PRODUCTION NOTES (v 9/6/2015)

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PRODUCTION NOTES (v 9/6/2015)
CINEMA LIBRE STUDIO
Presents a FLOR DE LOTO PICTURES S.R.L.
Production
PRODUCTION NOTES
(v 9/6/2015)
1
OLVIDADOS
(FORGOTTEN)
Directed by Carlos Bolado
Coming to theatres in NEW YORK – Starts Sept 18
Coming to theatres in Los Angeles – Starts Oct 2
HBO Latino– Premiering in December 2015
112 Minutes | Not Rated | Spanish with English subtitles | 5.1 & Stereo | HD
NORTH AMERICAN DISTRIBUTOR CONTACT
Booking – Rich Castro
[email protected]
PH: 818.588.3033
SPANISH-LANGUAGE PUBLICITY
Carlos Gutierrez – Cinema Tropical
[email protected]
PH: 212.254.5474
Other Marketing & PR – Beth Portello
[email protected]
PH: 818.588.3033
http://www.olvidadosfilm.com | www.facebook.com/olvidadosfilm | www.twitter.com/olvidadosfilm
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HIGHLIGHTS AND OVATIONS
“Forces contemporary audiences to confront the roots of today's politics and to remember atrocities such as the theft of
thousands of children from their families.” – Michael Ordoña, Los Angeles Times
“Unbelievably powerful…” – Bijan Tehrani, Cinema Without Borders
“I’m convinced that if this film does not make the Bolivian people fall in love again, I’m going to change careers.” – Paolo
Agazzi, Filmmaker/Producer
"This is an important step for Bolivian cinema.” - Jordi Chaparro, Cine Center
Bolivia’s Foreign Language Film submission for the 87th Academy Awards®
Since premiering in Bolivia on July 31, 2014, Olvidados has run continuously in theatres for one entire year.
Bolivia’s Maya Awards – Won
 Best Film
 Best Actor – Christian Mercado
 Best Actress – Carla Ortiz
 Best Philanthropic Work done by a Celebrity – Carla Ortiz
Platinos Awards – Nominations
 Best Ibero-American Fiction Film
 Best Director – Carlos Bolado
 Best Script – Elia Petridis, Carla Ortiz, Mauricio D’avis
 Best Actor - Damián Alcázar, Christian Mercado
 Best Actress – Carla Ortiz
 Best Original Music – Ruy Folguera
International Film Festival of India
 Official Selection - World Premiere
San Diego Latino Film Festival
 Official Selection – US Premiere
 Opening Night Film
Chicago Latino Film Festival
 Official Selection – East Coast Premiere
 Opening Night Film
Mar Del Plata International Film Festival
 Special Gala Screening
Merida Y Yucatan International Film Festival
 Official Selection
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Cinefest – Ecuador
 Official Selection
 Third Place – People’s Choice Award
Festival Internacional de Cinelebu
 Official Selection
 Opening Night Film
Festival de Florianopolis
 Official Selection
 Opening Night Film
Rosario Film Festival
 Official Selection – Invited Country
Festival Internacional de Cine de Ayacucho – FICA
 Official Seleciton
 Special Mention
Festival Internacional de Cine de los Derechos Humanos
 Official Selection
 Closing Night Film
 Best Film to Expose Human Rights Issues
TRAILER (ENGLISH): https://youtu.be/Z1D82hPsAv0
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U.S. COVERAGE DURING OSCAR QUALIFICATION
Deadline: http://deadline.com/2014/12/forgotten-bolivia-oscar-entry-carla-ortiz-talks-about-operationcondor-1201317670/
The Hollywood Reporter: http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/review/forgotten-olvidados-film-review756495
Los Angeles Times: http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/la-et-mn-en-foreign-films-20141120-story.html
Cinema Without Borders: http://cinemawithoutborders.com/world-cinema-reports/3730-carla-ortiz-boliviaoscar-entry-forgotten.html
Chicago Latino Film Festival: http://chicagolatinofilmfestival.org/film/forgotten/
Noticine: http://www.noticine.com/iberoamerica/36-iberoamerica/22019-carla-ortiz-inicio-en-los-angeles-lacampana-de-qolvidadosq-por-el-oscar.html
Cinecuentro: http://www.cinencuentro.com/2014/11/25/critica-olvidados-pelicula-bolivia-candidata-oscar2015-plan-condor/
Fox News Latino: http://latino.foxnews.com/latino/espanol/2014/05/20/olvidados-la-pelicula-boliviana-sobreel-plan-condor-se-estrenara-en-julio/
Vida Latina, San Diego: http://www.vidalatinasd.com/news/2014/may/20/olvidados-la-pelicula-bolivianasobre-el-plan/
- http://www.vidalatinasd.com/news/2014/jul/28/olvidados-el-filme-sobre-plan-condor-que-quiere/
INTERNATIONAL COVERAGE
Bolivian Consulate: http://www.consuladoboliviano.com.ar/portal/node/497
El Mostrador: http://www.elmostrador.cl/noticias/pais/2014/07/28/olvidados-la-pelicula-boliviana-sobre-elplan-condor/
Cine Lebu: http://www.cinelebu.cl/wp/?p=1335
La Republica: http://www.larepublica.ec/blog/entretenimiento/2014/07/28/olvidados-filme-sobre-plancondor-que-quiere-enamorar-a-los-bolivianos/
Casa de la Cultura Ecuatoriana:
http://www.casadelacultura.gob.ec/index.php?ar_id=11&no_id=2378&palabrasclaves=Olvidados,%20Bolivia&
title=%93Olvidados%94%20se%20
El Telegrafo: http://www.telegrafo.com.ec/cultura1/item/nunca-hay-que-dejar-de-lado-el-instinto.html
ISSUU: http://issuu.com/distereocanalwebbolivia/docs/revista2015final/19?e=12582063%2F11025813
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El Sol de San Luis: http://www.oem.com.mx/elsoldesanluis/notas/n3677149.htm
Soy TJ: http://www.soytj.co/blog/olvidados-una-pelicula-increiblemente-poderosa/
Diario de Yucatan: http://yucatan.com.mx/espectaculos/cine/sube-el-telon-del-ficmy-con-el-filme-olvidados
- http://yucatan.com.mx/espectaculos/cine/la-cinta-olvidados-inaugura-el-festival-de-cine-demerida-yucatan
Informacion de lo Nuevo: http://www.informaciondelonuevo.com/2015/01/lujosa-inauguracion-del-primerfestival.html?m=1
Los Tiempos: http://www.lostiempos.com/oh/entrevista/entrevista/20140712/olvidados-una-pelicula-pararecordar_266375_583948.html
- http://www.lostiempos.com/diario/actualidad/tragaluz/20140730/%E2%80%9Colvidados%E2%80
%9D-la-mas-ambiciosa-produccion-del-cine_268375_588656.html
Bolivia Te Vemos: http://www.boliviatv.net/2014/07/olvidados-de-carla-ortiz-fue-estrenado.html
El Visor Boliviano: http://www.elvisorboliviano.com/olvidados-para-recordar-siempre/
Pagina Siete: http://www.paginasiete.bo/cultura/2015/1/27/filme-olvidados-compite-festival-cinelatinoamericano-45351.html
La Prensa: http://www.laprensa.com.bo/diario/entretendencias/cultura/20150304/bolivia-postula-aolvidados-a-los-premios-platino_64995_107926.html
Cinemas Cine: http://www.cinemascine.net/fotograma_bolivia/noticia/Semana-del-cine-de-Ecuador
Oxigeno: http://www.oxigeno.bo/node/715
El Deber: http://www.oxigeno.bo/node/715
Hipertextual: http://hipertextual.com/2014/11/oscar-candidatas-2015
La Paz Vanguardia: http://www.lapazvanguardia.com/?p=16818
Distereo Bolivia:
http://www.distereobolivia.com/noticias/det_noticia.php?c1=2321&c2=1&c3=Alfombra%20Roja%20y%20Pre
mier%20de%20%E2%80%9COlvidados%E2%80%9D%20%20(+V
Opinion: http://www.opinion.com.bo/opinion/vida_de_hoy/2014/0731/vidadehoy.php?id=2717
Gobierno Autonomo Departamental, Santa Cruz:
http://www.santacruz.gob.bo/prensa/contenido.php?IdNoticia=11718&IdMenu=9
Erbol: http://www.erbol.com.bo/noticia/cultura/08082014/ingresaron_6000_personas_ver_los_olvidados
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SHORT SYNOPSIS:
After suffering a heart attack, retired General José Mendieta (Damián Alcázar) is haunted by his dark past as
an officer in Operation Condor, the CIA-backed campaign of political repression in Latin America that was
responsible for executions, torture, and imprisonments in the 1970’s. In a letter to his son Pablo (Bernardo
Peña), Mendieta confesses the role he played in the abduction, persecution, and execution of countless men
and women during his posting to Chile.
