Fern Communicator 01-17-16 - Fern Elementary School

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Fern Communicator 01-17-16 - Fern Elementary School
REVISED COPY
NEW FERN STUDENT ENROLLMENT
Kindergarten & Transitional Kindergarten (TK)
January 15, 2016
Dear Fern Parents and Guardians,
It’s almost time to enroll children for Kindergarten or Transitional Kindergarten! All future
Falcons will be enrolled at the Torrance Unified Family Welcome Enrollment Center
(FWEC) located at 2336 Plaza del Amo Torrance, California (8:00am to 3:00pm).
Fern’s Transitional Kindergarten/Kindergarten registration dates are January 26th and 27th
at the Family Welcome Center. There are several forms that must be completed prior to
registration. Please bring the completed forms and all documentation with you on the
26th or the 27th. Enrollment forms can be found on www.tusd.org. Click on the Family
Welcome Center icon.
All incoming Kindergarten students must be 5 years of age on/or before
September 1, 2016 and all incoming Transitional Kindergarten students must be 5 years
between September 2, 2016 and December 2, 2016.
Additionally, all incoming Kindergarteners will have an opportunity to be evaluated by Fern
Kindergarten teachers on April 25th. You will be able to schedule an appointment for your
child at FWEC when you enroll your child.
If you are unable to attend the Transitional/Kindergarten registration dates in January,
the make-up date for Fern is on February 12th. I strongly encourage you to enroll your
child in January so that our staff can begin to prepare classes for the new school year.
If your child is currently attending Fern, you do not need to enroll again. Please share this
important information with new families in your neighborhood. The Fern Staff is looking
forward to meeting our future students and their families!
With Fern PRIDE,
Debbie Mabry
Debbie Mabry
Principal
Honorary Service Awards
It’s that time of year again, the time we say “Thank You” to our hard working-dedicated
volunteers and community helpers. Honorary Service Awards (HSAs) are a unique way
for PTA units to publicly acknowledge both individuals and organizations for outstanding
community service to children and youth in a community.
All nominations will be considered. The HSA Selection Committee will select the
recipient.
Please take the time to complete this nomination form and tell us who you think should
be recognized for their outstanding service. Submissions accepted until Friday, January
22, 2016.
HONORARY SERVICE AWARD PROGRAM
Please select one award:
Outstanding Teacher Award (OTA) - This award is given to recognize a teacher for
outstanding service to children and youth through PTA, school, or community.
Outstanding Administrator Award (OAA) - This award is given to recognize an
administrator for outstanding service to children and youth through PTA, school, or the
community.
Very Special Person Award (VSP) - This award is given to recognize an individual or
organization for their service to PTA.
Honorary Service Award (HSA) - This award is given to recognize an individual or
organization for outstanding service to children and youth in your community, going above
and beyond what is asked of them.
Continuing Service Award (CSA) - This award is given to recognize an individual or
organization for ongoing or long-time service to children and youth, providing support year
after year.
Golden Oak Service Award (GOSA) - This award is given to recognize, as the most
prestigious of the Honorary Service Awards, an individual or organization that has made
significant contributions to the welfare of children and youth in a school or community.
Name of Individual nominated (please include title or position):
Name of organization nominated:
Organization Information:
Contact Person
Address
City/Town
State/Province
ZIP/Postal Code
Email Address
Phone Number
Reason for nomination:
Name of person submitting the nomination:
Name
Email Address
Phone Number
2016-17 Kindergarten Enrollment
Priority enrollment for Kindergarten (5th birthday must fall on or before September 1, 2016) and
Transitional Kindergarten (TK) (5th birthday must fall on or between September 2, 2016 – December 2,
2016) will begin January 26, 2016, schools and their specific enrollment dates are listed below. All
incoming kindergarteners will be enrolled at the Family Welcome Enrollment Center located at 2336
Plaza del Amo, Torrance, CA 90509 from 8:00 am – 3:00 pm. Please follow the directions on the
back of this page and bring all necessary items to enroll your kindergartner on your date.
Dates to Enroll
School of Residency
January 26 & 27, 2016
January 28 & 29, 2016
February 1, 2 & 3, 2016
February 4 & 5, 2016
February 9, 10 & 11, 2016
February 16, 17, 18 & 19, 2016
February 22 & 23, 2016
February 24, 25, & 26, 2016
February 29, March 1, 2 & 3, 2016
March 7 & 8, 2016
March 9, 10 & 11, 2016
March 14, 15 & 16, 2016
March 17 & 18, 2016
March 21, 22 & 23, 2016
March 24 & 25, 2016
March 28 & 29, 2016
March 30 & 31, 2016
April 11, 12 & 13, 2016
Fern
Torrance Elementary
Seaside
Edison
Towers
Hickory
Arlington
Riviera
Victor
Wood
Anza
Arnold
Lincoln
Walteria
Yukon
Adams
Carr
LAUNCH (kindergarten & TK)
If you miss the registration date for your child’s school listed above, the following makeup days will
also be available:
February 12, 2016
Any school that enrolled Jan. 26- Feb. 11, 2016
March 4, 2016
Any school that enrolled Feb. 16 – Mar. 3, 2016
April 1, 2016
Any school that enrolled Mar. 7 – 31, 2016
If you miss your scheduled enrollment date, you can enroll your kindergartner or TK anytime beginning
May 2.
