President Obama`s Immigration Announcement What is

Comentarios

Transcripción

President Obama`s Immigration Announcement What is
President Obama’s Immigration Announcement
On November 20, 2014, President Obama announced executive actions to address problems in our
immigration system including an expansion of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA)
program and the creation of the Deferred Action for Parental Accountability (DAPA) program.
What is deferred action?
Under deferred action, the government will not place people who meet certain requirements into
deportation proceedings. It is sort of like the government saying: “We know you are in the country
without permission or lawful immigration status, and we could deport you, but we will postpone any
action on deporting you.” It does not mean that a person with an approved deferred action request has
legal immigration status, a visa or a green card. And it is not a path to citizenship. However, a person
with deferred action is protected from deportation temporarily, and is eligible for a work permit.
What are these programs?
DACA and DAPA are immigration programs that allow those who qualify to stay in the United States and
get permission to work for three years.
Who
qualifies?
Deferred Action for Parental
Accountability (DAPA) Program
Expanded Deferred Action for Childhood
Arrivals (DACA) Program
To qualify for DAPA, you must:
Most of the requirements to DACA have not
changed, but there are some changes that may
allow more people to qualify.





Be the parent of a U.S. citizen
or lawful permanent resident
(“green card holder”) son or
daughter born on or before
November 20, 2014;
Have lived in the U.S. since
January 1, 2010;
Be here in the U.S. on
November 20, 2014 and on the
date you apply for deferred
action;
Have no lawful immigration
status in the U.S. on November
20, 2014; and
Submit to, and pass, security
and criminal background
checks.
Here are the changes to DACA:
 There is no longer an age cap. If you were
told before that you were too old to qualify
for DACA this may mean that you now
qualify as long as you meet the other
criteria.
 The President changed how long you must
have lived in the United States to qualify
for DACA. Before, you were required to
show that you lived in the U.S. since June
15, 2007. Now, DACA will cover people who
have lived in the U.S. since January 1,
2010.
 DACA and a work permit will be for threeyear periods. Starting November 24, 2014,
people who apply for DACA for the firsttime or to renew, will receive deferred
action and permission to work for three
years. If you have already been approved
for DACA renewal, it is still valid for two
years, but check for updates because the
government is looking into ways of
Developed by: CLINIC, National Immigration Project of the Nationals Lawyers Guild, Immigrant Legal Resource Center, United
We Dream
Last Updated: November 20, 2014
Deferred Action for Parental
Accountability (DAPA) Program
Expanded Deferred Action for Childhood
Arrivals (DACA) Program


When can I
apply?
The government is not accepting
applications now. They expect to
begin accepting applications in
approximately 180 days (i.e., May
20, 2015).
extending it to three years.
If you have ever been arrested or convicted
of a crime, or associated with gangs, or if
you are unsure about your criminal history,
you should get a copy of your criminal
history and talk to an attorney to learn if
you are eligible for DACA.
NOTE: To apply for DACA, you still must be
at least 15 years old, and you must have
entered the U.S. before your 16th birthday.
Visit the USCIS website to learn more about
the other requirements:
www.uscis.gov/childhoodarrivals.
If you meet the old criteria for DACA, you can
apply now. However, if you qualify for DACA
under the new criteria, you will have to wait to
apply. USCIS will begin accepting applications
under the new criteria in approximately 90 days
(i.e., February 18, 2015).
What steps can I take now? Gather documents to see if you qualify for the program.
Note: It is best to collect documents that have the following information: your name, the date, and show
that you were in the United States.
DAPA
DACA

