Phonological Awareness - The Literacy Connection

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Phonological Awareness - The Literacy Connection
T h e Lite r acy Conn ection a t H ome
P ro ject E n lig h te nme nt • Wake Cou nty Pu b lic Sch o o l System
P h o n o l o g ical Awareness
Phonological awareness is a strong predictor of later reading success. Phonological
awareness refers to the sensitivity to the sounds in speech, no letters, just sounds. This is
important because in order to be able to sound out words for reading, children need to be
able to hear the similarities and differences in words. However, phonological awareness
skills are less likely to develop through incidental exposure (Sulzby and Teale, 1991).
The preschool years are the perfect time to help children sensitize to sound similarities and
differences by listening to patterned, predictable texts while enjoying the feel of reading and
language.
Phonological awareness develops in stages:
•
Children acquire the ability to hear and focus on sounds in the environment,
listening.
•
Children notice and recognize the ending sounds of words, rhyming.
•
Children notice and recognize the beginning sounds, alliteration.
•
Children are aware of the concept of syllable, syllables.
•
Children are aware of the beginning sounds and start to think and play with words
that start with that initial sound, beginning sounds.
•
Children can identify the last sound of their names, ending sounds .
•
Children understand that the sounds of spoken language work together to make
words, phonemic awareness.
Phonemic awareness is the ability to manipulate the smallest sounds in speech; a
type of phonological awareness.
Phonics is the ability to combine sounds and letters.
Parents can encourage activities that support the ability to discriminate sounds by:
•
Creating an awareness of the sounds around their environments. For example;
“Did you hear the dog barking?” “What is that sound outside?”
P h o n o lo g ic a l Awa re n ess • P rese nte r Info rm atio n • 1
•
Doing activities that focus just on listening. For example, if a parent is tearing
paper, he or she could say to the child, “Close your eyes and listen. Tell me what
you think you hear me doing.”
•
Playing word play games or rhyming. Word play teaches children to listen on
purpose for sounds in language and to pronounce new sounds and words. For
example, provide the child with two different words and let him find the correct
one. “Does ‘cat’ or ‘tub’ rhyme with ‘sub’?” Nonsense or made up words are
okay. The important part of this activity is the word play rather than the meaning of
the word.
•
Playing with the child’s name. Find words that start with the same letter as your
child’s name. “Wonderful Willie, let’s go outside.”
•
Intentionally pointing out the sounds of a word. For example, a parent can say,
“We need some bread. Let me write the word ‘bread’ down. Look, I am writing
‘bread’ on the list. Bread starts with the letter “b” and “b” sounds like [b].”
Problem Solving for Success
Using the skill of daily problem solving has a profound effect on how a child feels about
himself. When we teach problem-solving skills to a young child, his or her energy is used
to learn and not to fight.
A good way to start is by talking about the “Give Me Five” activity, the five finger
solution to resolution. This is a five-step activity that will help parents model, teach and
support their children in developing and using appropriate problem-solving skills.
The five steps are:
1. Cool down.
2. Identify the problems.
3. Brainstorm solutions.
4. Choose a solution.
5. Try it out!
P h o n o lo g ic a l Awa re n ess • P rese nte r Info rm atio n •2
Tips for Supporting Families with Children that are English Language
Learners (ELL)
•
Providing ELL children the opportunity to sing, to recite nursery rhymes, and to
play with sounds in their native language sets the foundation for easier sound
discrimination and recognition. In English, when children have fun playing with
the familiar sounds, they might be willing to experiment with unfamiliar sounds too.
•
When families translate English rhymes into their home language, the words will no
longer rhyme.
Tips for Supporting Families with Children with Special Needs
•
Many books, songs, and nursery rhymes utilize concepts of phonological
awareness. Use them as tools to begin word play – you can even substitute your
child’s name to capture his or her interest. For example: “Rain, rain, go away. Little
_________ (your child’s name) wants to play!”
•
In the early stages of oral language development, children often substitute one
sound for another. For example, they may say “lellow” for “yellow.” Model the
correct sound without making the error an issue.