SEE BACK SIDE FOR ENROLLMENT
INSTRUCTIONS
Enrollment forms are available at the Family Welcome Enrollment Center or can
be downloaded at www.tusd.org, select the Green
Family Welcome Enrollment Center link and scroll down to the
Kindergarten Enrollment packet.
Torrance Unified School District
Enrollment Requirements
Dear Parent(s)/Guardian(s):
The following documents are required at time of enrollment. Please be advised that if you do not have
all the required documents, your student will not be enrolled.
1) Proof of Age
•
Birth Certificate or Passport (Original required)
2) State Immunization Requirements
•
Immunization Record (Original required)
3) Proof of Residency – 2 proofs required (dated within the past 60 days)
A home check may be conducted to verify student residency.
•
•
•
•
•
Electric
Gas
Water
Trash
Cable/Satellite
•
•
•
•
•
Internet
Lease/Rental Agreement
Mortgage Statement
Property Tax Bill
Home Telephone (landline only)
Disconnect Notices and Cell Phone Bills are not accepted.
WE DO NOT FAX OR PHONE PREVIOUS SCHOOLS, LANDLORDS, OR UTILITY COMPANIES REQUESTING
DOCUMENTS. Parents/guardians are responsible for providing ALL required documentation.
4) Parent/Guardian Photo ID (original required)
5) Enrollment Form – completed and signed
6) Health History Form – completed and signed
7) Student Residency Questionnaire/Affidavit – completed and signed
~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ If Applicable ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~
10) IEP – please bring this with you to Enrollment
11) 504 – please bring this with you to Enrollment
Any students entering from another country must have all documents translated into English.
HOURS OF SERVICE
Enrollment Processing: Monday – Friday
•
8:00am – 3:00pm
Enrollment processing may close earlier if lines are long.
Questions and Forms: Monday – Friday 8:00am – 4:00pm Saturday/Sunday: CLOSED
2336 Plaza Del Amo ~ Torrance, CA 90509 ~ (310) 972-6280 ~ www.tusd.org
Torrance Unified School District
Family Welcome Enrollment Center
2336 PLAZA DEL AMO
*
Torrance, CA 90509
*
(310) 972-6280
OPEN ENROLLMENT for Torrance Unified School District Residents
Application - 2016-17 School Year
1)
JANUARY 4, 2016 - FEBRUARY 29, 2016 (4:00pm) - Application DEADLINE - before 4:00pm on Feb 29, 2016.
Applications will ONLY be accepted IN PERSON - NO FAX - NO EMAIL - NO MAIL .
Parent/Guardian must complete this application.
TYPE or PRINT CLEARLY.
- Complete ONE application for each student applying - ONLY ONE per student.
- Siblings - DO NOT AUTOMATICALLY FOLLOW AN OLDER SIBLING ON OPEN ENROLLMENT.
- An application must be submitted for each student wanting to change their home school.
ELEMENTARY & MIDDLE SCHOOLS:
HIGH SCHOOLS:
return this application to the Family Welcome Enrollment Center - IN PERSON.
return this application to the office of the High School requested.
~ ~ ~ ~ Applications WILL NOT be accepted before January 4, 2016 or after 4:00pm on February 29, 2016. ~ ~ ~ ~
2)
A computer generated Lottery is held to determine which students are accepted and the order in which students are placed on
a Wait List.
Parent/Guardian will receive a letter stating the application for Open Enrollment has been accepted OR if you are not accepted at this time,
you will receive a letter with your Wait List number. If you receive a number, you will be notified by letter IF SPACE BECOMES AVAILABLE.
3)
If approved for Open Enrollment, Parent/Guardian MUST COMPLETE and RETURN the Confirmation Letter.
ELEMENTARY & MIDDLE SCHOOLS:
HIGH SCHOOLS:
return the signed Confirmation Letter to the Family Welcome Enrollment Center - IN PERSON.
return the signed Confirmation Letter to the office of the High School requested.
YOU WILL FORFEIT YOUR OPEN ENROLLMENT IF THE CONFIRMATION LETTER IS NOT RETURNED - IN PERSON
BY THE DATE ON THE LETTER ~ NO FAX - NO EMAIL - NO MAIL .
Keep a copy of the signed Confirmation Letter for your records.
4)
Enrollment in Torrance Unified School District (TUSD)
Student CURRENTLY ENROLLED in TUSD: If accepted and confirmed, contact the school of Open Enrollment after May 2, 2016.
