Press dossier - The International Treaty

Comentarios

Transcripción

Press dossier - The International Treaty
 PRESS DOSSIER
Tunis, 2009
Index of media coverage
Wires
Africa Science News Service (2)
African Press Organization—English (Switzerland)
African Press Organization—French (Switzerland)
Afrol News (Spain)
Agence France-Presse (2)
Agence Tunis Afrique Presse (Tunisia)
Agencia EFE (Spain)
Moj News Agency (Iran)
Reuters (UK)
Schweizerische Depeschenagentur AG (Switzerland)
UN News Service (2)
UN News Service—French
United Press International
Xinhua News Agency—French (China) (3)
Print
Les Echos (France)
L’Expert Journal (Tunis)
Irish Times (Ireland)
Le Monde (France)
New Scientist (UK)
El Pais (Spain)
Science (US)
Sud Oueste (France)
De Telegraaf (Netherlands)
Le Temps (Tunisia)
Trouw (Netherlands)
Original Online
Actualites News Environnement (France)
African Manager (Tunisia)
AgroInformacion.com (Spain)
Agrocope (Spain)
America Latina en Movimiento
Akhbar Online (Tunisia)
Assabah Online (Tunisia)
Business Intelligence Middle East (UAE)
Consumer Eroski (Spain)
Cnn.com
Ecoportal.net (Argentina)
Essahafa Online (Tunisia)
Intellectual Property Watch (Switzerland) La Presse Online(Tunisia)
La Voz del Sandinismo (Nicaragua)
Le Renouveau (Tunisia)
Nature News (UK)
Stackyard.com
Teatro Naturale International (Italy)
Toulouse7 News
Via Campesina (Indonesia)
Online Pick-up
Agrodigital.com
Cyberpresse.ca
e-agriculture.org
EVANA: European Vegetarian and Animal News Alliance
Finanzas.com (Spain)
Le Bulletin des Agriculteurs (Canada)
Lakoom Info.com
MSN Actualités –French
MSN Latino
Newsdesk.se (Sweden)
Newstin (Spain)
New York Times Online
Noticias Terra (Brasil)
NTR Zacatecas (Mexico)
Planet Ark
Romandie News (Switzerland)
SDP Noticias (Mexico)
Times of the Internet
Times of India Online
UN Syria
Yahoo! Noticias Argentina
WIRES
11 projects to receive grants from treaty on food plant genes
Written by Henry Neondo
Tuesday, 02 June 2009
Millet projects in Kenya and Senegal and a project on wheat in Tanzania are among eight others in
developing countries that will receive more than $500 000 to support their effort in conserving food seeds
and other genetic material from major crops.
According to an announcement made Tuesday in Tunis at a high-level meeting of the governing body of
the International Treaty for Plant Genetic Resources in Food and Agriculture, grants are to be awarded to
projects in Egypt, Kenya, Costa Rica, India, Peru, Senegal, Uruguay, Nicaragua, Cuba, Tanzania and
Morocco.
It is the first time funds have become available under the benefit-sharing scheme of the Treaty, designed
to compensate farmers in developing countries for their role in conserving crop varieties.
The projects were chosen from hundreds of applications and come on stream thanks to the generous
donations of Norway, Italy, Spain and Switzerland in support of agriculture and food security.
The projects to be supported include: on-farm protection of citrus agro-biodiversity in Egypt, the genetic
enhancement and revitalization of finger millet in Kenya and the conservation of indigenous potato
varieties in Peru.
http://africasciencenews.org/asns/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=1321&Itemid=2
Farmers to benefit from the new gene pact
Written by ASNS in Tunis
Monday, 01 June 2009
Farmers in developing countries are to be rewarded under a binding international treaty for conserving
and propagating crop varieties that could prove to be the saviour of global food security over the coming
decades.
A new benefit-sharing scheme, part of the International Treaty on Plant Genetic Resources for Food and
Agriculture, is to come on stream thanks to the generous donations of several governments that will
support five such farmers’ projects.
They will be announced at a meeting of the Treaty’s Governing Body is Tunis this week from more than
300 applications submitted by farmers, farmer’s organisations and research centres mainly from Africa,
Asia and Latin America. It is the first time that financial benefits are being transferred under the Treaty
which was agreed in 2004.
The Treaty established a global pool comprised of 64 food crops that make up more than one million
samples of known plant genetic resources.
The Treaty stipulates that whenever a commercial product results from the use of this gene pool and that
product is patented, 1.1 percent of the sales of the product must be paid to the Treaty’s benefit-sharing
fund.
The first batch of projects are to receive around $250 000. Norway, Italy, Spain and Switzerland have
contributed the funds as seed money for the benefit-sharing scheme.
Plant breeding is a slow process and it can take ten years or more for a patented product to emerge from
the time the genetic transfer took place which is why the aforementioned governments have backed the
scheme. Norway introduced a small tax on the sale of seeds on its domestic market to fund its donation.
The projects selected will have to fulfil a number of criteria that support poor farmers who conserve
different seed varieties and reduce hunger in the world.
“We are grateful to the governments who have made voluntary contributions to make this possible,” said
Dr Shakeel Bhatti, Secretary of the Treaty’s Governing Body. “If farmers and other agricultural
stakeholders don’t get any support in conserving and developing the different varieties, this crop diversity
that they look after may be lost forever.
No country is self-sufficient in plant genetic resources; all depend on genetic diversity in crops from other
countries and regions. International cooperation and open exchange of genetic resources are therefore
essential for food security.
Climate change has made this challenge even more pressing as there is a need to preserve all the crops
developed over millennia that can resist cold winters or hot summers.
Yet, agricultural biodiversity, which is the basis for food production, is in sharp decline due the effects of
modernization, changes in diets and increasing population density.
About three-quarters of the genetic diversity found in agricultural crops has been lost over the last
century, and this genetic erosion continues. It is estimated that there were once 10,000 types of food
crops.
Today, only 150 crops feed most of the world's population, and just 12 crops provide 80 percent of dietary
energy from plants, with rice, wheat, maize, and potato alone providing almost 60 percent.
Many new and unexploited varieties are found in some of the hardest to reach places in poor countries,
where they have been traditionally grown by local farmers but never commercialized.
The real concern is that many crops that have developed resistance to hot summers and cold winters, or
long periods of drought might be lost which is why the Treaty has made on-farm conservation one of its
priorities.
Delegates to the meeting will seek agreement on ways to further speed up the benefit-sharing aspects of
the Treaty. These might include an appeal from the Governing Body to governments, private donors and
foundations for $116 million to strengthen the treaty’s work in helping developing countries grow better
crops.
“While disagreements over access to crop genetic resources can involve highly technical issues and
complex legal matters, the challenges are quite clear,” said Dr Bhatti. “Crop breeders need wide access
to genetic diversity in order to confront climatic change, fight plant pests or disease, and feed the world’s
rapidly growing populations.”
http://africasciencenews.org/asns/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=1318&Itemid=2
(Switzerland)
Reward for conserving crops / 11 projects announced in Tunis to
receive grants from treaty on food plant genes
TUNIS, Tunisia, June 2, 2009/African Press Organization (APO)/ — Eleven developing countries that
conserve food seeds and other genetic material from major crops will receive more than $500 000 to
support their efforts according to an announcement made today in Tunis at a high-level meeting of the
governing body of the International Treaty for Plant Genetic Resources in Food and Agriculture.
Grants are to be awarded to projects in Egypt, Kenya, Costa Rica, India, Peru, Senegal, Uruguay,
Nicaragua, Cuba, Tanzania and Morocco. It is the first time funds have become available under the
benefit-sharing scheme of the Treaty, designed to compensate farmers in developing countries for their
role in conserving crop varieties.
The projects were chosen from hundreds of applications and come on stream thanks to the generous
donations of Norway, Italy, Spain and Switzerland in support of agriculture and food security.
The projects to be supported include: on-farm protection of citrus agro-biodiversity in Egypt, the genetic
enhancement and revitalization of finger millet in Kenya and the conservation of indigenous potato
varieties in Peru.
http://appablog.wordpress.com/2009/06/02/reward-for-conserving-crops-11-projects-announced-in-tunisto-receive-grants-from-treaty-on-food-plant-genes/
(Switzerland)
Compensations pour la conservation des plantes / Onze projets de
financement annoncés à Tunis Publié par: la Base de données de
communiqués de presse liés à l’Afrique
TUNIS, Tunisie, 2 juin 2009/African Press Organization (APO)-On apprend, lors de la réunion cette
semaine à Tunis de l’Organe directeur du Traité sur les ressources phytogénétiques pour l’alimentation et
l’agriculture, que dans11 pays en développement des projets de conservation de gènes et d’autre
ressources phytogénétiques vitales pour nourrir l’ humanité seront financés grâce au système de partage
des bénéfices institué par ce Traité.
Les fonds, qui totalisent 543 millions de dollars, vont à des projets en Egypte, au Kenya, au Costa Rica,
en Inde, au Pérou, au Sénégal, en Uruguay, au Nicaragua, à Cuba, en Tanzanie et au Maroc. C’ est la
première fois que des transferts d’ avantages financiers sont effectués aux termes du Traité et ce, depuis
son entrée en vigueur en juin 2004. Ce système de partage des bénéfices découlant du Traité vise à
compenser les paysans des pays en développement pour leur rôle dans la conservation des varietés des
plantes.
Ces onze projets ont été choisis parmi plus d’ une centaine de demandes et cela a été rendu possible
grâce aux généreuses contributions de la Norvège, de l’Italie, de l’Espagne et de la Suisse. Ils
comprennent notamment la protection à la ferme de l’agrobiodiversité des agrumes en Egypte,
l’amélioration génétique et la revitalisation d’une variété de mil au Kenya et la conservation de variétés
indigènes de pommes de terre au Pérou.
http://appablog.wordpress.com/2009/06/02/compensations-pour-la-conservation-des-plantes-onzeprojets-de-financement-annonces-a-tunis/
(Spain)
Túnez impulsa tratado sobre recursos fitogenéticos
afrol News, 2 de Junio - Por primera vez, los agricultores de los países en desarrollo se verán
recompensados al amparo de un tratado internacional vinculante para la conservación y difusión de
variedades de cultivos que pueden salvaguardar la seguridad alimentaría mundial en las próximas
décadas.
Como parte del Tratado Internacional sobre los Recursos Fitogenéticos para la Alimentación y la
Agricultura, se pondrá en marcha un nuevo esquema de distribución de beneficios gracias a las
generosas donaciones de diversos gobiernos destinadas a algunos proyectos en este ámbito.
Los detalles serán explicados en la reunión de esta semana del Órgano Rector del Tratado en Túnez.
Los proyectos han sido seleccionados entre más de 300 propuestas enviadas por campesinos,
organizaciones de agricultores y centros de investigación, sobre todo de África, Asia y América Latina.
Es la primera vez que se transfieren beneficios económicos en aplicación del Tratado acordado en 2004.
El Tratado creó un fondo común mundial formado por 64 cultivos alimentarios que suman más de un
millón de muestras de recursos fitogenéticos conocidos.
El Tratado estipula que siempre que un producto comercial patentado haya utilizado un gen de este
fondo común, el 1,1 % de sus ventas debe destinarse al fondo de distribución de beneficios del Tratado.
El primer grupo de proyectos recibirá unos 250 000 dólares. Noruega, Italia, España y Suiza han
aportado el capital inicial a este fondo para la distribución de beneficios, recordó el Fondo de Naciones
Unidas para Agricultura y Alimentación (FAO).
La fitogenética es un proceso lento y pueden transcurrir diez o más años desde que se produce la
transferencia de genes hasta que llega a un producto patentado. Por este motivo los gobiernos
anteriormente citados han respaldado el proyecto.
Para financiar su donación, Noruega introdujo un pequeño impuesto sobre la venta de semillas en su
mercado nacional. Los proyectos seleccionados tendrán que respetar una serie de criterios en apoyo a
los agricultores pobres que conservan diferentes variedades de semillas y ayudan a reducir el hambre en
el mundo.
"Estamos agradecidos a los gobiernos que han realizado aportaciones voluntarias para poder hacer
estos proyectos realidad", afirmó Shakeel Bhatti, Secretario del Órgano Rector del Tratado. "Si los
campesinos y otras partes implicadas -añadió- no reciben ninguna ayuda para conservar y desarrollar las
diferentes variedades, esta diversidad de cultivos que tienen en sus manos podría perderse para
siempre".
Ningún país es autosuficiente en recursos fitogenéticos; todos dependen de la diversidad genética de los
cultivos de otros países y regiones. Por lo tanto, la cooperación internacional y el libre intercambio de
recursos genéticos son esenciales para la seguridad alimentaria.
El cambio climático ha hecho que este reto sea aún más urgente, ya que existe la necesidad de
conservar todos los cultivos desarrollados durante milenios capaces de resistir inviernos fríos o veranos
calurosos.
Sólo 150 cultivos alimentan a la mayor parte de la población mundial, y únicamente 12 de ellos
proporcionan el 80 por ciento de la energía alimentaria procedente de las plantas, suministrando el arroz,
el trigo, el maíz y la patata por sí solos casi el 60 por ciento.
Muchas variedades nuevas y sin explotar se encuentran en algunos de los lugares más remotos e
inaccesibles de los países pobres, donde tradicionalmente han sido cultivadas por campesinos locales,
pero nunca han sido comercializadas. La mayor preocupación es que muchos cultivos que han
desarrollado una resistencia a veranos calurosos e inviernos fríos, o a largos periodos de sequía, pueden
perderse. Por este motivo, la conservación en los propios lugares de cultivo es una de las prioridades del
Tratado.
Los delegados que asistan a la reunión tratarán de consensuar fórmulas para impulsar aún más los
aspectos del Tratado relacionados con la distribución de beneficios. Estos podrían incluir un llamamiento
del Órgano Rector a los gobiernos, donantes privados y fundaciones para aportar 116 millones de
dólares con los que consolidar la labor de ayuda del Tratado a los países en desarrollo para la mejora de
sus cultivos.
"Aunque las discrepancias sobre el acceso a los recursos genéticos agrícolas pueden entrañar aspectos
muy técnicos y cuestiones legales muy complejas, los retos están bastantes claros", afirmó el Dr. Bhatti.
"Los fitogenetistas necesitan un acceso amplio a la diversidad genética para hacer frente al cambio
climático, luchar contra las plagas y enfermedades de las plantas, y alimentar a una población mundial
que está experimentando un rápido crecimiento", aseguró.
La mayor parte de los alimentos que consumimos hoy en día tienen su origen en el trabajo y
conocimientos de los agricultores a lo largo de los siglos en otras partes del mundo, desde las patatas de
Perú hasta las alcachofas de África del Norte.
Sin embargo, la biodiversidad agrícola, fundamental para la producción alimentaria, está experimentando
un acusado descenso debido a los efectos de la modernización, los cambios en la dieta y el incremento
de la densidad demográfica. Se estima que en el último siglo se han perdido unas tres cuartas partes de
la diversidad genética de los cultivos agrícolas, y esta merma genética continúa.
Se estima que hace tiempo existían unos 10.000 cultivos. Hoy en día, sólo 150 cultivos alimentan a la
mayor parte de la población mundial, y únicamente 12 de ellos proporcionan el 80 por ciento de la
energía alimentaria procedente de las plantas. El arroz, el trigo, el maíz y la patata representan por sí
solos casi el 60 por ciento.
El Tratado Internacional sobre los Recursos Fitogenéticos para la Alimentación y la Agricultura
proporciona a campesinos, fitogenetistas y científicos el acceso a material fitogenético gratuito de 60
cultivos -cultivos que representan el 80 por ciento de todo el consumo humano- y ayuda a compartir los
beneficios obtenidos de su uso comercial.
http://www.afrol.com/es/articulos/33422
FAO: accords sur la conservation des ressources génétiques des
plantes
6 juin 2009 samedi 2:59 PM GMT
LONGUEUR: 267 mots
ORIGINE-DEPECHE: TUNIS 6 juin 2009
Un accord de 116 millions de dollars a été conclu pour le financement d'un système de conservation des
gènes des plantes et leur partage dans le cadre d'un traité international, ont annoncé samedi des experts
de la FAO à l'issue d'une réunion à Tunis.
Plus de 120 délégués et experts de cette agence de l'ONU pour l'alimentation et l'agriculture se sont
également mis d'accord sur les procédures d'échange des ressources génétiques au plan international et
sur un partage de bénéfices.
Ces arrangements ont été trouvés lors d'une réunion organisée du 1er au 5 juin par la FAO pour la
promotion du "Traité international sur les ressources phytogénétiques", un accord en vigueur depuis
2004.
"Le traité est devenu opérationnel, on vient de passer à l'application", a indiqué samedi Clive Stannard,
expert et fondateur du texte "juridiquement contraignant" pour ses signataires.
Ce cadre multilatéral offre un accès gratuit au matériel génétique de 60 espèces cultivées qui assurent 80
pour cent de la nourriture des hommes et instaure le partage des revenus qui en découlent, a indiqué la
FAO.
Onze pays ont été en outre sélectionnés pour le financement de projets destinés à protéger le patrimoine
génétique menacé par les effets du changement climatique et les maladies.
Un financement de 500.000 dollars avait été alloué à un premier lot de projets dont certains sont axés sur
la lutte contre la maladie dite "UG 99" qui menace 90% des variétés de blé dans le monde.