Proof that you were in the U.S. on November 20,
 Proof of education or military service:
2014. If you haven’t already, get proof that you
School transcripts, high school diploma,
were in the U.S. on this day. For example, a bank
GED, certificate from high school or
statement, records from a doctor’s office, or other
other qualifying education program.
proof.
To meet the military service requirement,
 Proof of Relationship to U.S. citizen or lawful
you must show that you are an honorably
permanent resident children: Birth Certificate of
discharged veteran of the Coast Guard or
son or daughter, or other proof.
U.S. Armed Forces.
 Proof that your son or daughter is a U.S. citizen or
lawful permanent resident: Passport, Birth
Certificate, Naturalization Certificate, Lawful
Permanent Resident card (“green card”), or other
proof.
Proof of Identity: Passport, Birth Certificate, National Identity Document, and other documents.
Proof of having lived in the U.S. since January 1, 2010: Rent Receipts or Mortgage Payment Records,
Medical Records, Employment Records, Bank Statements, Tax Records, Church Records, School
Records, and other documents.
Criminal and juvenile history records: See “How to Get Your Criminal Records Guide” at
http://www.adminrelief.org/resources/attachment.259796
2
WARNING! Beware of scams. Get help from a licensed attorney or Board of Immigration Appeals (BIA) accredited
representative. Find legal help at www.adminrelief.org/legalhelp
Document Preparation for Deferred Action
REMEMBER, NOTHING HAS GONE INTO EFFECT YET, SO YOU OR ANYONE ELSE SHOULD NOT FILE ANY
DOCUMENTS OR PAY ANY FEES TO THE GOVERNMENT AT THIS TIME ON YOUR BEHALF. IF YOU HAVE
QUESTIONS, CONSULT A LICENSED ATTORNEY. (http://www.mobar.org/)
Under the new Deferred Action, a person will have to prove:



Continuous Physical presence in the United States since January 1, 2010
Has a child who is a United States Citizen or Lawful Permanent Resident
No serious criminal history or threats to national security
Before it is time to apply for Deferred Action, you can:






Be sure you have your birth certificate (or a copy) and some form of photo identification
Gather documents to show physical presence in the United States since the time that you
entered. This may include:
o Medical records
o Employment Records
o Tax records
o School records
o Leases
o Bank account records
o Bills with U.S. address
o Police reports/criminal documents
o Any other document reflecting presence
Make a list of ALL Addresses you have lived at since coming to the United States with at least the
approximate dates you lived at each place (i.e. from: month/year, to: month/year)
Gather records of ALL contact you may have had with the police. If there are any outstanding
tickets or warrants, be sure to pay them or clear them from your record
Be sure you have copies of birth certificates of any children who are U.S. citizens or residents
If possible, file back taxes for any year that you have worked in the United States using an
Individual Tax Identity Number (ITIN)
IN THE MEAN TIME: DOs and DON’Ts








Do not make false claims to U.S. citizenship.
Do not register to vote or vote in any election not open to non-citizens
Do obtain a government-issued photo identification document from your country of nationality.
Do organize personal records of residence, employment and tax filings in chronological order.
Do file your taxes every year
Do maintain good moral character and avoid activity which may cause you to be convicted of a
crime.
Do learn to speak, read and write in English to the best of your ability.
Do save money to pay for future USCIS application fees and legal assistance fees.
CHECKLIST





