strategic
management
II. Tool-Set of strategic planning:
 The PIMS-programme
 SWOT-Analysis
 Strategic balance
 Experience curve effects
 Competition within an industry
 From BCG-Matrix to integrated portfolio management
III. Implementation of strategic planning:
 Planning modell
 Strategic analysis
 Derivation of strategies
 Strategies of internationalization
 Analysis based on practical cases
Input of lecturer
Coached literature review
Case studies regarding decision problems
Group discussions
Presentations of theses
Guest lecture by foreign guest lecturers
Special features (e.g. online
part, excursions, guest lectures
etc.)
Set reading
Barney/Hesterly: Strategic Management and Competitive
Advantage: Concepts and Cases
Katsioloudes: Strategic Management: Global Cultural
Perspectives for Profit and Non-Profit Organizations
52
Additional recommended
literature
Katsioloudes: Global Strategic Planning
Grant: Strategic Management
Grant: Contemporary Strategic Analysis
Hunger/Wheelen: Essentials of Strategic Management
Kreilkamp: Strategisches Marketing und Management
Müller/Stewens: Strategisches Management
Lombriser/Abplanalp: Strategisches Management
Kerth et al.: Die besten Strategietools in der Praxis
Huber: Praxishandbuch Strategische Planung
53
Course Code
Course title
Part 2
Lecturer
Teaching language
Number of allocated ECTS
points
Course workload
Breakdown of workload
Hours per week
Type of test/requirements for
allocation of credit points
Content of course
IM-1.1.2 (M. A.)
Strategic Planning
Strategy Implementation
Prof. Dr. Elie Menassa
English
3 CP
90 h
Lecture:
30 h
Self-study/preparation & follow-up of lecture:
20 h
Topic elaboration:
20 h
Case study:
20 h
Total:
90 h
2 h (total 30 h)
See module description
 Operative planning based on the St. Gallen management
model
 Integrated operative planning
 Concept of bottleneck planning and removal of
bottlenecks
 Sales planning
 F&E planning
 Procurement planning
 Production planning
 HR planning
 Planning of support functions
 Integration and coordination of planning processes
Teaching and learning methods Input of lecturer
of course
Case studies regarding decision problems
Group projects regarding practice-oriented planning
problems
Special features (e.g. online part, Guest lecture by foreign guest lecturers
excursions, guest lectures etc.)
Set reading
Russell, R.: Operations Management: Creating Value Along
the Supply Chain, Wiley & Sons 2011
Slack, N.; Chambers, S. & Johnston, R.: Operations and
Process Management: Principles and Practice for Strategic
Impact, Prentice Hall (2008)
Slack, N.; Chambers, S. & Johnston, R.: Operation
Management, Prentice Hall (2009)
Verweire, K.; Van de Berghe, L. (ed.): Integrated
Performance Management: A Guide to Strategy
Implementation, Sage 2004
Additional recommended
Abele, E.; Meyer, T. et al.: Global Production: A Handbook
literature
for Strategy and Implementation, Springer 2007
Goffin, K. and Mitchell, R.: Innovation Management:
54
Strategy and Implementation Using the Pentathlon
Framework
Palgrave Macmillan 2010
Hahn/Hungenberg: Planung & Kontrolle
Reichmann: Controlling mit Managementberichten
Horváth: Controlling
Graumann: Fallstudien zum Controlling
Troßmann/Baumeister/Werkmeister: ManagementFallstudien im Controlling
David: Strategisches Management von Controllerbereichen
55
Course Code
Course title
Course title in LSF
Lecturer
Info
Questions concerning content
Teaching language
Course requirements
Number of allocated ECTS
points
Course workload
Breakdown of workload
IM-1.3.1 (M. A.)
Crafting Strategy
1.3 Corporate Transformation/Organizational Development
(61300)
Prof. Dr. Jörg Funder
International Management M. A.
Susanna Ripp
e-Mail: [email protected]
English
- Knowledge in English language
- Solid understanding of (traditional) organizational theories
3 CP
90 h
Contact
Self-study
25 h
30 h
Exam prep:
5h
30 h
Sum:
30 h
60 h
Lecture:
Self-study/project:
Total:
Hours per week
Type of test/requirements for
allocation of credit points
Content of course
Qualification goals
90 h
2 h (total 30 h)
Exam
The concept of strategy
 What is strategy?
 Importance of strategy
 Managerial processes of strategy development
2. Core concepts of strategy
 Evaluation of companies external environment
 Evaluation of companies resources & competitive
position
 Evaluation of companies capabilities
3. Strategy development
 Generic strategies
 Tailoring Strategy to fit industry and company situations
 Strategies, ethics and social responsibility
4. Strategy execution
 Building a strategic organization
 Managing operations
 Corporate culture & leadership
 Understand different concepts of strategy and strategy
making
1.

Understand dynamics of ‘new’ strategy

Understand how companies need to be structured for
56
continuous self-renewal & dynamic strategies

Understand the importance of social context for strategy
making

Being able to distinguish ‚strategy formulation’ vs.
‚strategy formation’
Lecture & Case Studies
Teaching and learning
methods
Special features (e.g. online
 International Visiting Professor(s)
part, excursions, guest lectures  Guest lectures on selected topics
etc.)
Set reading
 Thompson, A., Strickland, J., Gambe, J., Jain, A. (2009):
„Crafting and Executing strategy – the quest for competitive
advantage“, McGraw Hill.
 Course reader
Additional recommended
 Eisenhardt, M. K., Sull, N. D. (2001): „Strategy as simple
literature
rules“, Harvard Business Review, January, 107-116.
 Eisenhardt, M. K. (2002): „Has strategy changed? “, Sloan
Management Review, Winter, 8-91.
Number of students limited!
Remarks
Binding registration till 11th October 2013 12pm (M 105) via
course choice list - A LATER DROPPING OF THIS COURSE
LEADS DIRECTLY TO A 5,0 (FAIL).
Please double check lecture dates as those might be subject to
change due to external guest speaker availability (!)
57
Course Code
Course title
Course title in LSF
Lecturer
Info
Questions concerning content
Teaching language
Course requirements
Number of allocated ECTS
points
Course workload
Beakdown of workload
IM-1.3.2 (M. A.)
Organizational Learning
1.3 Corporate Transformation/Organizational Development
(61300)
Prof. Dr. Jörg Funder
International Management M. A.
Susanna Ripp
e-Mail: [email protected]
English
- Knowledge in English language
- Solid understanding of (traditional) organizational theories
3 CP
90 h
Contact
Self-study
30 h
35 h
Lecture:
Self-study/ project:
25 h
Exam prep:
Sum:
30 h
Total:
Hours per week
Type of test/requirements for
allocation of credit points
Content of course
60 h
90 h
2 h (total 30 h)
Class participation / final exam or team project
1. Knowledge-based theory of the firm
2. Organizational (un)learning
Qualification goals
Teaching and learning
methods of course
3. Organizational ambidexterity
 Understand importance of knowledge creation and
knowledge management for competitive advantage

Convey basic principles of creating a knowledge-driven
company to students

Understand difficulties to balance different learning
modes within an organization

Understand leadership challenges in learning
organization

Discuss impact of organizational blind spots and core
beliefs on

Identify and evaluate complexities in dynamically
changing and fast pace environments
 Lecture
 Case study discussion
58
Literature (set
reading/additional
recommended literature)
Knowledge-based theory of the firm
- Grant (1996): „Towards a knowledge based theory of
the firm“, Strategic Management Journal, Winter 1996,
17, 109-122.
- Nonaka/ vonKrogh (2009): „Tacit knowledge and
knowledge conversion: controversy and advancement
in organizational knowledge creation theory“,
Organization Science, May/ June 2009, 635-652.
Organizational (un)learning
- Senge, Peter M. (2008): „Die fünfte Disziplin; Kunst und
Praxis der lernenden Organisation“, Schäffer-Poeschel,
Stuttgart.
- Akgün et al. (2007): „Organizational unlearning as
change in beliefs and routines in organizations“, Journal
of Organizational Change Management, 20, 6, 794-812.
- Starbuck/ Nystrom (1984): „To avoid an organizational
crisis, unlearn“, Organizational Dynamics, 12, 4, 53-65.
Organizational Ambidexterity
- Tushman et al. (2010): „Exploration and exploitation
within and across organizations“, The Academy of
Management Annals, 4, 1, 109-155.
- Tushman/ O’Reilly (1996): „Ambidextrous organizations:
managing evolutionary & revolutionary change“,
California Management Review, 38, 4, 8-30.
- Birkinshaw/ Gibson (2004): „Building ambidexterity into
an organization“, MIT Sloan Management Review,
Summer 2004, 47-55.
Knowledge-based theory of the firm
- Nonaka (1994): „A dynamic theory of knowledge
creation“, Organization Science, 5:1, 14-27.
- Nonaka (1998): „The science of ‚Ba’: building the
foundation for knwoledge creation“, California
Management Review, 40, 3, 40-54.
Organizational (un)learning
- March (1991): „Exploration and Exploitation in
organizational learning“, Organization Science, 2,1,7189.
- Klein (1989): „Parenthic learning in organizations:
toward the unlearning of the unlearning model“, Journal
of Management Studies, 26, 3, 291-308.
- Lembke, Gerald (2004): “Die lernende Organisation; als
Grundlage einer entwicklungsfähigen Unternehmung”,
Tectum, Marburg.
Organizational Ambidexterity
- Gibson/ Birkinshaw (2004): „The antecedents,
consequences, and mediating role of organizational
ambidexterity“, Academy of Management Journal, 47, 2,
pp. 209-226.
59
Remarks
Other
- Kruse, Peter (2009): “next practice; Erfolgreiches
Management von Instabilität”, 4. Auflage, Gabal,
Offenbach.
- Doppler/ Lauterburg (2008): „Change Management;
Den Unternehmenswandel gestalten“, 12. Auflage,
Campus, Frankfurt.
Number of students limited!
Binding registration till 11th October 2013 12pm (M 105)
via course choice list - A LATER DROPPING OF THIS
COURSE LEADS DIRECTLY TO A 5,0 (FAIL).
Please double check lecture dates as those might be
subject to change due to external guest speaker availability
(!)
60
Course Code
Course title
Course title in LSF
Lecturer
Info
Questions concerning content
Teaching language
Course requirements
Number of allocated ECTS
points
Course workload
Beakdown of workload
IM-1.3.3 (M. A.)
Dynamic Strategy & Strategic Renewal
1.3 Corporate Transformation/Organizational Development
(61300)
Prof. Dr. Jörg Funder
International Management M. A.
Susanna Ripp
e-Mail: [email protected]
English
- Knowledge in English language
- Solid understanding of (traditional) organizational theories
3 CP
90 h
Exam
Lecture:
Team project
Contact
SelfStudy
Contact
SelfStudy
24 h
45 h
24 h
45 h
6h
15 h
30 h
60 h
Self-study/
project:
Exam prep:
6h
15 h
Sum:
30 h
60 h
Total:
Hours per week
Type of test/requirements for
allocation of credit points
Content of course
Qualification goals
90 h
2 h (total 30 h)
Class participation / final exam or team project
1. Dynamic strategy & strategic renewal
2. Path creation
3. Transforming the resource-base
4. Transforming the capability base (dynamic resourcebased strategies)
5. Business model transformation
 Learn about basic concepts of behavioral strategy
making
 Understand the correlation of ‚organizational alignment’
and competitive advantage
 Understand the interdependence of structure, process,
systems and culture to implement strategic renewal
processes
 Understand the impact and interaction of resources and
capabilities in the context of dynamic environmental
changes
 Being able to plan/ execute a high-level transformation
journey
 Identify and evaluate the readiness and necessity for
strategic renewal
61

Teaching and learning
methods of course
Literature (set
reading/additional
recommended literature)
Being able to differentiate between the concepts of
strategy and operational efficiency
 Lecture
 Case study discussion
Dynamic strategy & strategic renewal
- Porter (1996): „What is strategy? “, Harvard Business
Review, November – December, 61-78.
- Lovas/ Ghosal (2000): „Strategy as guided evolution“,
Strategic Management Journal, 21, 875-896.
- Argaval/ Helfat (2009): „Strategic renewal of
organizations“, Organizational Science, 20, 2, MarchApril 2009, pp. 281-293.
Path creation
- Sydow/ Schreyögg et al. (2009): „Organizational path
dependence: opening the black box“, Academy of
Management Review, 34, 4, 689-709.
- Garud/ Karnoe (2010): „Path dependence or path
creation?“, Journal of Management Studies, 47, 4, 760774.
Transforming the resource-base
- Peteraf (1993): „The cornerstones of competitive
advantage: a resource-based view“, Strategic
Management Journal, 14, 3, 179-191.
- Gant (1996): „The resource based view of theory of
competitive advantage: implications for strategy
formulation“, California Management Review, 33, 3,
114-135.
Transforming the capability base (dynamic resourcebased strategies)
- Helfat/ Perteraf (2003): „The dynamic resource based
view: capability lifecycles“, Strategic Management
Journal, 24, 10, 997-1010.
- Eisenhardt/ Martin (2000): „Dynamic capabilities: what
are they?“, Strategic Management Journal, 21, 10,
1105-1121.
- Barreto (2010): „Dynamic Capabilities: A Review of Past
Research and an Agenda for the Future“, Journal of
Management, 34, 256-288.
Business Model Transformation
- Doz/ Kosonen (2010): „Embedded strategic agility: a
leadership agenda for accelerating business model
renewal“, Journal of Long Range Planning, 43, 2.
- Casadesus-Masanell/ Ricart (2007): „Competing though
business models“, Working Paper # 713, IESE
Business School, Nov. 2007.
Case Series (might be subject to change, please refer to
current term course syllabus)
- Collis (2005): Ben & Jerry’s Homemade Ice Cream Inc.:
A Period of Transformation, HBS Case # 9-796-109.
- Gavetti/ Tripsas (2007): Polaroid: Entering digital
imaging, Harvard Business School Case # 9-706-459.
62
Remarks
- Bartlett/ Ginska (2005): GE’s Digital Revolution:
Redefining the ‚E’ in GE, HBS Case # 9-302-001.
- Nada/ Bartlett (1994): Intel Corporation - Leveraging
Capabilities for Strategic Renewal, HBS Case # 9-394141.
- Mazutis/ White/ Beamish (2008): Research in Motion:
Managing Explosive Growth, Richard Ivey School of
Business Case # 908M46.
- Fahrfoomand (2006): SAP Platform Strategy, University
of Hongkong Case # HKS564.
Number of students limited!
Binding registration till 11th October 2013 12pm (M 105)
via course choice list - A LATER DROPPING OF THIS
COURSE LEADS DIRECTLY TO A 5,0 (FAIL).
Please double check lecture dates as those might be
subject to change due to external guest speaker availability
(!)
63
Course Code
Course title
Course title in LSF
Lecturer
Info
Questions concerning content
Teaching language
Course requirements
Number of allocated ECTS
points
Workload
Breakdown of workload
IM-2.3.1.1 (M. A.)
Retail Strategy
2.3.1 General Management (3102)
Prof. Dr. Jörg Funder
International Management M. A.
Susanna Ripp
e-Mail: [email protected]
English
− Basic understanding about international retail markets
− Fluent English language ability
4 CP
120 h
Contact
Self-Study
Lecture:
35 h
35 h
Self study/ team project:
10 h
40 h
45 h
75 h
Exam preparation:
Sum:
Total:
Hours per week
Type of test/requirements for
allocation of credit points
Content of course
Qualification goals
120 h
3 h (45h total)
 Course participation (20%)
 Course exams: quick tests during lecture (30%)
Term paper: team project researching & evaluating or developing
a strategy of a to be selected retail company (50%)
Retailing ranks amongst the most competitive industries. In most
developed countries markets are at best stagnating. Often growing
market share is only possible by ruling out competitors.
Traditionally favoring price reductions and improving operational
efficiency most retailers lack a clear strategy competence.
Diversifications and internationalization of business have seldomly
proven successful but demonstrate increases complexity of
operations. Students will learn about how to identify and exploit
growth potentials and how to support the development of
successful retail strategies. Strategy tools and ‘how to’s’ are
taught providing a basic consulting skills and a toolkit for the
corporate strategist.
 Understand the concept of strategy and general management
lingo

Being able to develop and evaluate retailer strategies’