Ces projets gérés par les paysans sont situés en Egypte, Costa Rica, Cuba, Inde, Kenya, Maroc,
Nicaragua, Pérou, Sénégal, Tanzanie et Uruguay.
http://news.fr.msn.com/environnement/article.aspx?cp-documentid=147810887
FAO: accords pour la conservation et la partage des gènes de
l'alimentation
6 juin 2009 samedi 4:50 PM GMT
LONGUEUR: 615 mots
ORIGINE-DEPECHE: TUNIS 6 juin 2009
Un premier accord de financement de 116 millions de
dollars pour la conservation des gènes végétaux par
les paysans et leur partage à l'échelle internationale a
été conclu au cours d'une réunion de l'agence de
l'ONU pour l'alimentation et l'agriculture (FAO) en
Tunisie.
Un financement de 116 millions de dollars a été
engagé, en présence de 120 délégués et experts
réunis du 1er au 5 juin à Tunis, pour promouvoir le
"Traité international sur les ressources
phytogénétiques" à l'initiative de la FAO.
Les experts se sont également mis d'accord sur des procédures d'échange des ressources génétiques et
sur les modalités de partage de bénéfices entre les 121 pays signataires.
Première concrétisation du traité, ces accords visent à "produire plus et mieux" pour la population
mondiale, par une utilisation durable du patrimoine génétique menacé par le changement climatique et
les maladies.
Le traité présenté comme un instrument de lutte contre la faim et la pauvreté est entré en vigueur en
2004 sans devenir opérationnel, faute de financements.
"On vient de passer à l'étape d'application du Traité" a indiqué samedi à l'AFP Clive Stannard, expert
fondateur du traité.
Ce cadre multilatéral offre un accès gratuit au matériel génétique de 60 espèces cultivées qui assurent
80% de la nourriture des hommes et instaure le partage des revenus qui en découlent.
A partir des ressources génétiques partagées, les producteurs de semences peuvent désormais
commercialiser et faire breveter des variétés nouvelles ou améliorées. En contrepartie, ils reverseront
1,5% environ de leurs revenus aux paysans pour la conservation des gènes "in situ", au niveau de la
ferme.
"La nourriture que nous consommons est le résultat du savoir-faire ancestral des paysans, on doit le
reconnaître et avoir conscience du fait que le contenu du panier alimentaire perd tous les jours", a ajouté
M. Stannard, évoquant les les effets dramatiques du réchauffement climatique.
Pour la première fois, les paysans des pays pauvres pourront prétendre à des avantages financiers pour
avoir conservé et diffusé des variétés dont dépend la nourriture des générations futures.
Onze pays du sud ont reçu un financement pour des projets destinés à protéger le patrimoine génétique
et produire des "variétés plus résistantes au stress climatique et aux maladies", a dit Mohammed Kharrat,
chercheur tunisien, élu représentant de l'Afrique dans l'instance exécutive du Traité.
Orange d'Egypte ou pomme de terre du Pérou, les projets situés en Afrique, Asie et Amérique latine
permettraient de "nourrir deux milliards de bouches supplémentaires d'ici 2050", selon une experte de la
FAO.
Au Maroc, il s'agira de lutter contre la maladie dite "UG 99" qui menace 90% des variétés de blé dans le
monde, selon les experts.
La Norvège, l'Italie, l'Espagne et la Suisse ont été les premiers bailleurs des fonds pour le lancement du
système de partage des bénéfices.
Les discussions ont connu "un marchandage serré" entre les pays du sud conduits par le Brésil, et les
Etats industrialisés, sur la mise en commun de patrimoine génétique, le financement et la bonne
gouvernance, selon une source proche de la réunion.
"Il ne s'agit pas de générosité, c'est une affaire d'intérêts bien compris" a lancé aux délégués José
Esquinas (Espagne).
"Technologie et compensation pour les pauvres, ressources génétiques pour le monde industrialisé: c'est
une question de sécurité nationale", a-t-il insisté.
De milliers d'espèces cultivées autrefois, il ne resterait plus que 150 plantes pour nourrir l'humanité. Une
douzaine de plantes, dont le riz, le blé, le maïs et la pomme de terre, assurent 80% des apports
énergétiques d'origine végétale, selon la FAO.
http://www.cyberpresse.ca/environnement/especes-en-danger/200906/06/01-863676-accords-pour-laconservation-et-la-partage-des-genes-de-lalimentation.php
(Tunisia)
3ème session des réunions de l’organe directeur du traité
phytogénétique pour l’alimentation et l’agriculture
’’TUNIS, 1er juin 2009 (TAP) - La 3ème session des réunions de l’organe directeur du traité
phytogénétique pour l’alimentation et l’agriculture de la FAO s’est ouverte lundi à Gammarth.
Quelque 120 pays et organisations participent à cette session en vue de discuter des moyens de
renforcer ce traité juridiquement contraignant, notamment en ce qui a trait à son financement et la
mobilisation de ressources supplémentaires au profit de programmes et projets relatifs aux ressources
phytogénétiques.
Le traité, qui est entré en vigueur en juin 2004, est un accord international d’une importance cruciale pour
l’avenir de l’agriculture et de la sécurité alimentaire dans le monde. Il offre un cadre multilatéral pour
l’accès aux ressources génétiques des plantes et le partage des avantages qui en découlent. Il aide
également les pays en développement à améliorer la conservation et l’utilisation durable de leurs
ressources phytogénétiques.
La base de ressources génétiques dont dispose l’humanité (1,1 million d’échantillons provenant de 64
récoltes principales dans le monde), est vitale pour nourrir une population mondiale en augmentation
constante. Les gènes des plantes fournissent la matière première qui permet aux sélectionneurs de
développer de nouvelles variétés pour améliorer l’alimentation et relever les défis annoncés tels que le
changement climatique et l’apparition de ravageurs ou de maladies des plantes jusqu’ici inconnus.
L’organe directeur du traité sur les ressources phytogénétiques pour l’alimentation et l’agriculture a
annoncé aujourd’hui, au cours de sa réunion à Tunis, qu’il aidera à hauteur de plus d’un demi-million de
dollars 11 pays en développement a protéger leurs collections de gènes et d’autres ressources
génétiques vitales d’une part, pour nourrir des centaines de millions de bouches supplémentaires dans
les 30 années à venir et, d’autre part, pour contrer la menace du changement climatique et des maladies
des plantes.
Ouvrant cette rencontre, M.Abdessalem Mansour, ministre de l’agriculture et des ressources hydrauliques
a indiqué que la préservation des ressources génétiques et leur exploitation optimale constitue,
aujourd’hui une priorité, étant donné la surexploitation de ces richesses à travers les différentes époques.
La fréquence des phénomènes climatiques extrêmes tels que la sécheresse, l’effet de serre, les
incendies et les inondations nécessitent l’utilisation de nouvelles espèces de plantes qui s’adaptent aux
changements climatiques.
Les gènes constituent une sources essentielle de la conception d’espèces végétales améliorées à haute
productivité pour faire face à la réduction des superficies agricoles dans le monde d’un côté et à la
hausse de la consommation alimentaire en raison de la croissance démographique d’un autre côté. Il a
relevé que 40 % des forêts naturelles ont disparu ainsi que 10 % des récifs coralliens.
Le ministre a, également évoqué les principales réalisations accomplies en Tunisie en matière de
préservation des ressources génétiques et d’encouragement de la recherche scientifique à concevoir de
nouvelles espèces végétales plus résistantes.
M.Modibo Traoré, directeur général adjoint de la FAO a indiqué de son coté, que 120 pays et
organisations ont ratifié le traité à l’heure actuelle.
Aujourd’hui, a t-il précisé près d’un milliard de personnes souffrent de la faim et de la malnutrition à
travers le monde. Les projections les plus optimistes estiment que pour nourrir les 9 milliards d’êtres
humains que la planète comptera en l’an 2050, il nous faudrait au moins doubler le niveau actuel des
productions agricoles.
L’amélioration de la productivité des ressources phytogénétiques disponibles et leur constante adaptation
à des écosystèmes mouvants depuis l’accélération des changements climatiques, sont des options
incontournables pour faire faceà cette augmentation considérable de la demande, a t-il conclu.
http://www.tap.info.tn/fr/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=66248&Itemid=205
(Spain)
Agricultores de países pobres serán amparados por tratado
internacional
01/06/2009 - 11:33 - Noticias EFE
Roma, 1 jun (EFE).- Los agricultores de los países pobres serán recompensados al amparo de un
Tratado internacional vinculante para la conservación y difusión de variedades de cultivos que pueden
salvaguardar la seguridad alimentaría mundial en las próximas décadas.
Un comunicado de la Organización de las Naciones Unidas para la Agricultura y la Alimentación (FAO)
afirma hoy que como parte del Tratado Internacional sobre los Recursos Fitogenéticos para la
Alimentación y la Agricultura, "se pondrá en marcha un nuevo esquema de distribución de beneficios
gracias a las generosas donaciones de diversos gobiernos destinadas a algunos proyectos en este
ámbito".
Los proyectos -refiere- han sido seleccionados entre más de 300 propuestas enviadas por campesinos,
organizaciones de agricultores y centros de investigación, sobre todo de África, Asia y América Latina.
Es la primera vez -asegura- que se transfieren beneficios económicos en aplicación del Tratado
acordado en 2004 y que creó un fondo común mundial formado por 64 cultivos alimentarios que suman
más de un millón de muestras de recursos fitogenéticos conocidos.
El Tratado estipula que siempre que un producto comercial patentado haya utilizado un gen de este
fondo común, el 1,1 % de sus ventas debe destinarse al fondo de distribución de beneficios del Tratado.
El primer grupo de proyectos recibirá unos 250.000 dólares y fueron "EEUU, Noruega, Italia, España y
Suiza los que han aportado el capital inicial a este fondo para la distribución de beneficios"
La fitogenética -añade- es un proceso lento y pueden transcurrir diez o más años desde que se produce
la transferencia de genes hasta que llega a un producto patentado. Por este motivo los gobiernos
anteriormente citados han respaldado el proyecto.
El comunicado explica que "ningún país es autosuficiente en recursos fitogenéticos; todos dependen de
la diversidad genética de los cultivos de otros países y regiones y por lo tanto, la cooperación
internacional y el libre intercambio de recursos genéticos son esenciales para la seguridad alimentaria".
Agrega que "el cambio climático ha hecho que este reto sea aún más urgente, ya que existe la necesidad
de conservar todos los cultivos desarrollados durante milenios capaces de resistir inviernos fríos o
veranos calurosos"".
Según la FAO, "sólo 150 cultivos alimentan a la mayor parte de la población mundial, y únicamente 12 de
ellos proporcionan el 80 por ciento de la energía alimentaria procedente de las plantas, suministrando el
arroz, el trigo, el maíz y la patata por sí solos casi el 60 por ciento".
http://www.finanzas.com/noticias/empresas/2009-06-01/171420_agricultores-paises-pobres-seranamparados.html
(Iran)
Poor Countries Share Benefits of Food Plant Genes Treaty
June 1, 2009 Monday
LENGTH: 650 words
For the first time, farmers in poor countries are to be rewarded under a binding international treaty for
conserving and propagating crop varieties that could prove to be the savior of global food security over
the coming decades. A new benefit-sharing scheme, part of the International Treaty on Plant Genetic
Resources for Food and Agriculture, is to come on stream thanks to the generous donations of several
governments that will support five such farmers' projects. They will be announced at a meeting of the
Treaty's Governing Body in Tunis this week from more than 300 applications submitted by farmers,
farmer's organisations and research centres mainly from Africa, Asia and Latin America. It is the first time
that financial benefits are being transferred under the Treaty which was agreed in 2004. The Treaty
established a global pool comprised of 64 food crops that make up more than one million samples of
known plant genetic resources.
The Treaty stipulates that whenever a commercial product results from the use of this gene pool and that
product is patented, 1.1 percent of the sales of the product must be paid to the Treaty's benefit-sharing
fund. The first batch of projects are to receive around $250 000. Norway, Italy, Spain and Switzerland
have contributed the funds as seed money for the benefit-sharing scheme. Plant breeding is a slow
process and it can take ten years or more for a patented product to emerge from the time the genetic
transfer took place which is why the aforementioned governments have backed the scheme. Norway
introduced a small tax on the sale of seeds on its domestic market to fund its donation. The projects
selected will have to fulfil a number of criteria that support poor farmers who conserve different seed
varieties and reduce hunger in the world. "We are grateful to the governments who have made voluntary
contributions to make this possible," said Dr Shakeel Bhatti, Secretary of the Treaty's Governing Body. "If
farmers and other agricultural stakeholders don't get any support in conserving and developing the
different varieties, this crop diversity that they look after may be lost forever." No country is self-sufficient
in plant genetic resources; all depend on genetic diversity in crops from other countries and regions.
International cooperation and open exchange of genetic resources are therefore essential for food
security. Climate change has made this challenge even more pressing as there is a need to preserve all
the crops developed over millennia that can resist cold winters or hot summers. Yet, agricultural
biodiversity, which is the basis for food production, is in sharp decline due the effects of modernization,
changes in diets and increasing population density. About three-quarters of the genetic diversity found in
agricultural crops has been lost over the last century, and this genetic erosion continues. It is estimated
that there were once 10,000 types of food crops. Today, only 150 crops feed most of the world`s
population, and just 12 crops provide 80 percent of dietary energy from plants, with rice, wheat, maize,
and potato alone providing almost 60 percent. Many new and unexploited varieties are found in some of
the hardest to reach places in poor countries, where they have been traditionally grown by local farmers
but never commercialized. The real concern is that many crops that have developed resistance to hot
summers and cold winters, or long periods of drought might be lost which is why the Treaty has made onfarm conservation one of its priorities. Delegates to the meeting will seek agreement on ways to further
speed up the benefit-sharing aspects of the Treaty. These might include an appeal from the Governing
Body to governments, private donors and foundations for $116 million to strengthen the treaty's work in
helping developing countries grow better crops. Source: FAO 2009/06/01
http://www.mojnews.com/en/news_full_story.asp?nId=6010
Climate change threatens to knock crop yields
18 Jun 2009 15:15:37 GMT
Source: Reuters
* Crop yields dented by climate change
* Inadequate seed banks of resistant African strains * Climate adaptation funds fall short
By Gerard Wynn
LONDON, June 18 (Reuters) - Rapid rises in temperatures worldwide may overwhelm farmers' efforts to
keep up, say experts who want funds to breed new crops and freeze heat-resistant strains bred over past
centuries.
A Stanford University study to be published on Friday estimates that African growing seasons for the
continent's staple foods -- maize, millet and sorghum -- will be hotter in nine out of 10 years by 2050.
Farmers can adapt by shifting growing times or using new varieties but the pace of change will require
extra help, the study in the journal Global Environmental Change concludes.
"For a majority of Africa's farmers, warming will rapidly take climate not only beyond the range of their
personal experience but also beyond the experience of other farmers within their country," said the study,
whose authors were from Stanford and the Global Crop Diversity Trust.
The United States, Britain and the European Union have all recently reviewed the impacts of climate
change.
The White House published this week a report which forecast that heat, floods, drought and pests would
harm food yields and concluded, for example, that cranberry production may no longer be possible by
2050 in its East Coast heartland.
Britain said on Thursday that 2 degrees celsius hotter summers were "inevitable" in southern England by
the 2040s and cited a survey of farmers which found half already affected.
The EU's executive Commission pointed in April to research which showed a net positive effect for the
next 30 years, for example from milder winters, but with increasingly negative effects. "The magnitude of
climatic changes may exceed the adaptation capacity of many farmers," it said.
LAG
The development of more resistant crops, for example, involves a decade or more to breed or design new
varieties, screen these and get them into the hands of farmers. One initiative is the 2001 International
Treaty on plant genetic resources for food and agriculture. Its 121 signatories have agreed to give up any
patent claims on their native food crops, to speed up the sharing of different strains.
But the treaty will have to overcome a lack of funding and poor seed banks in countries in Africa which
have rich seams of heat and drought-resistant varieties.
"There was a lack of funds. This is the big challenge," said Shakeel Bhatti, secretary of the treaty's
governing body.
Earlier this month signatories agreed a target fund of $116 million by 2014 to boost diversity of crop
species, especially in developing countries, but have pledges of less than 3 million euros ($4.19 million)
so far.
Under the U.N.-led Kyoto Protocol to fight climate change a global adaptation fund earns a commission
from global carbon trading and has so far accrued 66 million euros ($92.11 million).
If seed banks were improved, many African countries could switch to crop varieties already grown in
hotter parts of the continent. But several nations in the Sahel will have to change food crops altogether,
for example from maize to millet, the Stanford study found. (Reporting by Gerard Wynn, Editing by Sue
Thomas)
http://www.alertnet.org/thenews/newsdesk/LH875701.htm
(Switzerland)
Accords sur la conservation des ressources génétiques des plantes
7 juin 2009 dimanche 4:04 AM CET
AUTEUR: EP
LONGUEUR: 269 mots
ORIGINE-DEPECHE: Tunis
Un accord de 116 millions de dollars a été conclu pour le financement d'un système de conservation des
gènes des plantes et leur partage dans le cadre d'un traité international. C'est ce qu'ont annoncé samedi
des experts de la FAO à l'issue d'une réunion à Tunis.
Plus de 120 délégués et experts de cette agence de l'ONU pour l'alimentation et l'agriculture se sont
également mis d'accord sur les procédures d'échange des ressources génétiques au plan international et
sur un partage de bénéfices.
Ces arrangements ont été trouvés lors d'une réunion organisée du 1er au 5 juin par la FAO pour la
promotion du "Traité international sur les ressources phytogénétiques", un accord en vigueur depuis
2004.
"Le traité est devenu opérationnel, on vient de passer à l'application", a indiqué samedi Clive Stannard,
expert et fondateur du texte "juridiquement contraignant" pour ses signataires.
Ce cadre multilatéral offre un accès gratuit au matériel génétique de 60 espèces cultivées qui assurent 80
pour cent de la nourriture des hommes et instaure le partage des revenus qui en découlent, a indiqué la
FAO.