Birth Certificate
Proof of entry to the U.S.
Photo ID
Evidence of having a child who is U.S. citizen or lawful permanent resident
Continuous Physical Presence
o Medical Records
o Employment Records
o School Records
 Criminal Documents
o Police Records
o Court Records
o Evidence of Completed Sentence
ADDRESS:
From:__________
To:__________
From:__________
To:__________
______________________________
______________________________
______________________________
______________________________
From:__________
From:__________
To:__________
To:__________
______________________________
______________________________
______________________________
______________________________
From:__________
From:__________
To:__________
To:__________
______________________________
______________________________
______________________________
______________________________
EMPLOYMENT HISTORY
From:__________ To:___________
Employer:______________________
Address:_______________________
From:__________
To:__________
Employer:______________________
Address:_______________________
From:__________
To:__________
Employer:______________________
Address:_______________________
From:__________
To:__________
Employer:______________________
Address:_______________________
IMMIGRATION ATTORNEY REFERRAL LIST
Private Attorneys:
Gustavo Arango and Ken Schmitt
8714 Gravois Road
St. Louis, Missouri 63123
(314) 729-1049
General Immigration, General Civil, Criminal Defense,
Real Estate, Employment, Business, Commercial, and
E-Commerce Law
Speaks Spanish
Ackerman & Fitzpatrick
8816 Manchester Road, Suite 184
Brentwood, Missouri 63144
(314) 769-3445
Meggie Biesenthal
9300 Olive Blvd.
St. Louis, Missouri 63132
Telephone: (314) 873- 3642
Barbara D. Bleisch
225 S. Meramec Ave, Suite 325
St. Louis, MO 63105
(314) 863-2112
General Immigration, Criminal Defense, Traffic Ticket
General Immigration
Speaks Russian and Bosnian
Raymond Reza Bolourtchi
8866 Ladue Road, Suite 250
St. Louis, Missouri 63124
Telephone: (314) 863-3838
General Immigration, Criminal Defense, I-9 Compliance
Speaks French, Spanish, Farsi, Italian, and Catalan
Suzanne Brown
9300 Olive Blvd
St Louis, MO 63132
(314) 995-3932
General Immigration, (U Visa experience)
Speaks Spanish, French, Russian, Arabic
James Fischer
230 S. Bemiston, Suite 640
Saint Louis, MO 63105
(314) 862-1003
General Immigration
Speaks Spanish
Lindsay Gray
9300 Olive Blvd.
St. Louis, Missouri 63132
Telephone: (314) 502-9557
James O. Hacking, III
34 N. Gore, Suite 101
St. Louis, Missouri 63119
(314) 961-8200
General Immigration, Criminal Defense
Speaks Spanish
Immigration, Personal Injury, Employment, and Civil
Rights
Dorothy J. Harper
1401 Hawthorne Place
St. Louis, MO 63117
314-863-3885 / 314-644-3424
General Immigration, Estate Planning, Family Law
Richard T. Middleton, IV
P. O. Box 1302
Maryland Heights, MO 63043
(314) 477-2741
General Immigration, Criminal Defense, Family Law
Speaks Spanish
Sarah Molina
9300 Olive Blvd.
St. Louis, Missouri 63132
Telephone: (314) 995-5351
General Immigration
Speaks Spanish
Annie Rice
1826 Chouteau Avenue
St. Louis, Missouri 63103
www.immigrate2usa.com
(314) 399-8853
General Immigration
Wes Schooler
9300 Olive Blvd.
St. Louis, Missouri 63132
Telephone: (314) 995-3932 ext. 113
General Immigration
Monica N. Smith
205 North Fifth Street, Suite 204
St. Charles, Missouri 63301
(636) 724-0300
General Immigration
Speaks Spanish and French
Yi Sun
141 N. Meramec, Suite 25
St. Louis, MO 63105
(314) 863-8887
General Immigration, criminal defense, business law, wills
and trusts, landlord and tenant, and traffic violations
Speaks Cantonese
Other FREE or Low Cost Legal Services Organizations:
Catholic Immigration Law Project
Kristine Walentik
100 N. Tucker Blvd., Suite 726
St. Louis, MO 63101-1915