Students NOT CURRENTLY ENROLLED in TUSD: If accepted and confirmed, Parent/Guardian must come to the Family Welcome
Enrollment Center after May 2, 2016 and enroll the student for the 2016-17 school year .
For an Enrollment Packet and instructions / requirements on what is needed to enroll, go to:
www.tusd.org - select Family Welcome Enrollment Center - scroll down to 2016-17 Enrollment Packet
Enroll at the Family Welcome Enrollment Center - Enrollment Hours are Monday - Friday 8:00am to 3:00pm
Once enrolled, the school of choice remains the student's home school through High School graduation - even if you move to another
address within Torrance Unified School District boundaries.
5)
Important Information about Open Enrollment:
- Submitting this application DOES NOT GUARANTEE that you will be approved for the requested school.
- Applications are considered equally, if received within the stated time period. IT IS NOT FIRST-COME, FIRST-SERVED.
- Students with siblings already attending the school requested on a PERMANENT BASIS will be given priority.
Permanent basis meaning the sibling is on Open Enrollment and will still be attending in the 2016-17 school year.
- A Wait List will be created for schools where there are more applications than spaces available.
- Transportation to the school of choice is NOT provided.
- IMPORTANT: The Open Enrollment school is your permanent Home School until High School graduation unless:
you move out of Torrance Unified School District boundaries
you re-apply AND are accepted into another site for Open Enrollment during a later school year.
OE App 12/9/2015
DATE / TIME STAMP:
OFFICE USE ONLY
2016 / 2017
All information is complete and ACCURATE.
This form will be used to process your request.
TUSD is NOT responsible for any illegible, false, inaccurate or incomplete information.
Falsification of information is grounds for denial of request.
By submitting this form you verify that you have read all the information on the front of the application.
Keep a COMPLETE COPY (front and back) of this paper for your information.
OPEN ENROLLMENT APPLICATION - DUE by February 29, 2016 - 4:00 PM
Student's Legal LAST NAME:
Student's Legal FIRST NAME:
MIDDLE NAME:
Date of BIRTH:
(month / day / year)
CURRENT GRADE:
N/A
GRADE IN 2016-17 SCHOOL YEAR:
TK
K
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
TK
K
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
STUDENT ID#:
Does student have an IEP?
YES
NO
School of RESIDENCE:
School CURRENTLY ATTENDING:
School REQUESTED:
(To become permanent Home School)
Parent / Guardian NAME:
ADDRESS:
Apt / Unit#:
CITY:
ZIP CODE:
EMAIL ADDRESS:
HOME PHONE#:
CELL PHONE#:
WORK PHONE#:
Does the student have a sibling already attending the requested school on a PERMANENT BASIS*:
If YES, give sibling(s) NAME and GRADE in Sept 2016:
YES
NAME:
GRADE:
NAME:
GRADE:
NAME:
GRADE:
NO
By signing this form, you verify that you have read all the information on the front page.
PARENT / GUARDIAN SIGNATURE:
* see front page for explanation of PERMANENT BASIS.
OE App 12/9/2015
DATE
FWEC
Metropolitan Educational Theatre Network/MET2 invites you to be part of
the cast of this FUN-tastical musical!
Oh the Thinks You Can Think
When You JOIN OUR CAST!
Directed by
Alison Bretches
Workshop,
Parent Orientation,
and First Rehearsal
Thursday
January 28, 2016
at 7:00 p.m.
An imaginative musical based on the books of Dr. Seuss.
Manypartsforyoungpeopleofallages,
Kthroughcollege(andparentstoo!)aswejourneyintothemindof
Dr.Seussonthismagicaladventure.
No Experience Necessary!
Toyota Meeting Hall
Ourworkshopfeesincludeweekly
rehearsalsandeveryonewhocompletes
oureducationalworkshopswill
performonstageina
professionalstyletheatrewithcostumes,
scenery,andlivemusiciansin
March,2016
3330 Civic Center Drive,
Torrance 90503
Askaboutourfamilydiscounts
andpaymentplans.
Torrance Cultural Arts Center
Bringtwonewfriendswhoregisterand
yourregistrationisfree!
Looking for information?
Unable to attend?
Please call:
1-800-961-0194 ext 2
Wegladlyacceptallmajorcreditcards.
WorkshopTrainingFeeApplicable
(Workshopfeeisnon-refundableanddoes
notincludecostumefeeandnominal
administrativefee.)
The Cat in the Hat,
Horton the Elephant,
Gertrude McFuzz,
the Whos, and other wellknown and beloved
characters leap out of the
vivid imagination of Dr.
Seuss and onto the stage.
Imagine a world where
anything is possible an elephant in a tree,
a person too tiny to see,
a heroic child, and dreams
running wild! Seussical
creates the witty, wild,
and whimsical world of
Dr. Seuss as it has never
been seen before.
MetropolitanEducationalTheatreNetwork(MET2)isanon-profiteducationalorganizationprovidingyoungpeoplewiththeunique
opportunitytobeactiveparticipantsinthedramaticprocessasactors,singers,anddancers.