Onze pays ont été en outre sélectionnés pour le financement de projets destinés à protéger le patrimoine
génétique menacé par les effets du changement climatique et les maladies.
Un financement de 500.000 dollars avait été alloué à un premier lot de projets dont certains sont axés sur
la lutte contre la maladie dite "UG 99" qui menace 90% des variétés de blé dans le monde. Ces projets
gérés par les paysans sont situés en Egypte, Costa Rica, Cuba, Inde, Kenya, Maroc, Nicaragua, Pérou,
Sénégal, Tanzanie et Uruguay.
Experts from 120 countries meet in Tunis for UN-backed plant
diversity forum
1 June 2009 – Delegates from some 120 countries today opened a
United Nations-supported meeting in Tunis to discuss plant genetics and
food resources, the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) said.
Participants at the five-day meeting, the third session of the governing
body of the 2004 International Treaty on Plant Genetic Resources for
Food and Agriculture, are seeking agreement on ways to further speed up
the benefit-sharing aspects of the Treaty, FAO noted in a press release.
“No country is self-sufficient in plant genetic resources; all depend on genetic diversity in crops from other
countries and regions. International cooperation and open exchange of genetic resources are therefore
essential for food security,” stated the agency.
“Climate change has made this challenge even more pressing as there is a need to preserve all the crops
developed over millennia that can resist cold winters or hot summers.
“Yet, agricultural biodiversity, which is the basis for food production, is in sharp decline due the effects of
modernization, changes in diets and increasing population density.”
The agency said about three-quarters of the genetic diversity found in agricultural crops has been lost
over the last century, and this genetic erosion continues.
http://www.un.org/apps/news/story.asp?NewsID=30982&Cr=FAO&Cr1=Plants Farmers in 11 developing countries win UN-backed grants for
conserving crops
2 June 2009 – Nicaraguan farmers preserving ancient varieties of
potatoes, and Kenyan women revitalizing differing types of millet are
among projects in 11 developing countries to win supporting grants for
their work, the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO)
announced today.
A total of more than $500,000 will go to farming projects in Egypt, Kenya,
Costa Rica, India, Peru, Senegal, Uruguay, Nicaragua, Cuba, Tanzania
and Morocco, according to a news release issued by the agency.
Pick of the crop: farmers in
developing countries to be
compensated for conservation
efforts The winners were announced today in Tunis at a meeting of the
governing body of the International Treaty for Plant Genetic Resources
in Food and Agriculture.
It is the first time funds have become available under the benefitsharing scheme of the Treaty, designed to compensate farmers in
developing countries for their role in conserving crop varieties, FAO said.
Norway, Italy, Spain and Switzerland fund the awards programme in support of agriculture and food
security.
Other winners include on-farm protection of citrus diversity in Egypt, conservation of native potato
varieties in Peru, the preservation of mountain varieties of maize and beans in Cuba, and a study of the
adaptability of potatoes in Costa Rica to climate change.
Experts from some 120 countries are attending the UN-supported five-day meeting, the third session of
the governing body of the 2004 Treaty aimed at stemming the loss of food bio-diversity worldwide.
http://www.un.org/apps/news/story.asp?NewsID=30991&Cr=FAO&Cr1=
UN News Service
(French)
Conservation des plantes: 11 projets de financement annoncés
2 juin 2009 – Onze projets de conservation de gènes et d'autres
ressources phytogénétiques vitales pour nourrir l'humanité ont été
sélectionnés pour bénéficier du système de partage des bénéfices institué
par le Traité sur les ressources phytogénétiques pour l'alimentation et
l'agriculture, dont l'organe directeur est réuni cette semaine à Tunis,
indique mardi l'Organisation des Nations Unies pour l'alimentation et
l'agriculture (FAO).
Echange de connaissances dans
les champs.
Les fonds, qui totalisent 543 millions de dollars, vont à des projets en
Egypte, au Kenya, au Costa Rica, en Inde, au Pérou, au Sénégal, en
Uruguay, au Nicaragua, à Cuba, en Tanzanie et au Maroc.
C'est la première fois que des transferts d'avantages financiers sont effectués aux termes du Traité et ce,
depuis son entrée en vigueur en juin 2004. Ce système de partage des bénéfices découlant du Traité
vise à compenser les paysans des pays en développement pour leur rôle dans la conservation des
variétés des plantes, précise la FAO dans un communiqué.
Ces onze projets ont été choisis parmi plus d'une centaine de demandes et cela a été rendu possible
grâce aux contributions de la Norvège, de l'Italie, de l'Espagne et de la Suisse. Ils comprennent
notamment la protection à la ferme de l'agro-biodiversité des agrumes en Egypte, l'amélioration
génétique et la revitalisation d'une variété de mil au Kenya et la conservation de variétés indigènes de
pommes de terre au Pérou.
http://www.un.org/apps/newsFr/storyF.asp?NewsID=19294&Cr=agriculture&Cr1=FAO
U.N. food unit opens plant genetics forum
TUNIS, Tunisia, June 1 (UPI) –
Plant genetics and food resources were discussed by delegates attending a U.N. meeting Monday in
Tunis, Tunisia, officials said.
The delegates from 120 countries are seeking agreement on ways to speed up the benefits-sharing
aspects of the 2004 International Treaty on Plant Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture, the United
Nations' Food and Agriculture Organization said in a news release.
"No country is self-sufficient in plant genetic resources; all depend on genetic diversity in crops from other
countries and regions. International cooperation and open exchange of genetic resources are therefore
essential for food security," the food agency said. "Climate change has made this challenge even more
pressing as there is a need to preserve all the crops developed over millennia that can resist cold winters
or hot summers."
Biodiversity is declining sharply because of agricultural modernization, changes in diet and increasing
population density, the agency said.
The agency said about three-quarters of the genetic diversity found in agricultural crops has been lost
during the last century.
http://www.upi.com/Top_News/2009/06/01/UN-food-unit-opens-plant-genetics-forum/UPI43351243895968/
(China)
Réunion onusienne consacrée à la coopération sur les plantes
génétiques et la sécurité alimentaire
2 juin 2009 mardi 3:50 PM EST
RUBRIQUE: ACTUALITÉ INTERNATIONALE
LONGUEUR: 191 mots
ORIGINE-DEPECHE: ROME 1er juin
Une réunion de l'ONU consacrée aux plantes génétiques et à la sécurité alimentaire s'est ouverte lundi à
Tunis, avec la participation de 120 pays, a annoncé l'Organisation des Nations unies pour l'alimentation
et l'agriculture (FAO).
Pendant cinq jours, les participants à la troisième session du conseil d'administration du Traité
international 2004 sur les ressources de plantes génétiques pour l'alimentation et l'agriculture, doivent
discuter des moyens d'améliorer encore davantage les aspects du traité liés au partage des bénéfices,
selon un communiqué de presse de l'ONU.
"Aucun pays n'est autosuffisant en matière de ressources de plantes génétiques; tout le monde dépend
de la diversité génétique dans les plantes agricoles des autres pays et régions. La coopération
internationale et l'échange public des ressources génétiques sont donc essentiels pour la sécurité
alimentaire", a indiqué la FAO.
Le changement climatique a rendu ce défi encore plus pressant car il est nécessaire de préserver toutes
les plantes agricoles développées qui peuvent survivre en hiver comme en été, a encore indiqué la FAO.
(China)
FAO/gènes : 500.000 dollars pour 11 pays en développement
2 juin 2009 mardi 3:50 PM EST
RUBRIQUE: ACTUALITÉ INTERNATIONALE
LONGUEUR: 317 mots
ORIGINE-DEPECHE: TUNIS juin 2
L'organe directeur du Traité sur les ressources phytogénétiques pour l'alimentation et l'agriculture a
annoncé qu'il aidera à hauteur de plus d'un demi-million de dollars 11 pays en développement.
Cette décision est prise lors de la 3ème session des réunions de l'organe directeur du Traité
phytogénétique pour l'alimentation et l'agriculture de la FAO s'est ouverte à Gammarth (Tunis), avec la
participation de 120 pays et organisations.
Selon la FAO, cette décision vise d'une part, a protéger les collections de gènes de ces 11 pays, les
ressources génétiques vitales pour nourrir des centaines de millions de bouches supplémentaires dans
les 30 années à venir et, d'autre part, pour contrer la menace du changement climatique et des maladies
des plantes.
Les participants à cette session vont discuter les moyens de renforcer ce traité juridiquement
contraignant, notamment en ce qui a trait à son financement et la mobilisation de ressources
supplémentaires au profit de programmes et projets relatifs aux ressources phytogénétiques.
Le traité, qui est entré en vigueur en juin 2004, est un accord international d'une importance cruciale pour
l'avenir de l'agriculture et de la sécurité alimentaire dans le monde. Il offre un cadre multilatéral pour
l'accès aux ressources génétiques des plantes et le partage des avantages qui en découlent.
La base de ressources génétiques dont dispose l'humanité (1,1 million d'échantillons provenant de 64
récoltes principales dans le monde),est vitale pour nourrir une population mondiale en augmentation
constante.
Les gènes des plantes fournissent la matière première qui permet aux sélectionneurs de développer de
nouvelles variétés pour améliorer l'alimentation et relever les défis annoncés tels que le changement
climatique et l'apparition de ravageurs ou de maladies des plantes jusqu'ici inconnus.
(China)
La FAO accordera à onze pays en développement des fonds pour
préserver la diversité des cultures
3 juin 2009 mercredi 3:50 PM EST
RUBRIQUE: ACTUALITÉ INTERNATIONALE
LONGUEUR: 146 mots
ORIGINE-DEPECHE: ROME juin 2
L'Organisation des Nations unies pour l'alimentation et l'agriculture (FAO) a annoncé mardi sa décision
d'accorder à onze pays en développement un fonds de 500.000 dollars destiné à préserver la diversité de
leurs cultures.
La FAO a pris cette décision lors de sa réunion sur le Traité international sur les ressources génétiques
des plantes pour l'alimentation et l'agriculture, tenue à Tunis en présence d'experts provenant de 120
pays.
Il s'agit du premier fonds disponibilisé dans le cadre du programme de partage des bénéfices du traité,
visant à indemniser les fermiers des pays en développement pour leurs efforts de préservation des
variétés des cultures, a indiqué la FAO.
Selon un communiqué de la FAO, les onze pays sont l'Egypte, le Kenya, le Costa Rica, l'Inde, le Pérou,
le Sénégal, l'Uruguay, le Nicaragua, Cuba, la Tanzanie et le Maroc.
PRINT
(France)
Agronomie; Avancées sur le traité international sur les semences
7 juin 2009 dimanche
RUBRIQUE: PLANETE; Pg. 4
LONGUEUR: 111 mots
Cinq ans après son lancement, le traité international sur les ressources phytogénétiques pour
l'alimentation et l'agriculture a réuni 120 pays à Tunis, du 1er au 5 juin, pour réfléchir à un partage
équitable des semences.
Objectif ?
Lever 116 millions de dollars d'ici à 2014 pour soutenir la conservation de variétés locales dans les pays
du Sud. Une première sélection de onze projets devrait bénéficier de 500 000 dollars. A terme, le traité
doit permettre l'échange de semences à travers une banque mondiale et la redistribution de 1,1 % des
retombées économiques engendrées par ces ressources génétiques, afin d'enrayer la dégradation de la
biodiversité agricole.
(Switzerland)
Ressources génétiques
1/6/09
Une réunion d'experts internationaux, axée sur le renforcement du Traité international sur les ressources
phytogénétiques pour l'alimentation et l'agriculture aura lieu du 1er au 5 juin à l'hôtel Ramada Plaza à
Gammarth.
Plus de 100 experts venus des quatre coins de la planète doivent discuter des moyens de renforcer ce
Traité juridiquement contraignant notamment en ce qui a trait à son financement et la mobilisation des
ressources financières supplémentaires au profit de programmes et projets relatifs aux ressources
phytogénétiques et visant à aider les paysans à produire plus et mieux, plus particulièrement dans les
pays en développement et les pays en transition.
(UK)
(Spain)
Los pobres tienen en sus manos el futuro alimentario
La Cumbre de Túnez acuerda dar 80 millones para salvar la biodiversidad
EMILIO DE BENITO - Madrid - 07/06/2009
La esperanza para la alimentación de la humanidad en el futuro está en
los países en desarrollo, que mantienen una mayor biodiversidad en
sus cultivos. Para ayudarles, 121 países han acordado esta semana en
Túnez un adelanto de 80 millones de euros para financiar proyectos de
desarrollo. La idea, como explica el español José Esquinas Alcázar
desde la capital africana, es que mantengan la biodiversidad que los
más ricos han despreciado en aras de una mayor rentabilidad.
Con esta premisa, la Agencia para la FAO consiguió que en 2001 se firmara un acuerdo, el Tratado
Internacional de Recursos Fitogenéticos para la Agrocultura y la Alimentación. El texto "tiene el mismo
nivel legal que el de Kioto sobre cambio climático, pero a pesar de su importancia casi nadie le hace
caso", comenta Esquinas, considerado el padre del convenio, que España ratificó en 2006. En Túnez ha
habido representantes de 121 países que ya lo han ratificado.
La razón del acuerdo es la pura supervivencia humana. Mientras cuatro cultivos (trigo, arroz, maíz y
patata) suponen el 60% de la alimentación calórica de los habitantes del mundo, en los países pobres se
mantienen especies de nombres exóticos -quinua, kiwicha, tarwi, cañihua, por citar sólo algunos cereales
andinos- que pueden ser la reserva si en un futuro las plantas más consumidas actualmente sufren una
epidemia o resultan inviables por cambios en el entorno (por ejemplo, por el calentamiento), advierte
Esquinas.
Claro que mantener estas especies no es gratis. Las modas y los hábitos -el "colonialismo alimentario",
como dice el experto- han hecho que de las 8.500 especies vegetales que se han usado a lo largo de la
historia como sustento de la humanidad, actualmente sólo se exploten 150. "Hay una erosión genética",
afirma Esquinas.
El problema es que convencer a los pobres para que mantengan sus variedades cuesta dinero. El
acuerdo prevé que se les compensará con una parte de los beneficios de las patentes obtenidas a partir
de sus semillas. Pero eso lleva tiempo. Por eso en Túnez, después de una semana de discusión, se ha
llegado al acuerdo de hacer una aportación a cuenta. Son sólo 121 millones de dólares. Muy barato para
asegurar la alimentación mundial.
http://www.elpais.com/articulo/sociedad/pobres/tienen/manos/futuro/alimentario/elpepisoc/20090607elpe
pisoc_9/Tes/ Dimanche 7 Juin 2009
TOUTES EDITION
116
RUBRIQUE: ACTUALITÉ; Pg. 5
LONGUEUR: 58 mots
C'est le nombre de millions de dollars qui financeront la conservation des gènes végétaux par les
paysans et leur partage à l'échelle internationale. Cette décision, prise à Tunis lors d'une réunion du FAO
(agence de l'ONU pour l'alimentation et l'agriculture), permettra d'appliquer le traité de 2004 qui vise à
lutter contre la faim et la pauvreté.
(Netherlands)
Internationaal verdrag voedselzekerheid
6 juni 2009 zaterdag
SECTION: OVERMORGEN; Blz. 5
LENGTH: 470 woorden
Van onze redactie wetenschap WAGENINGEN - Hoe kan de voedselzekerheid in de wereld worden
veiliggesteld? Deze wordt immers bedreigd door onder meer klimaatverandering en ernstige
plantenziekten. Bovendien groeit de wereldbevolking explosief en moeten derhalve steeds meer monden
worden gevoed. Over deze vraagstukken bogen zich afgelopen week in Tunesië tal van wetenschappers
onder wie dr. ir. Bert Visser, directeur van het Centrum voor Genetische Bronnen Nederland (CGN) in
Wageningen.
"Het is van het allergrootste belang dat we internationaal verantwoordelijkheid nemen voor het behoud
van biodiversiteit van planten, zeg maar de verscheidenheid aan soorten. Begin jaren negentig is
afgesproken dat het eigendom op biodiversiteit een nationale soevereiniteit is, maar voor
voedselgewassen is later een uitzondering gemaakt. Op wereldniveau gaat de genetische variatie
achteruit en dat levert gevaar op voor de voedselzekerheid. Daarom is gekozen voor een multilateraal
systeem dat alle landen toegang geeft tot basismaterialen", zo vertelt Visser.
Het verdrag is in juni 2004 gesloten en twee jaar later werd een praktische invulling gegeven door af te
spreken dat een materiaaluitwisseling kan plaatsvinden. Deze week werden de puntjes op de i gezet.
Het CGN vervult een belangrijke spilfunctie. Visser: "In ons centrum bewaren we 26.000 monsters die
allemaal onder het verdrag vallen. Jaarlijks verzenden we 6000 monsters over de hele wereld. Steeds
voegen we nieuwe rassen toe zodat de genetische variëteit goed op peil blijft. Internationaal worden per
dag 800 monsters over de hele wereld verstuurd." Iedere vernieuwing krijgt een plek op het internet zodat
de gegevens voor iedereen beschikbaar zijn.
Opslagbunkers
Een tweede manier om verlies aan diversiteit te voorkomen is de Svalbard Global Seed Vault, die vorig
jaar in Spitsbergen (Noorwegen) is geopend. In opslagbunkers zijn miljoenen monsters opgeslagen die
een duplicaat zijn van de zaden van de vele genenbanken verspreid over de wereld. "Ook onze 26.000
exemplaren liggen er. Dus mocht de Rijn overstromen en onze databank vernielen, is er geen man
overboord", lacht Visser.