(314) 977-2619
General Immigration, Family Law
Low income clients up to 150% of the Poverty Line
Speaks Spanish
Immigration Law Project
Legal Services of Eastern Missouri
4232 Forest Park Ave.
St. Louis, MO 63108
(314) 534-4200
1-800-444-0514
General Immigration
Low income clients up to $125% of the Poverty Line
Interfaith Legal Services for Immigrants
Ryan Fitzpatrick
4158 Lindell Blvd
St Louis, MO 63108
(314) 371-4765
General Immigration
Low income clients up to 200% of the Poverty Line
Migrant and Immigrant Community Action Project
Nicole Cortés
9300 Olive Blvd., Lower Level
St. Louis, MO 63132
(314) 995-6995
Toll Free: (855) 995-6995
General Immigration
Speaks Spanish
Immigration Options for
Victims of Crime
If you are being abused, you may be able to obtain legal status.
Talk to an immigration attorney or to someone you trust to get help.
Violence Against Women Act
(VAWA) Self-Petitioners
Victims of domestic violence
who are the child, parent, or
current/former spouse of a
United States citizen or a
permanent resident and are
abused by the citizen or
permanent resident may be
eligible to apply for a green card
without needing the abuser to
file for immigration benefits on
their behalf.
U Nonimmigrant Status
T Nonimmigrant Status
U nonimmigrant status (or U
visa) offers immigration
protection for victims and is also
a tool for law enforcement. To
obtain U status, the victim must
obtain a certification from law
enforcement and approval by
USCIS.
The T nonimmigrant status (or
T visa) provides immigration
protection to victims of
servere forms of trafficking in
persons, a form of modern-day
slavery. Victims must assist
law enforcement in the
investigation and prosecution
of human trafficking cases.
You shouldn’t be stuck in an abusive relationship because of your immigration status.
Even if they threaten to deport you, there may be ways you can stay.
Talk to an attorney or someone you trust to get help.
Visit the “Humanitarian” section of the USCIS website for more information,
or call one of the attorneys on the referral list.
www.uscis.gov
El Anuncio de Inmigración del Presidente Obama
El 20 de noviembre del 2014, el Presidente Obama anunció acciones ejecutivas para solucionar algunos
de los problemas de nuestro sistema de inmigración, incluyendo una extensión del programa de Acción
Diferida para los Llegados en la Infancia (DACA, por sus siglas en inglés) y la creación del programa de
Acción Diferida para Responsabilidad de los Padres (DAPA, por sus siglas en inglés).
¿Qué es la acción diferida?
Con la acción diferida, el gobierno no va a poner en procedimientos de deportación a las personas que
cumplan con ciertos requisitos. Esto es como si el gobierno dijera: "Sabemos que usted está en el país
sin permiso o sin estatus de inmigración legal, y nosotros podemos deportarlo, pero vamos a diferir
cualquier acción de deportación contra usted”. Recibir acción diferida no quiere decir que la persona
tiene estatus de inmigración legal, una visa ni una tarjeta de residencia. La acción diferida tampoco es
un camino a la ciudadanía. Sin embargo, una persona con acción diferida está protegida de la
deportación temporalmente y es elegible para un permiso de trabajo.
¿Cuáles son estos programas?
DACA y DAPA son programas de inmigración que permiten a personas que cumplen con los requisitos
permanecer en los Estados Unidos y obtener un permiso para trabajar durante tres años.
¿Quién
califica?
Programa de Acción Diferida para
Responsabilidad de los Padres
(DAPA)
Extensión del Programa de Acción Diferida para los
Llegados en la Infancia (DACA)
Para calificar para DAPA, usted debe:
La mayoría de los requisitos de DACA no han cambiado,
pero hay algunos cambios que podrían permitir que más
personas califiquen.