P h o n o lo g ic a l Awa re n ess • P rese nte r Info rm atio n •3
T h e Lite r acy Conn ection a t H ome
P ro ject E n lig h te nme nt • Wake Cou nty Pu b lic Sch o o l System
P h o n o l o g ical Awareness
A G ENDA
We lcom e
L e a r n in g Ob je ct ive
Re a d Alo u d
Icebr e a ker: Guess this Sound
Wh at is Ph o n o lo g ica l A war e n e ss?
Pro b le m So lvin g
Make a n d Take: Alliteration and Rhyming Cube
Cl o sin g
We lcom e
3 mi n ut es
•
Welcome participants.
•
Introduce presenters and other personnel.
•
Introduce the facility and cover “housekeeping,” such as location of bathrooms,
telephones, and vending machines.
•
Establish or review existing ground rules with the participants’ input.
L e a r n in g Ob je ct ive
•
2 mi n ut es
Families will understand the importance of phonological awareness in the
development of reading and writing.
•
Families will understand how they can use problem-solving steps with their
child.
Re a d Alo u d
5 mi n ut es
Feature a book from the list suggested for this session, emphasizing the bookmark,
“Reading and Word Sounds.” Demonstrate a model read-aloud.
P h o n o lo g ic a l Awa re n ess • Worksho p A g e n d a • 4
Guess th is So u n d
5 mi n ut es
Gather a collection of items that make identifiable sounds: such as, a pair of scissors and
paper, beans in a cup, water in a cup. Hide the items from the participants. Examples of
ways to hide them are: 1) place items on a table and cover them with a colored cloth, or 2)
place items on a table and place a piece of poster board as a barrier in front of them to
obstruct the view. Ask participants to listen and guess what sound they hear as you use the
hidden objects: e.g., cutting paper, pouring water, or shaking beans in a cup, etc. From this
activity, participants will understand that they can do activities like this at home to help
children focus on listening.
Listening to sounds is the first skill children need to have in order for them
to learn how to differentiate sounds in speech.
Wh at Is Ph o n o lo g ica l A war e n e ss?
5 mi n ut es
Phonological awareness is the ability to hear sounds in speech. In order to
be able to sound out words for reading, children need to hear the
similarities and differences in words and to know that letters are connected
to sounds they represent.
For example:
• [d] in “daddy” is the same [d] as the sound in “dog”.
• “Rose” and “nose” don’t begin with the same sound but have the
same
ending sounds. The same ending sound is what makes them rhyme.
• [d] sound is represented by the letter D.
Ha n d o ut 1 – L iste n Up!
Distribute and review handout.
Ph o n o l o g ica l A war e n e ss
1 0 mi n ut es
Let’s do a fun activity to get us started thinking about games we can do to
expose children to phonological awareness . Alliteration is a phonological
activity. Alliteration occurs when words start with the same sound, like
Peter Piper. For this game, get a partner. Think of a word that positively
describes your child that begins with the same sound of your child’s name.
For example:
Joyful Jen
Healthy Heidi
Terrific Terisha
Tremendous Tulia
P h o n o lo g ic a l Awa re n ess • Worksho p A g e n d a • 5
Take turns sharing your alliteration for your child’s name. Allow three
minutes.
This is one way to draw your child’s attention to the initial sound of a
word that starts with the same letter as your child’s name. Remember, the
focus is on the sound and not necessarily letter identification. You might be
using a word in which the first letter is silent.
When children use their name to acquire specific skills, they feel proud and
good about themselves and their accomplishment. When children feel good
about themselves, they can learn anything.
Being able to solve problems fosters positive self-esteem and encourages a
positive attitude toward learning. So, the ability to problem solve whether
during a game or during a misunderstanding with a playmate, is a beneficial
lifelong skill.
Ha n d o ut 2 – Give Me Five!
Distribute and review the handout. Here are the steps to follow with your child .
Hold out your hand and point to each finger as you go through each step of
the process.
1.
Cool down: Stop and take a deep breath.
2.
Identify the problem: Find out and state the real problem.
3.
Brainstorm solutions: Think of some pos sible solutions and for
each
solution think about:
•
It is safe?
•
How might people feel?
•
Is it fair?
•
Will it work?