Hoe verrassend de ontwikkeling bij gewassen kan gaan, bleek onlangs in West-Afrika. Hier hebben
rijstboeren de afgelopen jaren een nieuw rijsttype ontwikkeld, zo ontdekten onderzoekers van de
Wageningen Universiteit onlangs.
In West-Afrika hebben boeren twee rijstsoorten tot hun beschikking: Aziatische rijst met hoge
opbrengstpotentie en Afrikaanse rijst die beter is aangepast aan de lokale omstandigheden. Na jaren
blijkt een kruisbestuiving plaatsgevonden te hebben. Dit nieuwe rijsttype geeft een redelijk stabiele
opbrengst en kent een korte groeiperiode. Dat betekent dat de plant goed is aangepast aan de korte
regenperiode in Gambia en Senegal.
(Tunisia)
Ressources génétiques
Le temps 1/6/09
Une réunion d'experts internationaux, axée sur le renforcement du Traité
international sur les ressources phytogénétiques pour l'alimentation et
l'agriculture aura lieu du 1er au 5 juin à l'hôtel Ramada Plaza à Gammarth.
Plus de 100 experts venus des quatre coins de la planète doivent discuter des
moyens de renforcer ce Traité juridiquement contraignant notamment en ce qui
a trait à son financement et la mobilisation des ressources financières
supplémentaires au profit de programmes et projets relatifs aux ressources
phytogénétiques et visant à aider les paysans à produire plus et mieux, plus
particulièrement dans les pays en développement et les pays en transition.
(Netherlands)
Boer in arme landen waarborgt biodiversiteit
June 6, 2009
Zaterdag
BYLINE: Jeroen den Blijker
SECTION: ECONOMIE; Blz. 14-15
LENGTH: 547 woorden
SAMENVATTING:
Boeren in arme landen beheren vele gewassen die de rijke wereld nog eens hard nodig kan hebben.
Wetenschappers hebben in Tunesië afspraken gemaakt om die agrarische schatkamers veilig stellen.
VOLLEDIGE TEKST:
Aardappelmoeheid, schimmels in bananen of de oprukkende roest in tarwe. Het zijn slechts enkele
voorbeelden van ziekten die opeens de kop kunnen opsteken en tot grote gevolgen kunnen leiden.
"De tarweroest is bijvoorbeeld heel actueel. Die is ontstaan in centraal Afrika en rukt op naar het noorden.
Binnen enkele jaren duikt de ziekte op in het Midden-Oosten", zegt Bert Visser, directeur van het
Centrum voor Genetische Bronnen Nederland (CGN) van Wageningen Universiteit. En grote
plantenziektes, die nu vaak onvoorspelbaar opduiken, kunnen de opbrengsten van gewassen al snel
halveren, zo leert de ervaring.
Deskundigen vrezen dan ook voedseltekorten. De voedselonzekerheid die daardoor bij de bevolking
ontstaat, kan zelfs leiden tot politieke instabiliteit. Het antwoord hierop moet de ontwikkeling van nieuwe
gewassen zijn, gewassen die niet of minder gevoelig zijn voor deze ziektes. Maar dat is niet eenvoudig.
Onder druk van de monocultuur die de moderne landbouw typeert, zijn veel oorspronkelijke gewassen
gemarginaliseerd of soms zelfs in bepaalde regio's geheel verdwenen.
Afgelopen week vergaderden experts van 120 landen hierover in Tunesië. De landen ondertekenden
allemaal in 2001 een VN-verdrag tot behoud van genetische bronnen voor voeding en landbouw.
De top in Tunesië was vooral bedoeld om de belangen van arme landen en die van de rijke landen op
een lijn te brengen, legt Visser uit. Hij nam namens Nederland aan de top deel. "Wij hebben belang bij de
toegang tot hun biodiversiteit. Ontwikkelingslanden erkennen ook de noodzaak om in actie te komen,
maar missen vaak het geld of de expertise daartoe."
In arme landen missen veel boeren het geld om dure zaden te kopen van de vaak westerse
zaadveredelaars. Ze moeten zich behelpen met traditionele gewassen. De opbrengsten van die
gewassen zijn vaak beperkt, als genetische bron zijn ze echter zeer waardevol voor landen waar de
laatste eeuw door monocultuur de agrarische biodiversiteit verschraalde. "We willen die kleinschalige
landbouw dus gaan ondersteunen", zegt Visser. Berekend is dat daar in beginsel 116 miljoen dollar voor
nodig is. "We starten daartoe een fondsenwervingscampagne en hopen op grote stichtingen als de Bill
Gates-foundation bijvoorbeeld, maar ook op steun van goede doelen. Uiteindelijk is dit in ieders belang."
Zo'n aanpak is waarschijnlijk effectiever dan aankloppen bij de overheid.
Afgelopen week zijn in Tunesië ruim 150 projectvoorstellen ingediend. Daarvan zijn er uiteindelijk elf
gekozen die nu voor steun in aanmerking komen. Zo zijn Peruaanse boeren die hoog in de Andes het
zogenaamde 'aardappelpark' met oorspronkelijke wilde aardappelrassen beheren, door de
klimaatverandering gedwongen hun teelt naar lagere regionen te verplaatsen. "Dat kost geld en vereist
ook de nodige studie", zegt Visser.
Een ander project moet bevorderen dat Keniaanse boeren weer kennismaken met hun 'eigen' gewassen
en deze ook weer gaan telen. Nu eten die boeren steeds vaker boontjes of wortelen, gewassen die in
Kenia worden geteeld in opdracht van westerse supermarkten.
ORIGINAL ONLINE
(France)
Compensations financières pour conservation de gènes de plantes
02/06/2009 13:58 (Par Pierre MELQUIOT)
Compensations financières pour conservation de gènes de plantes. Dans 11 pays en développement,
des projets de conservation de gènes de plantes et d'autres ressources phytogénétiques seront financés
grâce au système de partage des bénéfices institué par le Traité sur les ressources phytogénétiques pour
l'alimentation et l'agriculture.
Des délégués de 120 pays échangent actuellement à Tunis du partage des bénéfices découlant du Traité
international sur les ressources phytogénétiques.
En effet, pour la première fois, les paysans des pays pauvres seront, aux termes d'un traité international
sur les ressources phytogénétiques pour l'alimentation et l'agriculture, juridiquement contraignant, «
récompensés » pour avoir conservé et propagé des variétés de plantes susceptibles de sauvegarder la
sécurité alimentaire mondiale au cours des prochaines décennies.
On vient d’ailleurs d’apprendre, ce mardi, lors de cette réunion d’une semaine à Tunis de l'Organe
directeur du Traité sur les ressources phytogénétiques pour l'alimentation et l'agriculture, que dans 11
pays en développement des projets de conservation de gènes de plantes et d'autres ressources
phytogénétiques vitales pour nourrir l'humanité seront financés grâce au système de partage des
bénéfices institué par ce Traité.
Compensations financières pour conservation de gènes de plantes
Dans 11 pays en développement, des projets de conservation de gènes de plantes et d'autres ressources
phytogénétiques seront financés grâce au système de partage des bénéfices institué par le Traité sur les
ressources phytogénétiques pour l'alimentation et l'agriculture.
Un nouveau système de partage des bénéfices - partie intégrante du Traité sur les ressources
phytogénétiques pour l'alimentation et l'agriculture - devait en effet entrer en vigueur grâce aux dons
généreux octroyés par plusieurs gouvernements en faveur de projets devant bénéficier aux paysans, a
déclaré la Food & Agriculture Organisation (FAO).
Ces projets seront annoncés dans le courant de cette semaine à Tunis au cours d'une réunion de
l'organe directeur du Traité à l'hôtel Ramada (les Côtes de Carthage). Ils ont été sélectionnés parmi plus
de 300 propositions soumises par des paysans, des associations paysannes et des centres de recherche
principalement d'Afrique, d'Asie et d'Amérique latine.
C'est la première fois que des transferts d'avantages financiers seront effectués aux termes du Traité et
ce, depuis son entrée en vigueur en juin 2004.
Le Traité sur les ressources phytogénétiques pour l'alimentation et l'agriculture a établi une banque de
gènes mondiale comprenant 64 cultures vivrières qui constituent plus d'un million d'échantillons de
ressources phytogénétiques connues.
Le Traité sur les ressources phytogénétiques pour l'alimentation et l'agriculture stipule qu'à chaque fois
qu'un produit commercial résulte de l'utilisation de cette banque de gènes et que ce produit est breveté,
1,1 pour cent des ventes de ce produit doivent être versés au Fonds de partage des bénéfices du Traité.
Ainsi, les fonds, qui totalisent 543 millions de dollars, vont à des projets en Egypte, au Kenya, au Costa
Rica, en Inde, au Pérou, au Sénégal, en Uruguay, au Nicaragua, à Cuba, en Tanzanie et au Maroc. C'est
la première fois que des transferts d'avantages financiers sont effectués aux termes du Traité et ce,
depuis son entrée en vigueur en juin 2004. Ce système de partage des bénéfices découlant du Traité
vise à compenser les paysans des pays en développement pour leur rôle dans la conservation des
variétés des plantes.
Ces onze projets ont été choisis parmi plus d'une centaine de demandes et cela a été rendu possible
grâce aux généreuses contributions de la Norvège, de l'Italie, de l'Espagne et de la Suisse. Ils
comprennent notamment la protection à la ferme de l'agrobiodiversité des agrumes en Egypte,
l'amélioration génétique et la revitalisation d'une variété de mil au Kenya et la conservation de variétés
indigènes de pommes de terre au Pérou.
http://www.actualites-news-environnement.com/20665-compensations-financieres-conservation-genesplantes.html
(Tunisia)
Tunisia: 11 projects announced in Tunis to receive grants from treaty
on food plant genes
Eleven developing countries that conserve food seeds and other genetic material from major crops will
receive more than $500 000 to support their efforts according to an announcement made today in Tunis
at a high-level meeting of the governing body of the International Treaty for Plant Genetic Resources in
Food and Agriculture.
Grants are to be awarded to projects in Egypt, Kenya, Costa Rica, India, Peru, Senegal, Uruguay,
Nicaragua, Cuba, Tanzania and Morocco. It is the first time funds have become available under the
benefit-sharing scheme of the Treaty, designed to compensate farmers in developing countries for their
role in conserving crop varieties.
The projects were chosen from hundreds of applications and come on stream thanks to the generous
donations of Norway, Italy, Spain and Switzerland in support of agriculture and food security.
The projects to be supported include: on-farm protection of citrus agro-biodiversity in Egypt, the genetic
enhancement and revitalization of finger millet in Kenya and the conservation of indigenous potato
varieties in Peru.
http://www.africanmanager.com/site_eng/detail_article.php?art_id=13449 (Spain)
España insta a fomentar la colaboración para preservar la
biodiversidad agrícola
La Directora General de la Oficina Española de Variedades Vegetales del MARM, Alicia Crespo, ha
encabezado la delegación española que ha acudido a la 3ª Reunión del Órgano Rector del Tratado
Internacional de Recursos Fitogenéticos (TIRFAA), que se celebra en Tunez, donde ha subrayado la
necesidad de que los países firmantes del Tratado cumplan sus compromisos financieros para la
realización de las actividades contempladas en el programa de trabajo acordado en la primera reunión
de este Órgano Rector celebrada en Madrid en 2006.
01/06/2009 (Noticia leida 321 veces)
MARM- Es crucial, ha resaltado Alicia Crespo, que el apoyo político que se ha dado al Tratado durante
estos años, se acompañe de un apoyo económico que permita su funcionamiento con normalidad y con
unos fondos predecibles y suficientes, tanto para el presupuesto administrativo básico, como para el
Fondo especial para Fines Acordados, que permitirá financiar actividades de apoyo técnico y
capacitación, como para el Fondo de Reparto de Beneficios derivados del uso de ese material, para su
empleo en la conservación y utilización de los recursos, fundamentalmente en países en vías de
desarrollo que son los que más diversidad agrícola conservan.
En este sentido, la Directora de la Oficina Española de Variedades Vegetales del MARM ha recordado
que el 75% de la población mundial más pobre vive en zonas rurales pero sin embargo solo el 4% de la
ayuda internacional al desarrollo se destina a la agricultura, subrayando que la conservación y acceso a
los recursos genéticos no debe ser considerado solo en el contexto de la ayuda al desarrollo, sino
también en el del desarrollo nacional.
Ante esta situación económica, ha señalado que en línea con el apoyo político que España viene dando
al trabajo de los recursos genéticos de la FAO, el Gobierno ha elaborado una estrategia para financiar el
Tratado Internacional, para proporcionar un cierto grado de seguridad financiera durante varios años,
mediante una aportación durante el presente y los 3 siguientes períodos bianuales de 3 millones de
euros.
Estas aportaciones, ha señalado la Directora, permitirán, a través del Tratado, potenciar la seguridad
alimentaria de la humanidad al ocuparse de la conservación, promoción de uso e intercambio de los
recursos fitogenéticos de 64 especies vegetales, incluyendo el arroz, el trigo, el maíz o la patata,
alimentos básicos en las dietas de gran parte de la población mundial, dando así respuesta a algunos de
los grandes retos de la humanidad como el cambio climático, la crisis alimentaria y el crecimiento de la
población, recordando que, a través de la preservación de los recursos fitogenéticos, se promueve
también la lucha contra el hambre y la pobreza.
http://www.agroinformacion.com/noticias/1/agricultura/17761/espana-insta-a-fomentar-la-colaboracionpara-preservar-la-biodiversidad-agricola.aspx
(Spain)
Los recursos fitogenéticos, al alcance de los más pobres
Todo gracias a un Tratado Internacional que permitirá un nuevo esquema de distribución de beneficios
gracias a las generosas donaciones de diversos gobiernos. Los detalles se debatirán durante estos días
en Túnez.
Madrid. 01/06/2009
Silvia González Cerredelo
Gracias al Tratado Internacional sobre Recursos Fitogenéticos para la
Alimentación y la Agricultura, los agricultores de los países pobres se
verán recompensados en lo que se refiere a la conservación y difusión
de variedades de cultivos que puedan salvaguardar la seguridad
alimentaria mundial.
Como parte del Tratado se pondrá en marcha un nuevo esquema de
distribución de beneficios gracias a las generosas donaciones de
diversos gobiernos.
Así, se seleccionarán diferentes proyectos que tendrán que respetar una
serie de criterios en apoyo a los agricultores pobres que conservan
diferentes variedades de semillas y ayudan a reducir el hambre en el
mundo.
Según la Organización de las Naciones Unidas para la Agricultura y la Alimentación (FAO), ningún país
es autosuficiente en recursos fitogenéticos, todos dependen de la diversidad genética de los cultivos de
otros países y regiones, por lo que la cooperación internacional y el libre intercambio "son esenciales
para la seguridad alimentaria".
Los detalles del Tratado serán explicados esta semana en la reunión que el Órgano rector mantendrá en
Túnez.
http://www.agrocope.com/noticias.php?id=98231&comu=&ztipo=&ini=0&ini2=0
Crossroads at Carthage: Last chance for the FAO seed treaty?
Via Campesina
En route to the twin summits at the end of the year— the food crisis summit in Rome in November, and
the climate crisis summit to be held in Copenhagen in December— the meeting of the FAO Seed Treaty
(ITPGRFA) is at the critical nexus of the international community’s ability to respond to the food and
climate crises.
“If we don’t safeguard our seed diversity and implement peasants’ rights, then the global agricultural
system won’t be able to respond to rapidly changing climatic conditions,” said Adam Kuleij, Massai
pastoralist from Tanzania.
Addressing the fundamentals of on-farm conservation is essential to the food supply. Meanwhile, the
elephant in the room is that member states have spent years squabbling over the barebones 116 million
dollars in budget proposed from 2007 needed to fulfill the basic goals of the treaty.
The International Planning Committee on Food Sovereignty (IPC) facilitated a meeting of people from five
continents including 25 countries, representing peasant, pastoralist, and indigenous organizations, to
analyze the status and role of the treaty.
Dr. Malaku Worede of Ethiopia, the founder of Africa’s most important gene bank and former chair of the
U.N. Commission that led to the Treaty emphasized the key role of small farmers in conserving the
genetic diversity of seeds:
“Ex-situ gene banks have an important role to play. But we’ve been trying to save seed in gene banks for
the last half century, with more failures than successes. To ensure a sustained supply of useful
germplasm and a more dynamic system of keeping diversity alive, we must support farmers in
maintaining seed in their field. If we lose this living diversity Africa and the world will not be able to adjust
to climate change,” Worede said.
After two days debate the representatives are demanding the following:
In light of the food emergency there must be a suspension of all intellectual property rights and other
regulations that prevent farmers from saving and exchanging non-GMO seed.
There must be a major financial commitment to save seed in the field, for the conservation of genetic
diversity in the field, and to prevent and monitor biopiracy.
We must bring an end to the monopoly practices of multinational seed companies who are controlling
seeds, the first link in the food chain.
Governments cannot act alone, they must involve farmers in decision making every step of the way, and
governments must implement the treaty’s decision on Farmers’ Rights.
“We, are giving states one last chance to implement collective farmers’ rights, and on-farm conservation
of seeds. If not we’ll no longer consider the treaty a relevant body for implementing food sovereignty.”
said Soniamara Maranho of the Via Campesina Brazil.
(Below the Declaration of La Via Campesina)
---------------------------------------------------------
Seed Treaty: La Via Campesina Declaration
Submitted to the members of the Governing Body of the International Treaty on Genetic Plant Resources
for Food and Agriculture on the occasion of the Third Session of the Governing Body, held June 1-5,
2009, in Tunis.
The multiplication and the aggravation of the food, economic, energy and climate crises are forcing
peasants all over the world to adapt their farming systems to the acceleration of changes to their
environment. The dynamic conservation and sustainable use of cultivated biodiversity, agro-systems,
social systems and related peasant knowledge are at the heart of this adaptation; the food of future
generations depends on it.