Provide retail consulting skills, including being able to apply
strategy tools

Provide students with an insight various pricing practices in
retail business
64

Understand and appreciate the principles and practices of
cross-border retailing

Teaching and learning
methods
Understand difficulties in the management of multinational
retail chains
 Lecture
 Case discussions
 Coaching of team project
Guest speakers
Special features (e.g. online
part, excursions, guest lectures
etc.)
Literature (set
 Course reader with selected strategy articles from leading
reading/additional
strategy & organizational journals
recommended literature)
 Johnson/ Scholes/ Whittington (2007): Exploring Corporate
Strategy, Prentice-Hall.
 Rumelt (2003): „What in the World is Competitive Advantage? “
UCLA Working Paper 2003-105.
 Case studies provided in course
Remarks
 Zentes/ Morschett/ Schramm-Klein (2007): Strategic Retail
Management: Text and International Cases, Gabler.
 Davies/ Brooks (1989): Positioning Strategy in Retailing, Paul
Chapman Publishing.
 Müller-Stewens/ Lechner (2005): Der General Management
Navigator: Wie strategische Initiativen zum Wandel führen“,
Schaeffer-Poeschl.
 Core Management Journals such as Strategic Management
Journal, Academy of Management Journal, Journal of Retailing,
Journal of International Retail & Distribution Management,
McKinsey Quarterly (online).
Number of students limited!
Binding registration till 11th October 2013 12pm (M 105) via
course choice list - A LATER DROPPING OF THIS COURSE
LEADS DIRECTLY TO A 5,0 (FAIL).
Please double check lecture dates as those might be subject to
change due to external guest speaker availability (!)
65
Course Code
Course title
Course title in LSF
Lecturer
Teaching language
Course requirements
Number of allocated ECTS
points
Workload
Breakdown of workload
IM-2.3.1.2 (M. A.)
Managing Corporate Distress
2.3.1 General Management (3102)
Prof. Dr. Jörg Funder
English
- Solid understanding of accounting principles and corporate
finance basics is required (!)
- Fluent English language ability
5 CP
150 h
Contact
Self-Study
Lecture:
35 h
65 h
Study/ Excursion:
10 h
40 h
45 h
105 h
Preparation:
Sum:
Total:
Hours per week
Type of test/requirements for
allocation of credit points
Content of course
Qualification goals
150 h
3 h (45 h total)
 Class participation (30%)
 Written case assignments (40%)
 Final project (30%)
Students learn, from the standpoint of a general manager, how to
distinguish between ‘troubled’ and ‘crisis’ companies and how to
use both qualitative and quantitative tools to effect solutions. As
every restructuring requires the satisfaction of many stakeholders
and interest groups in order to be successful and value enhancing
a sample of restructurings is evaluated and the wisdom of
management decisions is discussed. Furthermore, as the form of
restructuring is unique to each organization and what the entity
intends to achieve, the course is designed to foster a better
understanding of what corporations do and why they do it. The
course thereby examines challenges and opportunities that
organizations face within an restructuring phase
 Deep understanding of retail financials

Being able to distinguish between "troubled" and "crisis"
companies

Knowing both qualitative and quantitative tools to effect
solutions

Being able to develop (basic) restructuring programs and
evaluate restructuring programs

Knowing the success factors of corporate restructuring
programs
66

Teaching and learning
methods
Getting an overview of legal aspects associated with corporate
restructuring
 Lecture
 Case discussions
 Restructuring team project (develop own restructuring plan)
 Guest lectures of restructuring experts
Special features (e.g. online
part, excursions, guest lectures
etc.)
Literature (set

reading/additional
recommended literature)
Remarks
Bowman/ Singh (1993): ”Corporate restructuring:
reconfigurating the Firm”, Strategic Management Journal,14, 1,
pp. 5-14.
 Bowman/ Singh (1999): „When does restructuring improve
Economic performance?“, California Management Review, 41,
2, pp. 33-54.
 Course reader including case studies (pls. refer to terms
course syllabus for details as literature might be subject to
change given the dynamic nature of the field of study)
 Slatter/ Lovett/ Barlow (2006): “Leading corporate turnaround:
how leaders fix troubled companies”, Wiley.
 Finkelstein/ Whitehead/ Campbell (2009): “Think again: why
good leaders make bad decisions and how to keep it away
from you”, Harvard Business School Press.
 Hommel/ Knecht/ Wohlenberg (2006): Handbuch
Unternehmensrestrukturierung, Gabler.
 Kraus, K.-J., Blatz, M., Evertz, D. et al. (2004): Kompendium
der Restrukturierung, Sanierung, Insolvenz, 2nd Edition,
Privatdruck von Roland Berger Strategy Consultants GmbH:
Berlin.
 American Bankruptcy Institute (http://www.abiworld.org)
Number of students limited!
Binding registration till 11th October 2013 12pm (M 105) via
course choice list - A LATER DROPPING OF THIS COURSE
LEADS DIRECTLY TO A 5,0 (FAIL).
Please double check lecture dates as those might be subject to
change due to external guest speaker availability (!)
67
Course Code
Course title
Course title in LSF
Lecturer
Info
Questions concerning content
Teaching language
Course requirements
Number of allocated ECTS
points
Course workload
Beakdown of workload
IM-2.3.2.1 (M. A.)
Strategic Sourcing & Retail Procurement
2.3.2.1 Strategic Sourcing & Retail Procurement (3101)
Mr. Hans-Christian Seidel
International Management M. A.
Susanna Ripp
e-Mail: [email protected]
English
− Fluent English language ability
4 CP
120 h
Exam
Lecture:
Team project
Contact
SelfStudy
Contact
SelfStudy
35 h
40 h
35 h
40 h
10 h
35 h
45 h
75 h
Self-study/
project:
Exam prep:
10 h
35 h
Sum:
45 h
75 h
Total:
Hours per week
Type of test/requirements for
allocation of credit points
Content of course
Qualification goals
120 h
3 h (total 45 h)
Class participation / final exam or team project
Procurement is one of retailers’ most important functions.
Students will get to know about core procurement functions
and core cross-functional procurement processes.
Students will develop a struc-tured understanding about
tasks and core activities, which account for successful
procurement. The course thereby focuses on the
interdependence of retailers’ strat-egy and procurement
(brand building, market positioning, differentiation). Practices of an effective in-season manage-ment are
discussed, based on selected product types (basic &
promotion, perish-ables, fashion). Finally students will learn
on how to set up and execute category management
strategies.
 Gain understanding of end-to-end merchandising
process

Understand the ‘world of the buyer’ & the role of the
buyer in the merchandising organization

Get a structured understanding about the activities and
tasks that comprise success of buying and selling
merchandise
68

Understand retailer’s approach to (fact based)
negotiations and being able to prepare annual supplier
negotiations

Understand different dynamics and challenges of
product types

Get practical hands on experience of in-season
management

Understand typical issues of buyers in in-season
management

Being able to develop category strategies & understand
8 step approach to category management
 Lecture
 Case study discussion
 Role play
Special features (e.g. online
 Guest lecturers of invited procurement professionals
part, excursions, guest lectures  Negotiation training including discussion of intercultural
etc.)
differences in negotiation approaches
Set reading
Weele (2004): Purchasing & Supply Chain Management:
Analysis, Strategy, Planning and Practice, 4th Edition,
Wiley.
Booth (2010): Strategic Procurement: Organising Suppliers
and Supply Chains for Competitive Advantage, Kogan
Page.
Ulwick (2005): What Customers Want: Using OutcomeDriven Innovation to Create Breakthrough Products and
Services, McGraw-Hill.
Course reader with relevant journal papers and case
studies (for details see term course syllabus)
Additional recommended
Axelsson, Axelsson & Rozemeijer (2005): Developing
literature
Sourcing Capabilities: Creating Strategic Change in
Purchasing and Supply Management: From Insight to
Strategic Change, Wiley.
Kerkhoff et al. (2009): Einkaufsagenda 2020: Beschaffung
in der Zukunft - Wettbewerbsvorteile durch einen
visionären Einkauf sichern und ausbauen, Wiley.
Merkel et al. (2008): Global Sourcing im Handel – Wie
Modeunternehmen erfolgreich beschaffen, Springer.
Number of students limited!
Remarks
Teaching and learning
methods of course
Binding registration till 11th October 2013 12pm (M 105)
via course choice list - A LATER DROPPING OF THIS
COURSE LEADS DIRECTLY TO A 5,0 (FAIL).
69
Course Code
Course title
Course title in LSF
Entrance requirements
Name of lecturer(s)
Info
Questions concerning content
Teaching language
Number of allocated ECTS
points
Hours per week
Type of test/requirements for
allocation of credit points
Qualification goals of course
Content of course
IBA-10.1
Microeconomics
Mikroökonomie (1001)
None
Prof. Dr. Rieck
International Business Administration and Foreign Trade B. A.
Ms. Christin Voyé
E-mail: [email protected]
English
2,5 CP
2 h (total 30 h)
Final written exam
Acquisition of basic knowledge of microeconomics
1. Supply and demand
2. Consumer theory
3. Derivation of individual demand function
4. Production function
5. Cost theory
6. Theory of company offer and competition
Teaching and learning methods  Lectures
of course
 Self-study
 Presentations
Literature
Reiß, Winfried, Mikroökonomische Theorie, 6. Aufl., München,
(set reading/additional
Wien, 2007
recommended literature)
Varian, Hal R., Grundzüge der Mikroökonomik, 7. Aufl.,
München, Wien, 2007 (also english edition Intermediate
Microeconomics, Norton 2010)
Baßeler Ulrich, Grundlagen und Probleme der Volkswirtschaft,
10. Aufl. Stuttgart 2010
Samuelson, Paul A. Volkswirtschaftslehre 18. Aufl. Landsberg
2005 (also english edition Microeconomics McGraw-Hill,
2009)
Krugman, Paul, Wells, Robin, Volkswirtschaftslehre, Stuttgart
2010 (also english edition Economics Palgrave
Macmillan,
2009)
Remarks
Mankiw, Greg N., Volkswirtschafstlehre, Stuttgart 2004 (also
english edition Economics 2nd ed., South-Western Cengage
Learning, 2011)
Number of students limited!
70
Course Code
Course title
Course title in LSF
Entrance requirements
Name of lecturer(s)
Info
Questions concerning content
Teaching language
Number of allocated ECTS points
Hours per week
Type of test/requirements for
allocation of credit points
Qualification goals of course
Content of course
IBA-23.1
Intercultural Management Asia
Intercultural MT Asia (410)
None
Prof. Dr. Rieck
International Business Administration and Foreign Trade B. A.
Ms. Christin Voyé
E-mail: [email protected]
English
2 CP
1 h (total 15 h)
Final exam
The students are aware of the differences in culture and
business life and know how to handle them (especially China,
Japan, Asian tigers).
1. Basics of intercultural communication
 Culture
 The German image
 German cultural standards
 Stereotypes
2. Facts and figures on selected Asian countries
 Geography
 History
 Language and religion
 Political system
 Economy
3. Socio-cultural aspects on selected Asian countries
 Hierarchy
 Concept of time
 Social relationships
 Communication styles
 Nonverbal communication
 Business etiquette
 Business negotiations
 Social activities
4. Business etiquette & business negotiations
Teaching and learning methods of
course
5. Typical cultural phenomena
 Interactive lectures incl. teamwork (worksheets,
simulations, role plays, case studies, current topics
and articles)
 Presentations
 Self-directed learning
 Verbal competency and a continuous, active
71
participation
Literature
(set reading/additional
recommended literature)
Bredon, J. & Mitrophanow, I.: Das Mondjahr, Wien 1937
Chen, H: Kulturschock China, Taiwan und HongKong
Fischer, D.: Länderbericht China
Hall, E. T.: The Silent language in overseas business, 1960
Hofstede, G. & Hofstede, G. J.: Cultures and Organizations,
2005
Kotte, J.: Geschäftlich in China, 2008
Kutschker, M. & Schmid, S.: Internationales Management,
2006
Lewis, R. D.: Handbuch internationale Kompetenz, 2000
Von Senger, H., 36 Strategeme für Manager, München 2004
Shuna Hsu & Evan Frendo (2010): Working in Asia, Cornelsen
Verlag
Journals/Magazines
Business Forum China, Karlsruhe Germany
The China Business Review, Washington DC
The McKinsey Quarterly, New York
Remarks
Wirtschaftswoche, Germany
All Intercultural Management courses offered by IBA start
with the Intercultural Management Basics course
(lecturer: Mr. Mejri).
This is part of the Intercultural Management Asia and it is
included in the 2 CP. The visit is mandatory in order to
attend the Intercultural Management Asia course
afterwards and to pass the course. The basic course is
not a separate course, which need to be mentioned on
your course choice list!
72
Course Code
Course title
Course title in LSF
Entrance requirements
Name of lecturer(s)
Info
Questions concerning content
Teaching language
Number of allocated ECTS
points
Hours per week
Type of test/requirements for
allocation of credit points
Qualification goals of course
Content of course
IBA-23.2
Intercultural Management East Europe
Intercultural MT East Europe (420)
None
Prof. Dr. Michael Graef
International Business Administration and Foreign Trade B. A.
Ms. Christin Voyé
E-mail: [email protected]
English
2 CP
1 h (total 15 h)
Final exam
Enable the student to
 do business in Eastern Europe and South Eastern Europe.
 Avoid cultural shocks and to handle intercultural
differences.
 Overcoming cultural differences in negotiation skills,
values and attitudes and building up interpersonal
relationships with your business partner.
 Developments and trends in the economic and political
systems in East and Southeast Europe/economic systems
in transition
 Political and social trends
 Economic history and development

Problems and perspectives of selected economic
systems/East and Southeast European countries

Opportunities and risks of a market entry in East Europe

Development of selected market segments

National culture and corporate culture in East and
Southeast Europe

Intercultural/culturally comparative management
studies

Germany and East European countries in comparison
Overcoming cultural differences in business activities
with an in East and Southeast Europe
 Overcoming cultural differences in business activities with
an in East and Southeast Europe

Negotiation techniques

Verbal, paraverbal and nonverbal communication

Values and attitudes

Build‐ up of interpersonal/personal relationships with
73
business partners

Human resource management – recruiting and retention
management 
Recruiting, structure and stage of development of
human resource markets

Retention management/proper incentives for East
Europe

Labour law

Deciding between secondment and local staffing

Leadership/management culture

Teaching and learning methods
of course
Literature
(set reading/additional
recommended literature)
Management and organization of East European
companies
Lectures, case studies, self-study
Domsch, Michel, and Tatjana Lidokhover (eds.), Human
Resource Management in Russia, Aldershot et al. 2007
Morley, Michael, Noreen Heraty, Snejina Michailova (eds.),
Managing Human Resources in Central and Eastern Europe,
London et al. 2008
Mueller, Susanne, Werner Stein and Peter Simon (eds.),
Modern South Eastern Europe, A Handbook for Investors and
Executives, Frankfurt 2010
Pavlovskaya, Anna, Cultureshock!, A Survival Guide to
Customs and Etiquette, Russia, New York 2007
Richmond, Yale, From Nyet to Da, Understanding the New
th
Russia, 4 edition, Boston and London 2009
Williams, Isobel, and Stuart Amor, Working in Russia and
Eastern Europe, Berlin 2010
Remarks
All Intercultural Management courses offered by IBA start
with the Intercultural Management Basics course
(lecturer: Mr. Mejri).
This is part of the Intercultural Management Asia and it is
included in the 2 CP. The visit is mandatory in order to
attend the Intercultural Management East Europe course
afterwards and to pass the course. The basic course is
not a separate course, which need to be mentioned on
your course choice list!
74
Course Code
Course title
Course title in LSF
Entrance requirements
Name of lecturer(s)
Info
Questions concerning content
Teaching language
Number of allocated ECTS
points
Hours per week
Type of test/requirements for
allocation of credit points
Qualification goals of course
Content of course
IBA-23.3
Intercultural Management Iberoamerica
Intercultural MT Iberoamerica (430)
None
Prof. Dr. Münscher
International Business Administration and Foreign Trade B. A.
Ms. Christin Voyé
E-mail: [email protected]
English
2 CP
1 h (total 15 h)
Final exam
The students know the determining socio-economic factors of
elective Central and Southern American countries as well as
Spain and Portugal. They are thereby informed of the
business structures and conditions. At the same time, they are
familiar with culture-specific behaviour patterns concerning
business communication and etiquette. As a result, the
students possess intercultural competency and security while
dealing with Iberoamerican business communities.
1. Basics of intercultural communication
 Concept of culture
 Image of Germans
 German cultural standards
 Stereotypes
2. Facts and figures of selected Iberoamerican states
 Geography
 History
 Language and religion
 Political system
 Economy
Teaching and learning methods
of course
3. Socio-cultural aspects of selected Iberoamerican states
 Hierarchy
 Concept of time
 Social relationships
 Communication styles
 Nonverbal communication
 Business etiquette
 Business negotiations
 Social activities
 Typical cultural phenomena
Interactive seminar with discussions, trainings and
presentations.
75
Literature
(set reading/additional
recommended literature)
Remarks