MIDDLE SYNOPSIS:
After suffering a heart attack, retired General José Mendieta (Damián Alcázar) is haunted by his dark past as
an officer in Operation Condor, the CIA-backed campaign of political repression in Latin America that was
responsible for executions, torture, and imprisonments in the 1970’s. It is estimated that over 400,000 people
were imprisoned and 30,000 forcibly disappeared as a result of these government actions.
In a letter to his son Pablo (Bernardo Peña), Mendieta confesses the role he played in the abduction,
persecution, and execution of countless men and women during his posting to Chile. Journalist Marco
(Carlotto Cotta) and his pregnant wife Luciá (Carla Ortiz) are among those who were arrested, along with their
activist friend Antonio (Tomás Fonzi) and revolutionary Andrea (Ana Calentano). They suffer terribly under
Mendieta and his cohort Sanera (Rafael Ferro), which leads to a cascade of betrayals, secrets, and stolen lives
that spans generations.
LONG SYNOPSIS:
After suffering a heart attack, retired General José Mendieta (Damián Alcázar) is haunted by his dark past as
an officer in Operation Condor, the CIA-backed campaign of political repression in Latin America that was
responsible for executions, torture, and imprisonments in the 1970’s. It is estimated that over 400,000 people
were imprisoned and 30,000 forcibly disappeared as a result of these government actions.
In a letter to his son Pablo (Bernardo Peña), Mendieta confesses the role he played in the abduction,
persecution, and execution of countless men and women during his posting to Chile. Journalist Marco
(Carlotto Cotta) and his pregnant wife Luciá (Carla Ortiz) are among those who were arrested, along with their
activist friend Antonio (Tomás Fonzi) and revolutionary Andrea (Ana Calentano). They suffer terribly under
Mendieta and his cohort Sanera (Rafael Ferro), which leads to a cascade of betrayals, secrets, and stolen lives
that spans generations.
Olvidados (Forgotten), Bolivia’s Foreign Language Film submission for the 87th Academy Awards®, stars
renowned actors from five countries, and was filmed in Bolivia, Chile, and New York. It is the first film to
specifically address the horrors perpetrated under Operation Condor, which was responsible for: 50,000
deaths; 30,000 “disappeared”; and 400,000 arrested and imprisoned in Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile,
Paraguay, and Uruguay.
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EXCERPTS FROM INTERVIEWS WITH CARLOS BOLADO - Director
“Reality is worse than fiction. In my
screenplay, I had torture. I had all those
things, but I realized it’s ineffable. And people
still tell me that the torture in the film is
violent, but every time someone tells me that
I say, ‘No, read the books, see the photos,
read the descriptions.’ But I also tried to
contain the violence, to look for something
more psychological, because [as a filmmaker]
you can’t compete with violence.”
[excerpt from http://remezcla.com/features/giff2015-violence-crime-film-panel-luis-mandokiamat-escalante/]
*
“We have to remember and tell the real stories. ‘Olvidados’ must speak, and already does talk about that. It discusses
Operation Condor, which was an operation supported by the United States but of the different intelligence agencies of
all the countries. That is what this film does. There have been films made about Operation Condor in Argentina, Chile,
and some other countries, in this case what we do is see that it was a global issue, not a particular situation in any one
country.”
Source: HOY Los Angeles, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8PE3ZPgF0SM
*
“I recently read something that said, ‘we should remember so as to not forget, and not forget so as to not repeat.’ The
world moves in cycles, it is a spiral. Violence will always be present, since the beginning of humanity, death, imposition,
violence. This (Operation Condor) was something that happened, that was serious. The fact that someone has to make a
decision in an office and sign a paper that will cost the lives of innocent people, is not right.”
Source: Vivelo Hoy, http://www.vivelohoy.com/entretenimiento/8440415/video-olvidados-en-el-festival-de-cine-latino-de-chicagoentrevista-con-carlos-bolado-y-carla-ortiz
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Q&A WITH CARLA ORTIZ:
Q: This is the first feature film to be made specifically about Operation Condor, which affected the Southern
Cone of South America. It’s a very political topic. Previous to making ‘Olvidados’ — your first feature film
as a producer –you weren’t really known as “political.” Why did you choose this topic?
C.O.: For anybody that was born between ‘75 and ‘82 – this was something that everybody talked about, but
nobody actually discussed it outright. There were curfews and you were told not to speak out. I remember my
parents would have these dinner parties, and when curfew started at midnight, everyone would have to sit
under the tables or behind couches, and they’d turn off the lights. So one of the scenes in Olvidados is
inspired by this memory.
I definitely come from a family that is rather conservative. However, my aunt was married to an activist who
was also within the opposition movement and he disappeared for two to three weeks. The adults would
whisper about it but it was never discussed outright. That’s why when I read Mauricio D’Avis original
investigation and the first version of his script, I realized that it was such an important film to make because
we, the Latin Americans, don't have as much information as we should and we are not educated about the
subject. And in order to understand the process of change in the country, or in South America, you need to
understand better your history.
I was in Egypt for New Year’s right before the Arab Spring. A week or two later, this whole thing exploded, and
I realized that dictatorships were not just a story from the 70's, and that as the new generation of creators,
artists, filmmakers, celebrities, and people making social movements, that we urgently need to recuperate
our historical memory, in order to not let history repeat itself. And that was when I realized that this was the
moment to make this film.
I realized that even though the United States has done a lot of positive things for Latin America, it's also done
so many painful and negative things. It is important for the Americans to understand what their government
keeps doing wrong or keeps on abusing its power for their benefit.
I am an American citizen. I absolutely love my country. I do come from family that would be considered rightleaning but we were under the same illusion as the rest of the people.
But I understand that when you talk politics, it's the only way to change the world. And if you really want to
leave a little drop of betterment with your existence, you actually have to take action on that step towards
change. And I think the most important step is knowledge, knowledge of your own history for Americans and
for us, Latin Americans.
Q. The film is clearly a very important part of not only your history, but the history of all Latin Americans
then. When you thought about making the film and putting this project together, was it a challenge to get it
going? Did you find it even more challenging being a woman making a film?
C.O.: It’s very hard because you have to prove yourself. So we start with that and the fact that when they
would read my script they would say, “Oh, this is amazing,” and then “Are you sure you wrote this? Who else
wrote this?” So I had to go through that even with the people that I would hire. Like, “Is she really a producer
or is she just paying everybody to do the work and then she is going to say she did it?” It was like graduating
from high school, university, and doing a master’s and a doctorate at the same time in doing this.