4. Choose a solution: Agree on the best solution.
5. Try it out! Apply the solution and ask if it is working. It may need
revising.
If so, you can go through the “Give Me Five” steps again. When
the process is successful, share a “high five” with your child.
P h o n o lo g ic a l Awa re n ess • Worksho p A g e n d a • 6
Presenter Tip
If you have a variety of languages in your group, be aware that words that rhyme in
English will not rhyme in other languages. Two sets of pictures have been provided
for the rhyming cube. One is for English rhyming words, and the other is in
Spanish. If you have other languages spoken, consult with a translator for
appropriate pictures for the rhyming cube.
Allit er at io n a n d Rhym in g Cu b e
2 0 mi n ut es
This a ctivity pr ese nts a fun g a m e to reco g n ize wor ds that sou n d th e
sam e at the b e g in n in g (a l lit er at io n) a n d/or th e e n d (rh ym in g ).
Allow time for participants to create the cube. Encourage participants to practice different
ways they can play with the cube with their family.
Cl o sin g
5 mi n ut es
Review the main points of the workshop:
•
•
•
Phonological awareness is a listening skill that is a major predictor
for reading success.
Playing word games helps children pay attention to the sound s in
the words.
The ability to solve problems fosters self-esteem and encourages a
positive attitude toward learning. The use of problem-solving
skills like, the process of “Give Me Five,” will enhance a child’s
ability to solve problems in an appropriat e manner and are skills
that will last him or her a lifetime.
Encourage parents to come to the next workshop. Give time, date and place.
Distribute and collect evaluations.
P h o n o lo g ic a l Awa re n ess • Worksho p A g e n d a • 7
T h e Lite r acy Co nn ection a t H om e
P ro ject E n lig h te nme nt • Wake Cou nty Pu b lic Sch o o l System
P h o n o l o g ical Awareness
S u g ge s ted B o o k s
Brown Bear, Brown Bear* by Bill Martin Jr.
Five Little Monkeys* by Eileen Christelow
Is Your Mama a Llama?* by Steven Kellogg
Miss Mary Mack by Mary Ann Hoberman
One Duck Stuck by Phyllis Root
Silly Sally by Audrey Wood
Tomie’s Little Mother Goose by Tomie DePaolo
Tumble Bumble by Felicia Bond
Who Took the Cookies from the Cookie Jar? by Bonnie Lass and Philemon Sturges
Additional Books in Spanish
Arroz con Leche by Lulu Delacre
Los Cinco Patitos by Pamela Paparone
*Available in Spanish
P h o n o lo g ic a l K n ow le d g e • S u g g ested B o ok • 8
T h e Lite r acy Conn ection a t H ome
P ro ject E n lig h te nme nt • Wake Cou nty Pu b lic Sch o o l System
All i teratio n / R h y m i n g C u be
Mater ia ls
•
•
•
•
•
•
One pre-cut cube pattern from cardstock or file
folder per participant
One set of eight pictures (English or Spanish) per
participant
Tape, one roll for every two participants
Glue stick, one stick for every two participants
Scissors, one pair for every two participants
Color markers, a variety for each table to share
Dir e ctio n s
•
•
•
Fold cube pattern to create a cube and tape the edges.
Color the pictures and cut them out.
Glue the pictures onto the cube.
Activ ity
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Present the cube to your child.
Explain that the cube is really a rhyming game.
Encourage your child to review the cards and name them if possible.
Review the names of the pictures with your child by pointing at each picture on
the cube.
Explain that the cube can be rolled or gently tossed.
When the cube comes to a stop, the child can state the name of the picture on
top of the cube and then state a rhyming word such as “book” then “cook.”
Take turns rolling the cube and stating rhyming words.
Ad d it io n a l Activit ies•
•
•
Provide the child with two different words and let him find out the correct one.
Example: Ask the child, “Does ‘cat’ or ‘tub’ rhyme with ‘sub’?”
If the child uses a nonsense or made-up word, it is okay. The important part of
this activity is the word play rather than the meaning of the word.
Change the game from rhyming to alliteration. When the cube is rolled, ask the
child to name the picture and say a word that starts with the same sound as the
picture. For example: the picture is of a book, so the response might be baby, box, or
banana.