Script
Composition of Internet pages on current topics and
information on countries
 Padilla Gálvez/Gaffal, Spanienknigge, Oldenbourg:
München 2005
 Marek/Müller, Unternehmenskultur in Spanien.
Interkultureller Managementleitfaden, IKO-Verlag:
Frankfurt am Main 200
 Werz, Lateinamerika. Eine Einführung, Nomos: Baden‐
Baden 2005
 Schweickhart/Kaufmann (Hrsg.): Lateinamerika‐
Management. Konzepte, Prozesse, Erfahrungen, Gabler:
Wiesbaden 2004
 Terri Morrison & Wayne A. Conaway (2006): Kiss, Bow,
or Shake Hands: Latin America: How to Do Business in
18 Latin American Countries. Adams Media
 Robert Crane und Carlos Rizowyvon Palgrave (2011):
Latin American Business Cultures. Palgrave
Advanced English skills required
All Intercultural Management courses offered by IBA start
with the Intercultural Management Basics course
(lecturer: Mr. Mejri).
This is part of the Intercultural Management Asia and it is
included in the 2 CP. The visit is mandatory in order to
attend the Intercultural Management Iberoamerica course
afterwards and to pass the course. The basic course is
not a separate course, which need to be mentioned on
your course choice list!
76
Course Code
Course title
Course title in LSF
Entrance requirements
Name of lecturer(s)
Info
Questions concerning content
Teaching language
Number of allocated ECTS
points
Hours per week
Type of test/requirements for
allocation of credit points
Qualification goals of course
IBA-23.4
Intercultural Management Middle East & Arab World
Intercultural MT Arab World (440)
None
Mr. Ridha Mejri
International Business Administration and Foreign Trade B. A.
Ms. Christin Voyé
E-mail: [email protected]
English
2 CP
1 h (total 15 h)
Final exam





Raising intercultural understanding through a mixture of
detailed background information as well as practical advice
and solutions
Optimization of intercultural competency by understanding
culture and etiquette
Approach to various socio-economic and socio-cultural
realities of the Arab world and the Middle East region
Practical strategies to successfully conduct businesses in
the Middle East region and the Arab world
Beside geographic and general knowledge about the
Middle East region and the Arab world, the students are
able to:
a) Investigate core elements of socio-economic structures of
the 22 Arabic countries and the Middle East region
b) Use essential Arabic sentences („door and heart openers“)
The course provides a fundamental overview of data sources
concerning the Arab world and Middle East.
Content of course
1. Introduction into the Middle East region and the Arab world
(geography, history, language and religion, political
systems, economy, etc.)
2. Country descriptions, selected indicators, etc.
3. Important structures as well as economic, socio-political
and cultural conditions for establishing commercial
relationships and realizing economic projects with the Arab
world and the Middle East region are demonstrated.
4. Role of intercultural communication and national language
for trade
5. Discussion on “stereotypes” and
misunderstandings/missing communication as well as
theis effects on conducting or establishing a business in
the Arab world or the Middle East business in the region
77
6. Business culture and attitudes at workplaces in the Middle
East and the Arab world: hierarchy, rules, time,
relationships, management, polychromic vs. monochromic,
communication, behavioural rules, negotiations, etc.
7. Islamic financial system
Teaching and learning methods  Interactive lectures incl. team work
of course
 Worksheets, simulations, role plays, case studies, current
topics and articles
 Presentations
 Self-directed learning
 Verbal competency and a continuous, active participation
Literature
Atiyyah, Hamid (1995) How to Live and Work in the Gulf, How
(set reading/additional
to Books
recommended literature)
Burke, Edmund (1992) Struggle and Survival in the Modern
Middle East (Society and Culture in the Modern Middle East),
I B Tauris & Co, Ltd.
Foster, Dean (2002) The Global Etiquette Guide to Africa and
the Middle East, Wiley Publishers
Nydell, Margaret (2005) Understanding Arabs, Intercultural
Press
Williams, Jeremy (2006) Don’t they know it’s Friday? Gulf
Business Books of Motivate Publishing
CultureShock! Guides
Novell B. De Atkine, Raphael Patai (2007): The Arab Mind.
Hatherleigh Press
Kratochwill, G., Business-Knigge Arabische Welt, orell füssli
Verlag AG, 2007
J.Al-Omari (2008) Understanding the Arab Culture. How To
Books Ltd; 2 Rev Ededition
Brian Kettel (2010) Islamic Finance in a Nutshell. John Wiley
& Sons Ltd.
Ortlieb, S. (2006) Business Knigge für den Orient. Bildung &
Wissen Verlag
Remarks
Jeremy Williams (2010): Don’t they Know It’s Friday
All Intercultural Management courses offered by IBA start
with the Intercultural Management Basics course
(lecturer: Mr. Mejri).
This is part of the Intercultural Management Asia and it is
included in the 2 CP. The visit is mandatory in order to
attend the Intercultural Management Middle East & Arab
World course afterwards and to pass the course. The
basic course is not a separate course, which need to be
mentioned on your course choice list!
78
Course Code
Course title
Course title in LSF
Entrance requirements
Name of lecturer(s)
Info
Questions concerning content
Teaching language
Number of allocated ECTS
points
Hours per week
Type of test/requirements for
allocation of credit points
Qualification goals of course
Content of course
IBA-35.1
International Entrepreneurship
Gründungs- & InnovationsMT (3500)
None
Prof. Dr. Michael Graef
International Business Administration and Foreign Trade B. A.
Ms. Christin Voyé
E-mail: [email protected]
English
5 CP
4 h (total 60 h)
Final written exam
The students will be able to
 Identify business ideas based on a lucrative, sustainable
and value-based planning and market them
 Establish and manage an international company
 Entrepreneur and entrepreneurship/theoretical
considerations
 Global markets / globalization of industries
 International entrepreneurial mindset/international new
ventures
 Internationalization
 Reasons and strategies
 Types
 Identification of business opportunities
 Unique selling propostion and comparative advantages
 Feasibility study
 Business plan for an international new venture
 Structure and requirements for the content design
 Target groups
 Management and organizations of the international
new venture
 Configuration and coordination of the value chain
 Market and competitive analysis
 Sales planning and strategic growth
 Market entry strategies
 Pricing and pricing policy
 Entrepreneurial environment/input factors
 Human resources
 Capital for start-up companies (traditional sources of
financing, venture capital financing)
 Support for start-ups
 Location decision
 Budgeting
 Planning for profitability
 Liquidity planning
 Cash flow statement / income statement / balance
79
sheet
Financial needs and financial accounts / structuring of
the financing / short, medium and long-term financial
planning
 Sensitivity analysis
Teaching and learning methods Lectures, case studies, project work, self-study
of course
Literature
De, Dennis, Entrepreneurship, Gründung und Wachstum von
(set reading/additional
kleinen und mittleren Unternehmen, München et al. 2005
recommended literature)
Delaney, Laurel, Start and Run a Profitable Exporting
Business, Bellingham et al. 1998

McDougall, Patricia, Benjamin Oviatt and Rodney Shrader, A
Comparsion of International and Domestic New Ventures, in:
Journal of International Entrepreneurship, Quarter 1, 2003, S.
59-82
Oviatt, Benjamin, and Particia Phillips, Toward a theory of
international new ventures, in: Journal of International
Business Studies, First Quarter 1994, S. 45-64
Léo-Paul Dana (Hrsg.), Handbook of Research on
International Entrepreneurship, Cheltenham et al. 2004
Dillerup, Ralf, und Roman Stoi, Unternehmensführung,
München 2006
Kutschker, Michael, und Stefan Schmid, Internationales
Management, 4. Aufl., München et al. 2005
Ostendorf, Export-Push oder -Pull?
Internationalisierungsstrategien von Klein- und Mittelbetrieben,
in: Kleine und mittlere Unternehmen in einer globalisierten
Welt, hrsg. von Klaus Müller und Ralf Paquin, Köln 2003, S.
175-188
Perlitz, Manfred, Internationales Management, 5. Aufl.,
Stuttgart 2004
Remarks
Alain Fayolle und Heinz Klandt (Hrsg.), International
Entrepreneurship Education
Please enrol for this course only if you are able to attend
the complete lecture (definetly no overlapping with other
courses)!
This course is together with IBA-35.2 (LSF) – please ask
the lecturer in the first session which dates are relevant
only for IBA-35.1.
80
Course Code
Course title
Course title in LSF
Entrance requirements
Name of lecturer(s)
Info
Questions concerning content
Teaching language
Number of allocated ECTS
points
Hours per week
Type of test/requirements for
allocation of credit points
Qualification goals of course
Content of course
IBA-35.2
Innovation Management
Gründungs- & InnovationsMT (3500)
None
Prof. Dr. Michael Graef
International Business Administration and Foreign Trade B. A.
Ms. Christin Voyé
E-mail: [email protected]
English
2,5 CP
2 h (total 30h)
Exam
Students
 understand the management of innovation as the
central task of management
 know the stages, phases and characteristics of the
corporate innovation process
 are familiar with handling innovation-promoting and
inhibitory forces
1. Key aspects of Innovation Management
a) Definitions and basic concepts
b) Functions and duties
c) Innovation activities and policies
2. Innovation strategies and typologies
3. Actors of innovation management
4. Innovation process
a) Problem definition and initiation
b) Idea generation and creativity
c) Evaluation, selection and implementation
d) Innovation controlling
5. Barriers to innovation
a) Resistance as an essential characteristic
b) Causes and reinforcements
c) Overcoming of resistance
6. Organizational design and corporate culture
7. Protection of innovation
a) Non-formal protection instruments
b) Intellectual property
c) Patents
d) Protection strategies
81
8. Innovation Success
a) Dimensions
b) Measurement
c) Factors
9. Ethical aspects
Teaching and learning methods Interactive lecture
of course
Literature
- Script
(set reading/additional
- Hauschildt/Salomo, Innovationsmanagement, Vahlen:
recommended literature)
München.
- Vahs/Burmester, Innovationsmanagement, SchäfferPoeschel: Stuttgart.
- Burr, Innovationen in Organisationen, Kohlhammer:
Stuttgart.
- Strebel, Innovations- und Technologiemanagement, UTB:
Stuttgart.
- Gerpott, Strategisches Technologie- und
Innovationsmanagement, Schäffer-Poeschel: Stuttgart.
- Bergmann/Daub, Systemisches Innovations- und
Kompetenzmanagement, Gabler: Wiesbaden.
- Corsten/Gössinger/Schneider, Grundlagen des
Innovationsmanagements, Vahlen: München.
Please enrol for this course only if you are able to attend
Remarks
the complete lecture (definetly no overlappings with other
courses)!
This course is together with IBA-35.1 (LSF) – please ask
the lecturer in the first session which dates are relevant
only for IBA-35.2.
82
Course Code
Course title
Course title in LSF
Entrance requirements
Name of lecturer(s)
Info
Questions concerning content
Teaching language
Number of allocated ECTS
points
Hours per week
Type of test/requirements for
allocation of credit points
Qualification goals of course
IBA-12.1
Business English 1 Basic Business Terminology
English I (1200)
None
Ms. Holfelder
International Business Administration and Foreign Trade B. A.
Ms. Christin Voyé
E-mail: [email protected]
English
3,75 CP
3 h (total 45 h)
Final written exam
The students:

Content of course
acquire the necessary theoretical knowledge to
communicate successfully in business life.
 improve their communication skills, build up their
business vocabulary, refresh and broaden their
grammar skills.
The following topics will be dealt with:
 Company structures
 Recruitment
 Retailing
 Franchising
 International business styles
 Banking
 Business environment
 Stock market
 Import/export
 Company performance
The script offers additional exercises:
 False friends
 Prepositions
 Telephone conversations
 Audiovisual media
Teaching and learning methods
 Interactive lectures with teamwork (homework,
of course
worksheets, simulations, role plays, case studies,
current topics and articles, etc.)
 Self-study
 Oral skills and a regular, active participation
 Final exam incl. discussion of results
Literature
 Tonya Trappe & Graham Tullis (2005): Intelligent
(set reading/additional
Business. Longman
recommended literature)
 Magazines: Business Spotlight, The Economist,
Fortune, Businessweek, etc.
83

Remarks
Collins German‐ English/English German Dictionary
(or similar), latest edition
 Longman Business English Dictionary, latest edition
 Martin Hewings, Advanced Grammar in Use, 2006,
Cambridge University Press
 Peter Strutt (2000): Market Leader. Business Grammar
and Usage. Longman
Number of students limited!
84
Course Code
Course title
Course title in LSF
Entrance requirements
Name of lecturer(s)
Info
Questions concerning content
Teaching language
Number of allocated ECTS
points
Hours per week
Type of test/requirements for
allocation of credit points
Qualification goals of course
Content of course
IBA-13.1
Business English 2 Advanced Business English in Use
Englisch II (1300)
None
Mr. Mejri
International Business Administration and Foreign Trade B. A.
Ms. Christin Voyé
E-mail: [email protected]
English
3,75 CP
2 h (total 30 h)
Final written exam
The students should:

acquire the specific terminology/business jargon as
well as the corresponding vocabulary (socializing,
meeting, negotiation, marketing, describing diagrams,
etc.).

be able to write reports and essays on business topics.

be able to moderate a brainstorming session
(e.g. marketing, teleworking, working abroad, current
economic situation in Germany, globalization, etc.).
Additionally, made‐ to‐ measure exercises will increase
students’ semantic technical language skills.
The following topics will be dealt with:
1. Socializing
2. Meetings
3. Business jargon
4. Video analysis (meeting objectives , market leader portfolio,
intelligent business)
5. Presenting facts & figures
6. Marketing/business strategies
7. Negotiations
8. Job applications (CV, letter of application, job interview,
recruitment process, etc.)
9. Case studies
10. Setting up a business, corporate alliances & acquisitions
and business media
Teaching and learning methods
 Interactive lectures with teamwork (homework,
of course
worksheets, simulations, role plays, case studies,
current topics and articles, etc.)
85
Literature
(set reading/additional
recommended literature)
Remarks




Self-study
Oral skills and a regular, active participation
Final exam incl. discussion of results
Tonya Trappe & Graham Tullis (2005): Intelligent
Business. Longman
 Magazines: Business Spotlight, The Economist,
Fortune, Businessweek, etc.
 Collins German‐ English/English German Dictionary
(or similar), latest edition
 Longman Business English Dictionary, latest edition
 Martin Hewings, Advanced Grammar in Use, 2006,
Cambridge University Press
 Peter Strutt (2000): Market Leader. Business Grammar
and Usage. Longman
 Script with exercises, audiovisual media
Number of students limited!
86
Course Code
Course title
Course title in LSF
Entrance requirements
Name of lecturer(s)
Info
Questions concerning content
Teaching language
Number of allocated ECTS
points
Hours per week
Type of test/requirements for
allocation of credit points
Qualification goals of course
Content of course
IBA-14.1
Business English 3 Presentations
Englisch III (1400)
None
Mr. Mejri
International Business Administration and Foreign Trade B. A.
Ms. Christin Voyé
E-mail: [email protected]
English
3,75 CP
3 h (total 45 h)
Final written exam
The students are to:
 prepare a presentation (of a company)
 be well informed about the topic
 participate actively in discussions
 improve their communication skills and
 presentation techniques
 improve their oral language skills
 be able to analyse and evaluate presentations of their
fellow students
1. Emphasis:
 Theory and practical exercises
 Analysis and integration of the audience
 Verbal and non-verbal communication
 Evaluation of presentations
 Tools and techniques
2. Additionally the script includes the following
topics:
 Entering a foreign market
 International mergers
 Global production
 Thinking global, acting local
 Overseas postings
 Global careers
 Recruiting internationally, etc.
Teaching and learning methods
 Interactive lectures with teamwork (homework,
of course
worksheets, simulations, role plays, case studies,
current topics and articles, etc.)
 Self-study
 Oral skills and a regular, active participation
 Final exam incl. discussion of results
Literature
 Adrian Pilbeam, Market Leader: International
(set reading/additional
Management, 2000, Longman
recommended literature)
 Script
87