Biodiversity cannot be preserved and renewed without recognizing the farmers’ rights defined by the
ITPGR (International Treaty on Plant Genetic Resources), particularly those rights defined in Article 9 to
preserve, use, exchange and sell their seeds, to participate in national decision-making, and to protect
their traditional knowledge. However, in spite of many political and scientific declarations on the need to
develop on-farm conservation, the majority of the signatory countries of the Treaty prohibit the exercise of
these collective rights. They have replaced them with private intellectual property laws on seeds, which
make it possible for a handful of multinational seed companies to proclaim their ownership of all existing
biodiversity.
Deprived of their rights, the peasants can no longer preserve the hundreds of thousands of varieties,
which they so patiently selected to adapt them to their agro-systems. The multinational companies
replace these varieties with a few dozen industrial crops intended to feed the richest populations, their
animals or their cars. These varieties cannot be reproduced and are protected by Intellectual property
laws (IPL) which prohibit the peasants from re-sowing the seeds harvested, these industrial seeds are too
expensive for the small farmers who can neither afford to buy them every year, nor to buy fertilizers or the
pesticides required to grow them. They thus destroy food crops, social and cultural systems, and the
traditional knowledge of peasant communities and indigenous peoples.
To only allow farmers the right to sharing of advantages is a decoy used by UPOV who refuse to make
the labeling of the origin of resources compulsory for depositing a variety certificate and by the patents
that camouflage this information. This illusionary right is only used to gain acceptance by the intellectual
property Rights in denying the collective rights of farmers, and generating “shared benefits” that are never
shared.
Using the money ear-marked for fighting hunger to distribute these industrial seeds and associated
fertilizers for free to the small-scale farmers - who feed the poor people of the South - until they give up
their local peasant seeds, is to condemn them to give up farming as soon as this non-sustainable support
comes to an end: this aggressive policy is contrary to the protection of the rights of farmers as defined in
the ITPGR.
The “ex-situ” gene banks and cultivated biodiversity are threatened in their very homelands and in their
diversification, by contamination by patented GMOs, wars, and the lack of public finance required for their
conservation. This is particularly true in the countries of the South that have the richest cultivated
biodiversity. To replace them with genetic collections of digitized genetic sequences deprives the
peasants of access to the diversity of the reproducible living seeds that they will need to feed future
generations. The peasants have no use for seeds that cannot germinate, that are locked up in an
immense strong room of ice and to which they have no access, or for their digitalized genetic code stored
in computers. Only the multinationals will have access to this treasure to market a few standardized
plants resulting from patented synthetic genes that their financial power allows them to manufacture.
This is why the Via Campesina demands the Governing Body of the Treaty to implement the following
proposals:

to request compliance by all signatory countries of the rights of farmers to conserve, use,
exchange and sell their farm-grown seeds, protect them from biopiracy, contamination by



patented genes and from the aggressive policies which destroy social systems, agro-systems,
cultural systems and the associated traditional knowledge. And to request to suspend intellectual
property rights on seeds in order to allow peasants to respond to food, climate and energy crises
as quickly as possible.
to preserve the ability of seeds to germinate, and to make genetic plant resources grown in the
fields and currently locked up in the gene banks, available to all the peasants of the world
to mobilize financial partners, particularly the World Food Program, in order to develop vast
programs of participatory selection in the field and not to distribute industrial seeds that cannot be
reproduced or to digitalize the collections that exist within the multilateral system
to associate the small-scale farmers’ organizations present within the Via Campesina with the
process of developing decisions, on an equal basis with the representatives of industry.
In order to achieve this, we propose to bring peasant organizations into the functioning of the Treaty in
order to:



create a report on the rights of farmers and the conditions of peasants in the world, on the basis
of their own experience. This should be done on the basis of peasants’ own experiences as well
as based on documentation provided by government institutions
create a working group in charge of ensuring the conformity of practices of those who participate
in the multilateral system with the rules of the Treaty, in particular in order to take measures
against biopiracy
create a working group with the task of defining a framework for in-situ conservation on farms and
to secure its financing create common working areas with CGIAR on the definition of ex-situ
resources and a code of procedure as to how to access resources, how to use them and the
sharing of benefits, as well as to secure for small peasants’ organizations the financial means to
participate in this work.
http://www.alainet.org/active/30728&lang=es ‫)‪(Tunisia‬‬
‫ةيتابنلا ةيثارولا دراوملا لوح ةودن‬
‫‪29/5/09‬‬
‫ةيتابنلا ةيثارولا دراوملاب ةينعملا ةيلودلا ةدﻩاعملاب ةصاخلا ةيسائرلا ةئيﻩلل ةثلاثلا ةرودلا سنوت نضتحت‬
‫‪.‬ملاعلا ءاحنأ فلتخم نم يلود ريبخ ‪ 100‬نم رثكأ ةكراشمب مداقلا ناوج ‪ 5‬ىلإ ‪ 1‬نم مظتنت يتلا ةعارزلاو ةيذغألل‬
‫ميعدتب ةليفكلا لبسلا ثحب ىلع ةعارزلاو ةيذغألل ةيممألا ةمظنملا ﻩمظنت يذلا عامتجالا يف نوكراشملا فكعيسو‬
‫جماربلاو تاعورشملل ةيفاضإلا دراوملا ةئبعت كلذ يف امب ةيليومتلا اﻩتيجتارتسإ زيزعتو ةيلودلا ةدﻩاعملا‬
‫‪.‬ةيلاقتنا ةلحرمب رمت يتلا نادلبلاو ةيمانلا نادلبلا يف اميس الو نيعرازملا ةدعاسمل ةيثارولا دراوملاب ةينعملا‬
‫دراوملا ىلع لوصحلا لجا نم بناوجلا ددعتم اراطإ ةرﻩاظتلا ﻩذﻩ يمظنم بسح ‪ 2004‬ةنس ذيفنتلا زيح تلخد يتلا ةدﻩاعملا‬
‫لضفأ ةقيرطب ةيثارولا دراوملا نم ةدافتسالا فدﻩب ةيمانلا نادلبلا معد يف مﻩست اﻩنأ امك ‪.‬اﻩايازم مساقتو ةيثارولا‬
‫‪.‬ةمادتسم ةروصبو‬
‫ةياعرل ةيرورضلا ةيلوألا داوملا بوعشلل ءاذغلا نيمأت يف يرﻩوج رودب علطضت يتلا ةينيجلا دراوملا نمؤتو‬
‫ضارمألاو تافﺁلاو ةيخانملا تاريغتلا كلذ يف امب لبقتسملا ﻩجاوت نا اﻩنأش نم ةديدج فانصأ ريوطتو تاتابنلا‬
‫‪.‬عونتم يئاذغ ماظن نيمأت ىلإ ةفاضإلاب ةفورعملا ريغ ةيتابنلا‬
‫تانيجلل ينطولا كنبلا ثادحإ ىلإ ةحالفلا عاطق ريوطت يف ةينيجلا دراوملا ةيمﻩاب اﻩيعو راطا يف سنوت ترداب دقو‬
‫نيسحتو جاتنالا ريوطت لجا نم ﻩئارثاو يسنوتلا يتابنلاو يناويحلا نوزخملا ىلع ظافحلل ةماﻩ ةيلﺁ دعي ىذلا‬
‫‪.‬دالبلاب ةيخانملاو ةيتايحلا تابوعصلا عم ملقأتلا ىلع اﻩتاردقو اﻩعونتب مستت ةيلحملا عاونألا ناو ةصاخ ةيدودرملا‬
‫نم فنص ‪ 7600‬ديدحت نم تانيجلل ينطولا كنبلا نم قرف اﻩب تماق يتلا ةيفاشكتسالا ةيناديملا ثوحبلا تنكمو‬
‫ينيجلا نوزخملا ءارث دكؤي امب ريعشلا نم ‪2854‬و نيللا حمقلا نم ‪724‬و بلصلا حمقلا نم ‪ 3487‬اﻩنم بوبحلا‬
‫نم حالفلا نيكمتو فانصالا نيسحتل ةينطولا جماربلا تايجاح نيماتل اردصم لكشي يذلا يتابنلاو يناويحلا‬
‫‪.‬يئاذغلا نمالا ددﻩت يتلا ةيخانملا تاريغتلا تاريثات عم ملقاتلا‬
‫تضرقنا يتلا ةيسنوتلا بوبحلا نم فنص ‪ 4800‬ةلمج نم فنص ‪ 1000‬جامدا ىلع تانيجلل ينطولا كنبلا لمع دقو‬
‫‪.‬ةلحاقلا قطانملا يف ةحالفلل يلودلا زكرملا فارشا تحت كلذو ديعب نمز ذنم‬
‫فاجلا ﻩبشو فاجلا يسنوتلا خانملا عم ملقأتلا ىلع ةرداق ةيلحم ةيناويح فانصا جامدا ةداعا ىلا ايلاح كنبلا ىعسيو‬
‫‪”.‬سنوت فورخ”ـب ةامسملا ةيربربلا نافرخلا ةليصف رارغ ىلع‬
‫‪http://www.akhbar.tn/wp-content/uploads/2009/05/ginat.jpg‬‬
‫)‪(Tunisia‬‬
‫ةيثارولا دراوملا ةدﻩاعمب ةصاخلا ةيسائرلا ةئيﻩلل ةثلاثلا ةرودلا نضتحت سنوت‬
‫ةعارزلاو ةيذغألل ةيتابنلا‬
‫ةرودلا سنوت نضتحت ناوج ‪ 5‬ىلا ‪ 1‬نم ةدتمملا ةرتفلا لالخو ملاعلا ءاحنا لك نم يلود ريبخ ‪ 100‬نم رثكأ ةكراشمب‬
‫‪.‬ةعارزلاو ةيذغألل ةيتابنلا ةيثارولا دراوملاب ةينعملا ةيلودلا ةدﻩاعملاب ةصاخلا ةيسائرلا ةئيﻩلل ةثلاثلا‬
‫يف امب ةيليومتلا اﻩلبسو ةدﻩاعملا زيزعت ةيجيتارتسال ةضيرعلا طوطخلا ثحبب ةرودلا ﻩذﻩ يف نوكراشملا متﻩيسو‬
‫‪.‬ةيمانلا نادلبلا يف اميس ال نيعرازملا ةدعاسمل ةيثارولا دراوملا ةئبعت كلذ‬
‫نم ةيمانلا نادلبلا معد يف مﻩاست اﻩنأ امك ‪،‬اﻩايازم مساقتو ةيثارولا دراوملا ىلع لوصحلل ةصرف ربتعت ةدﻩاعملا ﻩذﻩو‬
‫‪.‬ةيضرملا رﻩاوظلاو ةيخانملا تاريغتملا لمحت ىلع ةرداق ةديدج عاونأ ريوطتو ةيثارولا دراوملا نم ةدافتسالا لجأ‬
‫ز‬
Experts from 120 countries meet in Tunis for UN-backed plant
diversity forum
Source: BI-ME , Author: BI-ME staff
Posted: Tue June 2, 2009 1:17 pm
TUNISIA. Delegates from some 120 countries today opened a United Nations-supported meeting in Tunis
to discuss plant genetics and food resources, the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) said.
Participants at the five-day meeting, the third session of the governing body of the 2004 International
Treaty on Plant Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture, are seeking agreement on ways to further
speed up the benefit-sharing aspects of the Treaty, FAO noted in a press release.
“No country is self-sufficient in plant genetic resources; all depend on genetic diversity in crops from other
countries and regions. International cooperation and open exchange of genetic resources are therefore
essential for food security,” stated the agency.
“Climate change has made this challenge even more pressing as there is a need to preserve all the crops
developed over millennia that can resist cold winters or hot summers.
“Yet, agricultural biodiversity, which is the basis for food production, is in sharp decline due the effects of
modernisation, changes in diets and increasing population density.”
The agency said about three-quarters of the genetic diversity found in agricultural crops has been lost
over the last century, and this genetic erosion continues.
http://www.bi-me.com/main.php?id=37321&t=1&c=33&cg=4&mset September 7, 2009 – (CNN) -- When the chips are down, the world may one day owe a debt of gratitude to a group of
potato farmers high up in the mountains of Peru.
Not small potatoes: Preserving potato varieties in Peru is vital to global food security.
Thanks to a new $116 million global fund established this summer, the Quechua Indians are
being paid to maintain their diverse collection of rare potatoes and ensure that they will be
available to help the world adapt to future climate change.
The Quechua are one of 11 communities around the world, chosen for the important collection of
crops they farm, which together are part of a major new initiative to ensure that the world has the
options it might need to cope with future food crises.
Other countries involved include Cuba, where they will be focusing on maize and beans, as well
as oranges in Egypt and wheat in Tanzania.
The fund, a cornerstone of the International Treaty on Plant Genetic Resources for Food and
Agriculture (ITPGRFA), aims to maintain a reservoir of essential species for all our major food
crops.
"Agricultural biodiversity is essential," Dr Shakeel Bhatti, Secretary of the Treaty, told CNN. "It
is really the global insurance that in the future we will be able to adapt to problems like climate
change and population growth."
Just as biodiversity is now seen as the cornerstone of the resilience of natural world, so having a
broad variety of agricultural crops is essential to the resilience of agriculture. Different species of
plants are often able to cope with widely differing environmental conditions and many obscure
varieties could hide vital disease resistance.
But the world's valuable diversity is disappearing incredibly fast.
"The figures are quite disturbing," said Dr Bhatti.
Over the millennia, humans have relied on more than 10,000 different plant species for food.
Today, we have barely 150 species under cultivation -- and of those only 12 species provide 80
percent of all of our food needs. Four of those -- rice, wheat, maize and potatoes -- provide more
than half of our energy requirements.
As global markets have grown and seed production and agriculture become more
commercialized, the old system of farmers saving their own seeds - and by doing so a myriad of
different crops, often closely adapted to local conditions - has almost disappeared.
As a result variety is dwindling towards a vanishing point. China has lost 90 percent of the wheat
varieties it had just 60 years ago. In the United States more than 90 percent of fruit tree and
vegetable varieties found in farmers' fields at the beginning of the twentieth century are no
longer there. Mexico has lost 80 percent of its corn varieties. India has lost 90 percent of its rice
varieties
"They're gone; they've disappeared forever," said Dr Bhatti. "From a food security point of view
this makes the world's farmers much more vulnerable to pests... and increases the vulnerability of
some poor countries to price shocks in global commodity markets."
The ITPGRFA has two major aims: to prevent the loss of underused crops and ensure the full
diversity of common crop species is maintained. It has already enabled the establishment of a
seed bank containing 1.1 million varieties that opened in Svalbard, Norway, in 2008. But now
the focus is on crop varieties than cannot be stored in this way -- such as potatoes.
Historically, both the 19th century Irish Potato Famine and the Bengal Famine, in India, are hard
lessons in what happens when we rely too much on a small range of species that are hit by
disease.
But, according to Dr Bhatti, there are problems around the world now that offer a glimpse at
what could happen in the future if we don't maintain our vigilance.
Wheat Stem Rust is a devastating wind-born disease affecting cereals that has spread across
Africa and is now in the Middle East, and migrating further eastwards.
"If it reaches South Asia and China then millions could face a major threat to food security," says
Dr Bhatti.
In southwest Australia years of drought, believed to be linked to climate change, have had a huge
impact on rice production.
"It has almost wiped out the sector," said Dr Bhatti.
Although the ITPGRFA was agreed in 2001, and came into affect in 2004, but for the last five
years signatories have been locked in negotiations over how the scheme would be financed. It
wasn't until a conference in Tunis in June 2009 that the deadlock was broken with the new $116
million benefit sharing fund, which will fund the 11 projects.
There are also contracts to ensure those countries that are centers of diversity -- often poorer
nations -- benefit when species are used commercially by richer nations.
"That was a major step forward," said Dr Bhatti. "We now have tremendous confidence in the
system; the treaty is on track."
Rich signatories, such as Norway, Spain and Italy, have agreed to provide the rest of the funds
within five years, and according to Dr Bhatti the U.S. has expressed a desire to sign up after
disinterest during the Bush administration.
So successful is the model established by the ITPGRFA that the World Health Organization is
looking at it as a way of sharing information on viruses, including influenza; there are also plans
for a bank of animal genetic material.
"I must say I have been so delighted by the Tunis conference this year," said Dr Bhatti. "To a
certain extent we were at a crossroads, but we completely came through. It was a quantum leap;
a major thing. We are moving forward."
http://edition.cnn.com/2009/TECH/science/09/04/food.biodiversity/
(Spain)
El Tratado Internacional sobre recursos fitogenéticos para la
alimentación empieza a dar sus frutos
Delegados de 120 países se reúnen en Túnez para compartir los beneficios de este acuerdo
2 de junio de 2009
"Por vez primera, los agricultores de los países pobres se verán recompensados al amparo de un tratado
internacional vinculante para la conservación y difusión de variedades de cultivos que pueden
salvaguardar la seguridad alimentaria mundial en las próximas décadas", afirma la Organización de la
ONU para la Agricultura y la Alimentación (FAO), que anuncia la puesta en marcha de un nuevo
esquema de distribución de beneficios gracias a las "generosas donaciones" de diversos gobiernos
destinadas a algunos proyectos en este ámbito dentro del Tratado Internacional sobre los Recursos
Fitogenéticos para la Alimentación y la Agricultura.
Los detalles serán explicados en la reunión de esta semana del Órgano Rector del Tratado en Túnez, en
la que participarán delegados de 120 países. Los proyectos han sido seleccionados entre más de 300
propuestas enviadas por campesinos, organizaciones de agricultores y centros de investigación, sobre
todo de África, Asia y América Latina.