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I think it’s the craziest and hardest thing I’ve ever done in my life. I think it’s the most painful thing I’ve done
as well because you realize that there are still a lot of people in the entertainment business, all over the world,
that are not just macho, but are potentially misogynistic, and they hate the fact that there is a woman in
charge of something, and even worse, if there’s a woman like me who’s young and who acted in soap operas
in Mexico. I knew this was going to be hard because I’ve never done it. I have never produced before, but I
have done 11 films as an actress, so I knew how the pre-production and production would be. I had no idea
what post-production would be like.
Q. Given these obstacles, was it difficult getting everyone on board with the film?
C.O.: So, the first thing I did was, when I finished the script – it was really funny because I finished the script
and I was watching hundreds of Latin films a week –because I was looking for actors – and I remember that I
had in my head already who I wanted to play specific characters. And I remember that I called a casting
director in Bolivia, who knew me since I was very young. She said, “Carla, you realize you’re looking at the top
stars of Latin America for an ensemble role.” They don’t do that. “Carla, you are crazy. In Latin America there
aren’t films that have an ensemble. There’s no way. It’s not going to happen.”
So I didn’t listen to her and I sent a letter to everyone and they said yes. Everyone said, “Yes, it’s so important.
This is the moment to tell this story. I want to do this story.” I had the actors I wanted, and then I called
Manuel Teil, casting director in Mexico, who did Y Tu Mama Tambien and Amores Perros, and I asked him
about directors. I had interviewed four or five top directors in South America, but they were way too attached
to the story with a strong vision towards left, and more extreme.
But, I didn’t want to make a film that said “This is the evil, this is the good.” I wanted to make a film that
everybody can watch, and then you can make your decision of, “Okay this is bad, this is good, and this is what
happened.” And they were just – they related too much to the stories and to the time period, so I talked to
Carlos. I went to the screening of Colosio: the Assassination by Carlos Bolado and I thought it was fantastic,
especially the way he does the editing. He superimposes everything so, it’s fast and easy to see. And I really
liked all his work. I watched three more of his films and I offered him the position to direct this film and he
said, “Yes.” When we came together, we had immediate confirmation from the rest of the actors because they
were ready. We made all the offers and we were ready wrap up pre-production. Altogether, it took six
months to do the script, six months to do the pre-production. In the following months, we were already
shooting the film.
Q. Considering this was your first film as a producer, I’m sure you were met with many complex challenges
that were new to you. Simultaneously, you also held one of the principal roles in this film. How did you
juggle both acting in and producing Olvidados?
C.O.: When I think about it now, it was crazy. But at the time, it’s sort of like you are just walking in the dark,
and suddenly there are spotlights and someone says, “Dance!” And, you just dance [chuckles]. It was
something like that. I’d wake up at 3:30 a.m. to sign 30 to 40 checks. Then, I call the heads of every
department, and then go to shoot. At the beginning, it was very hard because I’d be in the middle of a tough
scene and I’d get interrupted, “The commander-in-chief wants to talk to you about the tanks.” At one point, I
told Carlos, “I don’t think I’m going to be able to make it.”
Paolo Agazzi, my mentor and line producer, stepped in and handled it. He said, “No. I’m going to take over
this whole thing and you are just – the days that you’re shooting, you are only shooting. If there is a disaster,
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you will only know after you finish and there’s nothing else.” It was also challenging because when I am on set,
my boss is Mr. Director, and it’s, “Yes, sir.” But at the same time, I’m his boss as the producer. He [Carlos
Bolado] was always very, very hard. But, I trusted him to be the captain of the boat.
There is also a moment where you learn to leave some huge decisions to those that do know what they are
doing. But I’ve also learned that your gut knows if this is right, or this is wrong. And, I would often just go with
my instinct and trust this instinct.
Q. Speaking of Carlos Bolado, how was it working with such a well-known Latin American director?
C.O.: Carlos is one of those directors in Latin America who started as an editor, and his first film as such was
Like Water For Chocolate. His vision is amazing, and the way he shoots a film is as an editor. So, he knows
exactly the reason why he's shooting a scene or why he's making you do something. The way he thinks when
he's working is very particular. He's also a director that's been covering mostly social matters and subjects in
all of his films – strong ones such as: Colosio: The Assassination, which was about the assassination of one of
the main candidates to run for the presidency in Mexico. It came out right before the elections.
He also made Tlatelolco, Verano de 68, which is the film about the genocide that affected students in 1968. He
dares to tell all these stories, and he does it in a very beautiful way when he edits. It's a really violent but, at
the same time, I think that the viewer feels – the spectator— feels like God, that you are seeing everything.
You have this superpower to see everything that is going on. He has this particular talent as an editor-director.
And he's a very well-read director and very academic.
What I've learned mostly from Carlos as a producer is that when you really want something, you have to fight
for it. You have to validate it. It needs to be so heavy that it's going to weigh by itself. He's the director and he
steers the ship. It’s incredible to see a scene, or see something that you don't conceive in your head, and then
let it come alive after you trust what the director wants to conceive because it's very hard when you have also
co-written the script. That's what I had to do; trust completely in everything he did. I would have never been
able to make this film the way I did, if it wasn’t for Carlos.
Q. It sounds like it was a great choice to have him come aboard then. In the same vein, how was it working
with Damián Alcázar? He’s been nominated for 11 Ariel Awards and won 5 for Best Actor.
C.O.: Damián Alcázar (General Mendieta) is that one name in the Latin American film industry that is adored
as a god of acting. He is untouchable. He is unbelievably talented and so smart. He can play something
completely different. He can be someone so funny and so cool at the same time, so interesting and naive, and
at the same time be so heavy and mean. General Mendieta is kind of nuanced. He knows things are not
completely right. But he does it anyway. He's not completely defined and in the end somehow he’s played
more evil than good.
Originally, he was doing us a favor to come and play the role of an immigration officer between two shoots
because he wanted to work with Carlos again, and he was going to be kind of like something just symbolic.
Wendy (casting director) and Manuel Tiel in Mexico, and my line producer were thrilled. We didn’t have the
lead cast yet, so I said, "Can you imagine if we could have Damián Alcázar? Originally, we were going to cast
two actors for the role. A younger and an older one as well. And he would be the only one that could pull this
off. But, he was booked until 2016 (and this was 2012).
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After discussing with Carlos who said, "Oh, he is booked completely but you can ask him. Why don't you ask
him?" I called him and said, "What would happen if I would tell you that I would love for you to play the main
lead?" He said, "I don't think there's an actor that wouldn't blink twice when they hear this." Two days later,
he was hired.
He's done every accent, Colombian, Venezuelan, Bolivian, Mexican, etc. He can do almost anything, and he's
the epitome of humbleness. He would go with his hat and walk by foot through all of La Paz. Eat food from the
street. He was so easy to work with, so professional. Just to get the prosthetics in his face when he ages,
would take two hours to put on and two hours to take off.
He also has a very strong stand politically. He has a very socialist point of view, and he loved to play this part.
He thought it was important, so his commitment was very different. As a producer, I've learned that having a
main star who is also not only amazingly talented, but a good person is sometimes the most important thing
when you are going to have such a difficult film, someone who can gather your team together. And all of us,
all the actors that are all very important in each of their countries, were so thrilled and honored to work with
him. There are very few actors in Latin America who have transcended and that are well-known inside the
broader industry because each country has its own little industry. Each of them have done amazing things, but
to be able to put all of them together in one film, it was something that's never been done before in Latin
America. And having Damián as the head of it, I think, was the smartest and luckiest thing that happened to
us.
Q. And the rest of the cast? How was it working with such an international ensemble?
C.O.: We were very lucky to have such an international cast with well-known actors in each of their countries,
who have done very important things in their countries. Manuela Martelli (Ximena), who did Machuca, has
won so many film festival awards and she keeps on winning many prizes worldwide. She's from Chile. We also
have Shlomit Baytelman (Gloria), also from Chile, who is like a top actress from the older generation and she
has had an incredible career. People love her. She's so strong in theater, as well as in film. Eduardo Paxeco
(Jorge) – also Chilean – is trained to do very rich characters, poor characters, and this talent that he has also
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with people – he's a street savvy person. He helped put the film on another level. He's very humble and
successful and has been nominated in Berlin, in Cannes, and at Sundance.