Remarks
Bob Dignen, Fifty Ways to Improve your Presentation
Skills in English…Without Too Much Effort!,
Langenscheidt/Summertown.
 Jo Billingham, Giving Presentations, Oxford University
Press.
 Marion Grussendorf, Presenting in English, Cornelsen.
 Mark Powell (2010): Dynamic Presentations.
Cambridge University Press.
Number of students limited!
88
Course Code
Course title
Course title in LSF
Entrance requirements
Name of lecturer(s)
Info
Questions concerning content
Teaching language
Number of allocated ECTS
points
Hours per week
Type of test/requirements for
allocation of credit points
Qualification goals of course
Content of course
IBA-15.1
Business English 4 International Business Studies
Englisch IV (1500)
None
Mr. Mejri
International Business Administration and Foreign Trade B. A.
Ms. Christin Voyé
E-mail: [email protected]
English
5 CP
4 h (total 60 h)
Final written exam
The students should:
 be able to analyse, summarise and present complex
case studies
 be able to deal with and discuss current topics like
globalisation, management, building brands,
innovations, leadership, environment, etc.
1. Video analysis:
 Business leader briefings: presentation of authentic
interviews with 14 of the world’s top business leaders
on video
 Alliance: an exciting case study about the alliance of
two airlines
 CNBC one-on‐ one CEO interview programme The
Leaders
2. Current case studies
(Harvard Business School, London Business School or
equivalent)
3. Presentations
(country profiles, company presentations, business topics, or
organizations/institutions)
Teaching and learning methods
 Interactive lectures with teamwork (homework,
of course
worksheets, simulations, role plays, case studies,
current topics and articles, etc.)
 Self-study
 Oral skills and a regular, active participation
 Final exam incl. discussion of results
Literature
 Harvard Business School case studies
(set reading/additional
 Business Spotlight
recommended literature)
 Fred Luthans & Jonathan Doh (2011): International
Management: Culture, Strategy, and Behavior.
McGraw‐ Hill Companies,Inc.
 Yang Kim & Curt Wozniak (2010): Brand Identity
89
Remarks
Essentials: 100 Principles for Designings Logos &
Building Brands. Rockport Publishers.
 Peter Guy Northouse (2009): Leadership: Theory and
Practice. Sage Publications. Inc.
 Michael Blowfield & Alan Murray (2011): Corporate
Responsibility. Oxford University Press.
 Kenneth Laudon & Carol Guercio Traver (2010): E‐
Commerce 2011. Prectice Hall.
 Philip Cateora, Mary Gilly & John Graham (2010):
International Marketing. McGraw‐ Hill/Irwin
 Patrick A. Gaughan (2010): Mergers, Acquisitions, and
Corporate Restructurings. Wiley
Number of students limited!
90
Course Code
Course title
Course title in LSF
Entrance requirements
Name of lecturer(s)
Info
Questions concerning content
Teaching language
Number of allocated ECTS
points
Hours per week
Type of test/requirements for
allocation of credit points
Qualification goals of course
Content of course
IBA-16.1
Business English 5 Intercultural Studies Europe & the
Anglophone World
Englisch V (1600)
None
Mr. Mejri
International Business Administration and Foreign Trade B. A.
Ms. Christin Voyé
E-mail: [email protected]
English
2,5 CP
2 h (total 30 h)
Final written exam
The students:
 learn how national cultures differ and how to handle
these differences.
 learn especially what to consider when communicating
and negotiating with people from different cultures and
how to motivate and lead them.
 improve their intercultural competences.
 acquire the basic terms of intercultural competency
(e.g. stereotypes, high context/low context culture,
verbal vs. nonverbal communication, polychronic vs.
monochronic, etc.).
 present a country in respect of intercultural
competency.
 be able to improve their key competences in
intercultural communication and for negotiations as
well as broaden their linguistic and semantic ESP
basis.
1. Analysis on communication processes and
examination of attitude as well as linguistic
barriers which threaten the understanding across
borders in international business.
2. Cultural dimensions (negotiations,
communications, rules of conduct, decision
making, management, corporate culture, etc.).
3. Case studies, critical situations and simulations.
4. Presentation on one country.
5. Essays on current topics like outsourcing, flat
taxes, minimum wage policy, privatization of state
pensions or study fees, improvement of written
skills.
91
Teaching and learning methods
of course
Literature
(set reading/additional
recommended literature)
Remarks

Interactive lectures with teamwork (homework,
worksheets, simulations, role plays, case studies,
current topics and articles, etc.)
 Self-study
 Oral skills and a regular, active participation
 Final exam incl. discussion of results
 Dereskey, Helen, International Management:
Managing Across Borders and Cultures
 Trompenaars, Fons and Charles Hampden‐ Turner.
Riding the Waves of Culture
 G. Hofstede, Cultural Consequences. Sage, Beverly
Hills 1980.
 Richard, D. Lewis: When Cultures Collide.
 Jandt, F.E., An Introduction to Intercultural
Communication: Identities in a Global Community,
Sage Publications, 2003
 Lewis, R.D., Cultural Imperative: Global Trends in the
21st Century, Intercultural Press, 2002
 Morrison, Terri; Conaway, Wayne A. (2007). Kiss,
Bow, or Shake Hands, Europe. How to do Business in
25 European countries. B&T; Adams Media.
 Pamela Pickford, Richard Crowe (2009): Market
Leader Intermediate Alliance Video. Longman
 Script with excercises
 Myron W. Lustig & Jolene Koester (2009): Intercultural
Competence: Interpersonal Communication Across
Cultures. Allyn & Bacon
 Jean‐ Claude Usunier (2009): Marketing Across
Cultures. Prentice Hall
 James William Neuliep (2011): Intercultural
Communication: A Contextual Approach. Sage
Publications, Inc.
Number of students limited!
92
Course Code
Course title
Course title in LSF
Entrance requirements
Name of lecturer(s)
Info
Questions concerning content
Teaching language
Number of allocated ECTS
points
Hours per week
Type of test/requirements for
allocation of credit points
Qualification goals of course
IBA-20.1
Business Spanish 4
Wirtschaftsspanisch IV (2010)
Very good skills in Spanish
Ms. Rosa Haro-Schmitt
International Business Administration and Foreign Trade B. A.
Ms. Christin Voyé
E-mail: [email protected]
German into Spanish
5 CP
4 h (total 60 h)
Written and oral exam
 Extension of knowledge of oral and written language
 Comprehension of more complex texts
 Composition of short texts
 Linguistic mastering of typical everyday life situations
 Improvement of communication skills
 Extended knowledge of grammatical structures
Content of course
1. Extension of basic vocabulary
2. Improvement of oral communication skills
3. Everyday speech and expressions
4. Deepening of grammar structures
5. Regional Hispanic studies and cultural
understanding
Teaching and learning methods Language course with excercises and self-study parts
of course
Literature
Dictionaries (German-Spanish) published by Langenscheidt or
(set reading/additional
Pons
recommended literature)
Grammar books, Spanish Grammar, published by Klett
Number of students limited!
Remarks
93
Course Code
Course title
Course title in LSF
Entrance requirements
Name of lecturer(s)
Info
Questions concerning content
Teaching language
Number of allocated ECTS
points
Hours per week
Type of test/requirements for
allocation of credit points
Qualification goals of course
IBA-21.1
Business Spanish 5
Wirtschaftsspanisch V (2110)
Very good skills in Spanish
Ms. Rosa Haro-Schmitt
International Business Administration and Foreign Trade B. A.
Ms. Christin Voyé
E-mail: [email protected]
German into Spanish
2,5 CP
2 h (total 30 h)
Final exam
The students know the Spanish terms in the context of
important company operations and are able to apply them
orally and in writing. They also get prepared for the Certificado
Superior del Español de los Negocios (C1) of the Madrid
Chamber of Commerce.
Content of course
1. Definition and classification of companies
2. Formation of a company
3. Company organization
4. Human resources
5. Finance
6. Marketing
7. Internationalization
8. Accounting
9. Taxes
Teaching and learning methods Language course with excercises and self-study parts
of course
Literature
Comunicación eficaz para los negocios, ISBN 978 84 7711
(set reading/additional
700 1
recommended literature)
Number of students limited!
Remarks
94
Course Code
Course title
Course title in LSF
Entrance requirements
Name of lecturer(s)
Info
Questions concerning content
Teaching language
Number of allocated ECTS
points
Hours per week
Type of test/requirements for
allocation of credit points
Qualification goals of course
IBA-22.1
Business Spanish 6
Wirtschaftsspanisch VI
Very good skills in Spanish
Ms. Rosa Haro-Schmitt
International Business Administration and Foreign Trade B. A.
Ms. Christin Voyé
E-mail: [email protected]
Spanish
2,5 CP
2 h (total 30 h)
Final exam and presentation
The students know the Spanish terms in the context of
important company operations and are able to apply them
orally and in writing.
Content of course
1. Definition and classification of companies
2. Formation of a company
3. Company organization
4. Human resources
5. Finance
6. Marketing
7. Internationalization
8. Accounting
9. Taxes
Teaching and learning methods Language course with excercises and self-study parts
of course
Literature
Pareja López: Temas de empresa. Manual para la
(set reading/additional
preparación del Certificado Superior del Español de los
recommended literature)
Negocios, Edinumen: Madrid 2005
Remarks
Composition of exercises
Number of students limited!
95
Course Code
Course title
Course title in LSF
Entrance requirements
Name of lecturer(s)
Info
Questions concerning content
Teaching language
Number of allocated ECTS
points
Type of test/requirements for
allocation of credit points
Content of course
IBA-1.1 (M. A.)
Strategies of Internationalization
Strategies of Internationaliziation (100)
None
Prof. Dr. Graef/Guest speakers from the business sector
International Business Administration and Foreign Trade M. A.
Ms. Christin Voyé
E-mail: [email protected]
English
1 CP
Compulsory attendance
Single lectures by guest lecturers mainly from industry who
will focus on certain key aspects of International Business
Strategy. An indicative list of topics of these guest lectures
could include the following topics of internationalization
strategy:
Setting the right strategy in an international environment
Globalized industries / Industry life cycle concept (Steel,
Automotive)
Globalization and international business - intercultural
environments, political and legal environments
Internationalization strategy / Global integration vs. local
responsiveness
Levels and limits of internationalization
Strategy of market selection and global integration vs. local
responsiveness
Value chain management / International configuration and
coordination of corporate value chain
Management of strategic growth / external vs. organic growth /
mergers & acquisitions
Cross national co-operations and agreements, joint ventures
Remarks
Management of multinational companies
Compulsory attendance at all presentations by guest
speakers in order to get the 1CP! You can not miss more
than one guest speaker!
Please enroll in moodle for this course in order to get all
necessary information! Please ask Ms. Christin Voyé for
the password for moodle.
96
Course Code
Course title
Course title in LSF
Entrance requirements
Name of lecturer(s)
Info
Questions concerning content
Teaching language
Number of allocated ECTS
points
Hours per week
Type of test/requirements for
allocation of credit points
Qualification goals of course
Content of course
IBA-2.1 (M. A.)
Selected Problems of International Trade
Selected Problems of Int. Trade (200)
Minimum of 120 CP in Bachelor degree course
Prof. Dr. Graef
Prof. Dr. Keim
International Business Administration and Foreign Trade M. A.
Ms. Christin Voyé
E-mail: [email protected]
English
4 CP
3 h (total 30 h)
Final written exam, presentation (bonus)
The module is a core subject. It uses selected examples and case
studies and aims at quickly making bachelor’s graduates familiar
with particular questions of foreign trade.

Case Studies in selected current topics in
internationalization and handling of international
business deals
 Emphasis on the areas of international financing,
internation payment transactions, customs and trade
barriers, etc.
Teaching and learning methods  Lectures
of course
 Case Studies will be announced at the beginning of the
semester
Literature
 Dicken, P., Global Shift, 6th ed., Los Angeles 2011
(set reading/additional
 UBS (Hrsg.), Foreign Exchange and Money Market – A
recommended literature)
Guide to the World of Currency Dealing, Zürich, 2006
 Salvatore, Dominick, International Economics 10th ed.
Hoboken NJ, 2011
 Delaney, L., Start and Run a Profitable Exporting
Business, Bellingham et al. 1998
 Branch, A., Export Practice and Management, 5th ed.,
London 2005
 Ball / McCulloch / Geringer / Minor / McNett,
International Business, The Challenge of Global
Competition, 11th ed., Columbus 2008
 Bartlett / Goshal / Beamish, Transnational
Management, Text, Cases & Readings in CrossBorder Management, Columbus 2006
 Nelson, C., Import-Export, How to take your business
across borders, 4th ed., Columbus 2009
 Harvard Business School Case Studies
Number of students limited!
Remarks
97
Course Code
Course title
Course title in LSF
Entrance requirements
Name of lecturer(s)
Info
Questions concerning content
Teaching language
Number of allocated ECTS
points
Hours per week
Type of test/requirements for
allocation of credit points
Qualifications goals of course
IBA-3.1 (M. A.)
International Economics
Int. Economics (300)
Minimum of 120 CP in Bachelor degree course
Prof. Dr. Keim
International Business Administration and Foreign Trade M. A.
Ms. Christin Voyé
E-mail: [email protected]
English
4 CP
3 h (total 45 h)
Final exam / Presentation (bonus)
Students acquire in-depth understanding of foreign trade
policy and theory.
In this way they will be able to critically evaluate the
multilateral institutions’ global framework and their working
methods.
Content of course
Teaching and learning methods
of course
Literature
Remarks



Structures in foreign economics
International economict heories
Instruments in foreign trade and international economic
policies
 Development politics
 Fiscal and monetary policy in a global environment
Lectures, presetations, case studies
Krugman, Paul R. and Obstfeld, Maurice (2008), International
Economics, 8th edition
None
98
Course Code
Course title
Course title in LSF
Entrance requirements
Name of lecturer(s)
Info
Questions concerning content
Teaching language
Number of allocated ECTS
points
Hours per week
Type of test/requirements for
allocation of credit points
Qualification goals of course
Content of course
Teaching and learning methods
of course
Literature
(set reading/additional
recommended literature)
Remarks
IBA-5.1 (M. A.)
International Project Management
Int. ProjectMT (510)
Minimum of 120 CP in Bachelor degree course
Prof. Dr. Sebastian Herr
International Business Administration and Foreign Trade M. A.
Ms. Christin Voyé
E-mail: [email protected]
English
2 CP
2 h (total 30 h)
Virtual projects
Presentations
Report
Through lectures and exercises the module aims at imparting
practice oriented, specialised knowledge and methodological
skills in the area of project management. It also aspires to
raise awareness for intercultural aspects in projects and
companies.
 Terms and basic principles
 Requirements for a successful project management
 Project assignment and start of project
 Project analysis and planning
 Project realisation, project close-out, project controlling
 Post-project learning
 Resistance and conflicts in projects
 Personnel management in projects
Lectures
Virtual projects with student presentations
Discussion
Case Studies
Kerzner, H.: Project Management Metrics, KPIs, and
Dashboards. A Guide to Measuring and Monitoring Project
Performance. International Institute for Learning Inc, New York
2011
Andler, N.: Tools for Project Management, Workshops and
Consulting: A Must-Have Compendium of Essential Tools and
Techniques, 2011
Number of students is limited!
99
Course Code
Course title
Course title in LSF
Entrance requirements
Name of lecturer(s)
Info
Questions concerning content
Teaching language
Number of allocated ECTS
points
Hours per week
Type of test/requirements for
allocation of credit points
Qualification goals of course
Content of course
IBA-5.2 (M. A.)
Business Ethics & Corporate Compliance
Business Ethics & Corporate Compliance (520)
Minimum of 120 CP in Bachelor degree course
Prof. Dr. Münscher
International Business Administration and Foreign Trade M. A.
Ms. Christin Voyé
E-mail: [email protected]
English
2 CP
2 h (total 30 h)
Presentations
The student as a future manager learns ethical aspects of
entrepreneurial acting as well as being familiar with the
aspects of corporate compliance.
 Definitions
 Management and ethics / integration / corporate
reputation and value creation
 Ethical aspects of internationalizing the value chain /
globalization and business ethics / multinational
companies and human rights
 Well-known examples of business ethics and corporate
compliance failure
 Principal-agent relationship / shareholder and
stakeholder management / Accountability / Social
Welfare / Social Balances and Environmental Balances
 Commitment / Code of Conduct / Staff regulations
Corporate Compliance
 Attribution of knowledge and information management
 Business risks and risk management
 Compliance organization
 PLCs and investor protection
 Audit
 Compliance Marketing / Sales
 Purchasing organization
 Research and development as well as production
 Corruption and fight against corruption
 Compliance management systems
 M&A business
 Data protection
 Environmental compliance
 Corporate crisis and insolvency