"Es la primera vez que se transfieren beneficios económicos en aplicación del Tratado acordado en
2004", asegura la FAO. Este acuerdo creó un fondo común mundial formado por 64 cultivos alimentarios
que suman más de un millón de muestras de recursos fitogenéticos conocidos. Estos cultivos
representan el 80% de todo el consumo humano. El arroz, el trigo, el maíz y la patata suponen por sí
solos casi el 60%.
250.000 dólares
El texto estipula que siempre que un producto comercial patentado haya utilizado un gen de este fondo
común, el 1,1 % de sus ventas debe destinarse al fondo de distribución de beneficios del Tratado. El
primer grupo de proyectos recibirá unos 250.000 dólares. Noruega, Italia, España y Suiza han aportado
el capital inicial a este fondo para la distribución de beneficios.
"Estamos agradecidos a los gobiernos que han realizado aportaciones voluntarias para poder hacer
estos proyectos realidad", señaló el doctor Shakeel Bhatti, secretario del Órgano Rector del Tratado. "Si
los campesinos y otras partes implicadas -añadió- no reciben ninguna ayuda para conservar y desarrollar
las diferentes variedades, esta diversidad de cultivos que tienen en sus manos podría perderse para
siempre".
La fitogenética es un proceso lento y pueden transcurrir diez o más años desde que se produce la
transferencia de genes hasta que llega a un producto patentado. Las iniciativas seleccionadas tendrán
que respetar una serie de criterios en apoyo a los agricultores pobres que conservan diferentes
variedades de semillas y ayudan a reducir el hambre en el mundo.
La FAO recuerda que ningún país es autosuficiente en recursos fitogenéticos; todos dependen de la
diversidad genética de los cultivos de otros países y regiones. Por lo tanto, la cooperación internacional y
el libre intercambio de estos recursos "son esenciales para la seguridad alimentaria".
http://www.consumer.es/seguridad-alimentaria/2009/06/02/185707.php
La encrucijada de Cártago: ¿La última oportunidad para el Tratado de las Semillas de la FAO?
04-06-09
En el camino hacia las cumbres gemelas de finales del año— la cumbre de la crisis alimentaria en Roma
en noviembre y las cumbre de la crisis climática que se celebrará en Copenhague en Diciembre— la
reunión del Tratado de las Semillas de la FAO (TIRFAA) pone a prueba más que nunca la habilidad de la
comunidad internacional para responder a la crisis climática y alimentaria.
“Si no conservamos nuestra diversidad de semillas e implementamos los derechos de los campesinos, el
sistema agrícola global no podrá dar respuestas a las condiciones climáticas rápidamente cambiantes”,
dijo Adam Kuleij, pastor nómada Massai de Tanzania.
La toma en consideración de los aspectos fundamentales de la conservación en los campos es esencial
para el suministro de alimentos. Mientras tanto, lo más destacable y molesto es que los estados
miembros han pasado años peleándose por los raquíticos 116 millones de dólares del presupuesto
propuesto desde 2007 necesario para cumplir los objetivos básicos del tratado.
El Comité Internacional de Planificación para la Soberanía Alimentaria (CIP) facilitó la reunión de
personas procedentes de cinco continentes, incluyendo 25 países, representantes de campesinos,
pastores nómadas y organizaciones indígenas para analizar el estado y el papel del tratado.
El Doctor Malaku Worede de Etiopia, fundador del banco de genes más importante de África y expresidente de la Comisión de la ONU que derivó en el tratado, enfatizó el papel clave de los pequeños
campesinos en la conservación de la diversidad genética de las semillas:
“Los bancos genéticos ex-situ tienen un papel muy importante. Hemos estado intentando guardar las
semillas en los bancos genéticos durante el último medio siglo, con más fracasos que éxitos. Para
garantizar un suministro sostenido de germoplasma útil y un sistema más dinámico de conservación de
la diversidad viva, debemos apoyar a los campesinos en la conservación de las semillas en sus campos.
Si perdemos esta diversidad viva, África y el mundo no podrán adaptarse al cambio climático”, dijo
Worede.
Después de un debate de dos días, los representantes exigen lo siguiente:
• A la luz de la emergencia alimentaria, la suspensión de todos los derechos de la propiedad intelectual y
otras regulaciones que evitan que los campesinos conserven e intercambien semillas no transgénicas.
• Un compromiso financiero para conservar las semillas en los campos, para la conservación de la
diversidad genética en los campos y para prevenir y hacer un seguimiento de la biopiratería.
• El fin de las prácticas de monopolio de las empresas semilleras multinacionales que controlan las
semillas, el primer eslabón de la cadena alimentaria.
• Los gobiernos no pueden actuar solos, deben involucrar a los campesinos en el conjunto del proceso
de toma de decisiones y los gobiernos deben implementar las decisiones del tratado relativas a los
Derechos de los Campesinos.
“Le damos a los estados la última oportunidad para implementar los derechos colectivos de los
campesinos y la conservación de semillas en los campos. Si esto no ocurre, dejaremos de considerar el
tratado como un organismo relevante para la implementación de la soberanía alimentaria”, dijo
Soniamara Maranho, de la Vía Campesina Brasil.
Semillas: La Vía Campesina Declaración
Entregado a los miembros del Comité Director del Tratado Internacional sobre los Recursos
Fitogenéticos para la Agricultura y la Alimentación, realizado el 1-5 de Junio, 2009, Tunis.
La multiplicación y la agravación de las crisis alimentarias, económicas, energéticas y climáticas obligan
a los campesinos de todas las regiones del mundo a adaptar sus sistemas de cultivo a la aceleración de
los cambios de su medio ambiente. La conservación dinámica y la utilización duradera de la
biodiversidad cultivada, los agro-sistemas, los sistemas sociales y conocimientos campesinos asociados
a éstos están en el centro de esta adaptación de la que depende la alimentación de las generaciones
futuras.
Esta biodiversidad no puede conservarse y renovarse sin el reconocimiento de los derechos de los
agricultores definidos por el TIRFAA, ante todo sus derechos definidos en el artículo 9 de conservar,
utilizar, a intercambiar y a vender sus semillas criollas, de participar en las decisiones nacionales y
proteger sus conocimientos tradicionales. A pesar de numerosas declaraciones políticas y científicas
sobre la necesidad de desarrollar la conservación en los campos, la mayoría de los países signatarios
del Tratado prohíben el ejercicio de estos derechos colectivos. Los sustituyen por los derechos privados
de propiedad intelectual sobre las semillas que permiten a una decena de empresas multinacionales de
semillas declararse dueños del conjunto de la biodiversidad existente.
Privados de sus derechos, los campesinos ya no pueden conservar los centenares de millares de
variedades que ellos seleccionaron pacientemente para adaptarlos a sus agro-sistemas. Las empresas
multinacionales los sustituyen por algunas decenas de cultivos industriales destinadas a abastecer a las
poblaciones más ricas, sus animales o sus coches. No reproductibles y protegidas por derechos de
propiedad intelectual que prohíben a los campesinos volver a sembrar su cosecha, estas semillas
industriales son demasiado costosas para los pequeños campesinos que no pueden ni re-adquirirlas
cada año, ni comprar los abonos y los pesticidas indispensables para cultivarlas. Destruyen así los
cultivos alimenticios, los sistemas sociales, culturales y los conocimientos tradicionales de las
comunidades campesinas y de los pueblos indígenas.
Sólo conceder a los agricultores el derecho al reparto de ventajas es una trampa diseñada por el UPOV
que se niega a exigir la indicación del origen de los recursos utilizados en el depósito de los COV y por
las patentes que sirven de camuflaje de ésta información; este derecho ilusorio sólo sirve para hacer
aceptar la negación de los derechos colectivos de los agricultores por los derechos de propiedad
intelectual que generan estas “ventajas” que nunca son compartidas.
Utilizar el dinero de la lucha contra el hambre para distribuir gratuitamente estas semillas industriales y
los insumos asociados a ellas a los pequeños campesinos que alimentan al pueblo pobre del Sur hasta
que abandonen sus semillas campesinas locales es condenarles a desaparecer en cuanto este apoyo no
duradero desaparecerá: ésta política agresiva es contraria a la protección de los derechos de los
agricultores definidos en el TIRFAA
Los bancos de genes “ex situ” y la biodiversidad cultivada son amenazados hasta en los centros de
origen y diversificación por las contaminaciones de OGM patentados, las guerras y el abandono de las
financiaciones públicas necesarias para su conservación, en particular en los países del Sur más ricos
en biodiversidad cultivada. Sustituirlos por colecciones de secuencias genéticas convertidas en bancos
de datos numéricos priva a los campesinos del acceso a la diversidad de las semillas vivas
reproductibles de las que tendrán necesidad para alimentar a la humanidad de mañana. Los campesinos
no tienen uso para semillas incapaces de germinar, encerradas en un congelador y a las cuales no
tienen acceso, ni de su código genético convertido en secuencias numéricas. Sólo las multinacionales
podrán apoderarse de este tesoro para comercializar algunas plantas estandarizadas resultantes de
genes sintéticos patentados que su potencia financiera les permite fabricar.
Por esta razón la Vía Campesina pide al Comité director del Tratado facilitar lo siguiente:
- aplicar con el conjunto de los países signatarios los derechos de los agricultores para conservar,
utilizar, intercambiar y vender sus semillas de explotación, protegerlas de la biopiratería, de
contaminaciones por genes patentados y de políticas agresivas que destruyen los sistemas sociales, los
agro-sistemas, los sistemas culturales y los conocimientos tradicionales asociados con éstos. Pedimos
suspender los derechos de propiedad intelectual sobre las semillas con el fin de permitir a los
campesinos a responder lo más rápido posible a las crises alimenticias, climáticas y energéticas.
- conservar la facultad germinativa de las semillas y hacer accesible al conjunto campesinos del planeta
los recursos fitogenéticos tomados de sus campos y encerrados en los bancos de genes,
- para movilizar a sus socios financieros, en particular, el programa mundial para la alimentación, con el
fin de desarrollar extensos programas de selección participativa al campo y no para distribuir semillas
industriales no reproductibles o para convertir las colecciones del sistema multilateral en bases de datos
numéricas
- para asociar a la elaboración de sus decisiones las organizaciones de pequeños agricultores reunidas
en Via Campesina en la misma medida que los representantes de la industria
Para garantizar esto pedimos incorporar las organizaciones campesinas en el funcionamiento del
tratado, especialmente lo siguiente:
• La realización de un informe sobre el respeto a los derechos de los agricultores y la situación de los
campesinos en el mundo, partiendo de sus propias experiencias así como de documentos
proporcionados por las instituciones gubernamentales
• Un grupo de trabajo con la tarea de asegurar la conformidad de las prácticas de los que utilizan el
sistema multilateral con las reglas del Tratado, sobre todo en lo que es tomar medidas concretas para
luchar contra la biopiratería
• Un grupo de trabajo encargado de definir un marco para la conservación in situ en las granjas y de
facilitar su financiamiento.
• Un trabajo común con los CGIAR sobre la definición de recursos ex situ y un código de conducta en
relación a las modalidades y el acceso a los recursos, su utilización y el reparto de beneficios
Y con estos fines, de dar a las organizaciones campesinas los medios financieros para participar en
estas labores. www.ecoportal.net
Para leer la declaración de Comité Internacional de Planificación: http://www.foodsovereignty.org
http://www.ecoportal.net/content/view/full/86439/ ‫)‪(Tunisia‬‬
‫ةينعملا ةيلودلا ةدﻩاعملاب ةصاخلا ةيسائرلا ةئيﻩلل ةثلاثلا ةرودلا داقعنا‬
‫ةعارزلاو ةيذغالل ةيتابنلا ةيثارولا دراوملاب‬
‫‪ 2009‬ناوج ‪ 2‬ءاثالثلا‬
‫ةمداقلا لايجألل يئاذغلا نمألا ىلع ةظفاحملا ةرورض‬
‫شارغد ةميرك‬
‫ةيسائرلا ةئيﻩلل ةثلاثلا ةرودلا لاغشا ةيئاملا دراوملاو ةحالفلا ريزو روصنم مالسلا دبع ديسلا سما حابص حتتفا‬
‫ناوج ‪ 5‬موي ةياغ ىلا دتمت يتلاو ةعارزلاو ةيذغالل ةيتابنلا ةيثارولا دراوملاب ةينعملا ةيلودلا ةدﻩاعملاب ةصاخلا‬
‫‪.‬ةدحتملا ممالل ةعارزلاو ةيذغالا ةمظنم سيئر بئان روضحب يراجلا‬
‫ميعدتب ةليفكلا لئاسولاو قرطلا ىقتلملا ثحبيو ةلود ‪ 120‬نم يلود ريبخ ‪ 100‬نم رثكا عامتجالا اذﻩ يف كراشيو‬
‫ةئبعت كلذ يف امب ةيليومتلا اﻩتايجيتارتسا زيزعتو ةيذغالل ةيتابنلا ةيثارولا دراوملاب ةينعملا ةيلودلا ةدﻩاعملا‬
‫‪.‬ةيمانلا نادلبلا يف ةصاخ نيعرازملا ةدعاسمل ةيثارولا دراوملاب ةينعملا جماربلاو تاعورشملل ةيفاضالا دراوملا‬
‫دامتعالا ربع رمي ةمداقلا لايجالل يملاعلا يئاذغلا نمالا نا ىلع ةرودلا ﻩذﻩل ةيحاتتفالا ةسلجلا يف نيلخدتملا لج دكأو‬
‫بلطتت تحبصا يتلا ةيخانملا تارييغتلا لظ يف ةصاخ دغلا حالس لثمت يتلاو ةيتابنلا ةيثارولا داوملا ىلع‬
‫‪.‬اﻩعم ملقأتلا ىلع ةرداق ةيتابنلا ةيثارولا داوملا نم ةنيعم فانصا دوجو‬
‫لايجالل ةيذغتلا نامضل يجولويبلا عونتلل ةجاحب ملاعلا نا دكا يذلا اوماسلاب ةعارزلا ريزو نيلخدتملا نيب نم ناكو‬
‫‪.‬ةمداقلا‬
‫ريبك رود ﻩل عرازملا نا تظحال دقف ةينابسالا ةيرحبلا نوؤشلاو فايرالا ةرازو يف لوصحملا عونت بتكم ةريدم اما‬
‫‪.‬اﻩنوص ةيفيك نوفرعيو اﻩنوفرعي مﻩنال دراوملا ﻩذﻩ نوصب ةصاخلا تارارقلا ذاختا يف‬
‫لكشيس عامتجالا اذﻩ نا ةيئاملا دراوملاو ةحالفلا ريزو روصنم مالسلا دبع ديسلا نيب ةبسانملاب اﻩاقلا ةملك يفو‬
‫ةيتابنلا ةيثارولا دراوملل ةيلودلا ةدﻩاعملا دونب فلتخم ذيفنت يف مدقت نم ققحت ام ضارعتسال ةحناس ةصرف‬
‫ةيتابنلا ةيثارولا دراوملا ىلع ةظفاحملا نا فاضاو ‪ 2007.‬ةنس امورب دقعنملا يناثلا عامتجالا ذنم ةعارزلاو ةيذغالل‬
‫نم تاورثلا ﻩذﻩ ﻩتدﻩش ام رابتعاب تايولوالا ىدحا ىضم تقو يا نم رثكاو مويلا لكشي حبصأ اﻩل لثمالا لالغتسالاو‬
‫قئارحلا عالدناو يرارحلا سابحنالاو فافجلاك ىوصقلا ةيخانملا رﻩاوظلا رتاوت نا امك ‪.‬روصعلا ربع فازنتسا‬
‫لوصالا دعتو ‪.‬ةريغتملا ةيخانملا فورظلا عم ملقأتت ةديدج ةيتابن فانصا لامعتسا انيلع متحت تاناضيفلاو‬
‫صلقت ةﻩباجمل ةيلاع ةيجاتنا تاذ ايثارو ةنسحم ةيتابن فانصا طابنتسال يساسالا ردصملا ةيتابنلا ةيثارولا‬
‫ينوناق راطا عضو نم تنكمت ةلماشلا ةيمنتلا ةسايس لضفبو سنوت نا ريزولا نيبو ‪.‬ملاعلا يف ةيعارزلا تاحاسملا‬
‫طابنتسا لاجم يف يملعلا ثحبلا عيجشتو يجولويبلا عونتلاو ةيثارولا دراوملا ىلع ةظفاحملا ىلا فدﻩي يرث‬
‫‪.‬نيطبنتسملل ةيركفلا ةيكلملا قوقح نامضو ةيخانملا تاريغتملا عم ىشامتت ةديدج فانصا‬
‫ةينطو تاسارد‬
‫ىلا لصي ةيراقلا تاتابنلل يلمجلا ددعلا نا تنيب يجولويبلا عونتلاب ةصاخ ةينطو تاسارد ةدع سنوت ترجأ دقو‬
‫‪ 600‬نم رثكا كانﻩ ةيرحبلاو ةبطرلا قطانملل ةبسنلابو بونجلاو طسولاب ضارقنالاب ةددﻩم ‪ 45‬اﻩنم عون فالﺁ ‪ 3‬يلاوح‬
‫لمعي ‪ 2007‬ةنس تانيجلل ينطو كنب ثعب مت دقو ‪.‬ةردانلا عاونالا نم ربتعت اعون ‪12‬و ضارقنالاب ةددﻩم ‪ 22‬اﻩنم عون‬
‫ناديم يف ةلماعلا فارطالا فلتخمو ةيمنتلاو ثحبلا تاسسؤم عم قيسنتلاب تالاجملا لك يطغت تاكبش ‪ 9‬قيرط نع‬
‫ةيمحم ‪16‬و ةينطو قئادح ‪ 8‬اﻩنم ةيمحم ةقطنم ‪ 24‬ثادحا متو ةيموكحلا ريغ تامظنملا كلذ يف امب ةيثارولا دراوملا‬
‫ةيامحب عتمتت ةيطسوتم ةيمﻩا تاذ قطانم ثالث ىلا ةفاضالاب راتكﻩ فلا ‪ 218‬براقي ام ةحاسم ىلع دتمت ةيعيبط‬
‫‪.‬سيانكلا رزجو اطلاج ليبخراو اتيربمزو ةربمزب ةينطولا ةقيدحلا يﻩو ةصاخ‬
‫اعورشم ‪ 11‬ليومت نع نالعالا‬
‫ةودن ةدﻩاعملا نيما يطاب ليكاش ديسلاو ةدﻩاعملل يذيفنتلا زاﻩجلا ةسائر نع لوؤسملا زادناننرف وسيدوم ديسلا دقعو‬
‫تاضوافم رامث يﻩ يتلا ةدﻩاعملا اذﻩ ريصم يف ىربك ةيمﻩا ﻩل سنوت عامتجا نا اﻩيف ادكا ‪.‬ةودنلا ﻩذﻩ شماﻩ ىلع ةيفحص‬
‫ءاكرشلا نم تناك ذا ةدﻩاعملا ﻩذﻩ يف اﻩرودل ارظن ءاقللا اذﻩ ناضتحال سنوت رايتخا مت دقو تاونس عبس ةدمل تماد‬
‫‪.‬اﻩيف نيلعافلا‬
‫ادلب ‪ 92‬نم عورشم ‪350‬ـل زرف ةيلمع ءارجا دعب مﻩرايتخا مث ملاعلاب قطانم ةدع نم اعورشم ‪ 11‬ليومت نع نالعالا متو‬
‫‪.‬ليومتلا نع اثحب مﻩتاحشرت اومدق‬
‫دقو ‪.‬اوغاراكينو اينيكو ياوغوروالاو دنﻩلاو لاغينيسلاو اينازناتو اكيراتسوكو ابوكو وريبلاو رصمو برغملا يﻩو‬
‫مساقت ىلا ةفاضا ميدتسملا مادختسالاو يجولويبلا عونتلا نوص كلذ نم ةدﻩاعملا فادﻩا اﻩمعدل عيراشملا ﻩذﻩ رايتخا مت‬
‫‪.‬عفانملا‬
(Switzerland)
First Result Of Benefit-Sharing Mechanism For FAO Treaty; Push For
Farmers’ Rights
22 June 2009
By Catherine Saez
@ 4:59 pm
Members of a global treaty on plant genetic resources this month announced 11 new projects on
biodiversity conservation in research institutions, and financed by a benefit-sharing fund whose
sustainability is still in doubt. The group separately acted to better protect farmers’ rights at the national
level.