Ser padre o madre de un
ciudadano estadounidense o
residente permanente que nació
el o antes del 20 de noviembre del
2014;

Haber vivido en los Estados Unidos
desde el 1 de enero del 2010;

Haber estado presente en los
Estados Unidos el 20 de
noviembre del 2014 y en la fecha
que solicite la acción diferida;

No tener estatus migratorio legal
en los Estados Unidos el 20 de
noviembre del 2014; y

Presentar y pasar una revisión de
seguridad y antecedentes penales.
Éstos son los cambios al programa de DACA:

Ya no existe algún límite de edad. Si anteriormente le
dijeron que usted era demasiado grande para calificar
para DACA, esto podría significar que ahora sí podría
calificar, siempre y cuando cumpla con los demás
requisitos.

El presidente cambió el tiempo que usted debe haber
vivido en los Estados Unidos para calificar para DACA.
Antes, usted tenía que demostrar haber vivido en los
Estados Unidos desde el 15 de junio del 2007. Ahora,
podrá calificar para DACA si ha vivido en los Estados
Unidos desde el 1 de enero del 2010.

DACA y el permiso de trabajo serán válidos por tres
años. A partir del 24 de noviembre del 2014, las
personas que soliciten DACA por primera vez o para
renovar, recibirán acción diferida y un permiso para
trabajar por tres años. Si usted ya fue aprobado para
la renovación de DACA, su permiso para trabajar es
valido por dos años, pero debe estar al pendiente de
las últimas noticias porque el gobierno está viendo
maneras de extenderla a tres años.

Si alguna vez ha sido arrestado o condenado por un
Developed by: CLINIC, National Immigration Project of the Nationals Lawyers Guild
Last Updated: November 20, 2014
delito, ha sido asociado con pandillas, o si no está
seguro de su historial criminal, usted debe obtener
una copia de sus antecedentes penales y hablar con un
abogado para saber si es elegible para DACA .