 Corporate marketing and Corporate Social
Responsibility (CSR)
100

Compliance in business corporations
 Pharmaceutical Industry
 Chemical Industry
 Automotive and supplying industry
Corporate Citizenship (CC)
 Corporate giving and corporate volunteering
 CC in a broader sense: investment in social
environment and regulative joint responsibility
 CC in the broadest sense: republican corporate ethics
Teaching and learning methods
of course
Literature
(set reading/additional
recommended literature)
Remarks
Lectures
Case Studies
To be announced in lecture
None
101
Course Code
Course title
Course title in LSF
Entrance requirements
Name of lecturer(s)
Info
Questions concerning content
Teaching language
Number of allocated ECTS
points
Hours per week
Type of test/requirements for
allocation of credit points
Qualification goals of course
Content of course
Teaching and learning methods
of course
Literature
(set reading/additional
recommended literature)
Remarks
IBA-6.1 (M. A.)
Advanced Human Resource & Organisation Management
Advanced Int. Human Resource and Organisation
Management (600)
Minimum of 120 CP in Bachelor degree course
Prof. Dr. Münscher
International Business Administration and Foreign Trade M. A.
Ms. Christin Voyé
E-mail: [email protected]
English
6 CP
4 h (total 60 h)
Final exam
Overview of HRM in its major functions focusing on current
trends including change management and cultural diversity
with a systematic integration of international perspectives.
Emphasis on Human Resources Metrics and how their
measurement can contribute to organizational strategy.
 Introduction to Human Resources
 Job Analysis and Work Flows
 Recruiting
 Screening and Selection
 Motivation
 Performance Management
 Human Resources Information Systems
 Security
Lectures
Exercises
Discussions
Dessler, G.; A Framework for Human Resource Management,
5th ed. New Jersey, 2009
None
102
Course Code
Course title
Course title in LSF
Entrance requirements
Name of lecturer(s)
Info
Questions concerning content
Teaching language
Number of allocated ECTS
points
Hours per week
Type of test/requirements for
allocation of credit points
Qualification goals of course
IBA-7.1 (M. A.)
International Marketing Management
Int. Marketing Management & CRM (700)
Minimum of 120 CP in Bachelor degree course
Mr. Maciejewski
International Business Administration and Foreign Trade M. A.
Ms. Christin Voyé
E-mail: [email protected]
English
3 CP
4 h (total 60h)
Final exam
International Marketing Management enables students to
identify and evaluate opportunities and challenges in
international markets, to develop international marketing
strategies, and to adapt marketing programs to specific
markets.
In the course we will discuss relevant challenges of
international marketing management.
Content of course







Teaching and learning methods
of course
Literature
(set reading/additional
recommended literature)
Definition of International Marketing Management
Challenges of Globalization
Informations for International Marketing Decisions
Development of a Strategy for Internationalization
Product Decisions
Price Decisions
Marketing Oganization
Etc.
Lectures
Analyses of case studies
Active participation in class discussion
Presentations
Self-study
Homburg, Ch., Kuester, S., Krohmer, H.: Marketing
Management: A Contemporary Perspective, McGraw Hill,
2009
Arussy, L.: Passionate and Profitable, Why Customer
Strategies Fail and Ten Steps to Do Them Right, New Jersey,
2006
Remarks
Day, George: Aligning the Organization to the Market, in
Lehmann, Donald R., Jocz, Katherine E. (Hrsg.): Reflections
on the Future of Marketing, Marketing Science Institute,
Cambridge 1997, S. 67-93.
Number of students is limited!
103
Course Code
Course title
Course title in LSF
Entrance requirements
Name of lecturer(s)
Info
Questions concerning content
Teaching language
Number of allocated ECTS
points
Hours per week
Type of test/requirements for
allocation of credit points
Qualification goals of course
IBA-7.2 (M. A.)
Customer Relationship Management
Int. Marketing Management & CRM (700)
Minimum of 120 CP in Bachelor degree course
Prof. Dr. Lubritz
International Business Administration and Foreign Trade M. A.
Ms. Christin Voyé
E-mail: [email protected]
English
3 CP
4 h (total 60h)
Final exam
Customer Relationship Management enables students to
understand theoretical marketing concepts and how to apply
these in a corporate environment.
Theoretical concepts are discussed in a close context to
practical challenges with a strong focus on how to develop a
customer-centric organisation.
Content of course
Teaching and learning methods
of course
Literature
(set reading/additional
recommended literature)
Customer Relationship Management will be broken down into
its various stages of a transformation process. Therefore, a
project-oriented view will be used as a baseline, which goes
along with a distinct view on customer-focused marketing
processes.
 What is CRM?
 Reasons why companies should invest in CRM
 Database marketing
 Customer Lifetime Value (CLV)
 Management of a CRM project
 Process management / Reengineering
 Cost benefit analysis of CRM
 Complaint management
 Mobile marketing
Lectures
Analyses of case studies
Active participation in class discussion
Presentations
Self-study
Greenberg, P.: CRM at the Speed of Light: Social CRM
Strategies, Tools, and Techniques for Engaging Your
Customers, Mcgraw-Hill Professional 2009
Payne, A.: Handbook of CRM: Achieving Excellence through
Customer Management, Taylor & Francis 2005
104
Remarks
Peelen, E.; van Montfort, K.; Beltman, R.; Klerkx, A.: A Study
in to the foundations of CRM success, NRG Working paper
series, March 2006 no. 06-09 Nyenrode 2006
Number of students is limited!
105
Course Code
Course title
Course title in LSF
Entrance requirements
Name of lecturer(s)
Info
Questions concerning content
Teaching language
Number of allocated ECTS
points
Hours per week
Type of test/requirements for
allocation of credit points
Qualification goals of course
Content of course
IBA-8.1 (M. A.)
E-Commerce
E-Commerce (800)
Minimum of 120 CP in Bachelor degree course
Prof. Dr. Rieck
International Business Administration and Foreign Trade M. A.
Ms. Christin Voyé
E-mail: [email protected]
English
6 CP
2 h (total 30 h)
Final written exam
Students should
 Know and adapt business process optimization models
 Know the basics of E-Commerce
 Handle relevant modules of E-Commerce
 Be aware of the difficulty of inter business processes
integration
Introduction to E-Commerce and E-Marketplaces
1. Overview of Electronic Commerce
2. E-market places: Structures, mechanisms, economics and
impacts
Internet Consumer Retailing
1. Retailing in electronic commerce: Products and services
2. Consumer behavior, market research and advertisement
Business-to-Business E-Commerce
1. B2B E-Commerce: Selling and buying in private E-markets
2. B2B Exchanges, directories and other support services
3. E-supply chains, collaborative commerce, coporate portals
Other EC Models and Applications
1. Innovative EC systems
2. Mobile computing and commerce and pervasive computing
EC Support Service
1. Dynamic trading: E-auctions, bartering and negotiations
2. E-Commerce security
EC Strategy and Implementation
1. Electronic payment systems
2. Order fulfilment, eCRM, and other support services
3. E-commerce strategy and global EC
4. Economics and justification of EC
5. Launching a successful online business and EV projects
6. Legal, ethical and compliance issues
106
7. Social networks and industry disrupters in the web 2.0
environment
Teaching and learning methods  Lectures
of course
 Homework
 Colloquium
 Workshop
 Case Studies
Literature
 Turban (2010): Electronic Commerce – a managerical
(set reading/additional
perspective
recommended literature)
 Laudon, Traver (2010) 6e E-Commerce. PrenticeHall
 Chaffey (2008): E-Business
 Strauss (2009): Internet Marketing
 Chaffey et al (2006): Internet Marketing
 Others: Script, Internet research
Number of students limited!
Remarks
107
Course Code
Course title
Course title in LSF
Entrance requirements
Name of lecturer(s)
Info
Questions concerning content
Teaching language
Number of allocated ECTS
points
Hours per week
Type of test/requirements for
allocation of credit points
Qualification goals of course
Content of course
IBA-9.1 (M. A.)
International Logistics & Transportation Management
Int. Logistics, Transportation Management (900)
Minimum of 120 CP in Bachelor degree course
Prof. Dr. Herr
International Business Administration and Foreign Trade M. A.
Ms. Christin Voyé
E-mail: [email protected]
English
6 CP
4 h (total 60 h)
Final written exam
In-depth understanding of all issues in international logistics
Basics of logistics
1. Logistics and supply chain
2. Supply chain improvement and optimization
3. Logistics and IT
Elements of logistics systems
1. Location planning
2. Outsourcing
3. Inventory management
4. Information flows
5. Operational logistics activities (warehouse & transportation
management)
Seminar: Six Sigma Yellow Belt
Teaching and learning methods  Lectures
of course
 Homework
 Presentations
 Case Studies
Literature
 Mangan, J.; Lalwani, C.; Butcher, T.; Javadpour, R.:
(set reading/additional
Global Logistics and Supply Chain Management, 2nd
recommended literature)
Edition, 2012
 Friedman, T.: The World is flat, 2005
 Verma, R.; / Boyer, K.: Operations and Supply Chain
Management, International Edition, 2010
Number of students limited!
Remarks
108
Course Code
Course title
Course title in LSF
Entrance requirements
Name of lecturer(s)
Info
Questions concerning content
Teaching language
Number of allocated ECTS
points
Hours per week
Type of test/requirements for
allocation of credit points
Qualification goals of course
Content of course
IBA-10.1 (M. A.)
International Entrepreneurship
Int. Entrepreneurship (1000)
Minimum of 120 CP in Bachelor degree course
Prof. Dr. Michael Graef
International Business Administration and Foreign Trade M. A.
Ms. Christin Voyé
E-mail: [email protected]
English
6 CP
4 h (total 60 h)
Final exam 50%
Business plan and/or Case Studies 50%
Enable the student to assess and solve complex
entrepreneurial challenges, situations and questions to set up
a complete business plan and model for an international new
venture.
International entrepreneurship is the intersection between
international business and entrepreneurship. The module
deals with new and innovative activities that have the goal of
value creation and growth in business organizations across
national borders. International Entrepreneurship is based on
the combination of management tools for entrepreneurs and
international and intercultural management.










