Holiday Magic Scotch Plains I

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Holiday Magic Scotch Plains I
SCOTCH PLAINS PUBLIC LIBRARY
W
1927. BAHTLE AVENUE
\ BCOTCH PLAINS, N. J. 07076
DEC 7 1990
Scotch Plains
Fanwood
Serving FaL
DECEMBER 6, 1990
VOLUME 33-NUMBER 49
Scotch Plains
Holiday Magic
Santa's coming to the
Tree Lighting Ceremony
and Downtown Area Gala
on Friday, December 7 th.
Come to the Scotch
Plains Municipal Building
Friday, December 7 at
6:30 p.m. Santa will be
there! Children from tod-
dlers to age 7 will have the
opportunity to talk to
Santa. Parents may take
photos.
The Scotch Plains/Fanwood Chamber of Commerce will have a treat for
each child.
Travel from business to
business in the downtown
area - free special treats
will be offered between 6
and 8 — magic shows, raffles, apple cider, cookies,
hot chocolate.
Sprinkles the Clown will
perform between 6 and
7:15 p.m., sponsored by
Kid's Country, 431 Park
Local Kiwanians kick-off
traditional Luminary Sale
noting the lighting of the
luminaries, purchased
candles and added to the
celebration the next
Christmas Eve. Thus a
local tradition was begun.
The Scotch PlainsFanwood Kiwanis Club
has continued the tradition
for the last 17 years. Over
75,000 liminaries now
light up the Christmas Eve
celebration all over Central New Jersey, with an
increasing number of local
residents joining the traditional lighting.
Luminaries may be purchased from the local
Kiwanians by visiting the
Friends and neighbors Fanwood
Municipal
of the Fanwood couple, Garage between 9AM and
The Scotch PlainsFanwood Kiwanis Club
announced the start of
their annual Luminary
Sale for 1990.
The tradition began in
Fanwood some 25 years
ago, after a local resident
observed the burning of
Christmas Luminaries in
New Mexico. Christmas
candles were placed across
the front of the resident's
home and down the
driveway. They were lit on
Christmas Eve to celebrate
the lighting of the way to
Bethlehem by the three
wise men.
3PM on December 8, 15,
22 and 23, 1990. The cost
for the candle, bag and
sand is 30 cents. Please bring a container to pick up
the proper amount of
sand. For additional information contact Marty
Fafette at 889-7791, or Bill
Lehman at 753-1650.
As always, all monies
collected from
the
Luminary Sale are used to
fund the Kiwanians contributions to local town
charities and scholarships.
The theme of this year's
sale is Peace on Earth.
Let's light up all of Central Jersey for the world to
see.
Ave. Santa's Elves will
perform on stage next to
the Municipal Building at
6:45 p.m., sponsored by
Moderne Academie of
Fine Arts, 1820 E. Second
St.
The entire event is sponsored by the Scotch Plains
is 50 new Flags by
Memorial Day.
A campaign is now
The men who keep the flags flying! Left lo right Joe underway to raise funds
needed to purchase the
Donatelli, Tom Donated! and Mike Pcttiniuchino.
Department of Parks and
Recreation with the help
of the Scotch Plains/Fanwood Chamber of Commerce.
Come to the downtown
area, Park Avenue and
East Second Street, and
see the new decorations
for this holiday season.
Special thanks goes to the
Town Council of Scotch
Plains for their special interest in this year's decorations.
For more information
call 322-6700, Extension
221 or 222 or the Chamber
of Commerce, 654-5542.
Holiday Decoration
Contest by DECA
The Scotch - PlainsFanwood High School
DECA C h a p t e r , in
cooperation with the
Scotch Plains Recreation
Department and the
Borough of Fanwood, is
sponsoring its 10th annual
Holiday House Decoration Contest. A separate
contest will be held for
Fanwood and Scotch
Plains and decorations
may be of any type including lawn, window,
door or tree.
Residents are urged to
enter their own homes or a
neighbors by calling the
Scotch Plains Recreation
Department at 322-6700
or the Fanwood Borough
Hall at 322-8236 before
December 24, 1990.