¿Cuándo
puedo
solicitar?
Actualmente el gobierno no está
aceptando solicitudes. El gobierno
espera comenzar a aceptar solicitudes
en aproximadamente 180 días (es
decir, el 20 de mayo del 2015).
NOTA: Recuerde que para solicitar DACA, usted debe
tener al menos 15 años de edad, y debe haber entrado
a los Estados Unidos antes de los 16 años. Visite la
página de internet de USCIS para obtener más
información sobre los otros requisitos:
http://www.uscis.gov/es/acciondiferida.
Si usted cumple con los requisitos anteriores para DACA,
usted puede aplicar ahora mismo. Sin embargo, si usted
califica para DACA bajo los nuevos requisitos, usted tendrá
que esperar para solicitar. USCIS comenzará a aceptar
solicitudes bajo los nuevos requisitos en aproximadamente
90 días (es decir, el 18 de febrero del 2015).
¿Qué pasos puedo tomar ahora? Reúna documentos para ver si usted califica para el programa.
Nota: Es mejor juntar documentos que tengan la siguiente información: su nombre y fecha, y que
muestren que usted estuvo en los Estados Unidos.
DAPA
DACA

Evidencia de que estaba en los Estados Unidos el 20
de noviembre del 2014. Si aún no lo ha hecho,
obtenga un comprobante de que usted estaba en los
Estados Unidos ese día. Por ejemplo, un estado de
cuenta bancario, registros médicos, u otro tipo de
evidencia.


Prueba de Parentesco con hijo(a) Estadounidense o
hijo(a) residente permanente: acta de nacimiento del
hijo(a), o cualquier otra prueba.

Evidencia de que su hijo(a) es un ciudadano(a)
estadounidense o residente permanente: pasaporte,
acta de nacimiento, certificado de naturalización,
tarjeta de residente permanente, u otra prueba.
Prueba de educación o de servicio militar:
boletas de la escuela, diploma o
certificado de la preparatoria, GED, u
otro programa de educación elegible.
Para cumplir con el requisito del servicio
militar, usted debe demostrar que es un
veterano con licenciamiento honorable de la
Guardia Costera o de las Fuerzas Armadas de
los Estados Unidos.
Prueba de identidad: pasaporte, acta de nacimiento, tarjeta de identidad, u otros documentos.
Evidencia de haber vivido en los Estados Unidos desde el 1 de enero del 2010: recibos de renta o hipoteca,
registros de pago, registros médicos, registros de empleo, estados de cuenta, impuestos, registros
escolares, y otros documentos.
Registros de antecedentes penales: Vea la guía de cómo obtener sus antecedentes penales en
http://www.adminrelief.org/resources/attachment.259796
ADVERTENCIA! Tenga cuidado con las estafas. Obtenga ayuda de un abogado o de un representante
acreditado de la Junta de Apelaciones de Inmigración (BIA). Encuentre ayuda legal en
www.adminrelief.org/legalhelp
2
Preparación de Documentos para Acción Diferida
RECUERDE QUE NADA SE HA LLEVADO A CABO TODAVÍA. NI USTED NI NADIE MAS DEBE PRESENTAR NINGÚN
DOCUMENTO, NI PAGAR NINGUNA TARIFA AL GOVIERNO EN ESTOS MOMENTOS. SI TIENE ALGUNA PREGUNTA,
CONSULTE CON UN ABOGADO LICENCIADO. (http://www.mobar.org/)
Bajo la nueva Acción Diferida, la persona debe comprobar:
 Presencia Física continua en los Estados Unidos desde el 1ro de Enero del año 2010
 Tener un hijo(a) que es Ciudadano o es Residente Permanente Legítimo de los Estados Unidos.
 Ningún antecedente penal o amenazas a la seguridad nacional.
Antes de que sea tiempo de solicitar la Acción Diferida usted puede:
 Asegurarse de tener su certificado o acta de nacimiento (o copia) y una identificación con foto.
 Reúna documentos que comprueben su presencia física en los Estados Unidos desde que entró al
país. Estos pueden incluir:
o Historial Médico
o Historial de Empleo
o Registro Fiscal o de Impuestos
o Registros Escolares
o Arrendamientos
o Estados de cuenta bancaria
o Facturas con una dirección en los Estados Unidos
o Reportes de policia/ Documentos penales
o Cualquier otro documento que refleje su presencia
 Haga una lista de TODAS las direcciones de los domicilios donde ha vivido desde que llegó a los Estados
Unidos con fechas aproximadas en las que vivió en cada una de ellas. (Por ejemplo, desde: mes/año,
hasta: mes/año)
 Reúna los expedientes de TODAS las veces que estuvo en contacto con la policía. Si tiene alguna multa u
orden de aprensión asegúrese de pagarlas o borrarlas de su registro
 Asegúrese de tener copias de las actas o certificados de nacimiento de cualquier hijo(a) que sean
ciudadanos o residentes de los Estados Unidos.
 Si es posible, declare impuestos atrasados de los años que ha trabajado en los Estados Unidos utilizando
su Numero de Identificación Personal del Contribuyente (ITIN por sus siglas en inglés)
MIENTRAS TANTO, ESTO ES LO QUE NO DEBE Y DEBE HACER
 No haga ningún reclamo falso acerca de la ciudadania estadounidense.
 No se registre para votar, ni vote en ninguna elección que no esta abierta para personas que no son
ciudadanas.
 Obtenga un documento de identificación con foto del gobierno de su país natal.
 Organize en orden cronológico sus registros personales de vivienda, empleo y declaración de
impuestos.
 Declare sus impuestos todos los años
 Mantenga un buen comportamiento moral y evite cualquier actividad criminal que lo pueda
condenar.
 Aprenda a hablar, leer y escribir en inglés lo mejor que pueda
 Ahorre dinero para pagar el costo de la solicitud y los honorarios de la asistencia legal.
LISTA DE LO QUE NECESITA