Teaching and learning methods
How to write a great business plan
Venture capitalists and their expectations
Strategic Management Tools for Entrepreneurs:
Strategies – competitive advantages – profit potential
Basic deliberations on internationalization of new
ventures
Strategic concepts of internationalization
Theory of international new ventures
Development of a global entrepreneurial mindset
Market entry and market penetration
Structure of international new ventures
Cross cultural differences and intercultural
management
The lecture will analyze what makes a good business plan and
what stakeholders and investors expect from both
entrepreneurs and business plans. Further focus is on
strategic development and growth of new ventures – in
particular on considering international configuration of value
chain activities, on particular qualifications of international
entrepreneurs and on understanding the strategic alternatives
in different industry contexts.
 Lectures
109
of course
Literature
(set reading/additional
recommended literature)
 Case Studies
 Project work
 Self-study
Barringer, Bruce, and Duane Ireland, Successfully Launching
New Ventures, 4th edition, Upper Saddle River 2012
Bhide, Amar, The Questions Every Entrepreneur Must Answer,
in Harvard Businesss Review, November - December 1996
Bygrave, William D., and Andrew Zacharakis (eds.), The
Portable MBA in Entrepreneurship, 4th edition, Hoboken 2010
Frynas, Jedrzej George, and Kamel Mellahi, Global Strategic
Management, 2nd edition, Oxford 2011
Hisrich, Robert, Michael Peters and Dean Shepherd,
Entrepreneurship, 8th edition, New York 2010
Hisrich, Robert D., International Entrepreneurship: Starting,
Developing, and Managing a Global Venture, Los Angeles et
al. 2010
Mead, Richard, and Tim G. Andrews, International
Management: Culture and Beyond, 4th edition, Hoboken 2009
Morschett, Dirk, Hanna Schramm-Klein and Joachim Zentes,
Strategic International Management, 2nd edition, Wiesbaden
et al. 2010, available on SpringerLink
Remarks
Osterwalde, Alexander, and Yves Pigneur, Business Model
Generation, A Handbook for Visionaries, Game Changers and
Challengers, Hoboken 2010
Only for students with advanced level (experiences in
writing a business plan)!
Please enrol for this course only if you are able to attend
the complete lecture (no overlapping with other courses)!
110
Course Code
Course title
Course title in LSF
Entrance requirements
Name of lecturer(s)
Info
Questions concerning content
Teaching language
Number of allocated ECTS
points
Hours per week
Type of test/requirements for
allocation of credit points
Qualification goals of course
Content of course
Teaching and learning methods
of course
Literature
(set reading/additional
recommended literature)
IBA-11.1 (M. A.)
Intellectual Property Management
Intellectual Property Management (1100)
Minimum of 120 CP in Bachelor degree course
Dr. Joachim Jakelski
International Business Administration and Foreign Trade M. A.
Ms. Christin Voyé
E-mail: [email protected]
English
6 CP
4 h (total 60 h)
Presentation and written paper
Students understand the importance, types, and functions of
intellectual property (IP). They also know how an efficient IP
management contributes to improving the competitive
performance of companies. Thereby students become familiar
with national and international IP-application processes, the
use of IP-information in business management, modern
(patent) evaluation tools as well as potential exploitation
strategies.
 Overview and principles of IP
 Historical outline
 International evolution
 Economic relevance of IP rights
 Functions of patents
 International comparison of patenting processes
 Use of patent information
 Patent evaluation tools
 Strategic use of patents
 Alternatives and additions to formal protection
 Functions, application and prosecution of trademarks
(national/international)
 Use of trademark information
 Strategic use of trademarks
 Function of design patents, application and enforcement of
design patents (national/international)
 Fighting product piracy (national/international)
Lectures, Presentations
Durham, Patent Law Essentials, Praeger Publishers: Westport
2nd ed. 2004
Mueller, Introduction to Patent Law, Aspen Publishers: New
York, 3rd ed. 2009
111
McJohn, Intellectual Property: Examples & Explanations,
Aspen Publishers, 3rd ed. 2009
O`Connel, Inside the Patent Factory: The Essential Reference
for Effective and Efficient Management of Patent Creation,
Wiley, 1st ed. 2008
Trott, Innovation Management and New Product
Development, Prentice Hall, 4th ed. 2008
Schilling, Management of Technological Innovation, McGrawHill, 2nd ed. 2008
Van Caenegem, Intellectual Property Law and Innovation,
Cambridge University Press, 1st ed. 2007
Fellenstein/Vassallo/Ralston, The Inventor’s Guide to
Trademarks and Patents, Prentice Hall, 1st ed. 2005
Milbradt, Fighting product piracy: Law & Strategies in
Germany, France, the Netherlands, Spain, UK, China, USA,
German Law Publishers, 1st ed 2009
Remarks
Number of students limited!
112
Course Code
Course title
Course title in LSF
Entrance requirements
Name of lecturer(s)
Info
Questions concerning content
Teaching language
Number of allocated ECTS
points
Hours per week
Type of test/requirements for
allocation of credit points
Qualification goals of course
Content of course
Teaching and learning methods
of course
Literature
(set reading/additional
recommended literature)
IBA-12.1 (M. A.)
Foreign Trade Consulting
Foreign Trade Consulting (1200)
Minimum of 120 CP in Bachelor degree course
Prof. Dr. Henning Kehr
International Business Administration and Foreign Trade M. A.
Ms. Christin Voyé
E-mail: [email protected]
English
6 CP
4 h (total 60 h)
Final exam
Learning about the relevant developments of
internationalization and about the handling of international
trade and business deals partly with case studies
 Case studies of current topics
 Special items of International Trade such as Foreign
Transactions, Documentary Credits, Strategies of foreign
exchange hedging
 Internationalization supplier-sided and buyer-sided
 Tapping of new markets
Lectures, Presentations, guest lectures, excursion
Backhaus, Klaus, Industriegütermarketing, 8. Auflage,
München 2007
Deutscher Industrie- und Handelskammertag (Hrsg.) Going
International – Erfolgsfaktoren im Auslandsgeschäft, Berlin
2007
Rose, Klaus, Sauernheimer, Karlhans, Theorie der
Außenwirtschaft, München 2006
Brakman, Garretsen, van Marrewijk, van Witteloostuijn,
Nations and Firms in the Global Economoy
Debiel, Tobias, Messner, Dirk, Nuscheler, Franz (Hrsg.),
Globale Trends 2007, Bonn 2006
UBS (Hrsg.), Foreign Exchange and Money Market – A Guide
to the World of Currency Dealing, Zürich, 2006
Sarno, Taylor, The economies of exchange rates, 7th ed.
Cambridge 2009
Hull, Otions, Futures and other derivatives 7th ed., Upper
Saddle River NJ, 2008
Bloss, Derivatives, München 2009
ICC Publication UCP 600 (Internationale Handelskammer,
Paris, Einheitliche Richtlinien für Akkreditive (ERA 600) und
113
URC 522 (Internationale Handelskammer, Paris, Einheitliche
Richtlinien für Inkassi) ERI 522)
URDG 758 (Uniform Rules for Demand
Guarantees/Einheitliche Richtlinien für auf Anforderung
zahlbare Garantien)
Salvatore, Dominick, International Economics 10th ed.
Hoboken NJ, 2011
Kotler, Philip; Keller, Kevin Lane; Marketing Management,
12ed. 2005
Porter, Michael E.; Competitive Strategy, NY 2004
Friedmann, The World is Flat, New York 2006
Sirkin, Hemerling, Bhattacharya, Globality, New York 2008
IMF, World Economic Outlook (act. Ed.)
Homaifar, Ghassem A. Managing Global Financial and
Foreign Exchange Rate Risk (Wiley Finance), Hoboken
(NJ/USA) 2004
Cavusgil, Knight, Riesenberger; International Business, NJ
2008
Griffin, Pustay; International Business, 6th ed., NJ 2010
Sirkin, Hemerling, Bhattacharya; Globality – Competing with
everyone from everywhere for everything, NY 2008
Morschett, Schramm-Klein, Zentes, Strategic International
Management; Wiesbaden 2009
Eiteman, Stonehill, Moffett; Multinational Business Finance,
12th ed. NJ, 2010
Eibner; Understanding International Trade: Theory and Policy,
München 2006
Remarks
Duelfer, Joestingmeier, International Management in Diverse
Cultural Areas, 2nd ed. Munich 2011 (esp. Ch. 3)
Number of students limited!
Only students with advanced level in this topic!
114
Course Code
Course title
Course title in LSF
Entrance requirements
Name of lecturer(s)
Info
Questions concerning content
Teaching language
Number of allocated ECTS
points
Hours per week
Type of test/requirements for
allocation of credit points
Qualification goals of course
Content of course
Teaching and learning methods
of course
Literature
(set reading/additional
recommended literature)
IBA-13.1 (M. A.)
International Finance, Advanced Corporate Finance &
Value Investing
Int. Finance, Advanced Corporate Finance and Value
Investing (1300)
Minimum of 120 CP in Bachelor degree course
Prof. Dr. Lars Jäger
International Business Administration and Foreign Trade M. A.
Ms. Christin Voyé
E-mail: [email protected]
English
6 CP
4 h (total 60 h)
Final exam
Knowledge of modern financial instruments and financial and
value planning instruments of companies. Knowledge of
optimum financing/ financing forms in particular in
internationally acting companies.
 Financial Crisis, Euro-Crisis
 Evaluation of Investments & Financial Instruments
 Portfolio Theory/ optimal portfolio choice
 Capital Asset Pricing Model (CAPM)
 Dividend Policy
 Optimum debt ratio
 Long term financing with equity capital
 Long term financing with bonds
 Mergers & Acquisitions
 Value Investing
 Options & Futures
 Financial markets and their functions
Lectures, Excerises
Berk, J./DeMarzo, P.: Corporate Finance, 2nd ed. 2011 (ISBN:
0-273-75603-6)
Damodaran, A.: Applied Corporate Finance, 3rd ed. 2011
(ISBN: 978-0-470-38464-0)
Fabozzi, F. J./ Neave, E. H. / Zhou, G.: Financial Economics,
2012 (ISBN:978-0-47059620-3)
Gitman, L. J./ Zutter,C. J.: Principles of Managerial Finance,
2012 (ISBN: 978-0-13-611945-6)
Moffett, M. H./Stonehill, A. I. /Eiteman, D. K.: Fundamentals of
Multinational Finance, 3rd ed., 2009
(ISBN: 978-0-321-55213-6)
115
Remarks
Eiteman, D. K./Stonehill, A. I./ Moffett, M. H.: Multinational
Business Finance, 12th ed., 2010 (ISBN: 978-0-321-55213-6)
Number of students limited!
116
Course Code
Course title
Course title in LSF
Entrance requirements
Name of lecturer(s)
Info
Questions concerning content
Teaching language
Number of allocated ECTS
points
Hours per week
Type of test/requirements for
allocation of credit points
Qualification goals of course
Content of course
Teaching and learning methods
of course
IBA-14.1 (M. A.)
Advanced International Controlling
Advanced Int. Controlling (1400)
Minimum of 120 CP in Bachelor degree course
To be announced
International Business Administration and Foreign Trade M. A.
Ms. Christin Voyé
E-mail: [email protected]
English
6 CP
4 h (total 60 h)
Final exam
Consolidation and intensification of International Controlling
with a focus on Business Performance Management and
Value Based Controlling. Coping with analysis, synthesis and
assessment of a practically oriented international case study.
Part I
Controlling in the context of Business Performance
Management and Value Based Management
Conceptual and instrumental aspects of international value
based controlling
Functional and application oriented concepts of international
controlling
Summary and outlook
Part II
Processing/presentation of practically oriented international
case studies
Exercises
Part I:
Interactive and collaborative learning, discussion of the basic
economic connections, inter alia means of practical examples
Part II:
Analysis, evaluation and presentation of practically oriented
international case studies by students mentored by the
lecturer
Literature
(set reading/additional
recommended literature)
Self-study:
Studies of literature, mentored (online-) excercises and
(online-) case studies in small groups
Atkinson, A., et al: Management Accounting
Weber, J., Schäffer, U., Einführung in das Controlling
Hahn, D., Hungenberg, H., Planung und Kontrolle –
Wertorientierte Controllingsysteme
Olfert, K., (Hrsg.), Controlling
117
Horváth, P., Controlling
Baum, H.-G., Strategisches Controlling
Horngren, C. T., Introduction to Management Accounting
Remarks
Further documents:
documents and exercises compementing the course.
Case studies (also online available)
current publications
Number of students limited!
118
Course Code
Course title
Course title in LSF
Entrance requirements
Name of lecturer(s)
Info
Questions concerning content
Teaching language
Number of allocated ECTS
points
Hours per week
Type of test/requirements for
allocation of credit points
Qualification goals of course
IBA-15.1 (M. A.)
International Business Cases
Int. Business Cases (1500)
Minimum of 120 CP in Bachelor degree course
Prof. Dr. Rieck
International Business Administration and Foreign Trade M. A.
Ms. Christin Voyé
E-mail: [email protected]
English
4 CP
2 h (total 30 h)
Final written exam
The student develop on his/her won or in a team solutions for
complex international business issues/cases – including
foreign trade & international economics
Content of course
Business cases will be announced before or during the first
lecture. In general the business cases contain questions on
international enterprise activities with
 strategic focus (e.g. market entrance, country
selection, growth, etc.)
 functional focus (questions on the form of trade routes,
construction of a distribution network, designing of the
supply chain, etc.)
 foreign trade/ international economic focus (trade risks,
customs, duties, taxes, trade barriers)
Teaching and learning methods  Business Cases (Harvard Business School et al.),
of course
development and presentation through current
investigation and presentation techniques
Literature
Daniels, J.; Radebaugh, L.H.; Sullivan, D.: International
(set reading/additional
Business, 13th Edition, 2011
recommended literature)
Number of students limited!
Remarks
119
Course Code
Course title
Course title in LSF
Entrance requirements
Name of lecturer(s)
Info
Questions concerning content
T-BAA 202
Statistics
Statistics
None
Prof. Dr. Ewald Brochhausen
Aviation Management B. A.
Jürgen Kaiser
E-mail: [email protected]
Pia Orth-Reich
E-mail: [email protected]
English
3 CP
2 h (total 30 h)
Final written examination
Teaching language
Number of allocated ECTS points
Hours per week
Type of test/requirements for
allocation of credit points
Exam will be written together with T-BAA 203 – exam title
in LSF: “Analytical Methods“, if you write only one part
you have to inform the supervising person in charge
before the exam starts.
On successful completion of this course, students shall be
able to
Qualification goals of course



Content of course
Teaching and learning methods of
course
Literature
(set reading/additional
recommended literature)
Remarks
understand and apply basic analytical methods, 
understand how statistics operate in business practice, 
develop analytical and conceptual thinking.
Introduction to basic statistical concepts. Types of
variables. Data presentation. Data summarization.
Measures of central tendencies. Measures of dispersion.
Probability and probability rules. Random variables.
Probability distributions. Hypothesis testing. Linear
regression and correlation. Sources of data. Descriptive
statistics. Exploring two-variable relationships. Methods
for more than two variables. Data analysis topics.
Probability. Random variables. Inference. Confidence
intervals and hypothesis testing.
Lectures and tutorials, script
The Practice of Business Statistics, Using Data for
Decisions, David S. Moore, George P. McCabe, William
M. Duckworth, Layth Alwan, 2nd edition (2008)
None
120
Course Code
Course title
Course title in LSF
Entrance requirements
Name of lecturer(s)
Info
Questions concerning content
Teaching language
Number of allocated ECTS points
Hours per week
Type of test/requirements for
allocation of credit points
Qualification goals of module
Content of course
Teaching and learning methods of
course
Literature
(set reading/additional
recommended literature)
Remarks
T-BAA 203
Research Methods and Presentation Skills
Research Methods and Presentation Skills
None
Dr. Tobias Grosche
Aviation Management B. A.
Jürgen Kaiser
E-mail: [email protected]
Pia Orth-Reich
E-mail: [email protected]
English
3 CP
2 h (total 30 h)
Final written examination
Exam will be written together with T-BAA 202 – exam title
in LSF: “Analytical Methods“, if you write only one part
you have to inform the supervising person in charge before
the exam starts.
On successful completion of this module, students shall be
able to
 use different presentation techniques according to
the situation
 draw from analytical methods to help solve
managerial problems.
An introduction to the art and science of solving research
problems and making students better users of research.
Explores the key elements of preparation, organization and
delivery of the presentation. An introduction of a style
manual for the preparation of a research proposal.
Elements of effective communication. Preparing, structuring
and delivering presentations.
Lectures, script, individual presentations, discussion
Research Methods for Business Students, Mark N.K.
th
Saunders, Adrian Thornhill, Philip Lewis, 5 edition (2009)
None
121
Course Code
Course title
Course title in LSF
Entrance requirements
Name of lecturer(s)
Info
Questions concerning content
T-BAA 221
Accountancy and Financial Reports
Accountancy and Financial Reports
None
Dr. Tobias Kisser
Aviation Management B. A.
Jürgen Kaiser
E-mail: [email protected]
Pia Orth-Reich
E-mail: [email protected]
English
6 CP
4 h (total 60 h)
Written examination
Teaching language
Number of allocated ECTS points
Hours per week
Type of test/requirements for
allocation of credit points
Exam will be written together with T-BAA 222 – exam title
in LSF: “General Management I“, if you write only one part
you have to inform the supervising person in charge before
the exam starts.
On successful completion of this module, students will be
conversant with:
Qualification goals of course








Content of course
Teaching and learning methods of
course
Literature
(set reading/additional
recommended literature)
Remarks
Accounting concepts
Accounting equation
Rules of accounting
Recording the transactions
Adjusting & Rectifying the books
Preparation of Financial Statements
Analyzing Financial Statements
Reconciling the books
Provides a grounding in double-entry bookkeeping and the
production of basic financial statements. Students perform
basic operations with Excel spreadsheets, as required for
bookkeeping and accounting. Concepts, principles and
conventions of financial accounting. Accounting techniques.
Construction and interpretation of financial reports.
Lectures and tutorials, discussions, reading, script, use of
spreadsheet programs
Accounting: An Introduction, Peter Atrill, Eddie McLaney,
4th edition (2007)
None
122
Course Code
Course title
Course title in LSF
Entrance requirements
Name of lecturer(s)
Info
Questions concerning content
T-BAA 222
Marketing and Sales Management
Marketing and Sales Management
None
Prof. Dr. von Dörnberg
Aviation Management B. A.
Jürgen Kaiser
E-mail: [email protected]
Pia Orth-Reich
E-mail: [email protected]
English
6 CP
Final written examination
Teaching language
Number of allocated ECTS points
Total workload and breakdown
(e.g. self-study + contact time)
Exam will be written together with T-BAA 221 – exam title in
LSF: “General Management I“, if you write only one part
you have to inform the supervising person in charge before
the exam starts.
4 h (total 60 h)
Exam
Hours per week
Type of test/requirements for
allocation of credit points
Qualification goals of course
Students also develop a familiarity with and an
understanding of the field of marketing with respect to: 
Content of course

its problems/opportunities and analytical
methods/frameworks, 

the structure and operation of the marketing system,
and

the terminology or jargon used by marketing
professionals.
An important learning outcome of
this general management module is that students
develop their critical, independent thinking and
problem-solving skills.
They gain experiences with
the use of spreadsheet programs in business and
commerce.
Basic concepts and techniques of marketing and sales
management and strategy with an emphasis on creating
customer value and building customer relationships. The
course develops concepts and skills necessary for
marketing decision-making and illustrates how various
decision-making tools apply to actual business situations.

The changing role of marketing.

Strategic marketing planning.

Marketing intelligence and creative problem solving.
123

Understanding consumer buying behavior.

Understanding business markets and buying behavior.

Market segmentation, target marketing, and positioning.

Product strategy.

The ethical perspective.