FounderAlexH.Urban,renownededucatorandtheatredirectorforover35years,hasdesignedaprogrambasedonbuildingself-esteem,
grace,discipline,andpoisewithintheindividual.
“Followusanddiscoverwhereimaginationleads!”–AlexH.Urban
AnEducationalTheatreCompanyDesignedandDirectedbyEducators
[email protected]
MetropolitanEducationalTheatreNetworkIsaNon-ProfitOrganization(#33-0794860)
LimitedScholarshipsAvailable
Remember, a person’s a person no matter how small!
January 2016
Torrance Unified School District
Help your child set and achieve
New Year’s learning goals
January is a good time for you and your child to
review her progress and set goals for the rest of
the school year. So encourage your child to make
some learning resolutions. Even better, help her
learn how to achieve her goals.
When your child thinks about goals, help her
choose one she can reach fairly soon. It should
also be specific. For instance, “Be smart in social
studies” is too broad. “Learn Civil War facts,” on
the other hand, can be observed and measured.
Then have your child follow these steps:
1.State the goal. “My goal is to learn my Civil War dates and terms by
February.” She should write her goal down and post it where she’ll see it.
2.Plan how to meet the goal. “I will make flash cards and study them
for 15 minutes every night. I will ask Mom to quiz me on Fridays.”
3.Talk about the goal with others. Your child should tell her teacher
what she plans to do. This strengthens her commitment to the goal.
4.Follow each step in the plan. If problems arise, she can brainstorm
solutions with you. For example, if she’s too tired after homework time to
review flash cards, perhaps she could study them over breakfast, instead.
5.Motivate and celebrate. Encourage your child to take pride in each
step she takes toward her goal. She could say, for example, “I’m proud
I studied my Civil War facts today. I’m going to do it tomorrow, too.”
When she achieves her goal, celebrate that her efforts paid off!
Poor attendance hurts school success
Parents often wonder if taking their young child out of school for a vacation
or an appointment can really affect his success. Research on students in
kindergarten through third grade suggests that chronic absence (missing 10
percent or more of school days) is linked to:
out the door the next morning
• Low performance in school.
with everything he needs.
It’s also connected to dropping
out, substance abuse and more.
• Enforce a regular bedtime.
• Lost learning time for class• Review your child’s schedule.
mates, when teachers must help
If after-school activities leave him
kids who were absent catch up.
too tired to do homework or wake
up easily, it’s time to cut back.
To make sure your child’s learning
won’t suffer from poor attendance:
Source: H. Chang and C. Leong, “Early Intervention
• Help your child get organized Matters: How Addressing Chronic Absence Can
Reduce Dropout Rates,” Attendance Works, niswc.
each evening so that he can get
com/chronic.
Speak up! Your words build
your child’s vocabulary
What’s one of the best things
you can do to build your
child’s language skills? Talk
to her! Here are some topics
to discuss:
• The world around you. Visit places
together. Use new words to describe them:
“Look at the scaffolding on that building!”
• Books. Ask your child about what she’s
reading. Tell her about books you love.
• Things you each wonder about.
“Why don’t clouds fall out of the sky?”
Brainstorm, then read to find the answer.
Foster classroom behavior
When a teacher is continually interrupted
by students who misbehave, the whole class
misses out on learning. To help your child
develop self-control:
• Talk to him about school rules.
• Show him the respect you want him
to show others.
• Set consistent limits at home.
• Praise responsible behavior, both
his and that of others.
Write it all on the calendar
A new year means it’s time
for a new family calendar.
Posted in a central location
in your home, a family
calendar is great for:
• Scheduling family time. Show your
child that time together is important
enough to write on the calendar.
• Keeping track of family schedules.
Use a different color for each person.
• Planning homework time. Each week,
look at the calendar with your child.
Discuss her schedule and how she plans
to use her time to complete assignments.
Copyright © 2016, The Parent Institute®, www.parent-institute.com
To get more information,
share first, then ask
January 2016
Will getting paid for grades
make my child work harder?
Q: My son gets average grades, but I
know he could do better. Some parents
pay their children for good grades. Is
this a good idea?
A: We all want our children to do their best in
school, and parents are constantly looking for
ways to motivate children to achieve. But most
experts agree that paying students for getting
good grades is not effective. There are several
reasons. Paying for grades:
• Deprives your child of the pure satisfaction of learning.
Children naturally love to learn. As they master new skills or memorize
new facts, they gain self-esteem and self-confidence. When you pay your
child for grades, he is less likely to appreciate these rewards of learning.
• Doesn’t recognize effort. If your child has tried his hardest, neither
he nor you should worry too much whether he receives an A or a B. And
if he’s worked hard but earned a low grade, it’s a signal that you and the
teacher should figure out how to better help him.
• Decreases motivation. When kids get paid for doing some things,
they might expect to get paid for everything they do. Pretty soon, your
child may have his hand out every time you ask him to do a chore.