P h o n o lo g ic a l Awa re n ess • Make a n d Take Instructio ns • Rhymin g Cu b e
T h e Lite r acy Conn ection a t H ome
P ro ject E n lig h te nme nt • Wake Cou nty Pu b lic Sch o o l System
El Cubo que Rima
Mater ia le s
• Un cubo de cartón ya cortado por participante
• Un juego con ocho dibujos (Ingles o Español) por
participante
• Un rollo de teipe por cada dos participantes
• Una barrita de goma de pegar por cada dos participantes
• Una tijera para cada dos participantes
• Varios marcadores para cada mesa
Instruccio n e s
•
•
•
Arme el cubo
Coloree los dibujos y corte cada dibujo
Pegue cada dibujo en cada lado del cubo
Activ id a d
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Enseñe el cubo a su niño
Explíquele que el cubo es un juego para rimar
Anime a que su niño revise los dibujos y los nombre.
Nombre los dibujos con su niño mientras apunta a cada uno de los dibujos.
Explique que el cubo se puede lanzar suavemente
Cuando el cubo se pare su niño dice el nombre del dibujo que esta en la parte de arriba
y luego que busque una palabra que rime con la misma. Por ejemplo: si el dibujo
señala la palabra “niña” su niño puede decir “piña” como la palabra que rima.
Tomen turnos lanzando el dado y buscando las palabras que riman.
Activ id a d e s a d icio n a le s
•
•
•
•
Déle dos palabras diferentes para que su niño escoja la que rima. Por ejemplo: el adulto
dice, “Veo que te salió “Gato”. Dime “Gato” rima con “Casa” o “Pato”
Si su niño tiene que conseguir la palabra, puede inventar alguna. Lo que importa es el
sonido no el significado.
También puede permitir que su niño busque palabras que suenan igual al comienzo.
Esto es llamado aliteración. Por ejemplo: perro, pasa, poco.
Cambie el juego de rima por aliteración. Cuando lance el cubo, pregúntele a su niño
que le diga el nombre del dibujo en el cubo y que busque una palabra que comience con
el mismo sonido. Por ejemplo: Si el dibujo es: “mesa” la respuesta podría ser “
mecha, mega, mango, m ano”
P h o n o lo g ic a l Awa re n ess • Sp a n is h Make a n d Take Instructio ns • Rhymin g Cub e
T h e Lite r acy Conn ection a t H ome
P ro ject E n lig h te nme nt • Wake Cou nty Pu b lic Sch o o l System
P h o n o lo g ic a l Awa re n ess • Make a n d Take Instructio ns • Rhymin g Cu b e P ictu res
RhymingCube Pattern
1. Cutout cubepattern.
2. Cutalongslitsthatare labeled"Cutslitshere".
Do not cut alongthe dottedlines.
3 Glue picturesalongthe six sidesof the cube.
4 . Fold cube along dotted lines.
5 Tape cube in orderto securethe ends.
Cut slithere.
Cut slit here.
.t Cut sfit here.
T h e Lite r acy Conn ection a t H ome
P ro ject E n lig h te nme nt • Wake Cou nty Pu b lic Sch o o l System
Listen Up!
Hear Rhyming Sounds and Letter Sounds
Phonological Awareness- When children
hear the different sounds in speech, it lays the
foundation for reading. In addition to using
language to communicate, children can
notice that words are made of sounds,
rhythms, rhymes and syllables. Once your child
is familiar with the sounds of language, he or
she will then be able to make the association
between letters and sounds.
You can help your preschool child learn to listen to words by having fun with:
Alliteration - Words that have the same beginning sound.
•
Emphasize the beginning sounds as you say the words so your child will
notice that the sounds are the same. Say, “Did you hear these sounds?
Both words start with the same sound.”
Example:
“Big Boy” or “Helping Hand”
Rhyming Words - Words that have the same ending sounds.
•
Say nursery rhymes together. After your child knows a rhyme well, pause
and let your child fill in the word. Talk about the words that rhyme. Try this
one on a rainy day!
Example:
•
“Rain, rain, go away,
Come again another day,
Little Johnny wants to play.”