From Bolivia, we had Cristian Mercado (Hugo), who has also won many prizes as best actor. He's also a
musician and very famous artist. From Argentina we have Tomás Fonzi (Antonio), who was in Nine Queens.
He's done so much in film and television. He's a huge star in Argentina; he's like Leonardo DiCaprio over there!
Rafael Ferro (Sanera) has done a lot of theater, TV, and very interesting and important films. Lorenzo
Quinteros (Old Lluveras) is a well-known actor that had an era in Argentina. People know his name. He's sort
of like Damián Alcázar.
Carloto Cotta, working with him, oh, my goodness! I remember he knocked on my door at three o'clock in the
morning to ask me, "Can I please have my typewriter and my costume? I need to start getting into character.”
It's unbelievable.
Ana Calentano (Andrea), she's unbelievably talented and famous. And she's the President of the Syndicate of
Actors, the SAG, in Argentina. And she's been an activist who has always been active on the subject of
Operation Condor. Jorge Ortiz (Justiniano), he is the best actor we had in Bolivia. Sandro Finoglio (Venezuelan
Reporter) from Venezuela, also very famous from Argentina. I think that our cast was one of the luckiest things
we had in the film.
Q. The post-production process was completely new to you, how was it going through that?
C.O.: I hired producer, Alejandro Clancy, who had worked on two films with Carlos Bolado, so he knew him
very well. I think that was the smartest move I did. We did the editing in Mexico. Juan Palacio and Camilo
Abadia were editors from big studios – they were amazing. They had a process, almost, of three, four months
working with Carlos to make the first rough assembly. I flew from another set (where I was working as an
actress) to go see my first “armado” of the film and I wanted to kill myself. It was four hours long and there
were all these wide-framed shots. Nothing made sense. They were all patient in explaining to me that this is
the way you first put it together and then, we do a first cut out of it.That was part of the inexperience
[laughter]!
Two months later, we had the first cut. Then I started understanding the process, learning the language of
editing, it was just a complete new world for me. It was a big team in Mexico that did all the editing and color
correction. When we flew them to Mexico to do the color correction, it was unbelievable. They would play
opera music audio and they would just go through scene-by-scene and start correcting the color and I was
really fascinated with this process because we had talked in concept of how we wanted the memories to be,
how we wanted the torture scenes to feel. It was incredible to see that process happening.
Then, when you go into the mixing, you have to create follies for all those sounds that were around and even
decide how – if you're moving this from the camera, you're talking, etc. – it has to be closer and further. I think
filmmakers should always take a special interest in post-production because I realized that, ultimately, what
defines the quality of your film is post-production. I was going to take it to Toronto [chuckles] without the
sound mix.
Q. Why should people – specifically, those with Latin American roots – go and see this film?
A: Latin Americans have been coming to America for a reason. One of those reasons is “Operation Condor”.
Our countries were abused in so many ways. Some of the richest countries in the world that are now so poor
13
because everything (natural resources) was extracted from them. Everything was decided at a desk by a few to
decide the lives of millions, of nations. I think that the only way, and the first way of taking action, is to
become educated. We can get educated through films like this. This film is done for the world so we
understand why this is happening, why we are so many people, especially this year, in the States and
elsewhere – looking for this opportunity of freedom, freedom of speech, freedom of just expressing your
stance, politically or religiously.
It is important that Americans know that these actions were done. It is real, not fiction, and this oppression
and this plan was created here by those in the highest positions of the government, and that the CIA was
involved, and how it was part of the Cold War. As citizens of the world, we can really change the history of the
world if we get involved. If we see that a nation's going through these things that go against human rights then
we can all take a stand. Then, announce on Twitter, on Facebook, on everything, get involved and know what's
going on. Things won't go as far as they've done in the past and knowledge is power and with power, they can
do much less to you.
So I hope that every person that lives in the United States comes to watch the film just to know this piece of
history. It's not an easy film because it's a dark period, but it's a film that will help them understand what is
also happening in Iraq and what has happened in other countries where we've gotten involved as a nation. I
say this because I'm also an American citizen, and I think that directors and filmmakers in Latin America are
making enormous efforts to make meaningful cinema happen.
14
ABOUT THE PRODUCTION
The script for Olvidados (Forgotten) started with a long history of documentation and investigation on the
part of Mauricio D’Avis. Conducting a seven year investigation, D’Avis notated everything he could about the
results of Operation Condor, which was turned into an original script and then headed up by Elia Petridis and
Carla Ortiz. Petridis and Ortiz spent six months co-writing and re-drafting the D’Avis work to make what
became the script for the film. An additional six months were spent in pre-production as Ortiz – a first-time
producer on this film – lined up actors to play each character (herself included) as well as attaching the
director, Carlos Bolado. Thanks to Ortiz’ friendship with Lionsgate founder, Frank Giustra – who served as
Executive Producer of the film – shooting began a couple months after all cast and crew were finalized.
Production took place over a span of 12 weeks and scenes were shot in Bolivia, Chile, and New York. Due to a
limited budget and timing constraints, the project seemed far more ambitious than what could be possible.
However, with the help and unbelievable support from state officials, airlines, telephone companies, police
officers, and locals in all three cities, they were able to conserve resources and handle filming logistics at every
turn. New York was used to shoot the scenes with Paolo, the general’s son; the exterior scenes were shot in
Chile; almost everything else – including the major military scenes – was shot in Bolivia. Scenes were shot on
Alexa cameras using 2K.
Production was particularly tricky due to the issues with special effects and working on-location. Because
Bolivian cinema is a small industry, many special accessories such as bullets, guns, and especially using
dynamite, posed a challenge. There were also no fight or stunt coordinators that the team could use, so the
actors had to work together and practice their stunts and fight scenes over and over again. Lighting also
became one of the spotlights of the shooting; Bolado was using a steady cam that was moving the whole time,
so for the majority of the shoots, the lighting was 360 degrees, making sure every corner of the location was
washed with light appropriate for the scene. One street in particular took about 5 hours to light and the team
had to improvise and would work with families to not only use relatives as extras, but to also use homes that
they could enter and exit depending on the scene and what they needed to accomplish.
The post-production process took roughly 14 to 15 months; the sound mixing alone was a staggering 5-6
weeks. Editing was conducted by Juan Palacio, Camilo Abadia & Carlos Bolado. Palacio also edited Bolado’s
other film, Tlatelolco, Verano de 68; Bolado – while also directing the film – served as a main editor due to his
extensive editing background and as editing supervisor for award-winning films such as Amores Perros and
Instructions Not Included. Sound Mixing was performed by Ramiro Fierro.
15
THE CAST
Damián Alcázar – “José Mendieta”
Damián Alcázar is one of the pillars of Mexican
contemporary cinematography. He studied at the Centro
Universitario de Teatro of the National Autonomous
University of Mexico. He has acted in more than 60
Mexican and foreign movies, 24 short films and many
series and educational shows for TV (FOX Telecolombia,
Argos TV and Latin American HBO). He has received over
15 international and 14 national awards, including 8
Arieles. Among the numerous films he has participated in,
are: La mujer del puerto(1996) directed by Arturo
Ripstein; Lolo (1993) by Francisco Athié; Dos
Crímenes (1995) directed by Roberto Sneider; El
Anzuelo (1996) by Ernesto Rimoch; Bajo California: el
límite del tiempo (1998) directed by Carlos Bolado; La ley de Herodes (1999) by Luis Estrada; El crimen del padre
Amaro (2002) directed by Carlos Carrera, Crónicas (2005) by Sebastián Cordero, Las vueltas del Citrillo (2006) by
Felipe Cazals, Las Crónicas de Narnia, 2008 Disney production, Del amor y otros demonios by Hilda Hidalgo, De la
Infancia (2008) directed by Carlos Carrera, Chicogrande (2009) by Felipe Cazals, El infierno (2009) directed by Luis
Estrada. In 2013 Ciudadano Buelna by Felipe Cazals and Fecha de Caducidad directed by Kenya Márquez for which he
has received important international awards.