The International Treaty on Plant Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture Governing Body met in
Tunis, Tunisia from 1-5 June. The treaty was established by the United Nations Food and Agriculture
Organization (FAO) in 2001.
The treaty aims at promoting conservation and sustainable use of plant genetic resources for food and
agriculture, and equitable sharing of benefits derived from the use of those resources. (IPW, Biodiversity,
7 August 2008)
The Governing Body, the treaty’s highest organ, meets at least once every two years. It is composed of
all member governments and its main function is to promote the full implementation of the treaty.
One of the highlights of this third session of the Governing Body was the implementation of a multilateral
system of access and benefit-sharing through the treaty’s benefit-sharing fund. The fund is intended to be
self-sustaining and is aimed at supporting conservation and sustainable use of plant genetic resources for
food and agriculture.
However, for the moment, according to the treaty secretariat, the funds of the benefit-sharing fund are
voluntary contributions from the governments of Norway, Switzerland, Italy and Spain.
The secretariat said the fund is the first multilateral mechanism providing financial support as a way to
share benefits arising from access to plant genetic resources.
Those “who access genetic material through the multilateral system agree that they will freely share any
new developments with others for further research, or, if they want to keep the developments to
themselves, they agree to pay a percentage of any commercial benefits they derive from their research
into a common fund to support conservation and further development of agriculture in the developing
world,” the secretariat said (IPW, Biodiversity, 14 January 2009).
First 11 Projects
The Treaty Governing Body in 2008 issued a call for proposals for potential grantees in its first biennial
cycle (2008-2009), and 471 pre-proposals were received from seven FAO regions, before the closing
date of 15 January 2009. After screening by the treaty bureau, proposals were sent to experts, with a
scoring template, according to Bryan Harvey of University of Saskatchewan in Canada, one of the
experts.
Eventually eleven projects were chosen. Some of the projects include characterisation and genetic
enhancement of finger millet in western Kenya; on-farm conservation of local durum and bread wheat in
Morocco; and conservation, dissemination and popularisation of farmer-developed varieties by
establishing village level enterprises in India. It also includes the contribution of traditional methods for the
in situ conservation and management of maize in Cuba; the conservation and sustainable use of native
potato diversity in Peru; and the on-farm conservation and in vitro preservation of citrus local varieties and
sustainable utilisation in Egypt.
Most organisations who submitted the projects are publicly funded institutions such as universities,
research institutes, and a gene bank.
Civil society representatives present at the Tunis event commented in a joint statement that “farmers were
largely absent from the eleven approved projects. ”They also doubted the benefit-sharing mechanism,
saying that the “money awarded … was not through the treaty mechanism but through voluntary
donations made by individual countries.”
For the next cycle (2010-2011), authority for the execution will be delegated to the bureau. The list of
treaty members that are eligible for support under the benefit-sharing fund will be prepared by the
secretariat, based on a complete list of developing countries derived from the most recent World Bank
classification of economies.
According to the Governing Body’s decision, the treaty secretary should consult within FAO in order to
find interim arrangements for the disbursement of funds, project reporting and monitoring, and for the
conclusion of the first project cycle.
All information generated by projects funded through the benefit-sharing fund shall be made publicly
available within one year of the completion of the project, according to the Governing Body’s third
session.
“Plant genetic resources for food and agriculture listed in Annex 1 of the treaty [describing the list of crops
covered under the multilateral system of access and benefit-sharing], resulting from projects funded by
the benefit-sharing fund, shall be made available according to the terms and conditions of the multilateral
system” according a secretariat source.
Breakthrough on Farmers’ Rights
One of the main demands of the civil society is that on-farm conservation be sustained and supported,
rather than only in off-site gene banks. “Ex-situ gene banks have an important role to play. But we have
been trying to save seed in gene banks for the last half century, with more failures than successes,” said
Malaku Worede of Ethiopia in a Via Campesina press release. Worede is the founder of Africa’s most
important gene bank and former chair of the UN Commission that led to the treaty, according to the press
release.
Via Campesina, an international movement of peasants with members from 56 countries, issued a
declaration on 2 June saying that biodiversity could not be preserved and renewed without the recognition
of farmers’ rights defined by the treaty. This particularly includes those rights - defined in Article 9 - on the
preservation, use, exchange and sale of their seeds, and their participation in national decision-making,
as well as the protection of their traditional knowledge.
However, they said, the majority of the signatory countries of the treaty prohibit the exercise of these
collective rights in favour of private intellectual property laws on seed benefitting a “handful of
multinational see companies to proclaim their ownership of all existing biodiversity.”
A resolution on the implementation of Article 9 on farmers’ rights, which was seen by many as a positive
step forward, was taken by the Governing Body on the last day of the session.
The resolution invites each contracting party to consider reviewing and, if necessary, adjusting its national
measures affecting the realisation of farmer’s rights. It also encourages contracting members to submit
views and experiences on the implementation of farmers’ rights as set out in Article 9, involving farmers’
organisations and other stakeholders.
“It is indeed a significant step towards recognition and implementation of farmers’ rights, especially since
the treaty is the only international agreement that has enshrined such rights and putting high regard on
the contributions of farmers to the conservation and development and sustainable use of plant genetic
resources all over the world,” Corazon de Jesus from the Southeast Asia Regional Initiatives for
Community Empowerment (SEARICE) told Intellectual Property Watch.
SEARICE agreed with the statement made by the Action Group on Erosion, Technology and
Concentration (ETC) and Via Campesina calling, among other things, for a suspension of all IP rights and
other regulations that prevent farmers from saving and exchanging non-genetically modified seed, a
major financial commitment to save seed in the field and to prevent biopiracy, said de Jesus.
She further emphasised “the need for more involvement and participation of farmers in decision-making,
not just at the national level but also in international negotiations such as the treaty meetings.”
“There was little done or said about in-situ conservation,” said Pat Mooney from ETC, adding “that there
was some recognition that the approach to in-situ project funding was both financially inadequate and far
too biased toward institutions rather than farmers.”
“Although it [the declaration] is still toothless,” François Meienberg from the Berne Declaration told
Intellectual Property Watch, “it is a step forward.”
Catherine Saez may be reached at [email protected]
Categories: Biodiversity/Genetic Resources/Biotech, Development, Education/ R&D/ Innovation, English,
Environment, Features, Human Rights, United Nations
http://www.ip-watch.org/weblog/2009/06/22/first-result-of-benefit-sharing-mechanism-for-fao-treaty-pushfor-farmers’-rights/
(Tunisia)
La réunion de Tunis au service d'un partage plus effectif
FAO - Ressources phytogénétiques
La Presse – Depuis novembre 2001 existe un traité international relatif aux ressources phytogénétiques
qui constitue la base juridique d'un «système multilatéral» devant servir à faciliter l'échange de matériel
génétique entre les pays. Ce traité a été adopté à cette date lors d'une conférence de l'Organisation des
Nations unies pour l'alimentation et l'agriculture (FAO), mais son entrée en vigueur est intervenue trois
ans plus tard, en juin 2004.
C’est afin de renforcer ce traité qu’une réunion internationale se tient depuis hier, lundi 1er, et jusqu’au
vendredi 5 juin, à Gammarth : il s’agit de la troisième réunion de l’organe directeur du traité. L’enjeu est
autant de consolider le dispositif de préservation de la biodiversité des différents pays et des différentes
régions de la planète que de mettre en place un système d’échange international des richesses
phytogénétiques.
La dernière crise alimentaire mondiale a sans aucun doute révélé toute l’importance stratégique qui est
celle de ce traité: face aux changements climatiques et aux bouleversements divers induits par la
mondialisation, mais aussi à l’apparition de maladies nouvelles des plantes, ou plus simplement à la
perte de performance des semences utilisées, les traditions agricoles se doivent en effet de renouveler
leur «matériel» phytogénétique si elles veulent continuer de nourrir les populations et, aussi, d’apporter
des revenus suffisants aux agriculteurs.
La réunion de Tunis devrait permettre au traité d’entrer dans une phase plus effective de son existence,
notamment à travers la mobilisation de ressources plus importantes en vue de son fonctionnement. Lors
des premières interventions de la première journée, la question du financement n’a pas tardé à être
évoquée. On a fait remarquer que les contributions des pays, et en particulier des pays industrialisés,
sont restées jusque là trop limitées, ce qui a empêché le traité d’atteindre ses objectifs : «L’appui
économique doit accompagner l’appui politique», a affirmé la représentante de l’Espagne.
Entre-temps, le dispositif s’étoffe. On dénombre plusieurs dizaines de propositions émanant des pays
contractants en matière d’échange d’informations, de transfert technologique, de conservation des
ressources au niveau des exploitations agricoles... Le ministre de l’Agriculture et de la Pêche des îles
Samoa, qui s’est déplacé pour l’occasion et qui a fait un exposé sur la situation de la biodiversité dans les
îles du Pacifique, a profité de la réunion de Tunis pour signer un accord avec la FAO en vertu duquel il
mettait à la disposition de l’agence onusienne le matériel phytogénétique des nombreuses îles de la
région Pacifique.
Notons qu’il existe désormais un «accord type de transfert de matériel» prévoyant les conditions d’un
partage «juste et équitable» des avantages qui découlent de l’exploitation de ces ressources, en
sauvegardant dans le même temps les droits souverains des parties contractantes sur leurs ressources
propres.
Raouf SEDDIK
(Nicaragua)
Financiarán proyectos para conservación de recursos genéticos en Nicaragua
Los fondos que otorgará la FAO, por un total de 543 millones de dólares, estarán destinados a proyectos,
además, en Egipto, Kenia, Costa Rica, India, Perú, Senegal, Uruguay y Marruecos
Por: Blanca Aguilar
02 de junio de 2009 | 16:00:52
El Organo Rector del Tratado Internacional de Recursos Fitogenéticos para la Alimentación y la
Agricultura financiará 11 proyectos en países en desarrollo para la conservación de semillas y recursos
genéticos de cultivos alimentarios.
Un comunicado de la Organización de Naciones Unidas para la Agricultura y la Alimentación (FAO)
informó este martes que esa decisión fue tomada en Túnez.
Precisó que los fondos, por un total de 543 millones de dólares, estarán destinados a proyectos en
Egipto, Kenia, Costa Rica, India, Perú, Senegal, Uruguay, Nicaragua y Marruecos.
'Se trata de la primera vez que se transfiere dinero al amparo del esquema de distribución de beneficios
del Tratado, cuyo objetivo es compensar a los campesinos de los países en desarrollo por su labor en la
conservación de la diversidad de cultivos', dijo el comunicado de la FAO.
Indicó que los proyectos fueron elegidos entre los más de un centenar presentados y que la iniciativa ha
sido posible gracias a la generosa contribución de Noruega, Italia, España y Suiza.
Entre los proyectos destacan los destinados a la protección de la agrodiversidad de los cítricos en
Egipto, la mejora genética y la revitalización de una variedad de mijo en Kenia, y la conservación de las
variedades indígenas de papa en Perú, añadió la FAO.
http://www.lavozdelsandinismo.com/nicaragua/2009-06-02/financiaran-proyectos-para-conservacion-derecursos-geneticos-en-nicaragua/
Ressources phytogénétiques pour l’alimentation Pour une meilleure
adaptation aux changements climatiques
Le Renouveau
Écrit par N.B
02-06-2009
*3.000 variétés de plantes recensées en Tunisie, dont 45 en voie de disparition au centre et au sud
L’organe directeur du Traité sur les ressources phytogénétiques pour l’alimentation et l’agriculture a
annoncé hier au cours de sa réunion périodique qui se tient du 1er au 5 courant à Tunis, qu’il aiderait à
hauteur de plus d’un demi-million de dollars 11 pays en développement, à protéger leurs collections de
gènes et d’autres ressources génétiques vitales d’une part, pour nourrir des centaines de millions de
bouches supplémentaires dans les 30 années à venir et, pour contrer la menace du changement
climatique et des maladies des plantes, d’autre part.
Aucun pays n’est autosuffisant en plantes destinées à l’alimentation. Tous dépendent de la diversité
génétique des plantes d’autres pays ou régions. De ce fait, les aides octroyées par l’organe directeur du
traité, notamment pour protéger des variétés vulnérables de maïs, sorgho, blé ou d’agrumes auront un
impact au niveau mondial.
«La coopération internationale et les échanges de ressources génétiques sont primordiaux pour la
sécurité alimentaire», souligne l’organe directeur du traité qui s’est félicité du partage équitable des
bénéfices découlant de l’utilisation de ces ressources.
D’après lui, c’est la première fois que des transferts d’avantages financiers seront effectués aux termes
du traité et ce, depuis son entrée en vigueur.
Il convient de signaler que le Traité international sur les ressources phytogénétiques pour l’alimentation et
l’agriculture, adopté en 2001, par les membres de l’Organisation des Nations Unies pour l’Alimentation et
l’Agriculture (FAO) est entré en vigueur en juillet 2004. Ce traité tient compte du rôle essentiel que les
agriculteurs, partout dans le monde, jouent dans la préservation de la diversité agricole. Cette diversité,
comme l’a dit M. Modibo Traoré, responsable à la FAO, au cours d’une conférence de presse tenue hier
en marge de la réunion de Tunis, est indispensable pour permettre à l’agriculture de s’adapter aux
changements climatiques et conditionne la sécurité alimentaire de l’humanité. Les ressources
phytogénétiques actuelles sont la base de la sélection de nouvelles variétés végétales, tant au niveau
commercial, qu’à celui des agriculteurs. Jusqu’ici, il y a 120 parties contractantes. Le contrat engage les
Etats membres à conserver et à utiliser de façon durable leurs ressources phytogénétiques pour
l’alimentation et l’agriculture et à partager de façon juste et équitable les avantages découlant de leur
utilisation, par un échange d’informations, des transferts de technologies et le renforcement des
capacités dans les pays en développement.
Le traité est ainsi conforme aux objectifs de la convention sur la diversité biologique des Nations Unies
qui reconnaît aux Etats souverains le droit de disposer de leurs ressources biologiques et d’en
réglementer l’accès par voie législative. Son organe directeur, composé de représentants de toutes les
parties contractantes, surveille et accompagne sa mise en œuvre dans les pays signataires.
La Tunisie, l’un des pays signataires du traité international sur les ressources phytogénétiques pour
l’alimentation et l’agriculture, œuvre, conformément aux dispositions de ce traité à préserver la diversité
phytogénétique afin d’assurer l’équilibre écologique, d’un côté et la sécurité alimentaire, de l’autre. C’est
dans ce cadre que le pays a réalisé plusieurs études nationales et mis en œuvre des programmes
d’action comprenant plusieurs projets visant la préservation et l’exploitation rationnelle et optimale de la
biodiversité. Ces efforts louables ont permis d’identifier les lacunes et les difficultés rencontrées dans la
réalisation des projets dans ce domaine et de trouver les solutions intelligentes pour développer le
secteur de la biodiversité et préserver les ressources phytogénétiques et animales, à l’effet de
développer la production agricole.