Acta o Certificado de Nacimiento
Comprobante de entrada a los Estados Unidos
Identificación con foto
Evidencia de que tiene un hijo(a) que es ciudadano o residente permanente legítimo de los
Estados Unidos
Presencia Física Continua
o Historial Médico
o Historial de Empleo
o Registros de la Escuela
Documentos Penales
o Antecedentes Penales
o Expediente Judicial
o Evidencia de sentencia cumplida
DIRECCIÓN
Desde:__________ Hasta:__________
Desde:__________
______________________________
______________________________
______________________________
______________________________
Desde:__________
Desde:__________
Hasta:__________
Hasta:__________
Hasta:__________
______________________________
______________________________
______________________________
______________________________
Desde:__________
Desde:__________ Hasta:__________
Hasta:__________
______________________________
______________________________
______________________________
______________________________
HISTORIAL DE EMPLEO
Desde:__________ Hasta:___________
Empleador:______________________
Dirección: _______________________
Desde:__________
Hasta:__________
Empleador:______________________
Dirección:_______________________
Desde:__________
Hasta:__________
Empleador:______________________
Dirección:_______________________
Desde:__________
Hasta:__________
Empleador:______________________
Dirección:_______________________
IMMIGRATION ATTORNEY REFERRAL LIST
Private Attorneys:
Gustavo Arango and Ken Schmitt
8714 Gravois Road
St. Louis, Missouri 63123
(314) 729-1049
General Immigration, General Civil, Criminal Defense,
Real Estate, Employment, Business, Commercial, and
E-Commerce Law
Speaks Spanish
Ackerman & Fitzpatrick
8816 Manchester Road, Suite 184
Brentwood, Missouri 63144
(314) 769-3445
Meggie Biesenthal
9300 Olive Blvd.
St. Louis, Missouri 63132
Telephone: (314) 873- 3642
Barbara D. Bleisch
225 S. Meramec Ave, Suite 325
St. Louis, MO 63105
(314) 863-2112
General Immigration, Criminal Defense, Traffic Ticket
General Immigration
Speaks Russian and Bosnian
Raymond Reza Bolourtchi
8866 Ladue Road, Suite 250
St. Louis, Missouri 63124
Telephone: (314) 863-3838
General Immigration, Criminal Defense, I-9 Compliance
Speaks French, Spanish, Farsi, Italian, and Catalan
Suzanne Brown
9300 Olive Blvd
St Louis, MO 63132
(314) 995-3932
General Immigration, (U Visa experience)
Speaks Spanish, French, Russian, Arabic
James Fischer
230 S. Bemiston, Suite 640
Saint Louis, MO 63105
(314) 862-1003
General Immigration
Speaks Spanish
Lindsay Gray
9300 Olive Blvd.
St. Louis, Missouri 63132
Telephone: (314) 502-9557
James O. Hacking, III
34 N. Gore, Suite 101
St. Louis, Missouri 63119
(314) 961-8200
General Immigration, Criminal Defense
Speaks Spanish
Immigration, Personal Injury, Employment, and Civil
Rights
Dorothy J. Harper
1401 Hawthorne Place
St. Louis, MO 63117
314-863-3885 / 314-644-3424
General Immigration, Estate Planning, Family Law
Richard T. Middleton, IV
P. O. Box 1302
Maryland Heights, MO 63043
(314) 477-2741
General Immigration, Criminal Defense, Family Law
Speaks Spanish
Sarah Molina
9300 Olive Blvd.
St. Louis, Missouri 63132
Telephone: (314) 995-5351
General Immigration
Speaks Spanish
Annie Rice
1826 Chouteau Avenue
St. Louis, Missouri 63103
www.immigrate2usa.com
(314) 399-8853
General Immigration
Wes Schooler
9300 Olive Blvd.
St. Louis, Missouri 63132
Telephone: (314) 995-3932 ext. 113
General Immigration
Monica N. Smith
205 North Fifth Street, Suite 204
St. Charles, Missouri 63301
(636) 724-0300
General Immigration
Speaks Spanish and French
Yi Sun
141 N. Meramec, Suite 25
St. Louis, MO 63105
(314) 863-8887
General Immigration, criminal defense, business law, wills
and trusts, landlord and tenant, and traffic violations
Speaks Cantonese
Other FREE or Low Cost Legal Services Organizations:
Catholic Immigration Law Project
Kristine Walentik
100 N. Tucker Blvd., Suite 726
St. Louis, MO 63101-1915
(314) 977-2619
General Immigration, Family Law
Low income clients up to 150% of the Poverty Line
Speaks Spanish
Immigration Law Project
Legal Services of Eastern Missouri
4232 Forest Park Ave.
St. Louis, MO 63108
(314) 534-4200
1-800-444-0514
General Immigration
Low income clients up to $125% of the Poverty Line
Interfaith Legal Services for Immigrants
Ryan Fitzpatrick
4158 Lindell Blvd
St Louis, MO 63108
(314) 371-4765
General Immigration
Low income clients up to 200% of the Poverty Line
Migrant and Immigrant Community Action Project
Nicole Cortés
9300 Olive Blvd., Lower Level
St. Louis, MO 63132
(314) 995-6995
Toll Free: (855) 995-6995
General Immigration
Speaks Spanish
Opciones de Inmigración
para Víctimas de Crímenes
Si usted sufre de abuso, es posible que pueda obtener un estatus legal.
Hable con un abogado de inmigración o con alguien en el que usted confíe, y que le pueda ayudar.
Ley de Violencia Contra la
Mujer (VAWA por sus siglas en
inglés) Solicitantes
Estatus U para No-inmigrante
T Estatus T para Noinmigrante
Las víctimas de violencia domestica,
que son hijos, padres, esposo(a) actual
o ex esposo(a) de un ciudadano o de
un residente permanente de los
Estados Unidos, y que son
abusados(as) por este ciudadano o
residente permanente, pueda que
reúnan las condiciones para solicitar
la tarjeta verde sin necesidad de que el
abusador(a) haga la petición por ellos,
para recibir los beneficios de
inmigración.
Estatus U para no-inmigrante (o
visa U) ofrece protección de
inmigración para víctimas y
también es una herramienta para
aplicar la ley. Para obtener estatus
U, la víctima debe obtener un
certificado de un oficial autorizado
de la agencia del orden público, y
debe ser aprobado por el USCIS.
El estatus T para no-inmigrante (o
visa T)provee protección de
inmigración para víctimas de formas
graves de trata de personas, que es
una forma de esclavitud hoy en día.
Las víctimas deben cooperar con la
ley en la investigación y el proceso
judicial en casos de trata de
personas.
Usted no tiene porque estar atrapado(a) en una relación de abuso por culpa de su estatus legal.
Aún si ellos lo(a) amenazan con deportarlo, puede haber otras opciones para que usted se quede. Hable con un
abogado de inmigración o con alguien en el que usted confíe, que pueda ayudarle.
Para más información Visite la sección de “Programas Humanitarios” de la página
web del USCIS, o llame a uno de los abogados en la lista de referencias.
www.uscis.gov

Documentos relacionados