So what can you do to get your child’s grades up? Help him focus on what
he’s learning. Call his attention to his new skills. And praise him for working
hard and doing his best!
Are you making study time positive?
Few children love doing homework. But when parents make homework a
positive experience, kids will usually do it without a battle. Are you setting
your child up for homework success? Answer yes or no to the questions below:
___1. Do you give your child
choices—such as which subject
to do first, or whether to study
after school or before dinner?
___2. Are you available and
nearby to offer support when
your child studies?
___3. Is homework time a quiet
time for your whole family?
Do you turn off the TV and
read, work or study?
___4. Do you help your child
study by quizzing her on
spelling words or using
flash cards?
___5. Do you praise your child
for a good effort?
How well are you doing?
More yes answers mean you are making
homework time a productive time for your
child. For each no, try that idea.
If you ask your child a lot of questions
about school each day but get few answers,
give this strategy a try: Before you ask a
question, tell him several things about your
day. Then ask him to tell you about his.
You can use this strategy to discuss
schoolwork, too. If your child brings home
a picture, for example, you could say what
you like about it or what it reminds you of.
Then ask, “What does it mean to you?”
Your child can be a leader!
All kids have the ability to become leaders.
To nurture your child’s leadership skills:
• Watch leaders in the news. When a
story features a successful team effort,
remind your child that somebody led that
group. Discuss what makes a good leader.
• Teach your child to see things from
other peoples’ points of view.
• Let your child lead a family meeting or
take charge of a family project.
Source: L. Balter and C.S. Tamis-LeMonda, Child Psychology: A
Handbook of Contemporary Issues, Psychology Press.
Teach the need to read
To help your child understand
the value of reading, point out
how essential it is to so many
daily activities, such as:
• Communication. Life without mail,
email, texts and notes would be difficult—and not as interesting.
• Business. Show your child contracts,
bills and other documents. Point out that
reading skills help with understanding
the “fine print.”
• Instructions. Have your child read a
recipe as you cook. Ask if he thinks he
could make the dish without reading the
instructions.
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Copyright © 2016, The Parent Institute®, www.parent-institute.com
Helping Children Learn®
Published in English and Spanish, September through May.
Publisher: John H. Wherry, Ed.D.
Editor: Alison McLean.
Staff Editors: Rebecca Miyares & Erika Beasley.
Production Manager: Pat Carter.
Translations Editor: Victoria Gaviola.
Layout & Illustrations: Maher & Mignella, Cherry Hill, NJ.
Copyright © 2016, The Parent Institute®, a division of NIS, Inc.
P.O. Box 7474, Fairfax Station, VA 22039-7474
1-800-756-5525 • www.parent-institute.com • ISSN 1526-9264
1527-1013
X02618959
Home&School
CONNECTION
®
Working Together for School Success
January 2016
Torrance Unified School District
Ben Egan, Director - State & Federal Projects
SHORT
NOTES
Resolution:
Success!
This year, have your child make resolutions that will motivate him to do
his best in school. For instance, he
could pick a subject to improve in
or a challenging book series to read.
Encourage him to draw a picture of
himself meeting his goal and share
the drawing with his teacher.
Hands-on history
Let your youngster take white paper
and an unwrapped crayon on a walk
around town. She can place the paper
over engravings on historical markers
or plaques and rub lightly with the
side of the crayon. At home, suggest
that she write a caption for each rubbing to tell a “local history” story.
Sick time
When your child is sick, notify the
school as soon as possible that he will
be absent. Then, follow school policy
about how long he must be symptomfree before he may return to class.
Note: He could ask a sibling or friend
to bring home his work. Or when he
goes back, he can talk to his teacher
about making up the work.
Worth quoting
“Every time you tear a leaf off a calendar, you present a new place for new
ideas and progress.” Charles Kettering
JUST FOR FUN
Q: Can you name three consecutive
days without saying
Sunday, Wednesday,
or Friday?
A: Yes! Yesterday,
today, and
tomorrow.
© 2015 Resources for Educators, a division of CCH Incorporated
The three Cs of group work
Three kindergartners work together
on a mural in art class. Several fifth
graders discuss a novel they read in
reading group. No matter how old
your child is, being able to communicate, collaborate, and compromise
is important when she works with
others. Consider these ways to practice at home.
C
ommunication
Group members communicate
better when one person speaks at
a time. Let your youngster create a
“talking stick” by covering a ruler with
aluminum foil or decorating a paper
towel tube. During a family discussion,
pass the stick around—only the person
holding it may speak. This will remind
your child to wait her turn and listen to
what others say.
C
ollaboration
Show your youngster that when
people combine ideas, they often come
up with new or better ones. Pretend
you’re a restaurant marketing team in
charge of designing a pizza or burger.
Start by looking at menus for interesting twists (barbecue pizza, burger with
fried egg), and create something differ-
ent (blue cheese pizza, Caesar burger).