Rafael Ferro – “Sanera”
Rafael Ferro was born in Buenos Aires in December of
1965. His long career includes numerous movies, plays
and television shows. Among his recent performances in
film are: Mala, by Adrian Israel Caetano; the Argentina
and Spanish coproduction Medianeras, directed by
Gustavo Taretto and the German productions El día que
no nací, directed by Florian Cossen and Las lágrimas de
mi madre, by Alejandro Cárdenas. In 2014 he starred in
5 movies: La otra orilla, directed by Daniel Gagliano;
Bolishoping, by Pablo Bardi; La vida después, by Franco
Verdoia and Planta Madre, by Gianfranco Quatrinni. In
television, he has acted in over 25 series, soap operas and miniseries. One of his major co-star roles was in the soap
opera Ciega a citas. He has participated in several episodes of Lalola, Para vestir santos, El pacto, El donante and in the
successful series Epitafios. In theater, he acted in 4 D
Óptico, written and directed by Javier Daulte (2011); Las
islas, written by Carlos Gamerra and directed by
Alejandro Tantanian (2011), La gaviota and La cocina
directed by Alicia Zanca and La vuelta al hogar by
Alejandro Maci (2009).
Carla Ortiz – “Lucia”
Carla Ortiz is Bolivia’s most important and internationally
16
renowned actress. She is also a television hostess and producer. She was born in Cochabambá and started her career at
13 years of age as a model. She studied performing arts in the United States and then moved to Mexico where she acted
in successful soap operas, such as Gotitas de amor, Mujeres engañadas and Secreto de amor. She relocated to Los
Angeles where she hosted several television programs (Xcape and Access Hollywood) and appeared in Baywatch, CSI:
Miami and Without a Trace. She has acted in many films, such as Los Andes no creen en Dios (2007), Escríbeme postales
a Copacabana (2009), The Land of the Astronauts (2010) and The Man Who Shook the Hands of Vicente Fernández
(2012) directed by Elia Petridis, where she performed the leading role, opposite Ernest Borgnine. In 2013 she starred in
Xibalba, a science fiction film inspired by legends from the Maya people. She was chosen by Esquire magazine as one of
the “Sexiest Women in the World” in 2010. She produced, co-wrote and stars in Olvidados, a historical fictionalized
version of Operation Condor.
Tomás Fonzi – “Antonio”
He was born in 1981 in Buenos Aires, Argentina. He is known for his
work in the films: The Roldans (2004), Botineras (2009) and Nine
Queens (2000). He won the prize for best actor in the Iberoamerican
Festival of Lérida and was nominated for the Condor de Plata award
as best revelation actor. He acted in two of the biggest box-office
hits in Argentina and recently started his international career in the
Spanish comedy Slam. He became known in Mexico when he toured
with his rock band Mono tremendo.
Ana Calentano – “Andrea”
She was born in Ciudad de La Plata, Argentina, and has an
important career in film, theater and television. She has acted in
more than 20 movies with directors such as Marcelo Piñeyro,
Hector Olivera and Hector Babenco, among others. She received a
Cóndor de Plata award for her first leading role in Las vidas
posibles by Sandra Gugliotta and the prize for best actress at the
International Film Festival in Ceará, Brasil. She has received
awards for El Mural by Hector Olivera, Las viudas de los jueves,
directed by Marcelo Piñeyro, Miguel Cohan’s first feature
film Sin retorno, which also received awards in Valladolid and
other international film festivals, and the Premio Clarín for best
supporting actress in Felicitas by Teresa Constantini.
Eduardo Paxeco – “Jorge”
He was born in Valparaíso, Chile. He has acted in movies, theater
and television. He participated in 03:34 Terremoto en Chile directed
by Juan Pablo Ternicier (best first feature film in the Latin American
Movie Show in Cataluña), Ilusiones ópticas by Cristián Jiménez (for
which he received the Pedro Sienna award for best leading actor)
and La buena vida by Andrés Wood that won the Goya award for
best movie in 2009. He had the leading role in Caleuche: El llamado
17
del mar by Jorge Olguín, the first Chilean movie to be distributed by Disney. He forms part of the theater company
Minimale. He has participated in the following TV series: Mishima, Litoral, Infieles, La Sexóloga, Infiltradas, Primera
Dama, Maldita and Aquí mando yo.
Carloto Cotta – “Marco”
He was born Portugal in 1984. He is one of the most important
young actors of his country with an international career. He is
known for his leading role in the film Tabú, directed by Miguel
Gomes for which he was nominated in San Sebastián and Cannes.
He has worked with renowned directors in films such asMisterios
de Lisboa by Raúl Ruiz, La religiosa portuguesaby Eugène
Green, Morrer como um homen directed by João Pedro
Rodrigues, Nuit de Chien by Werner Schroeter and in the short
film that won the Palm d’Or in Cannes, Arena by João Salaviza. He
has also done theater and series and soap operas for Portuguese
public and private television.
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KEY CREW
Carlos Bolado – Director
Carlos Bolado was born in Veracruz, Mexico. He had been a filmmaker since he was a teenager. He studied
Sociology at the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (UNAM), a degree that he combined with
Cinematography studies at Centro Universitario de Estudios Cinematograficos (CUEC), in the same university.
He has edited more than 11 feature films such as, Solo Dios Sabe (Only God Knows), Como Agua para
Chocolate (Like Water for Chocolate), Cronica de un Desayuno (A Breakfast Chronicle) and Novia que te vea
(Bride to Be) and has been an editing advisor for: Amores Perros, The Sentimental Engine Slayer, and
Instructions Not Included.
His directorial film debut, Bajo California: el limite del tiempo (Under California: The Limit of Time) (1999),
received numerous awards ( 9 Ariels, the Mexican Oscar) including Guadalajara Film Festival and the Los
Angeles Latino International Film Festival. It also participated in the Sundance, Toronto, Moscow, Munich, and
San Francisco.
As a director, his second film, Promises, about Palestinian and Jewish children living in Jerusalem that he codirected with Justine Shapiro and B.Z. Goldberg. With this film, he was nominated to an Academy Award in
the category of best documentary, won two Emmys, and received other awards in more than 50 film festivals
around the world such as Rotterdam, Locarno, Vancouver, Jerusalem, Valladolid, Sao Paolo, among others.
His documentary, Pikiawish River of Renewal, about the rights of native people to fish salmon on their own
land, won several Native American and ecological festivals such as the American Indian Film Festival in 2009. It
was shot on the mouth of the Klamath River in Oregon over 7 years (in the 2000s) and aired on PBS
nationwide.
Solo Dios Sabe (Only God Knows) was the first Mexican-Brazilian co-production and starred Alice Braga and
Diego. It premiered at Sundance Film Festival in 2006 and was distributed globally by Buenavista Pictures.
In 2008, he directed the documentary 1968 to mark the date of the 40th anniversary of the students’
movement and the Olympic Games in Mexico. Once TV broadcast this film every anniversary of the massacre
(October 2nd).
A film and a 12-episode historical TV series, Tlalteloco (Summer of 68), premiered in 2013 at the Morelia Film
Festival. The film version won the audience award in LA and Chicago Latino film festivals and won the
Catalonian Latin America Film Festival. Tlatelolco is a co-production between the Argentinian INCA, the UNAM,
Fidecine and Corazon Films.