Sing songs to help your child learn words, and hear sounds and rhymes.
Try this one together and act out the motions.
Example:
“I’m a little teapot, short and stout,
Here is my handle and here is my spout.
When I get all steamed up, hear me shoutTip me over and pour me out!”
P h o n o lo g ic a l Awa re n ess • Han d o ut 1 • L iste n Up! • 1
Syllables - The units of sounds in a word.
•
•
Notice the parts of the words as you say them.
Compare your family names. Say a name slowly and clap when you hear
each part. For example: ‘Jon/a/than’ has three syllables. Which family
member’s name is longest or shortest?
P h o n o lo g ic a l Awa re n ess • Han d o ut 1 • L iste n Up! • 2
T h e Lite r acy Conn ection a t H ome
P ro ject E n lig h te nme nt • Wake Cou nty Pu b lic Sch o o l System
¡Escucha!
Escucha los sonidos que riman y los sonidos de las le tras
Discriminación fonológica- Cuando su
niño escucha los diferentes sonidos en el
lenguaje esto crea la fundación para la
lectura. Además de utilizar las palabras para
comunicarse, su niño empieza a entender
que las palabras están formadas por un
grupo de sonidos, ritmos, rimas y sílabas. Una
vez que su niño se familiarice con los sonidos
del lenguaje, él o ella serán capaces de
asociar las letras con sus sonidos.
Ayude a que su niño en edad preescolar escuche las palabras mientras se
divierteSonidos iniciales (Aliteración) – Palabras que suenan igual al comienzo.
•
Trate de usar palabras que comienzan con la misma letra. Enfatice los
sonidos iniciales para que su niño note que los sonidos son iguales.
Ejemplo: “Bianca Bella” o “Rosa Risueña”
Palabras que riman- Palabras que suenan igual al final.
•
Son palabras que suena igual al final. Rimen y canten juntos. Después
que su niño se aprenda la rima deje que él termine la frase por usted.
Hable acerca de que las palabras riman. Intente esta rima durante un día
lluvioso.
Ejemplo: “Tip, top
Tip, top
La lluvia ya empezó.
Clip, clop
Clip, clop
La lluvia ya arreció.”
•
El cantar canciones ayuda a que su niño aprenda las palabras, escuche
los sonidos y pueda rimar. Intente esto juntos mientras se mueven.
Ejemplo: “Sana, sana colita de rana.
Si no sanas hoy, sanarás mañana.
Sana, sana colita de rana.
Ten un besito para hoy y mañana.”
P h o n o lo g ic a l Awa re n ess • Sp a n is h Han d o ut 1 • L isten Up! • 1
Sílabas- Unidades de sonido en una palabra.
• Note que tan extensa es cada palabra al dividir la palabra mientras
aplaude.
• Compare los nombres de su familia. Diga el nombre de alguien y
aplauda cada vez que divida la palabra. Por ejemplo: ‘Al/fre/do’ Tiene
tres sílabas. ¿Qué nombres en la familia son los más largos y los más
cortos?
P h o n o lo g ic a l Awa re n ess • Sp a n is h Han d o ut 1 • L isten Up! • 2
T h e Lite r acy Co nn ection a t H om e
P ro ject E n lig h te nme nt • Wake Cou nty Pu b lic Sch o o l System
“Give Me Five!” A Solution to Resolution
Help your child learn to problem solve by using a hand for thinking and
talking rather than acting aggressively. When in need of a resolution, you
and your child can each hold up a hand and go through the resolution
process by pointing to each finger and following each step.
3. Brainstorm solutions.
2. Identify the problem.
4. Choose a solution.
5. Try it out!
1. Cool down.
Once the process is complete, and a successful resolution
has occurred, celebrate with a high five!
P h o n o lo g ic a l Awa re n ess • Han d o ut 2 • G iv e Me Five!
T h e Lite r acy Co nn ection a t H om e
P ro ject E n lig h te nme nt • Wake Cou nty Pu b lic Sch o o l System
“¡Dame Los Cinco!”
Solución de cinco dedos para una resolución!