Then, work together to make your new
menu item for dinner.
C
ompromise
When group members disagree
on a topic for their presentation or on
who will take what role, it’s important to
compromise. That means stating what
you would prefer—and what alternatives you’re willing to accept. Your child
can try this at home when your family
makes a decision. For example, maybe
one sibling wants to go sledding while
another would prefer ice skating. They
could agree to sled first—but the one
who wanted to ice skate gets to choose
the hill they’ll sled on.♥
Keep track of progress
By staying on top of how your youngster does
in school, you can support his achievements and
nip any problems in the bud. Try these strategies.
● Go over papers. Look at each graded assignment your child brings home. This is an easy way
to see what he’s doing well and what he needs to
work on.
● Use electronic tools. If the school posts grades online, check them regularly.
● Communicate with the teacher. Contact her if your youngster says a subject
is difficult or brings home low grades. You could ask about ways to help him.♥
Home & School CONNECTION
January 2016 • Page 2
®
Behavior “mysteries”
struggling to switch out of
“school mode.” Try giving
him a break first—he
may appreciate a few
minutes to unwind, just
as some adults do after
work. Suggest a snack and
exercise, such as riding his
bike or jumping rope.
Is your youngster’s behavior sometimes baffling?
Here are solutions to common scenarios parents face.
My child behaves in school but acts out at
home. Your youngster probably feels more relaxed
at home and can let his guard down more with you.
Rest assured this is normal. Remind him of the consequences for misbehaving at home, and follow
through when he acts out. (And be glad that your
child behaves at school!)
After school, my youngster doesn’t want to talk
about his day or start homework. Your child may be
ACTIVITY
CORNER
Experiment with
evergreens
Your child may wonder why some
trees stay green throughout the year
(evergreens) and others lose their leaves
(deciduous). With this activity, she can
find out.
Let your
youngster cut
out two green
constructionpaper “leaves”
and sprinkle them lightly with water. She
should wrap one in waxed paper and lay
both leaves in the sun for at least two
hours. What happens? (The bare leaf stays
dry, but the protected one remains moist.)
The science: A deciduous tree loses
water through its leaves’ tiny pores, so it
gets rid of the leaves to conserve water
in harsh weather. But evergreen leaves
have a waxy cuticle, or covering, kind of
like the waxed paper that protected your
child’s paper leaf. This coating keeps the
water from evaporating, so leaves can
remain on the tree through the winter.♥
O U R
P U R P O S E
To provide busy parents with practical ideas
that promote school success, parent involvement,
and more effective parenting.
Resources for Educators,
a division of CCH Incorporated
128 N. Royal Avenue • Front Royal, VA 22630
540-636-4280 • [email protected]
www.rfeonline.com
ISSN 1540-5621
© 2015 Resources for Educators, a division of CCH Incorporated
My child only obeys me
when I raise my voice. If
your youngster knows he has
to do what you ask only when you shout, he’ll probably wait
for your raised voice before he listens. Tell him that you’ll ask
nicely once, and after that, there will be a consequence for
not listening.♥
Q Spell-check pitfalls
&
My daughter says spelling is no big deal
A Q:
because we have spell-check and autocorrect.
How can I convince her that spelling still matters?
A: Spell-check and autocorrect are handy tools.
But they’re not foolproof, and they’re not always available.
When your child writes a school report, sit with her while she runs spell-check.
Together, look for examples of mistakes caused by relying on the computer. This
often happens with homophones (it’s and its, you’re and your), for instance. She’ll
need to know the difference to use the correct word.
Also, help her think of situations where she won’t have spell-check or autocorrect, such as taking a test or using special software that doesn’t include the feature.
And if she can’t spell a word, she may not recognize it when she reads, which can
interfere with her comprehension.
Finally, point out that if she studies her spelling words, thinks carefully about
how words are spelled, and proofreads her work, she’ll find that the best spell-check
is in her own head!♥
PARENT
TO
ENT
R
A
P
Helpful strategies for ADHD
My fourth-grader,
Ryan, has ADHD, and he often loses
books and papers and forgets to turn in
assignments or to bring home slips for
me to sign.
I talked to a fellow PTA parent
whose oldest son has ADHD. She
said her son puts sticky-note
reminders everywhere—
on his desk and binders
and beside the front
door. He also does better
in school if he gets 11 hours
of sleep, about two hours more than his
siblings need.
I got colorful pads of sticky notes for
Ryan, and he came up with a system
for color-coding his reminders. Also, we
are moving up his bedtime by a
few minutes each night until we
notice a difference. I know Ryan
will still forget things
from time to time,
but it’s helpful to
know that we have
strategies to try.♥
Home&School
CONNECTION
®
Trabajando juntos para el éxito escolar
Torrance Unified School District
Enero de 2016
Ben Egan, Director - State & Federal Projects
NOTAS
BREVES
Propósito:
¡El triunfo!