Campaign underway to raise
funds for American flags
Under the direction of
Barton Barry and Frank
Wiser, the Scotch Plains
Beautification Committee
has expanded it's membership to include Paula
Leighton, Patricia Sidun,
James Hutton, Ralph
Russo, Jane Lehman,
Michael Pettinicchino and
Tom Donatelli.
Pleased with the efforts
to clean up downtown, the
committee turns it's direction towards increasing
the American flags flown
during holidays. The goal
30 CENTS
flags and install the pipes
in the sidewalks. Donations arc welcomed from
the community. Checks
should be made payable to
the "Beautificalion Committee of Scotch Plains"
and mailed to Beautiful
Things, c/o
Paula
Leighton, 1838 East Second Street,
Scotch
Plains, N,J. 07076.
I
1
HOME
TODAY!
li
DECA students will judge
the decorations December
26th-28th, so residents are
asked to leave their lights
on between the hours of
6-10 PM. Many awards including trophies and framed certificates will be given
out. Last year, DECA
selected over 40 winners
and are expecting even
more to be given out this
year. DECA is urging
residents to get into the
Holiday Spirit by entering
the Home Decoration
Contest.
Santa's coming to Fan.
For the seventeenth
consecutive year, Santa
Claus will tour the
Borough of Fanwood via
fire engine on Sunday,
December 24th with the
help of the Fanwood PBA
and Fire Department.
Gifts will be distributed
to children whose parents
have made early reservations with the North Pole.
Santa is requesting that
each individual's package
be no larger than 12"xl2"
and contain the name and
address of the rccipient.il'
there
are
multiple
packages at the same address, each package must
be so marked and all
packages securely tied
together. During the hus-
tle and bustle of a very
busy Christmas Eve, Santa insists that the gifts be
of nominal cost, because
he will not be responsible
for losses or damages.
If you wish your child
to have a surprise visit
from Santa, bring your
packages to Police Headquarters from December
14th to 9:00 a.m. on
December 24th.
The fire truck bearing
Santa will start its rounds
at 4:00 p.m. on Christmas
Eve, Alert the children to
be on watch for the
flashing lights of the truck
so that they can come out
quickly (with their
parents) to receive their
gifts.
Drunk & Drugged Driving Awareness Week 12/9-15
the 2000 block of
Princeton Avenue.
not metabolize alcohol as champagne,
Twelve mailboxes were
If, the ho.iday season will effec t so meone
well as men, and drink for
If, in spite of drinking
vandalized on Skytop once again, time to eat, depends on DO y B
with alcohol having
a
k,
women
show
a
wisely,
a person finds
Drive, Raritan Road and
drin
in
h l hrr^t
o l r,n
J a *nersons
8
cionif'icantlv higher blood- he is feeling "tipsy", he
Cooper Road, December drink, and be merry, but
8
2nd.
S . ^ ' l X o ^ o f S . t S - ^ E Siri/vel.
.» son,e shouUn,
depen, on a cup
cases,
one
"standard"
of coffee to sober up. OnOn the 3rd burglars
drinks can be safely condangers
of driving sumed by someone drink for a woman has the ly the body can metabolize
entered a home on Little the
FANWOOD
Falls Way through an while under the influence weighing 100 lbs. within effect that two such drinks the alcohol, and that takes
On November 30th
would have on a man. Of time. Coffee will simply
unlocked door. Cash and of alcohol, December
change was stolen from a
course a pregnant woman create a wide-awake
jewelry were reported
vehicle parked on Tillotshould abstain from all drunk. A friend should
missing from the home.
son Road.
ged Driving Awareness
alcohol to avoid potential drive this person safely
That
same
day
a
VCR
two
hours;
140
lbs.
within
Also on the 30th MatWeek in Union County by
harm to her unborn child, home.
was
stolen
during
a
thew Laird, of Fanwood,
the Board of Chosen VA hours; and 160 lbs. Finally, never consume
burglary
in
the
1600
block
For further information
within Vz an hour.
was arrested for a conFreeholders.
of
Raritan
Road.
Entry
an
alcoholic
beverage
on
on
drinking and driving
tempt of court warrant
According to the Union S.O.B.E.R. cards listing an empty stomach. Food on other issues involving
was gained by breaking a
from Fanwood.