Ayude a que su niño pueda resolver problemas de una manera sencilla al
usar los deditos de su mano en vez de pelear. Cuando necesite resolver
un problema, usted y su niño levantarán la mano y hablarán de cada
paso a seguir para resolver el problema.
3. Busca soluciones.
2. Identifica el problema.
1. Tranquilízate.
4. Escoje una solución.
5. Pon en
práctica un de
las soluciones!
¡Una vez que este proceso termine con resultado existo,
celebre chocando las manos!
P h o n o lo g ic a l Awa re n ess • Sp a n is h Han d o ut 2 • G iv e Me Five!
Read aloud to your child
everyday.
Read aloud to your child
everyday.
Read aloud to your child
everyday.
It’s the best thing a family can do
to support success in reading!
It’s the best thing a family can do
to support success in reading!
It’s the best thing a family can do
to support success in reading!
Tips for a Great Read-Aloud Time
Tips for a Great Read-Aloud Time
Tips for a Great Read-Aloud Time
Snuggle up! Put your arm
around your child.
❖
Snuggle up! Put your arm
around your child.
❖
Snuggle up! Put your arm
around your child.
❖
Let your child select a book.
❖
Let your child select a book.
❖
Let your child select a book.
❖
Make sure your child can
see the book.
❖
Make sure your child can
see the book.
❖
Make sure your child can
see the book.
❖
Read slowly and with expression.
❖
Read slowly and with expression.
❖
Read slowly and with expression.
❖
Talk about the pictures.
❖
Talk about the pictures.
❖
Talk about the pictures.
❖
When finished, ask your child “What
did you like best about this book?”
❖
When finished, ask your child “What
did you like best about this book?”
❖
When finished, ask your child “What
did you like best about this book?”
❖
Have fun!
❖
Have fun!
❖
Have fun!
❖
The next day, ask your child to tell you
about the book you read last night.
The next day, ask your child to tell you
about the book you read last night.
The next day, ask your child to tell you
about the book you read last night.
Reading
and
word sounds
Reading
and
word sounds
Reading
and
word sounds
The first step in hearing word and letter
sounds is developing listening skills.
Speak slowly and clearly when you
read to help your child hear the
differing sounds. When you read books
that rhyme, you have the chance to
help them learn about sounds.
The first step in hearing word and letter
sounds is developing listening skills.
Speak slowly and clearly when you
read to help your child hear the
differing sounds. When you read books
that rhyme, you have the chance to
help them learn about sounds.
The first step in hearing word and letter
sounds is developing listening skills.
Speak slowly and clearly when you
read to help your child hear the
differing sounds. When you read books
that rhyme, you have the chance to
help them learn about sounds.
Rhyming:
Rhyming:
Rhyming:
• After reading a book that has
rhyming words, say, “I heard a lot of
rhyming words when we read that
book. Let’s go back and find words
that rhyme. I see “Jill” and “hill.” They
end in the same sound. That makes
them rhyme. What else could
rhyme with Jill and hill?” (mill, till, dill)
“Those are silly sounds!”
• After reading a book that has
rhyming words, say, “I heard a lot of
rhyming words when we read that
book. Let’s go back and find words
that rhyme. I see “Jill” and “hill.” They
end in the same sound. That makes
them rhyme. What else could
rhyme with Jill and hill?” (mill, till, dill)
“Those are silly sounds!”
• After reading a book that has
rhyming words, say, “I heard a lot of
rhyming words when we read that
book. Let’s go back and find words
that rhyme. I see “Jill” and “hill.” They
end in the same sound. That makes
them rhyme. What else could
rhyme with Jill and hill?” (mill, till, dill)
“Those are silly sounds!”
• If you have read a rhyming word
book several times to your child, try
leaving a rhyming word blank for
your child to fill in, like . . .
• If you have read a rhyming word
book several times to your child, try
leaving a rhyming word blank for
your child to fill in, like . . .
• If you have read a rhyming word
book several times to your child, try
leaving a rhyming word blank for
your child to fill in, like . . .
Little Boy Blue, come blow your
horn, the sheeps in the meadow
the cow’s in the _____.
Your child would fill in “corn.” You
would say, “Horn and corn are
rhyming words. They end with the
same sound. They rhyme.”