Propóngale a su hijo este año que haga
propósitos que le motiven a esforzarse
al máximo en la escuela. Por ejemplo,
podría elegir una materia para mejorar
en ella o una serie de libros que leer.
Anímelo a que haga un dibujo de sí
mismo alcanzando su objetivo y a que
lo comparta con su maestro.
Historia interactiva
Cuando su hija salga de paseo por la ciudad, que se lleve papel blanco y un crayón sin su envoltura. Puede colocar el
papel sobre las inscripciones de señales
históricas o de placas y frotar ligeramente
con el lado del crayón. De regreso a casa
sugiérale que escriba un pie para cada
calco que cuente una “historia local”.
Falta por enfermedad
Si su hijo se pone enfermo, notifique a
la escuela cuanto antes de su ausencia.
Luego siga las normas de la escuela
sobre el tiempo que tiene que estar
libre de síntomas antes de regresar a
clase. Nota: Puede pedirle a un hermano o a un amigo que le traigan la tarea
a casa. Y cuando vuelva a clase puede
hablar con su maestro sobre cómo ponerse al día.
Vale la pena citar
“Cada vez que arrancas una hoja del
calendario presentas un lugar nuevo
para ideas nuevas y progreso”.
Charles Kettering
SIMPLEMENTE CÓMICO
P: ¿Puedes dar el nombre de tres días
consecutivos sin decir domingo, miércoles o viernes?
R: ¡Sí! Ayer, hoy y
mañana.
Las tres C del trabajo en equipo
Tres niños en edad de preescolar hacen
juntos un mural en la clase de arte. Varios estudiantes del quinto grado leen en
un grupo de lectura. Tenga la edad que
tenga, ser capaz de comunicar, colaborar y comprometerse es importante
cuando su hija trabaja con otros compañeros. Tenga en cuenta estas formas de practicar en casa.
C
omunicación
Los miembros de un grupo se
comunican mejor cuando hablan de
uno en uno. Que su hija cree un “bastón para hablar” cubriendo una regla con
papel de aluminio o decorando un tubo de
un rollo de toallas de papel. Durante una
conversación familiar pásense el bastón: sólo
puede hablar la persona que lo tenga. Esto
le recordará a su hija que debe aguardar su
turno y escuchar lo que dicen los demás.
C
olaboración
Enseñe a su hija que cuando las personas combinan sus ideas a menudo se les
ocurren otras nuevas o mejores. Imaginen
que son un equipo de mercadotecnia para
un restaurante encargado de diseñar una
pizza o una hamburguesa. Miren primero
menús en busca de variaciones interesantes (pizza barbacoa, hamburguesa con
huevo frito) y creen algo diferente (pizza
con queso azul, hamburguesa César). A
continuación trabajen juntos y cocinen de
cena el nuevo plato del menú.
C
ompromiso
Cuando los miembros del grupo no
están de acuerdo sobre un tema para su
presentación o sobre quién hará qué, es
importante llegar a un compromiso. Eso
significa decir lo que uno prefiere y qué
alternativas se está dispuesto a aceptar. Su
hija puede practicar esto en casa cuando
su familia tome una decisión. Por ejemplo,
puede que un hermano quiera jugar con
el trineo mientras que otro prefiere patinar
sobre hielo. Podrían decidir que jugarán
primero con el trineo, pero el que prefiere
patinar sobre hielo puede elegir la colina
por la que se deslizarán con el trineo.♥
Controlar el progreso
Si están al tanto de lo que su hijo hace en la escuela pueden apoyar sus logros y eliminar los problemas de raíz. Pongan a prueba estas estrategias.
● Revisen los trabajos. Miren cada tarea calificada
que su hijo trae a casa. Es una forma fácil de ver lo que
está haciendo bien y en qué necesita esforzarse más.
● Usen herramientas electrónicas. Si su escuela pone las notas en la red, consúltenlas con regularidad.
● Comuníquense con la maestra. Pónganse en contacto con ella si su hijo dice
que una materia es difícil o si saca notas bajas. Podría preguntarle de qué manera pueden ayudarle.♥
© 2015 Resources for Educators, a division of CCH Incorporated
Home & School CONNECTION
Enero de 2016 • Página 2
®
Los “misterios” del
comportamiento
cueste apagar la “función
escuela”. Procure darle
primero un respiro: agradecerá relajarse, lo mismo
que algunos adultos hacen
después del trabajo. Sugiérale que meriende y que
haga ejercicio, por ejemplo
puede montar en bici o saltar a la cuerda.
¿Les resulta incomprensible a veces el comportamiento de su hijo? He aquí soluciones a algunos escenarios
frecuentes a los que se enfrentan los padres.
Mi hijo se porta bien en la escuela pero no
en casa. Su hijo probablemente se siente más cómodo
en casa y baja la guardia cuando está con usted. Esto es
normal. Recuérdele las consecuencias de portarse mal en
casa y sea consecuente cuando sea malcriado. (¡Y alégrese
de que se porte bien en la escuela!)