In June 2012, he released a thriller about the attack and assassination of Mexico`s presidential candidate in
1994, Luis Donaldo Colosio with the title Colosio: el Asesinato. In 2012, this film became the box office hit in
Mexico in 2012.
The same year, he directed Olvidados (Forgotten); a feature film set in 1975 about a CIA operation in South
America known as Operation Condor which was filmed in Bolivia and Chile with an international cast.
In the winter of 2013-2014 he directed the TV series Camelia la Texana for Telemundo in a production of Argos
Media.
19
Bolado has directed TV Series such as Los Minondo (2010) a Conaculta production filmed to celebrate 200
years of the Mexican Independence and Estado de Gracia (2012) for ONCE TV that was released in the United
Stated by the Cine Latino Channel. He has also directed programs for Discovery Channel, PBS, Channel 4 and
ONCE.
He has been on the jury of film festivals such as Sundance, Sao Paolo, Munich, Miami, San Francisco, LA Latino,
Guadalajara and Guanajuato. He was also a member of Sistema Nacional de Creadores de Arte (SNCA) for 6
years and received the young artist fellowship of Conaculta, and fellowships of the Ford Foundation and the
Rockefeller Foundation.
Frank Giustra – Executive Producer
Mr. Frank Giustra serves as Chief Executive Officer and President at Fiore Capital Corp. Mr. Giustra has been
the President and Chief Executive Officer at Fiore Financial Corporation, an exclusive advisor to Endeavour
Mining Corp. since July 2007. He is the Founder of Lionsgate Entertainment Corporation. He founded ClintonGiustra Sustainable Growth Initiative in June 2007. In 1997, he founded Lions Gate Entertainment Corp. and
served as its Chairman from April 1997 to May 2003. He served as Chairman of Endeavour Financial Corp. from
January 2001 to July 2007. He served as the Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Yorkton Securities Inc.
from 1995 to December 1996 and as its President since 1990.
He has been an Independent Director at Lions Gate Entertainment Corp. since December 2010. He serves as
Director of Thunderbird Films Inc. and Lionsgate Entertainment Corporation.
Mr. Giustra serves as a Trustee of International Crisis Group (The) and, Streetohome Foundation. He is the
President and a Director of the Radcliffe Foundation and a Trustee of the William J. Clinton Foundation. He
and former US President launched the Clinton Giustra Enterprise Partnership, alleviating poverty in the
developing world through education, training and supply chain distribution.
Carla Ortiz – Producer
Bolivian actress turned producer Carla Ortiz, who currently resides in Los Angeles, began her artistic career as
an actor in several popular Mexican soap operas, then made the leap to the big screen and recently came to
Bolivia to participate in the World People’s Conference on Climate Change and the Rights of Mother Earth,
held in Cochabamba last April. Ortiz has transcended borders and achieved success as both an actress and
now as a first-time producer for her film, Olvidados (Forgotten).
Ortiz does not limit her agenda to artistic matters but belongs and works actively with American organizations
committed to climate change; an issue she is passionate about. In regards to her career, she produced
Olvidados (Forgotten), an epic feature film which features Damián Alcázar and takes a look at Operation
Condor, a CIA-backed strategy to impose right-wing dictators in the southern cone of Latin America in the 70s.
The film was Bolivia’s Official Entry as Foreign Language Film to the 87th Academy Awards ® and ran a
successful and continuous theatrical run in Bolivia for a year.
20
OPERATION CONDOR1
Operation Condor was a campaign of political repression and state terror involving intelligence operations and
assassination of opponents, officially implemented in 1975 by the right-wing dictatorships of the Southern Cone of
South America. The program was intended to eradicate communist or Soviet influence and ideas, and to suppress active
or potential opposition movements against the participating governments.
Due to its clandestine nature, the precise number of deaths directly attributable to Operation Condor is highly disputed.
Some estimates are that at least 60,000 deaths can be attributed to Condor, and possibly more. Condor's key members
were the governments in Argentina, Chile, Uruguay, Paraguay, Bolivia and Brazil. The United States government
provided technical support and supplied military aid to the participants until at least 1978, and again after
Republican Ronald Reagan became President in 1981. Such support was frequently routed through the Central
Intelligence Agency. Ecuador and Peru later joined the operation in more peripheral roles. These efforts, such
as Operation Charly, supported the local juntas in their anti-communist repression.
The dictatorships and their intelligence services were responsible for tens of thousands of killed and missing people in
the period between 1975 and 1985. Analyzing the political repression in the region during that decade, Brazilian
journalist Nilson Mariano estimates the number of killed and missing people as 2,000 in Paraguay; 3,196 in Chile; 297
in Uruguay; 366 in Brazil; and 30,000 in Argentina. According to John Henry Coatsworth, a historian of Latin America
and the provost of Columbia University, the number of victims in Latin America alone far surpassed that of the Soviet
Union and the Eastern Bloc during the period 1960 to 1990.
On 22 December 1992, torture victim Martín Almada and José Fernández, a Paraguayan judge, visited a police station
in the Lambaré suburb of Asunción to look for files on a former political prisoner. They found what became known as
the "Archives of Terror" documenting the fates of thousands of Latin Americans political prisoners, who were secretly
kidnapped, tortured and killed by the security services of Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Paraguay and Uruguay. The
archive has a total of 60,000 documents, weighing 4 tons and comprising 593,000 microfilmed pages. Southern Cone
Operation Condor resulted in up to 50,000 killed; 30,000 "disappeared"; and 400,000 arrested and imprisoned. Some of
these countries have relied on evidence in the archives to prosecute former military officers.
According to these archives, other countries, such as Peru, cooperated by providing intelligence information in response
to requests from the security services of the Southern Cone nations. While Peru had no representatives at the secret
November 1975 meeting in Santiago de Chile, there is evidence of its involvement. For instance, as late as June 1980,
Peru was known to have collaborated with Argentine agents of 601 Intelligence Battalion in the kidnapping, torture
and "disappearance" of a group of Montoneros living in exile in Lima.
The "terror archives" also revealed a degree of cooperation by Colombia and Venezuela. (For instance, Luis Posada
Carriles was probably at the meeting that ordered Orlando Letelier's car bombing). A Colombian paramilitary
organization known as Alianza Americana Anticomunista may have cooperated with Operation Condor. Brazil signed
the agreement later (June 1976), but refused to engage in actions outside Latin America.
Mexico, together with Costa Rica, Canada, France, the UK, Spain and Sweden received many people fleeing as refugees
from the terror regimes. Operation Condor officially ended when Argentina ousted the military dictatorship in 1983
(following its defeat in the Falklands War) and restored democracy.
1
Wikipedia: “Operation Condor” https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operation_Condor
21
ABOUT FLOR DE LOTO PICTURES S.R.L.:
Carla Ortiz is the founder of Flor de Loto Pictures S.R.L., a media company focused on bringing about social
consciousness and global awareness to the public.