Teaching and learning methods of
course
Literature
(set reading/additional
recommended literature)
Remarks
Future direction of marketing.
Lectures and tutorials, discussions, reading, script
Marketing Management, Philip Kotler, Kevin Lane Keller,
Kevin Lane Keller, 13th edition (2008)
None
124
Course Code
Course title
Course title in LSF
Entrance requirements
Name of lecturer(s)
Info
Questions concerning content
Teaching language
Number of allocated ECTS points
Hours per week
Type of test/requirements for
allocation of credit points
Qualification goals of course
T-BAA 401
Airport Management
Airport Management
None
Prof. Dr. Jäckel
Herr Mihlan
Aviation Management B. A.
Jürgen Kaiser
E-mail: [email protected]
Pia Orth-Reich
E-mail: [email protected]
English
5 CP
3 h (total 45 h)
Written examination
Exam will be written together with T-BAA 402 – exam title
in LSF: “Aviation Management I“, if you write only one part
you have to inform the supervising person in charge before
the exam starts.
On successful completion of this module, students shall be
able to

Content of course
Teaching and learning methods of
course
Literature
(set reading/additional
recommended literature)
Remarks
understand the options of strategic choice in
airport management,
 understand broad aspects of managing airports,
 identify relevant business trends and their
implications, draw from theories and principles to
help solve managerial problems.
History of airports. Major federal legislation affecting their
development. Rules and regulations governing airport
operations. Air traffic control, airfield, terminal, and ground
access facility infrastructure of airports. Airport security
policies. Economic, political, and social role of civil-use
airports. Air-carrier relationships, governing body
relationships, regulatory compliance, physical plant
management, vendor relationships, zoning and land use
issues and more.
Lectures and tutorials, guest speakers, discussions,
reading, script, excursion to airport
Managing Airports: An International Perspective, Anne
Graham, 2nd edition (2003) Airport Planning &
Management, Alexander T. Wells, Seth B. Young, 5th
edition (2008)
None
125
Course Code
Course title
Course title in LSF
Entrance requirements
Name of lecturer(s)
Info
Questions concerning content
Teaching language
Number of allocated ECTS points
Hours per week
Type of test/requirements for
allocation of credit points
Qualification goals of course
T-BAA 402
Air Cargo and Logistics Management
Air Cargo and Logistics Management
None
Prof. Dr. Herr
Dr. Tobias Grosche
Aviation Management B. A.
Jürgen Kaiser
E-mail: [email protected]
Pia Orth-Reich
E-mail: [email protected]
English
5 CP
3 h (total 45 h)
Written examination
Exam will be written together with T-BAA 401 – exam title
in LSF: “Aviation Management I“, if you write only one part
you have to inform the supervising person in charge before
the exam starts.
On successful completion of this module, students shall be
able to

Content of course
Teaching and learning methods of
course
Literature
(set reading/additional
recommended literature)
Remarks
understand the basic logistics concept and the air
cargo system, 
 understand the options of strategic choice in air
cargo management, 
 identify relevant business trends and their
implications, 
 draw from theories and principles to help solve
managerial problems. 
Introduction to different topics related to the planning and
operations of air cargo systems. Main components of an air
cargo system, the competition between air cargo and other
surface-transportation modes, network and capacity
planning, demand analysis and trends in the domestic and
international markets. Practices and problems of
management with respect to air cargo. Importance of air
cargo service to the economy, rate and tariff problems,
terminal facilities, competition, and future prospects.
Lectures and tutorials, guest speakers, discussions,
reading, script, excursion to airport
Air Cargo Guide, Hans-Helmut Grandjot, Ingo Roessler,
Ailine Roland (2007) Business Logistics/Supply Chain
Management, Ronald H. Ballou, 5th edition (2004)
None
126
Course Code
Course title
Course title in LSF
Entrance requirements
Name of lecturer(s)
Info
Questions concerning content
Teaching language
Number of allocated ECTS points
Hours per week
Type of test/requirements for
allocation of credit points
Qualification goals of course
T-BAA 412
Pricing and Revenue Management
Pricing and Revenue Management
None
Prof. Dr. Richard Klophaus
Herr Thams
Aviation Management B. A.
Jürgen Kaiser
E-mail: [email protected]
Pia Orth-Reich
E-mail: [email protected]
English
5 CP
3 h (total 45 h)
Written examination
Exam will be written together with T-BAA 411 – exam title
in LSF: “Aviation Management II“, if you write only one
part you have to inform the supervising person in charge
before the exam starts.
On successful completion of this module, students shall be
able to

Content of course
Teaching and learning methods of
course
Literature
(set reading/additional
recommended literature)
Remarks
understand the basic ideas, concepts and
techniques of pricing and revenue management, 
 understand the options of strategic choice in airline
management,
 identify relevant business trends and their
implications.
Concepts of pricing, air passenger demand forecasting,
innovative revenue generation techniques, revenue
management practices. Opportunities for revenue
optimization. Review the main methodologies. Legal issues
associated with different pricing strategies. Survey of
current industry practices.
Lectures and tutorials, guest speakers, discussions,
reading, script, excursion to airline
Straight and Level: Practical Airline Economics, Stephen
Holloway, 3rd edition (2008) How to Price: A Guide to
Pricing Techniques and Yield Management, Oz Shy (2008)
None
127
Course Code
Course title
Course title in LSF
Entrance requirements
Name of lecturer(s)
Info
Questions concerning content
Teaching language
Number of allocated ECTS points
Total workload and breakdown
(e.g. self-study + contact time)
Hours per week
Type of test/requirements for
allocation of credit points
Qualification goals of course
Content of course
Teaching and learning methods of
course
Special features (e.g. online part,
excursions, guest lectures etc.)
Literature
(set reading/additional
recommended literature)
Remarks
T-121
English for tourism professionals I
Englisch 1. Sem.
None
George F. Mayáns
Tourism and Travel Management B. A.
Jürgen Kaiser
E-mail: [email protected]
Pia Orth-Reich
E-mail: [email protected]
German into English
2 CP
37,5 h (self-study) + 22,5 h (lecture) = 60 h (total workload)
2 h (total 30 h)
Exam
 Students know actively-communicatively the basics of
the English tourism language (considering the common
speech in tourism/B2C communication
 Students know the basic characteristics of the tourism
industry in Great Britain and are able to actively
communicate those characteristics
 Students are familiar with culture-specific differences
 Students increase their receptive and productive
competency in speaking code
 Tourism related and intercultural communication
situations
 English specialised terminology Tourism I: Touristic
basics terms and basic specialised terminology of the
touristic supply chain regarding the specialised and
relevant touristic context
 Study in Tourism in Great Britain and Germany
 Regional bzw. culture-specific topics
 Selected areas concerning the English syntax
Interactive lecture with group work, practical parts and
discussions
Online course parts in moodle (www.fh-worms.de/moodle)
Bilingual dictionary with focus on tourism
B1 Language Level in English
128
Course Code
Course title
Course title in LSF
Entrance requirements
Name of lecturer(s)
Info
Questions concerning content
Teaching language
Number of allocated ECTS points
Total workload and breakdown
(e.g. self-study + contact time)
Hours per week
Type of test/requirements for
allocation of credit points
Qualification goals of course
T-131
Business English I
Englisch 3. Sem.
None
George F. Mayáns
Tourism and Travel Management B. A.
Jürgen Kaiser
E-mail: [email protected]
Pia Orth-Reich
E-mail: [email protected]
German into English
2 CP
37,5 h (self-study) + 22,5 h (lecture) = 60 h (total workload)
2 h (total 30 h)
Written examination




Content of course
Teaching and learning methods of
course
Special features (e.g. online part,
excursions, guest lectures etc.)
Literature
(set reading/additional
recommended literature)
Remarks
Students are able to cope with basal business
situations in English-speaking context
Students know actively-communicatively the basics of
the English business language (considering the
common speech in business/B2C communication
Students know the basic characteristics of the economy
of Great Britain
Students know the specifics of intercultural business
communication and the relevance of language codes
and register

Business related and intercultural communication
situations
 English specialised terminology Business I: Economic
basics terms and basic specialised terminology of
selected topics regarding the specialised and relevant
economic context
 Selected areas concerning the English syntax
Interactive lecture with group work, practical parts and role
plays
Online course parts in moodle (www.fh-worms.de/moodle)
Commercial dictionary bilingual
B1 Language Level in English
129
Course Code
Course title
Course title in LSF
Entrance requirements
Name of lecturer(s)
Info
Questions concerning content
Teaching language
Number of allocated ECTS points
Total workload and breakdown
(e.g. self-study + contact time)
Hours per week
Type of test/requirements for
allocation of credit points
Qualification goals of course
Content of course
Teaching and learning methods of
course
Literature
(set reading/additional
recommended literature)
Remarks
T-141
English for tourism professionals II
Englisch 4. Sem.
None
George F. Mayáns
Tourism and Travel Management B. A.
Jürgen Kaiser
E-mail: [email protected]
Pia Orth-Reich
E-mail: [email protected]
German into English
2 CP
67,5 h (self-study) + 22,5 h (lecture) = 90 h (total workload)
2 h (total 30 h)
Exam

Students intensify the acquired knowledge in Tourism
language
 Students improve their productive compentency in
spoken code
 English specialised terminology Tourism II:
Destinations, fairs, conventions and events
 English grammar in Tourism language
Interactive course
Bilingual dictionary with focus on tourism
Suitable for students who attended the course “English for
tourism professionals I” or who have a higher Language
Level than B1
130
Course Code
Course title
Course title in LSF
Entrance requirements
Name of lecturer(s)
Info
Questions concerning content
Teaching language
Number of allocated ECTS points
Hours per week
Type of test/requirements for
allocation of credit points
Qualification goals of course
Content of course
Teaching and learning methods of
course
Literature
(set reading/additional
recommended literature)
Remarks
T-151
Business English II
Englisch 5. Sem.
None
George F. Mayáns
Tourism and Travel Management B. A.
Jürgen Kaiser
E-mail: [email protected]
Pia Orth-Reich
E-mail: [email protected]
German into English
2 CP
2 h (total 30 h)
Exam

Students intensify the acquired knowledge in English
business language
 Students improve their receptive and productive
compentency in advanced business English and
advanced common speech in English regarding
business topics
 English specialised terminology Business II
 Grammar in business english
 Selected and current business topics in Great Britain
Interactive course
Commercial dictionary bilingual
Suitable for students who attended the course “Business
English I” or who have a higher Language Level than B1
131
Course Code
Course title
Course title in LSF
Info
Questions concerning content
Entrance requirements
Name of lecturer(s)
Teaching language
Number of allocated ECTS points
Type of test/requirements for allocation of
credit points
Qualification goals of course
Content of course
Teaching and learning methods of course
Literature
(set reading/additional recommended
literature)
Remarks
ILO-1
Business English I
Business English Incomings I
International Language Office (ILO)
Ms. Céline Maser
E-mail: [email protected]
None
Ms. Kujawa
English
4,5 CP
Exam
To be prepared for a one-year-study abroad.
Concentration on practical abilities and skills in
English as a foreign language.
Abilities and skills for presenting a varied range of
business topics in English with special emphasis on
business vocabulary.
Lectures in class
To be announced in class
Course day:
Mondays from 14.45-17.15 o’clock
Rooms to be announced (LSF)
To enrol for this course you have to sign the list
of attendees in the class and you have to add
the course to your personal course list in the
International Center ( Martina, office M105)
132
Course Code
Course title
Course title in LSF
Info
Questions concerning content
Entrance requirements
Name of lecturer(s)
Teaching language
Number of allocated ECTS points
Type of test/requirements for allocation of
credit points
Qualification goals of course
Content of course
Teaching and learning methods of course
Literature
(set reading/additional recommended
literature)
Remarks
ILO-2
Business English II
Business English Incomings II
International Language Office (ILO)
Ms. Céline Maser
E-mail: [email protected]
None
Ms. Kujawa
English
4,5 CP
Exam
To be proficient in English as a foreign language
Development of abilities and skills in reading
comprehension, speaking and writing to master
business related discussions and business letter
writing
Lectures in class
To be announced in class
Mondays from 12.00-14.30 o’clock
Rooms to be announced (LSF)
To enrol for this course you have to sign the list
of attendees in the class and you have to add
the course to your personal course list in the
International Center ( Martina, office M105)
133
Course Code
Course title
Course title in LSF
Info
Questions concerning content
Entrance requirements
Name of lecturer(s)
Teaching language
Number of allocated ECTS points
Type of test/requirements for allocation of
credit points
Qualification qoals of course
Content of course
Teaching and learning methods of course
Literature
(set reading/additional recommended
literature)
Remarks
ILO-3
Mandarin Chinese I
Wirtschaftschinesisch I
International Language Office (ILO)
Ms. Céline Maser
E-mail: [email protected]
None
To be announced
German into Chinese
6 CP
Exam
Basic knowledge of oral and written language
Presenting simple dialogues
Comprehension of simple texts
Composition of simple sentences
Look-up techniques for character
1. Basics of the Chinese phonetic notation
2. Introduction to reading and writing Chinese
characters
3. Demonstration of basic language structures
4. Grammar basics
5. Talk and listening comprehension
Lectures in class
To be announced in class
For beginners without basic knowledge
To enrol for this course you have to sign the list
of attendees in the class and you have to add
the course to your personal course list in the
International Center ( Martina, office M105)
134
Course Code
Course title
Course title in LSF
Info
Questions concerning content
Entrance requirements
Name of lecturer(s)
Teaching language
Number of allocated ECTS points
Type of test/requirements for allocation of
credit points
Qualification goals of course
Content of course
Teaching and learning methods of course
Literature
(set reading/additional recommended
literature)
Remarks
ILO-4
Mandarin Chinese II
Wirtschaftschinesisch II
International Language Office (ILO)
Ms. Céline Maser
E-mail: [email protected]
None
To be announced
German into Chinese
6 CP
Exam






Basic knowledge of oral and written language
Presenting simple dialogues
Comprehension of simple texts
Composition of simple sentences
Look-up techniques for characters
Ability to handle the character-based text
program
1. Basics of Chinese phonetics and phonetic
transcription (Pinyin)
2. Introduction to reading and writing of Chinese
characters
3. Teaching of basic vocabulary
4. Demonstration of basic language structures
5. Grammar basics
6. Lecture of simple texts
Lectures in class
To be announced in class
To enrol for this course you have to sign the list
of attendees in the class and you have to add
the course to your personal course list in the
International Center ( Martina, office M105)
135
Course Code
Course title
Course title in LSF
Info
Questions concerning content
Entrance requirements
Name of lecturer(s)
Teaching language
Number of allocated ECTS points
Type of test/requirements for allocation of
credit points
Qualification goals of course
Content of course
Teaching and learning methods of course
Literature
(set reading/additional recommended
literature)
Remarks
ILO-5
Mandarin Chinese III
Wirtschaftschinesisch III
International Language Office (ILO)
Ms. Céline Maser
E-mail: [email protected]
None
To be announced
German into Chinese
6 CP
Exam



Deepening of written and oral language skills
Business Chinese
Comprehension of more complex texts,
including newspaper language
 Composition of short texts
 Improvement of communication skills
 Extended knowledge of grammar structures
1. Chinese Regional Studies
2. China’s Economic Structure
3. Chinese Culture
4. Professional Chinese 1 – Travel and Tourism
5. Professional Chinese 2 – Marketing
6. Professional Chinese 3 – Finance
7. Professional Chinese 4 – Business Law
8. E-Commerce
Lectures in class
To be announced in class
To enrol for this course you have to sign the list
of attendees in the class and you have to add
the course to your personal course list in the
International Center ( Martina, office M105)
136
Course Code
Course title
Course title in LSF
Info
Questions concerning content
Entrance requirements
Name of lecturer(s)
Teaching language
Number of allocated ECTS points
Type of test/requirements for allocation of
credit points
Qualification goals of course
Content of course
Teaching and learning methods of course
Literature
(set reading/additional recommended
literature)
Remarks
ILO-6
Mandarin Chinese IV
Wirtschaftschinesisch IV
International Language Office (ILO)
Ms. Céline Maser
E-mail: [email protected]
None
To be announced
German into Chinese
6 CP
Exam
 Extension of written and oral language skills
 Business terminology
 Linguistic mastering of typical everyday
business situations
 Comprehension of more complex texts,
including newspaper language
 Composition of short texts
 Extension of grammar structures
1. Employment and Training
2. Business Communication
3. Office Environment
4. Conference and Visit
5. Goods Delivery and Payment
6. Marketing and Advertisement
Lectures in class
To be announced in class
To enrol for this course you have to sign the list
of attendees in the class and you have to add
the course to your personal course list in the
International Center ( Martina, office M105)
137
Course Code
Course title
Course title in LSF
Info
Questions concerning content
Entrance requirements
Name of lecturer(s)
Teaching language
Number of allocated ECTS points
Type of test/requirements for allocation of
credit points
Qualification goals of course
Content of course
Teaching and learning methods of course
Literature
(set reading/additional recommended
literature)
Remarks
ILO-7
Mandarin Chinese V
Wirtschaftschinesisch V
International Language Office (ILO)
Ms. Céline Maser
E-mail: [email protected]
None
To be announced
German into Chinese
3 CP
Exam