Ainsi, les études nationales sur la biodiversité montrent-elles que le nombre total des plantes
continentales s’élève actuellement à plus de 3.000 variétés dont 45 plantes, en voie de disparition au
centre et au sud. Dans les zones humides et maritimes, il existe plus de 600 variétés, dont 22 en voie de
disparition et 12 considérées comme variétés rares.
Les efforts consentis jusque-là, ont abouti à la création d’une banque de gènes en 2007, opérant à
travers 9 réseaux couvrant tous les domaines, en coordination avec les institutions de recherche et de
développement et les différentes parties concernées par les ressources génétiques parmi les
Organisations non-gouvernementales pour assurer sa bonne gestion, et inventer de nouvelles variétés à
forte productivité et adaptables aux conditions climatiques en Tunisie. En plus, 24 parcs ont été
aménagés dont 8 jardins publics et 16 réserves naturelles sur une superficie de 218 mille ha, outre des
zones protégées de portée méditerranéenne, à l’instar de l’archipel de la Galite.
«La biodiversité est, sans aucun doute, nécessaire pour assurer la durabilité de la vie. Elle peut fournir
une réserve riche en sources biologiques pouvant être exploitées à travers différentes techniques pour
mieux répondre à des objectifs de portée culturale, médicinale et industrielle. Elle représente également
l’un des fondements essentiels de la biotechnologie moderne et des industries agroalimentaires. Cette
biodiversité est, aujourd’hui, confrontée à des défis multiples menaçant son existence, à cause de la
surexploitation et des changements climatiques et de leur impact négatif sur les systèmes
environnementaux naturels. Face à ces défis, il importe de renforcer la coopération internationale dans le
domaine des ressources phytogénétiques pour l’alimentation et l’agriculture et d’unifier les
réglementations dans ce domaine, afin de renforcer la paix et la stabilité dans nos pays», a dit, en
substance, M. Abdessalem Mansour, ministre de l’Agriculture et des ressources hydrauliques.
(UK)
Boost for conservation of plant gene assets
Financial worries accompany award of first grants under international treaty.
Published online 1 June 2009 | Nature |
doi:10.1038/news.2009.532
Natasha Gilbert
An international treaty aimed at protecting and
improving access to the world's plant genetic
resources is set to dole out its first round of
research grants this week amid cash-flow
problems that could endanger future awards.
The grants, which will support research into new
crop varieties and plant-conservation efforts in
developing countries, mark the fifth anniversary of
the adoption of the International Treaty on Plant
Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture by the
Food and Agricultural Organization of the United
Nations. The treaty is best known for its role in
paving the way for construction of the Svalbard
Global Seed Vault in Norway — an underground
cavern containing a stock of plant seeds from
around the world.
The Svalbard Global Seed Vault is part of a
drive to protect plant genetic
resources.Wikimedia Commons / Svalbard
Global Seed Vault / Mari Tefre Some 120 nations are party to the treaty, and those that have ratified it are legally bound to pass on
genetic information about the world's 64 most important food crops, including potatoes and wheat —
making the information freely available to researchers, plant breeders and farmers. This information
might be held in gene banks or in the form of crops growing in a farmer's field, for example.
The treaty also gives financial support to farming communities in the developing world. This means that
they can afford to keep growing traditional, more genetically diverse crops instead of abandoning them in
favour of modern and improved — but also more uniform — varieties. Maintaining diversity is essential
for researchers and plant breeders who are searching for crops that can withstand the effects of climate
change or emerging diseases.
Lag time
At a meeting taking place this week in Tunis, Tunisia, the treaty's governing body is expected to award a
total of US$250,000 to between four and seven plant-research and conservation projects. For example,
one project that applied for funding comes from a farming community in the Peruvian Andes, an area that
holds the highest degree of potato diversity in the world. They hope the funding will help them to adapt
their growing strategies to the increasing temperatures they are experiencing as a result of climate
change.
But the treaty is now facing financial challenges, says Shakeel Bhatti, secretary of its governing board.
Its long-term goal is to generate funds for research and conservation projects through income raised
from the commercialization of products, such as new crop varieties, which are developed using genetic
material obtained through the treaty. Anyone who uses the treaty's genetic material in a patented,
commercialized product must agree to give back into a common pot 1.1% of the sales they make on the
product.
“Everyone needs something from
everyone else.”
"There is a lag time of around 10–15 years before a
commercial product is developed and the royalties start to
flow," says Bhatti.
Bert Visser
Centre for Genetic Resources The treaty also relies on donations from the signatory
nations, companies and charities that use it. But so far, only
Norway, Spain, Italy and Switzerland have contributed. As a
result, the pot currently holds US$500,000, meaning that only a fraction of the 500 proposals (which total
US$20 million) can be funded.
Bhatti says the limited funding for research and conservation is "a major concern" for the world's future
food security. He will seek agreement from the treaty's governing board at this week's meeting to launch
a campaign that aims to raise US$116 million over the next five years.
Global gene pool
Nations that are party to the treaty have made 1.1 million genetic samples available through it, and
around 200,000 exchanges of genetic material take place every year — showing it has so far been a
success, says Bert Visser, director of the Centre for Genetic Resources in Wageningen, the Netherlands.
"The treaty has enabled the creation of a global gene pool," he says.
David Ellis, curator of the Plant Genetic Resources Preservation Program within the US Department of
Agriculture's research service, says it has become "standard practice for genetic material to be accessed
and exchanged through the treaty".
He adds that it has also been useful in clarifying the terms and conditions under which profits can be
made on exchanged material. The United States is a signatory to the treaty, but has not yet ratified it.
No country's research and crop breeding efforts would amount to much without the ability to access and
use genetic resources from around the world, Visser says. "Everyone needs something from everyone
else," he adds.
http://www.nature.com/news/2009/090601/full/news.2009.532.html
First Fruits of Plant Gene Pact
2009-06-01
Delegates from 120 nations in Tunis to share benefits of treaty on food
plant genes.
For the first time, farmers in poor countries are to be rewarded under a
binding international treaty for conserving and propagating crop
varieties that could prove to be the saviour of global food security over
the coming decades.
A new benefit-sharing scheme, part of the International Treaty on
Plant Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture, is to come on
stream thanks to the generous donations of several governments that
will support five such farmers’ projects.
They will be announced at a meeting of the Treaty’s Governing Body
is Tunis this week from more than 300 applications submitted by
farmers, farmer’s organisations and research centres mainly from
Africa, Asia and Latin America.
Food gene pool
It is the first time that financial benefits are being transferred under the
Treaty which was agreed in 2004. The Treaty established a global
It takes all sorts of corn varieties
pool comprised of 64 food crops that make up more than one million
to feed the world.
samples of known plant genetic resources.
The Treaty stipulates that whenever a commercial product results from the use of this gene pool and that
product is patented, 1.1 percent of the sales of the product must be paid to the Treaty’s benefit-sharing
fund.
The first batch of projects are to receive around $250 000. Norway, Italy, Spain and Switzerland have
contributed the funds as seed money for the benefit-sharing scheme.
Ten year wait
Plant breeding is a slow process and it can take ten years or more for a patented product to emerge from
the time the genetic transfer took place which is why the aforementioned governments have backed the
scheme. Norway introduced a small tax on the sale of seeds on its domestic market to fund its donation.
The projects selected will have to fulfil a number of criteria that support poor farmers who conserve
different seed varieties and reduce hunger in the world.
“We are grateful to the governments who have made voluntary contributions to make this possible,” said
Dr Shakeel Bhatti, Secretary of the Treaty’s Governing Body.
“If farmers and other agricultural stakeholders don’t get any support in conserving and developing the
different varieties, this crop diversity that they look after may be lost forever.
Diversity is key
No country is self-sufficient in plant genetic resources; all depend on genetic diversity in crops from other
countries and regions. International cooperation and open exchange of genetic resources are therefore
essential for food security.
Climate change has made this challenge even more pressing as there is a need to preserve all the crops
developed over millennia that can resist cold winters or hot summers.
Yet, agricultural biodiversity, which is the basis for food production, is in sharp decline due the effects of
modernization, changes in diets and increasing population density.
About three-quarters of the genetic diversity found in agricultural crops has been lost over the last
century, and this genetic erosion continues.
It is estimated that there were once 10,000 types of food crops. Today, only 150 crops feed most of the
world's population, and just 12 crops provide 80 percent of dietary energy from plants, with rice, wheat,
maize, and potato alone providing almost 60 percent.
Hidden crops
Many new and unexploited varieties are found in some of the hardest to reach places in poor countries,
where they have been traditionally grown by local farmers but never commercialized.
The real concern is that many crops that have developed resistance to hot summers and cold winters, or
long periods of drought might be lost which is why the Treaty has made on-farm conservation one of its
priorities.
$116 million appeal
Delegates to the meeting will seek agreement on ways to further speed up the benefit-sharing aspects of
the Treaty. These might include an appeal from the Governing Body to governments, private donors and
foundations for $116 million to strengthen the treaty’s work in helping developing countries grow better
crops.
“While disagreements over access to crop genetic resources can involve highly technical issues and
complex legal matters, the challenges are quite clear,” said Dr Bhatti.
“Crop breeders need wide access to genetic diversity in order to confront climatic change, fight plant
pests or disease, and feed the world’s rapidly growing populations.”
http://www.stackyard.com/news/2009/06/arable/01_fao_plant_genes.html
(Italy)
Reward for conserving crops
11 projects announced in Tunis to receive grants from treaty on food plant genes
by S. C.
Eleven developing countries that conserve food seeds and other genetic material from major crops will
receive more than $500 000 to support their efforts according to an announcement made today in Tunis
at a high-level meeting of the governing body of the International Treaty for Plant Genetic Resources in
Food and Agriculture.
Grants are to be awarded to projects in Egypt, Kenya, Costa Rica, India, Peru, Senegal, Uruguay,
Nicaragua, Cuba, Tanzania and Morocco. It is the first time funds have become available under the
benefit-sharing scheme of the Treaty, designed to compensate farmers in developing countries for their
role in conserving crop varieties.
The projects were chosen from hundreds of applications and come on stream thanks to the generous
donations of Norway, Italy, Spain and Switzerland in support of agriculture and food security.
The projects to be supported include: on-farm protection of citrus agro-biodiversity in Egypt, the genetic
enhancement and revitalization of finger millet in Kenya and the conservation of indigenous potato
varieties in Peru.
by S. C.
04 June 2009 TN 5 Year 1
http://www.teatronaturale.com/article/646.html (France)
L’agriculture africaine au coeur du sommet de Tunis
Publié le juin 1, 2009
Dans la Catégorie Actus du jour |
Des délégués de 120 pays sont réunis du 1er au 5 juin à Tunis pour discuter du partage des bénéfices
découlant du Traité international sur les ressources phytogénétiques pour l’alimentation et l’agriculture et
des moyens de renforcer ce traité juridiquement contraignant.
brevets et produits commerciaux
Un nouveau système de partage des bénéfices, partie intégrante du Traité, doit entrer en vigueur grâce
aux dons généreux octroyés par plusieurs gouvernements en faveur de projets devant bénéficier à des
paysans pauvres. Ces paysans seront récompensés pour avoir conservé et propagé des variétés de
plantes susceptibles de sauvegarder la sécurité alimentaire mondiale au cours des prochaines
décennies, souligne un communiqué de l’Organisation des Nations Unies pour l’alimentation et
l’agriculture (FAO).
Ces projets seront annoncés cette semaine à Tunis au cours de cette réunion de l’organe directeur du
Traité. Ils ont été sélectionnés parmi plus de 300 propositions soumises par des paysans, des
associations paysannes et des centres de recherche principalement d’Afrique, d’Asie et d’Amérique
latine.
C’est la première fois que des transferts d’avantages financiers seront effectués aux termes du Traité et
ce, depuis son entrée en vigueur en juin 2004.
Le Traité a établi une banque de gènes mondiale comprenant 64 cultures vivrières qui constituent plus
d;un million d’échantillons de ressources phytogénétiques connues.
Il stipule qu’à chaque fois qu’un produit commercial résulte de l’utilisation de cette banque de gènes et
que ce produit est breveté, 1,1% des ventes de ce produit doivent être versés au Fonds de partage des
bénéfices du Traité.
http://www.toulouse7.com/2009/06/01/lagriculture-africaine-au-coeur-du-sommet-de-tunis/
Seed Treaty: La Via Campesina Declaration
TUESDAY, 02 JUNE 2009
Submitted to the members of the Governing Body of the International Treaty on Genetic Plant Resources
for Food and Agriculture on the occasion of the Third Session of the Governing Body, held June 1-5,
2009, in Tunis.
The multiplication and the aggravation of the food, economic, energy and climate crises are forcing
peasants all over the world to adapt their farming systems to the acceleration of changes to their
environment. The dynamic conservation and sustainable use of cultivated biodiversity, agro-systems,
social systems and related peasant knowledge are at the heart of this adaptation; the food of future
generations depends on it.
Biodiversity cannot be preserved and renewed without recognizing the farmers’ rights defined by the
ITPGR (International Treaty on Plant Genetic Resources), particularly those rights defined in Article 9 to
preserve, use, exchange and sell their seeds, to participate in national decision-making, and to protect
their traditional knowledge. However, in spite of many political and scientific declarations on the need to
develop on-farm conservation, the majority of the signatory countries of the Treaty prohibit the exercise of
these collective rights. They have replaced them with private intellectual property laws on seeds, which
make it possible for a handful of multinational seed companies to proclaim their ownership of all existing
biodiversity.
Deprived of their rights, the peasants can no longer preserve the hundreds of thousands of varieties,
which they so patiently selected to adapt them to their agro-systems. The multinational companies
replace these varieties with a few dozen industrial crops intended to feed the richest populations, their
animals or their cars. These varieties can not be reproduced and are protected by Intellectual property
laws (IPL) which prohibit the peasants from re-sowing the seeds harvested, these industrial seeds are too
expensive for the small farmers who can neither afford to buy them every year, nor to buy fertilizers or the
pesticides required to grow them. They thus destroy food crops, social and cultural systems, and the
traditional knowledge of peasant communities and indigenous peoples.
To only allow farmers the right to sharing of advantages is a decoy used by UPOV who refuse to make
the labeling of the origin of resources compulsory for depositing a variety certificate and by the patents
that camouflage this information. This illusionary right is only used to gain acceptance by the intellectual
property Rights in denying the collective rights of farmers, and generating “shared benefits” that are never
shared.
Using the money ear-marked for fighting hunger to distribute these industrial seeds and associated
fertilizers for free to the small-scale farmers - who feed the poor people of the South - until they give up
their local peasant seeds, is to condemn them to give up farming as soon as this non-sustainable support
comes to an end: this aggressive policy is contrary to the protection of the rights of farmers as defined in
the ITPGR.
The “ex-situ” gene banks and cultivated biodiversity are threatened in their very homelands and in their
diversification, by contamination by patented GMOs, wars, and the lack of public finance required for their
conservation. This is particularly true in the countries of the South that have the richest cultivated
biodiversity. To replace them with genetic collections of digitized genetic sequences deprives the
peasants of access to the diversity of the reproducible living seeds that they will need to feed future
generations. The peasants have no use for seeds that cannot germinate, that are locked up in an
immense strong room of ice and to which they have no access, or for their digitalized genetic code stored
in computers. Only the multinationals will have access to this treasure to market a few standardized
plants resulting from patented synthetic genes that their financial power allows them to manufacture.
This is why the Via Campesina demands the Governing Body of the Treaty to implement the following
proposals:




to request compliance by all signatory countries of the rights of farmers to conserve, use,
exchange and sell their farm-grown seeds, protect them from biopiracy, contamination by
patented genes and from the aggressive policies which destroy social systems, agro-systems,
cultural systems and the associated traditional knowledge. And to request to suspend intellectual
property rights on seeds in order to allow peasants to respond to food, climate and energy crises
as quickly as possible.
to preserve the ability of seeds to germinate, and to make genetic plant resources grown in the
fields and currently locked up in the gene banks, available to all the peasants of the world
to mobilize financial partners, particularly the World Food Program, in order to develop vast
programs of participatory selection in the field and not to distribute industrial seeds that cannot be
reproduced or to digitalize the collections that exist within the multilateral system
to associate the small-scale farmers’ organizations present within the Via Campesina with the
process of developing decisions, on an equal basis with the representatives of industry.
In order to achieve this, we propose to bring peasant organizations into the functioning of the Treaty in
order to:





create a report on the rights of farmers and the conditions of peasants in the world, on the basis
of their own experience. This should be done on the basis of peasants’ own experiences as well
as based on documentation provided by government institutions
create a working group in charge of ensuring the conformity of practices of those who participate
in the multilateral system with the rules of the Treaty, in particular in order to take measures
against biopiracycreate a working group with the task of defining a framework for in-situ
conservation on farms and to secure its financing
create a report on the rights of farmers and the conditions of peasants in the world, on the basis
of their own experience. This should be done on the basis of peasants’ own experiences as well
as based on documentation provided by government institutions
create a working group in charge of ensuring the conformity of practices of those who participate
in the multilateral system with the rules of the Treaty, in particular in order to take measures
against biopiracy
create a working group with the task of defining a framework for in-situ conservation on farms and
to secure its financingcreate common working areas with CGIAR on the definition of ex-situ
resources and a code of procedure as to how to access resources, how to use them and the
sharing of benefits, as well as to secure for small peasants’ organizations the financial means to
participate in this work.
To contact the Via Campesina delegation in Tunis: + 85264504508
See also the International Planning Committee declaration on : http://www.foodsovereignty.org
http://www.viacampesina.org/main_en/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=734&Itemid=37

Documentos relacionados