Después de la escuela mi hijo no quiere hablar de
su día o empezar los deberes. Puede que a su hijo le
DE
RINCÓN A
D
D
I
V
ACTI
Mi hijo sólo obedece
cuando levanto la voz.
Si su hijo sabe que tiene que
hacer lo que usted le manda sólo cuando usted grita, probablemente no escuchará hasta que usted levante la voz. Dígale que
le preguntará con gentileza una vez y que, a continuación, habrá
consecuencias si no escucha.♥
Experimentos con
árboles de hoja perenne
P
Puede que su hija se pregunte por qué
algunos árboles están siempre verdes a lo
largo del año (árboles de hoja perenne) y
otros pierden sus hojas (árboles de hoja
caduca). Con esta actividad podrá
averiguarlo.
Que su hija recorte dos “hojas”
de cartulina
verde y rocíe un
poco de agua
sobre ellas. Tiene
que envolver una con papel encerado y
colocar ambas hojas al sol dos horas por lo
menos. ¿Qué sucede? (La hoja descubierta
se seca, pero la protegida sigue húmeda.)
La ciencia: Un árbol de hoja caduca
pierde agua por los diminutos poros de
sus hojas, de modo que se desprende de
las hojas para conservar agua durante el
mal tiempo. Pero las hojas perennes tienen
una cutícula, o cubierta, cerosa, algo así
como el papel encerado que protegió la
hoja de papel de su hijo. Ese revestimiento
evita que el agua se evapore así que las
hojas pueden permanecer en el árbol durante el invierno.♥
P: Mi hija dice que la ortografía no importa porque tenemos correctores ortográficos y autocorrectores.
¿Cómo puedo convencerla de que saber ortografía sigue siendo importante?
N U E S T RA
F INAL IDAD
Proporcionar a los padres ideas prácticas que
promuevan el éxito escolar, la participación de los
padres y un mejor entendimiento entre padres e hijos.
Resources for Educators,
una filial de CCH Incorporated
128 N. Royal Avenue • Front Royal, VA 22630
540-636-4280 • [email protected]
www.rfeonline.com
ISSN 1540-563X
© 2015 Resources for Educators, a division of CCH Incorporated
&
R
Las trampas del corrector
ortográfico
R: El corrector ortográfico y el autocorrector son herramientas útiles. Pero no son infalibles y no siempre están disponibles.
Cuando su hija escriba un trabajo para clase, siéntese con ella mientras usa el corrector ortográfico. Busquen ejemplos de errores causados por confiar ciegamente en la computadora. En inglés esto ocurre frecuentemente con homófonos (it’s y its, you’re y your),
por ejemplo. Necesitará conocer la diferencia para usar la palabra correcta.
Ayúdela también a que piense en situaciones en las que no tendrá corrector ortográfico o autocorrector, por ejemplo cuando se examine o cuando use software especial que
no incluya esas funciones. Y si no puede escribir correctamente una palabra quizá no la
reconozca cuando la lea, lo cual puede dificultarle la comprensión de la lectura.
Finalmente, indíquele que si se estudia las palabras de su lista, piensa con atención
cómo se escriben las palabras y repasa y corrige su trabajo, ¡descubrirá que el mejor corrector ortográfico es su propia cabeza!♥
DE
PADRE
A PADRE
Estrategias útiles para ADHD
Mi hijo Ryan que
está en el cuarto
grado tiene ADHD y con frecuencia pierde
libros y papeles y se olvida de entregar sus
tareas o de traer a casa los formularios que
yo tengo que firmar.
Hablé con otra madre del PTA cuyo hijo
mayor tiene ADHD. Me dijo que su
hijo pone notitas por todas partes
como recordatorio de lo que
tiene que hacer: en su
mesa de trabajo y en sus
archivadores y junto a la
puerta de casa. También
consigue mejores resultados
en el colegio si duerme unas 11 horas,
unas dos horas más de lo que necesitan
sus hermanos.
Le compré a Ryan blocs de papelitos adhesivos de colores y él se inventó un sistema
para codificar sus recordatorios. Estamos
también anticipando la hora de acostarse
unos cuantos minutos cada noche
hasta que percibamos un cambio. Sé
que Ryan va a seguir olvidando
cosas de vez en cuando,
pero es útil saber que
existen estrategias con
las que podemos
experimentar.♥
WINTER SEASON
Fern Elementary
Tuesdays
1/26/2016-2/23/2016 Session 1
3/1/2016- 3/29/2016 Session 2
Grades Kinder 1:50-2:35 (Grass near play structure)
Registration is Online only. Space is limited. Reserve your spot today!
$75
Spring Break
Soccer Camp
2016
La Romeria Park
19501 Inglewood
Ave
Torrance, 90503
Ages 5-12 yrs
April 4 to April 8
5-Day Session
9 am - 3 pm
Register Today!

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