Ability to communicate with Chinese business
partners
 Ability to describe organisation structures and
company culture
 Ability to write informational papers
 Intercultural understanding
1. Description of job tasks
2. Application and CV
3. Working on the Internet
4. Questionnaire for customer survey
5. Organizing corporate events
6. Company budget and financial statement
7. Chinese business culture
Lectures in class
To be announced in class
To enrol for this course you have to sign the list
of attendees in the class and you have to add
the course to your personal course list in the
International Center ( Martina, office M105)
138
Course Code
Course title
Course title in LSF
Info
Questions concerning content
Entrance requirements
Name of lecturer(s)
Teaching language
Number of allocated ECTS points
Type of test/requirements for allocation of
credit points
Qualification goals of course
Content of course
Teaching and learning methods of course
Literature
(set reading/additional recommended
literature)
Remarks
ILO-9
Russian I
Wirtschaftsrussisch I
International Language Office (ILO)
Ms. Céline Maser
E-mail: [email protected]
None
To be announced
German into Russian
6 CP
Exam
Basic knowledge of oral and written language
Presenting simple dialogues
Comprehension of simple texts
Composition of simple sentences
Look-up techniques for character
1. Grammar basics
2. Business vocabulary
3. Interactive learning
4. Speaking, writing and reading
5. Exercises
6. Russian culture and intercultural understanding
Lectures in class
To be announced in class
For beginners without basic knowledge
To enrol for this course you have to sign the list
of attendees in the class and you have to add
the course to your personal course list in the
International Center ( Martina, office M105)
139
Course Code
Course title
Course title in LSF
Info
Questions concerning content
Entrance requirements
Name of lecturer(s)
Teaching language
Number of allocated ECTS points
Type of test/requirements for allocation of
credit points
Qualification goals and content of course
Content of course
Teaching and learning methods of course
Literature
(set reading/additional recommended
literature)
Remarks
ILO-10
Russian II
Wirtschaftsrussisch II
International Language Office (ILO)
Ms. Céline Maser
E-mail: [email protected]
None
To be announced
German into Russian
6 CP
Exam
The students have a sufficient command of the
Russian language to enable successful oral and
written communication in everyday situations.
 Extension of basic vocabulary and grammar
skills
 Basic business vocabulary
 Speaking, writing and reading
 Russian culture and intercultural understanding
Lectures in class
To be announced in class
To enrol for this course you have to sign the list
of attendees in the class and you have to add
the course to your personal course list in the
International Center ( Martina, office M105)
140
Course Code
Course title
Course title in LSF
Info
Questions concerning content
Entrance requirements
Name of lecturer(s)
Teaching language
Number of allocated ECTS points
Type of test/requirements for allocation of
credit points
Qualification goals of course
Content of course
Teaching and learning methods of course
Literature
(set reading/additional recommended
literature)
Remarks
ILO-11
Russian III
Wirtschaftsrussisch III
International Language Office (ILO)
Ms. Céline Maser
E-mail: [email protected]
None
To be announced
German into Russian
6 CP
Exam
Understanding native speakers and being able to
communicate without problems.
 Grammar basics
 Business vocabulary
 Interactive learning
 Speaking, writing and reading
 Exercises
 Russian regional and cultural studies and
intercultural understanding
Lectures in class
To be announced in class
To enrol for this course you have to sign the list
of attendees in the class and you have to add
the course to your personal course list in the
International Center ( Martina, office M105)
141
Course Code
Course title
Course title in LSF
Info
Questions concerning content
Entrance requirements
Name of lecturer(s)
Teaching language
Number of allocated ECTS points
Type of test/requirements for allocation of
credit points
Qualification goals of course
Content of course
Teaching and learning methods of course
Literature
(set reading/additional recommended
literature)
Remarks
ILO-12
Russian IV
Wirtschaftsrussisch IV
International Language Office (ILO)
Ms. Céline Maser
E-mail: [email protected]
None
To be announced
German into Russian
6 CP
Exam


Extension of oral and written language skills
Comprehension of more complex texts,
including newspaper language
 Composition of short texts
 Linguistic mastering of typical everyday life
situations
 Improvement of communication skills
 Extended knowledge of grammatical structures
 Terminology skills
 Extension of basic vocabulary
 Improvement of oral communication skills
 Everyday speech and expressions
 Deepening of grammar structures
 Russian Federation/CIS studies, cultural
studies, intercultural training
Lectures in class
To be announced in class
To enrol for this course you have to sign the list
of attendees in the class and you have to add
the course to your personal course list in the
International Center ( Martina, office M105)
142
Course Code
Course title
Course title in LSF
Info
Questions concerning content
Entrance requirements
Name of lecturer(s)
Teaching language
Number of allocated ECTS points
Type of test/requirements for allocation of
credit points
Qualification goals of course
Content of course
Teaching and learning methods of course
Literature
(set reading/additional recommended
literature)
Remarks
ILO-13
Russian V
Wirtschaftsrussisch V
International Language Office (ILO)
Ms. Céline Maser
E-mail: [email protected]
None
To be announced
German into Russian
3 CP
Exam
Understanding a native speaker and being able to
communicate without problems.
1. Case studies
2. Presentations
3. Speaking
4. Interactive exercises
Lectures in class
To be announced in class
To enrol for this course you have to sign the list
of attendees in the class and you have to add
the course to your personal course list in the
International Center ( Martina, office M105)
143
Course Code
Course title
Course title in LSF
Info
Questions concerning content
Entrance requirements
Name of lecturer(s)
Teaching language
Number of allocated ECTS points
Type of test/requirements for allocation of
credit points
Qualification goals of course
Content of course
Teaching and learning methods of course
Literature
(set reading/additional recommended
literature)
Remarks
ILO-14
Russian VI
Wirtschaftsrussisch VI
International Language Office (ILO)
Ms. Céline Maser
E-mail: [email protected]
None
To be announced
German into Russian
3 CP
Exam
The students have an excellent command of the
Russian economic terms and are able to apply them
orally and in writing.
1. Extension of business-related language
competences
2. Cultural understanding
3. Presentations
Lectures in class
To be announced in class
To enrol for this course you have to sign the list
of attendees in the class and you have to add
the course to your personal course list in the
International Center ( Martina, office M105)
144
Course Code
Course title
Course title in LSF
Entrance requirements
Info
Questions concerning content
Name of lecturer(s)
Teaching language
Number of allocated ECTS points
Type of test/requirements for allocation of
credit points
Qualification goals of course
Content of course
Teaching and learning methods of course
Literature
(set reading/additional recommended
literature)
Remarks
ILO-15
Arabic I
Wirtschaftsarabisch I
None
International Language Office (ILO)
Ms. Céline Maser
E-mail: [email protected]
Mr. Lahmar
German into Arabic
6 CP
Exam
Improvement of written and oral skills
Ability to read short texts
Ability to write short texts
1. Introduction to reading and writing Arabic as
well as into basic language structures
2. Adoption of basic skills and phrases
3. Basics of the Arabic alphabet and phonetics
4. Grammar basics
5. Lecture of simple texts
6. Practical exercises
7. Improvement of basic vocabulary
Lectures in class
To be announced in class
For beginners without basic knowledge
To enrol for this course you have to sign the list
of attendees in the class and you have to add
the course to your personal course list in the
International Center ( Martina, office M105)
145
Course Code
Course title
Course title in LSF
Entrance requirements
Info
Questions concerning content
Name of lecturer(s)
Teaching language
Number of allocated ECTS points
Type of test/requirements for allocation of
credit points
Qualification goals of course
Content of course
Teaching and learning methods of course
Literature
(set reading/additional recommended
literature)
Remarks
ILO-16
Arabic II
Wirtschaftsarabisch II
None
International Language Office (ILO)
Ms. Céline Maser
E-mail: [email protected]
Mr. Sandouk
German into Arabic
6 CP
Exam
Ability to write short essays
Ability to read and understand business texts
Improvement of communication skills
Ability to understand complex grammar structures
1. Extension of basic vocabulary
2. Deepening of grammar structures
3. Development of oral communication skills
4. Practical exercises
Lectures in class
To be announced in class
To enrol for this course you have to sign the list
of attendees in the class and you have to add
the course to your personal course list in the
International Center ( Martina, office M105)
146
Course Code
Course title
Course title in LSF
Entrance requirements
Info
Questions concerning content
Name of lecturer(s)
Teaching language
Number of allocated ECTS points
Type of test/requirements for allocation of
credit points
Qualification goals of course
Content of course
Teaching and learning methods of course
Literature
(set reading/additional recommended
literature)
Remarks
ILO-17
Arabic III
Wirtschaftsarabisch III
None
International Language Office (ILO)
Ms. Céline Maser
E-mail: [email protected]
Mr. Sandouk/Mr. Lahmar
German into Arabic
6 CP
Exam
Understanding native speakers and being able to
communicate without problems
Understanding headlines and complex texts
Being able to write essays
Improvement of communication skills
Understanding TV-news
Simulation of everyday life situations and role plays
1. Extension of business vocabulary
2. Deepening of grammar structures (phonetics,
expressions)
3. Everyday life language (different Arabian
dialects)
4. Regional Arabian studies and cultural
understanding
Lectures in class
To be announced in class
To enrol for this course you have to sign the list
of attendees in the class and you have to add
the course to your personal course list in the
International Center ( Martina, office M105)
147
Course Code
Course title
Course title in LSF
Entrance requirements
Info
Questions concerning content
Name of lecturer(s)
Teaching language
Number of allocated ECTS points
Type of test/requirements for allocation of
credit points
Qualification goals of course
Content of course
Teaching and learning methods of course
Literature
(set reading/additional recommended
literature)
Remarks
ILO-18
Arabic IV
Wirtschaftsarabisch IV
None
International Language Office (ILO)
Ms. Céline Maser
E-mail: [email protected]
Ms Ben Mbarek
German into Arabic
6 CP
Exam
Regional Arab studies and cultural understanding
Being able to understand the cultural differences
and aspects between different Arabian countries
1. Cultural differences between Germany and
Arabian countries
2. Linguistic analysis of everyday life situations
3. Deepening of vocabulary
Lectures in class
To be announced in class
To enrol for this course you have to sign the list
of attendees in the class and you have to add
the course to your personal course list in the
International Center ( Martina, office M105)
148
Course Code
Course title
Course title in LSF
Entrance requirements
Info
Questions concerning content
Name of lecturer(s)
Teaching language
Number of allocated ECTS points
Type of test/requirements for allocation of
credit points
Qualification goals of course
Content of course
Teaching and learning methods of course
Literature
(set reading/additional recommended
literature)
Remarks
ILO-19
Arabic V
Wirtschaftsarabisch V
None
International Language Office (ILO)
Ms. Céline Maser
E-mail: [email protected]
Ms Ben Mbarek
German into Arabic
3 CP
Exam
Communicate successfully with Arabian business
partners
Intercultural understanding
Understand business news
1. Negotiation skills, communication, management
in the Arab world, every day work life, conflict
management, symbols, time, Islam, collectivism,
etc.
2. Analysis of texts and situations on various topics
of the Arab business world
3. Analysis of problems in linguistic and cultural
communication in various Arab countries
Lectures in class
To be announced in class
To enrol for this course you have to sign the list
of attendees in the class and you have to add
the course to your personal course list in the
International Center ( Martina, office M105)
149
Course Code
Course title
Course title in LSF
Info
Questions concerning content
Entrance requirements
Name of lecturer(s)
Teaching language
Number of allocated ECTS points
Type of test/requirements for allocation of
credit points
Qualification goals and content of course
ILO-21
DaF A1 Incomings
German A1-Level
German as a foreign language
Deutsch als Fremdsprache A1 Incomings
International Language Office (ILO)
Ms. Céline Maser
E-mail: [email protected].de
None
Mr. Zimmermann/Mr. Neumann
German
6 CP
Exam
Students
can understand and use familiar everyday
expressions and very basic phrases aimed at the
satisfaction of needs of a concrete type.
can introduce him/herself and others and can ask
and answer questions about personal details such
as where he/she lives, people he/she knows and
things he/she has.
Teaching and learning methods of course
Literature
(set reading/additional recommended
literature)
Remarks
can interact in a simple way provided the other
person talks slowly and clearly and is prepared to
help.
Lectures in class
To be announced in class
For beginners without basic knowledge
Depending on the number of participants it could be
possible that we are able to offer this course with
more hours per week and therefore for more credit
points (9CP). This will be decided at the end of
September/beginning of October as soon as the
number of participants is fixed.
Course days and rooms to be announced (LSF)
To enrol for this course you have to sign the list
of attendees in the class and you have to add
the course to your personal course list in the
International Center ( Martina, office M105)
150
Course Code
Course title
Course title in LSF
Info/questions concerning content
Entrance requirements
Name of lecturer(s)
Teaching language
Number of allocated ECTS points
Type of test/requirements for allocation of
credit points
Qualification goals and content of course
ILO-22
DaF A2 Incomings
German A2-Level
German as a foreign language
Deutsch als Fremdsprache A2 Incomings
International Language Office (ILO)
Ms. Céline Maser
E-mail: [email protected]
German Entry Level Test on 12th September 2013
Mr. Zimmermann/Mr. Neumann
German
6 CP
Exam
Students
Can understand sentences and frequently used
expressions related to areas of most immediate
relevance (e.g. very basic personal and family
information, shopping, local geography,
employment).
Can communicate in simple and routine tasks
requiring a simple and direct exchange of
information on familiar and routine matters.
Teaching and learning methods of course
Literature
(set reading/additional recommended
literature)
Remarks
Can describe in simple terms aspects of his/her
background, immediate environment and matters in
areas of immediate need.
Lectures in class
To be announced in class
Depending on the number of participants it could be
possible that we are able to offer this course with
more hours per week and therefore for more credit
points (9CP). This will be decided at the end of
September/beginning of October as soon as the
number of participants is fixed.
Course days and rooms to be announced (LSF)
To enrol for this course you have to sign the list
of attendees in the class and you have to add
the course to your personal course list in the
International Center ( Martina, office M105)
151
Course Code
Course title
Course title in LSF
Info/questions concerning content
Entrance requirements
Name of lecturer(s)
Teaching language
Number of allocated ECTS points
Type of test/requirements for allocation of
credit points
Qualification goals and content of course
ILO-23
DaF III (A2/B1)
German B1-Level
German as a foreign language
Deutsch als Fremdsprache III
International Language Office (ILO)
Ms. Céline Maser
E-mail: [email protected]
German Entry Level Test on 12th September 2013
Mr. Burczyk/Ms. Kemerli
German
6 CP
Exam
Students
Can understand the main points of clear standard
input on familiar matters regularly encountered in
work, school, leisure, etc.
Can deal with most situations likely to arise whilst
travelling in an area where the language is spoken.
Can produce simple connected text on topics, which
are familiar or of personal interest.
Teaching and learning methods of course
Literature
(set reading/additional recommended
literature)
Remarks
Can describe experiences and events, dreams,
hopes & ambitions and briefly give reasons and
explanations for opinions and plans.
Lectures in class
To be announced in class
For intermediate students with good fundamental
knowledge
Course dates and rooms to be announced (LSF)
To enrol for this course you have to sign the list
of attendees in the class and you have to add
the course to your personal course list in the
International Center ( Martina, office M105)
152
Course Code
Course title
Course title in LSF
Info
Questions concerning content
Entrance requirements
Name of lecturer(s)
Teaching language
Number of allocated ECTS points
Type of test/requirements for allocation of
credit points
Qualification goals and content of course
ILO-24
DaF IV (B1/B2)
German B2-Level
German as a foreign language
Deutsch als Fremdsprache IV
International Language Office (ILO)
Ms. Céline Maser
E-mail: [email protected]
German Entry Level Test on 12th September 2013
Mr. Burczyk
German
6 CP
Exam
Students
Can understand the main ideas of complex text on
both concrete and abstract topics, including
technical discussions in his/her field of
specialisation.
Can interact with a degree of fluency and
spontaneity that makes regular interaction with
native speakers quite possible without strain for
either party.
Teaching and learning methods of course
Literature
(set reading/additional recommended
literature)
Remarks
Can produce clear, detailed text on a wide range of
subjects and explain a viewpoint on a topical issue
giving the advantages and disadvantages of various
options.
Lectures in class
To be announced in class
For intermediate students with very good
fundamental knowledge
Course dates and rooms to be announced (LSF)
To enrol for this course you have to sign the list
of attendees in the class and you have to add
the course to your personal course list in the
International Center ( Martina, office M105)
153
Course Code
Course title
Course title in LSF
Info
Questions concerning content
Entrance requirements
Name of lecturer(s)
Teaching language
Number of allocated ECTS points
Type of test/requirements for allocation of
credit points
Qualification goals and content of course
ILO-25
DaF V (B2/C1)
German C1-Level
German as a foreign language
Deutsch als Fremdsprache V
International Language Office (ILO)
Ms. Céline Maser
E-mail: [email protected]
German Entry Level Test on 12th September 2013
Ms Huhn
German
6 CP
Exam
Students
Can understand a wide range of demanding, longer
texts, and recognise implicit meaning.
Can express him/herself fluently and spontaneously
without much obvious searching for expressions.
Can use language flexibly and effectively for social,
academic and professional purposes.
Teaching and learning methods of course
Literature
(set reading/additional recommended
literature)
Remarks
Can produce clear, well-structured, detailed text on
complex subjects, showing controlled use of
organisational patterns, connectors and cohesive
devices.
Lectures in class
To be announced in class
For intermediate students with fluent fundamental
knowledge
Course dates and rooms to be announced (LSF)
To enrol for this course you have to sign the list
of attendees in the class and you have to add
the course to your personal course list in the
International Center ( Martina, office M105)
154

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