ABOUT CINEMA LIBRE:
Cinema Libre Studio is a full-service mini-studio known for producing and distributing high concept feature
films and social impact documentaries. Headquartered in the Los Angeles area, the team has released over
200 films including the Sundance Audience Award®‐Winning FUEL, THE END OF POVERTY?, Rachid
Bouchareb’s LONDON RIVER and Oliver Stone’s SOUTH OF THE BORDER. This year, the company has released
CAN’T STAND LOSING YOU, based on a memoir by Andy Summers, the guitarist of the band The Police, DAYS
OF GRACE (DIAS DE GRACIA), an eight-time Ariel Award ®-winning film by Mexican director Everardo Gout and
is gearing up for a Fall theatrical run for OLVIDADOS (FORGOTTEN), the Damian Alcazar-starring feature which
was Bolivia’s Official Selection as Foreign Language Film at the 87th Oscars ®.
www.cinemalibrestudio.com| http://www.facebook.com/cinemalibrestudio.com | twitter.com/cinemalibre
22
COMPLETE CREDITS:
CINEMA LIBRE STUDIO in association with FLOR DE LOTO PICTURES S.R.L.
presents
OLVIDADOS (FORGOTTEN)
CAST
JOSÉ MENDIETA Damián Alcázar
SANERA Rafael Ferro
LUCIA Carla Ortiz
ANTONIO Tomás Fonzi
ANDREA Ana Calentano
JORGE Eduardo Paxeco
MARCO Carloto Cotta
NEGRO Guillermo Pfening
GLORIA Shlomit Baytelman
XIMENA Manuela Martelli
HUGO Cristian Mercado
PABLO Bernardo Peña
MARIA Claudia Lizaldi
JUSTINIANO Jorge Ortiz
OLD LLUVERAS Lorenzo Quinteros
U.S.A. OFFICIAL Liam Waite
LISA Olga Fonda
PRIEST David Mondacca
GENERAL RAMOS Luis Bredow
DR. BENAVIDES Milton Cortez
SOFIA Daniela Ramírez
JORGE’S MOTHER
VENEZUELAN REPORTER
MRS. SANERA
YOUNG JUSTINIANO
CAPTAIN TORRICO
JOSE FONS
FEMALE TANGO DANCER
MALE TANGO DANCER
CHILEAN GUARD 1
CHILEAN GUARD 2
FLORIST SHOP LADY
ARGENTINIAN GUARD 1
ARGENTINIAN GUARD 2
ARGENTINIAN GUARD 3
ARGENTINIAN GUARD 4
María Elena Alcoreza
Sandro Finoglio
Lucila Sola
Daniel Larrazábal
Jorge Hidalgo
Gory Patiño
Gabriela Arce
Toto Angulo
Pedro Grossman
Alvaro Pantanioni
María Eugenia García Huidobro
Jorge Jamarlli
Miguel Estellano
Patricia García
Enrique Gorena
23
OLD ARTURO
YOUNG ARTURO
NURSE ISABEL
CAPTAIN BURGUETI
VIACHA LADY
MARIA’S BIRTH DOCTOR
VIACHA’S NURSE
GENERAL CONTRERAS
GENERAL CORREAS
CAPTAIN CASAS
GENERAL GUANES
OLDER COUPLE WOMAN
OLDER COUPLE MAN
HUGO’S WIFE
RAMOS’ WIFE
HUGO’S DAUGHTER
PROTEST LEADER
UNION LEADER
SPANISH REPORTER
FRENCH REPORTER
SANERA’S DAUGHTER
SANERA’S SON
CHILEAN RECEPCIONIST
POSTER KID 1
POSTER KID 2
POSTER KID 3
POSTER KID 4
ORLETTI’S BOY
VIACHA’S CHILD
PABLO’S SON 1
PABLO’S SON 2
JORGE’S SISTER
POLICEMAN CAR 1
POLICEMAN CAR 2
UNIVERSITY CAMPUS PHOTOGRAPHER
COFFE SHOP PATRON
GALA PARTY PRESENTER
OPERA SINGER
IMMIGRATION OFFICER
OLD LUCIA
Omar Duranboger
Alejandro Viviani
Daniela Lema
Diego Gullco
Paola Oña
Bernardo Arancibia
Claudia Eid
Eduardo Hochman
Martín Díaz
Daniel Vela
Jorge Resnikovsky
Agar Delos
Bernardo Bravo
Debora Castillo
Isabela Bernal
Camila Venchaya
Fernando Peredo
Edwin Urquidi
María López
Lucie Gosnet
Matilda Ferro
Alfonso Venchaya
Alicia López
Minor Sebastián
Mariano Antezana
Guiliana Medinacelli
Camilo Ayala
Leonardo Morales
Sebastián Troche
Lucas Peña
Diego Peña
Alejandra Siles
Ernesto Anacona
Jorge Denegri V.
Diego Nawrath
Rosa Ríos
Ramiro Serrano
Alejandra Gonzales
Fernando Pericón
Julieta Ortiz Oporto
CREW
DIRECTOR Carlos Bolado
PRODUCER Carla Ortiz
EXECUTIVE PRODUCER Frank Giustra
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LINE PRODUCER
DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY
SCREENPLAY
EDITOR
CASTING DIRECTOR
Paolo Agazzi
Ernesto Fernandez
Elia Petridis & Carla Ortiz and Mauricio D’Avis
Juan Palacio, Camilo Abadia & Carlos Bolado
Wendy Alcazar
POST PRODUCTION PRODUCER Alejandro Clancy
1st ASSISTANT DIRECTOR
2nd ASSISTANT DIRECTOR
3rd ASSISTANT DIRECTOR
SCRIPT SUPERVISOR
SCRIPT SUPERVISOR ASSISTANT
CASTING ASSOCIATE
EXTRAS COORDINATOR
EXTRAS ASSISTANT
PRODUCTION SUPERVISOR
PHYSICAL PRODUCTION EXECUTIVE
PRODUCTION ACCOUNTANT
ACCOUNTANT SUPERVISOR
FIRST ASSISTANT ACCOUNTANT
SECOND ASSISTANT ACCOUNTANT
PRODUCTION COORDINATOR
PRODUCTION SECRETARY
PRODUCTION ASSITANT
PRODUCTION ASSISTANT
LOCATION MANAGER
GENERAL ASSISTANT
CINEMATOGRAPHY BY
STEADICAM OPERATOR
CAMERA TECHNICIAN
FIRST ASSISTANT CAMERA
SECOND ASSISTANT CAMERA
STEADICAM ASSISTANT
DIGITAL IMAGING TECHNICIAN
VIDEO ASSIST
GAFFER AND KEY GRIP
GAFFER AND KEY GRIP
MAKING OF
Erik Baeza
José Villegas
Valeria Ariñez
Oscar Duran
Ivania Molina
Manuel Teil
Daniela Aguilar
Andrés Rojas
Patricia Quintanilla
Paulo Aranda
Juan Carlos Críales
Luis Omar Barrios
Rogelio Velásquez
Yvan Vertiz
Patricia Puerto
Gabriela Montesinos
Daniel Ocampo
Alicia López
Michael Linares
Franklin Poma
Ernesto Fernández
Rafael Sahade
Luis Pinto
Freddy Delgado
Fredie Mark Hayes
Ricardo Conte
Luis Pinto
Vicente Salazar
Pamela Gómez
Marcos Machaca
Ernesto Revollo
STILL PHOTOGRAPHY Miguel Canedo
IN HOUSE EDITOR Jesús Rojas
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PRODUCTION DESIGN
ART DIRECTION
ART PRODUCER
GRAPHIC DESIGNER
SET DRESSER
SET DRESSER
SET DECORATING COORDINATOR
PROPS
ART PRODUCTION ASSISTANT
ASSISTANT PROPERTY MASTER
CONSTRUCTION
CONSTRUCTION
CONSTRUCTION
CONSTRUCTION ASSISTANT
CONSTRUCTION ASSISTANT
CONSTRUCTION ASSISTANT
CONSTRUCTION ASSISTANT
COSTUME DESIGN
KEY COSTUMER
ASSISTANT COSTUME DESIGNER