Little Boy Blue, come blow your
horn, the sheeps in the meadow
the cow’s in the _____.
Your child would fill in “corn.” You
would say, “Horn and corn are
rhyming words. They end with the
same sound. They rhyme.”
Little Boy Blue, come blow your
horn, the sheeps in the meadow
the cow’s in the _____.
Your child would fill in “corn.” You
would say, “Horn and corn are
rhyming words. They end with the
same sound. They rhyme.”
Lea en voz alta a su niño(a)
todos los días.
Lea en voz alta a su niño(a)
todos los días.
Lea en voz alta a su niño(a)
todos los días.
¡Este es la mejor actividad que un
miembro de la familia puede hacer
para apoyar el éxito en la escuela!
¡Este es la mejor actividad que un
miembro de la familia puede hacer
para apoyar el éxito en la escuela!
¡Este es la mejor actividad que un
miembro de la familia puede hacer
para apoyar el éxito en la escuela!
Consejos para que su lectura
en voz alta sea exitosa.
Consejos para que su lectura
en voz alta sea exitosa.
Consejos para que su lectura
en voz alta sea exitosa.
Acurrúquesele, ponga su brazo
alrededor de su niño(a).
❖
Deje que su niño(a) seleccione el libro.
❖
Este seguro que su niño(a) puede
ver cada página del libro.
❖
Lea lentamente y con expresiones.
❖
Hable acerca de los dibujos.
❖
Cuándo termine, pregúntele
“ ¿Qué fue lo que más te
gusto de este libro?”
❖
¡Diviértanse!
❖
Al día siguiente pregúntele
que le cuente acerca de la historia
que leyeron la noche anterior.
Acurrúquesele, ponga su brazo
alrededor de su niño(a).
❖
Deje que su niño(a) seleccione el libro.
❖
Este seguro que su niño(a) puede
ver cada página del libro.
❖
Lea lentamente y con expresiones.
❖
Hable acerca de los dibujos.
❖
Cuándo termine, pregúntele
“ ¿Qué fue lo que más te
gusto de este libro?”
❖
¡Diviértanse!
❖
Al día siguiente pregúntele
que le cuente acerca de la historia
que leyeron la noche anterior.
Acurrúquesele, ponga su brazo
alrededor de su niño(a).
❖
Deje que su niño(a) seleccione el libro.
❖
Este seguro que su niño(a) puede
ver cada página del libro.
❖
Lea lentamente y con expresiones.
❖
Hable acerca de los dibujos.
❖
Cuándo termine, pregúntele
“ ¿Qué fue lo que más te
gusto de este libro?”
❖
¡Diviértanse!
❖
Al día siguiente pregúntele
que le cuente acerca de la historia
que leyeron la noche anterior.
La lectura y
los sonidos
de las
palabras
La lectura y
los sonidos
de las
palabras
La lectura y
los sonidos
de las
palabras
El primer paso para escuchar los
sonidos de una palabra y de una
letra es el desarrollo de la habilidad de escuchar. Hable lentamente y con claridad cuando
lea para que ayude a que su
niño distinga los sonidos. Cuando
usted lee los libros con rimas,
usted le da la oportunidad a que
aprenda acerca de los sonidos.
El primer paso para escuchar los
sonidos de una palabra y de una
letra es el desarrollo de la habilidad de escuchar. Hable lentamente y con claridad cuando
lea para que ayude a que su
niño distinga los sonidos. Cuando
usted lee los libros con rimas,
usted le da la oportunidad a que
aprenda acerca de los sonidos.
El primer paso para escuchar los
sonidos de una palabra y de una
letra es el desarrollo de la habilidad de escuchar. Hable lentamente y con claridad cuando
lea para que ayude a que su
niño distinga los sonidos. Cuando
usted lee los libros con rimas,
usted le da la oportunidad a que
aprenda acerca de los sonidos.
Rimando:
Rimando:
Rimando:
• Después de leer un libro que
tiene palabras que riman, diga,
“Escuche muchas palabras que
riman” Vamos a buscarlas. “Yo
veo “niña” y Piña” Estas terminan
con el mismo sonido. ¿Eso es lo
que hacen que rimen. Qué otras
palabras riman con niña y piña?