C o u n t y Council on the state's legal and safe slows down the absorption alcohol, contact the Union
rear window.
drinking and driving limits
On the 4th a radar Alcoholism and Other for adults over 21 were of alcohol into the C o u n t y Council on
SCOTCH PLAINS
Drug Addictions, Inc.,
bloodstream, so it's best Alcoholism and Other
On November 30th a detector was stolen from a
alcohol is involved in half available from the coun- to sample the hors Drug Addictions, Inc.
vehicle
parked
in
the
2200
radar detector was stolen
of the fatalities on New cil.
from a vehicle parked in block of Shawnee Path.
It is important to d'oeuvres while sipping (201)233-8810.
Jersey's highways and in
10% of all police-reported remember that women do
motor vehicle accidents in
The Township of tent of the clinic is to iden- the United States. "It is
Scotch Plains will hold the tify new cases of High possible to enjoy an
monthly Hypertension Blood Pressure. Those alcoholic beverage during
(High Blood Pressure) persons who are over the a holiday gathering, and
waste stream, a smaller This was unfair, she said,
Screening Clinic on age of thirty and smoke or by using good judgment, Faced with increases in dumpster was used, and to families who must bear
Wednesday, December 12, are overweight or have a drive home safely and trash disposal fees, steps fewer pick ups needed-a tuition costs. Additionalfamily history of heart legally," says Gladys had to be taken at Union
1990.
ly, if recyclables are found
disease
or diabetes and Kearns, Council Executive Catholic High School to tremendous decrease in in the school's trash, her
The Clinic will be held
disposal fees was realized.
in the Scotch Plains Public have not had their blood Director. The following gain some measure of conHowever,
as the hauler could refuse to
pressure
checked
recently
are
some
guidelines
for
trol
over
solid
waste
costs.
Library Community p
school's
dumpster
had remove that load and the
Principal Sister Percy Lee
celebrating responsibly.
Room from 4:00-7:00 are urged to attend.
school would also be subA bottle of beer, a glass Hart and students had been used illegally in the ject to township fines.
P.M. and is free. The inof wine, or one mixed made a commitment to past as a trash drop site by
_
On November 26 in
residents,, ..„
non-residents
drinking having 1 Vi oz. of recycling as a means of .„,„„
YARNS - KNITTING MACHINES
and
motorists,
Sister
Permunicipal
c o u r t , an
vodka, whiskey, gin, etc. lowering these costs.
cy
Lee
began
inspecting
Edison
resident
pleaded
Aluminum
cans,
cardcontain equal amounts of
alcohol, and each is con- board, newspaper, white the dumpster regularly, guilty to illegal dumping
Open.
391 Park Ave.
sidered one drink. The ex- paper, and glass were Signs were installed noting and was fined $100 for
322-6720
Tues.-Sat. 10-5
Scotch Plains
tent an alcoholic beverage removed from the school's the school's intention of this first offense.
Should you observe any
prosecuting violators of
the anti-dumping or- illegal dumping or the
removal of recyclables
dinance.
Despite this, Sister Per- from the curb prior to
cy Lee found she had to county recycling pick up,
file a complaint with the please report these violapolice when two large bags tions of local and county
of trash, containing ordinances to the police
recyclables, were found in and Solid Waste Coorthe school's dumpster. dinator, 322-6700.
POLICE
NEWS
VO
OS
w
OQ
w
u
u
Q
in
W
s
H
tu
DC
Monthly BP Clinic
Union Catholic takes action
for illegal dumping
WORLD OF YARN
QUICK...
COMPETITIVE ..
and PERSONAL ...
The three things that
make a United National
mortgage special.
QUICK response when you apply (we'll tell you
promptly if you qualify)...
COMPETITIVE interest rates...
PERSONAL—this is very important! Our present
policy is to keep our mortgages. We don't sell them to
other institutions. You deal directly with us—with people
you know—when you have a question or a problem.
For most of us, a home is the single largest
investment we'll ever make.
And a mortgage is the largest
loan.
Be sure that mortgage is a good
one.