TAILOR
COSTUME ASSISTANT
COSTUME ASSISTANT
COSTUME ASSISTANT
COSTUME ASSISTNAT
UNIFORM SET COSTUMER
UNIFORM SET COSTUMER
UNIFORM SET COSTUMER
UNIFORM SET COSTUMER
UNIFORM SET COSTUMER
UNIFORM SET COSTUMER
GRAPHIC DESIGN
GRAPHIC DESIGN
HAIR AND MAKE UP DEPARTMENT HEAD
SPECIAL MAKE UP FX DESIGNER
MAKE UP FX
KEY HAIR STYLIST
HAIR STYLIST ASSISTANT
KEY SPECIAL EFFECTS COORDINATOR
SPECIAL EFFECTS ASSISTANT
Marta Méndez
Serapio Tola
Melany Zuazo
Jorge Altamirano
Cesar Mamani
Sandro Alanoca
Irene Cajías
Ariel Morales
Pholak Rios
Luis Rojas
Iván Quiroga
Nelson Mamani
Emilio Quispe
Rubén Ramos
Franklin Mamani
Iver Castro
Osmar Quiroga
Pilar Groux
Martha Cabrera
Rita Escobar
Grover Ticona
Roxana Toledo
Erika Cornejo
Aydeey Mamani
Juan Colque
Julia Tintaya
Victor Hugo Tintaya
María Eugenia Tintaya
Nancy Bautista
Marielena Parca
Fernando Huanca
Reynaldo Tito
Hugo Helguero
Marcelo Antezana
Fernando Legarreta
Kantay Melgarejo
Leonor Cartagena
Víctor Tola
Daniel Cordero
Ivan Siácara
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SOUND MIXER
SOUND OPERATOR
SOUND OPERATOR
KEY LIGHTING MANAGER
KEY LIGHTING ELECTRICIAN
ELECTRICIAN
ELECTRICIAN
ELECTRICIAN
ELECTRICIAN
ELECTRICIAN
ELECTRICIAN
ELECTRICIAN
ELECTRICIAN
ELECTRICIAN
STAGE MACHINERY
ELECTRICAL DEPARTMENT DRIVER
Ramiro Fierro
Ramiro Valdez
Luis Bolívar
Américo Luna
Alberto Foronda
Zacarías Gutierrez
Walter Acho
Walter Bartolomé
Moisés Ticona
Enrique Callejas
José Luis Cartagena
Debray Quisbert
Héctor Guzmán
Miguel Patzi
Walter Pacombia
Jesús Villca
PICTURE CAR COORDINATOR NCE Transportation - LP
DRIVERS: Percy Miranda
Marcos Soto
Freddy Flores
Mauricio Gonzales
Orlando Coca
Miguel Sánchez
Willy Villazón
Jaime Clavijo
Osmar Quiroga
PICTURE ACTION CAR COORDINATOR Miguel Torrico
CAMERAS Cine Sur S.A. (Chile)
LIGHT & EQUIPMENT Rosendo Ticona (Cinearte)
CATERING Agustin Echalar
SOUND DESIGNER
SOUND EFFECTS RECORDING EDITOR
DIALOG EDITOR
SOUND EDITOR ASSISTANT
SOUND EDITOR ASSISTANT
PRE MIX
Matias Barberis
Raynier Hinojosa
Gabriel Coll
Gabriel Villegas Hurtado
Osvaldo Manuel Rodriguez
Matias Barberis
RECORDING MIXER Diego Gat
FOLEY RECORDING TECHNICIAN Flavio Nogueira
FOLEY EDITOR Alan Borodovsky
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FOLEY EDITOR
FOLEY ARTIST
FOLEY ARTIST
FOLEY ARTIST
FOLEY RECORDIST
RECORDING OF ADDITIONAL ADR
EDITING OF ADDITIONAL ADR
EDITING OF ADDITIONAL ADR
Flavio Nogueria
José Caldararo
Nerina Valido
Miren Begoña Cortazar
Rafael Millan
Flavio Nogueira
Flavio Nogueira
Leyla de la Hoz
CHILE
EXECUTIVE PRODUCER CHILE Álvaro Corvera Vergara
PRODUCTION COORDINATOR CHILE Francisca Corvera
PRODUCTION ASSISTANT Érika Andaur
LOCATION MANAGER AND CASTING Francisca Corvera
MAKE UP ASSISTANT Paola Cruchaga
ART ASSISTANT Rocío Concha
COSTUME ASSISTANT Florencia Brousain
SOUND MIXER Pepe de la Vega
SOUND MIXER ASSISTANT José Palma W.
DIGITAL IMAGING TECHNICIAN Luis Pinto
VIDEO ASSIST Jean Franco Albornoz
FOCUS PULLER Fredie Hayes
STEADICAM OPERATOR Leonardo Saldaño
ELECTRICIAN SUPERVISOR Christian Gonzalez
ELECTRICIAN Raúl Morales
ELECTRICIAN Pedro Morales
CATERING Héctor Ratalino “Bacan”
STAGE MACHINERY Jorge Miranda
TRANSPORTATION MANAGER Miguel Uribe
MEXICO IMAGE POST PRODUCTION
DCP GENERATOR Alondra Escamilla
D-CINEMA & DCI Ezequiel Gilardoni
CINECOLOR MEXICO
BIG STUDIO Big Studio Post Department
EDITOR Camilo Abadía Tamayo
EDITOR ASSITANT Christian de la Vega Velázquez
POST PRODUCTION Luis Eduardo Abadía Ávila
FIRST ASSISTANT POST PRODUCTION Diana H. Gutiérrez Valdéz
SECOND ASSISTANT POST PRODUCTION Luis Fernando Torres Zerecero
POST PRODUCTION COORDINATOR Luisa F. Hoos E.
PRODUCTION VISUAL EFFECT (VFX) Sergio Luis Villa Kramsky
VFX Ricardo Rico Mendoza
COLOR CORRECTION Pedro Vargas
ARGENTINA IMAGE POST PRODUCTION
SIN SISTEMA POST Sin Sistema
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POST PRODUCTION MANAGER De Lucas Sambade y Sebastian Toro
POST PRODUCTION SUPERVISOR Bruno Frauceglia
POST PRODUCTION ASISTANT Nicolas Toler
POST PRODUCTION COORINATOR Alina Couto
ADMINISTRATION Eugeia Giustozzi
DESIGN AND ART DIRECTION Estudio Juan Mathe
FIRST ASISTANT ART DIRECTION Sergio Di Vita
ART EDITOR Remo Albornoz
2D ANIMATION Tino Lopez Saubidet
TEASER EDITOR Susana Leunda
TRAILER EDITOR Leandro Mark
TRAILER EDITOR Fernando Rajlevsky
USA (NYC)
LINE PRODUCER/UPM Virginia Bechtold
1st ASSISTANT DIRECTOR David Ketterer
LOCATION MANAGER Marcy McKenzie
DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY Ernesto Fernández
1st CAMERA ASSISTANT FOCUS PULLER Leyla Perez
2nd CAMERA ASSISTANT / DIT Fleming Laursen
SOUND MIXER / BOOM OP Arjun Shet
PRODUCTION ASSISTANT Max Gately
PRODUCTION ASSISTANT Santiago Meyer
MUSIC RECORDING & MIX
IGLOO MUSIC STUDIOS
SCORING MIXER Gustavo Borner
MIXER ASSISTANT Serge Courtois
STUDIO ASSISTANT Daniel Davila
STUDIO ASSISTANT Andres Locsey
MUSICAL MANAGER Dafne Yagupsky
FLUTES Pedro Eustache
GUITARS Ramon Stagnaro
PIANO Ruy Folguera
VOICE & BOWLS Eugenia Castro
ORCHESTRA The Igloo Music Orchestra
CONDUCTOR Ruy Folguera
SPECIAL THANKS
MINISTERIO DE CULTURAS & TURISMO DE BOLIVIA
PABLO GROUX IRIS VILLEGAS
STEFAN ASHKENAZY ORTIZ OPORTO FAMILY
ORLANDO ORTIZ JULIETA ORTIZ
PAOLA ORTIZ DANIEL ORTIZ
LUCILA SOLÁ JOSÉ LUIS LOZADA
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