(viña, riña, ciña) esas son palabras y sonidos muy cómicas”
• Después de leer un libro que
tiene palabras que riman, diga,
“Escuche muchas palabras que
riman” Vamos a buscarlas. “Yo
veo “niña” y Piña” Estas terminan
con el mismo sonido. ¿Eso es lo
que hacen que rimen. Qué otras
palabras riman con niña y piña?
(viña, riña, ciña) esas son palabras y sonidos muy cómicas”
• Después de leer un libro que
tiene palabras que riman, diga,
“Escuche muchas palabras que
riman” Vamos a buscarlas. “Yo
veo “niña” y Piña” Estas terminan
con el mismo sonido. ¿Eso es lo
que hacen que rimen. Qué otras
palabras riman con niña y piña?
(viña, riña, ciña) esas son palabras y sonidos muy cómicas”
• Si usted ha leído un libro de rimas
muchas veces a su niño, trate de
que él consiga la palabra que
rima. Por ejemplo:
• Si usted ha leído un libro de rimas
muchas veces a su niño, trate de
que él consiga la palabra que
rima. Por ejemplo:
• Si usted ha leído un libro de rimas
muchas veces a su niño, trate de
que él consiga la palabra que
rima. Por ejemplo:
“aserrín, aserrán
Los maderos de San Juan
Los de Juan comen ____
“aserrín, aserrán
Los maderos de San Juan
Los de Juan comen ____
“aserrín, aserrán
Los maderos de San Juan
Los de Juan comen ____
“Su niño encontrará la palabra
“pan” Entonces usted dirá, “Sí
“pan” rima con Juan y aserrán.
Estas palabras terminan con el
mismo sonido. Estas riman.”
“Su niño encontrará la palabra
“pan” Entonces usted dirá, “Sí
“pan” rima con Juan y aserrán.
Estas palabras terminan con el
mismo sonido. Estas riman.”
“Su niño encontrará la palabra
“pan” Entonces usted dirá, “Sí
“pan” rima con Juan y aserrán.
Estas palabras terminan con el
mismo sonido. Estas riman.”
T h e Lite r acy Co nn ection a t H om e
P ro ject E n lig h te nme nt • Wake Cou nty Pu b lic Sch o o l System
P h on o l o g ical Awareness
Evaluati o n
Please circle the response that best represents your thoughts:
1. I understand that I can help my child by including rhyming and alliterative words
playfully in our conversation.
definitely
somewhat
not sure
2. I will use the Rhyming Cube in a planned manner to engage in rhyming and alliteration
word play with my child.
often
some
a little
3. I will use the “Give Me Five” resolution technique to help my child learn to solve
problems.
often
some
a little
4. One thing I learned in this session that I will remember and use __________________
____________________________________________________________________ .
5. What could make this session better _______________________________________ .
P h o n o lo g ic a l Awa re n ess • En g lis h Eva lu atio n
T h e Lite r acy Co nn ection a t H om e
P ro ject E n lig h te nme nt • Wake Cou nty Pu b lic Sch o o l System
Discrim inación de lo s S o n i d o s
Evaluación
Por favor marque la respuesta que mejor refleja sus opiniones.
1. Yo entiendo que puedo ayudar de una manera divertida al incluir rimas( palabras que
terminan con el mismo sonido) y aliteraciones (palabras que comienzan con el mismo
sonido) en nuestra conversación.
definitivamente
más o menos
no estoy seguro
2. Yo planeo utilizar el cubo para buscar palabras que suenan igual al final (rimas) y al
comienzo (aliteración).
definitivamente
más o menos
no estoy seguro
3. Yo voy a usar la guía “Dame los cinco” para ayudar a mi niño a que resuelva los
problemas.
definitivamente
más o menos
no estoy seguro
_____________________________________________________________________
4. Una cosa que aprendí en esta sesión es:______________________________________
5. Que hubiera podido hacer esta sesión mejor: ________________________________
______________________________________________________________________
P h o n o lo g ic a l Awa re n ess • Sp a n is h Eva lu atio n

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