Toy Drive for needy kids
The Scotch PlainsFanwood High School
DECA
Chapter
in
cooperation with the
Fanwood-Scotch Plains
Jaycees is sponsoring a
Toy Drive for needy
children in the Plainfield
area. DECA and the
Jaycees are joining forces
to collect toys for over 300
children and to help make
their holiday a happy one.
DECA and the Jaycees are
urging residents to show
their love for the holidays
by donating a new or used
toy for these children. Any
used toy must be in "likenew" condition. Toys
may be deposited at
Scotch Plains-Fanwood
High School, or if you
need to have the toys picked up, you may call
DECA Chairperson, Greg
Kowalczyk at the High
School, 889-8600.
On December 22, the
Plainfield Action Services
will be having a Christmas
Party for the 300 children
at the Plainfield YMCA.
DECA and the Jaycees
will be distributing the
toys at this time. Residents
are urged to buy an extra
toy for children between
the ages of infant to nine
years.
Otto Milgram named to
Environmental Board
V
Get it from United National.
NATIONAL
BANK
FOR ALL THE THINGS
THAT COUNT
Banking Offkeu Branching • BndgcivJlcr • Fanwood • Green Brook • Plainfield (3) • South Plainfleld • Warren * 756-3000
IELVIOERE DIVISION. Belvidcre • Harmony • 475-2107 BLAIRSTOWN DIVISION: Blalrstown • Cobblewood • Knotvlton • 362-6186
HUNTERDON DIVISION, Annandale »,Bunnvale • Callfon • Oldwlck • 8J2-21J1
Trail Departmenti HttdqitaiUrs. Plalnfield • Rtgitmal Olfitu, Annandale and Cobblcwood or by appointment at any Branch Office.
Member F.D.I.C.
* '•« "it L v ^
Equal Opportunity Lender
Union County Freeholder Waller Boright, right,
holds the bible for Otto Milgram as he is sworn in as
a member of the Union County Environmental
Health Advisory Board.
Milgram, from Scotch Plains, is given the oath of
office by Union County Counsel Jeremiah O'Dwyer,
also a Scotch Plains resident, as is Boright.
t
Fanwood Lions launch Annual Tree Sale
Fanwood Lions Club
once again are conducting
their annual Christmas
Tree Sale at LaGrande
Park
in
Fanwood.
Located at the corner of
LaGrande and 2nd Aves.,
the lot will be open for
business Monday thru Friday from 6:30 pm to
9:00 pm, on Saturday and
Sunday open from 9:00 am
to 9:00 pm.
Co-chairmen Robert
Harris and Sherman Feller
suggest you come early to
get a good selection. This
year we have Douglas Firs
and the old standard, the
Balsom. Also a great
selection of wreathes.
All profits from this
sale go to select charities,
scholarship funds and
community projects.
Coming back to make
his annual visit will be
S a n t a on S a t u r d a y ,
December 15th between
10:00 am and 12:00 noon.
Your support to our
project helps us to continue our giving to those
who need our support.
Don't forget, come early.
Membership is open for
all who like hard work
with a good feeling that
you have helped others.
Contact a member of the
Fanwood Lions Club.
Future meetings focus on
personnel study & memorial
The Scotch PlainsF a n w o o d Board of
Education will hear the
final report of Fleischer
Management Associates,
Inc., regarding a study of
local school district certificated personnel next
Monday, December 10, at
8 p.m. The report will
reflect the Fleischer
Associates' findings from
their observations of and
interviews with staff
throughout the fall and
from their study of data
about the district.
Also next week, the
Board of Education will
discuss
a
possible
memorial to Edward C.
Perry, a former board
member who died this past
August. The discussion
will take place as part of
the Board's AgendaSetting Meeting Thursday,
December 13. The meeting
will begin at 7:30 p.m.
with the public portion
starting at 8 p.m.
Community residents
are invited to attend both
meetings, and public input
is sought regarding a
possible Perry memorial.
The meetings will occur at
the Administrative Offices
of the Board of Education, Evergreen Avenue &
Cedar Street, Scotch
Plains.
Early Reminder!
H
X
Pamperin:
m
"Give the Best" to: "Look and Feel Great"
Perfect Christmas & Chanukah Gifts
Women
Men
Mini
Beauty Package
Day of Beauty
in
O
ffl
Day of Grooming
•Continental Breakfast
Women
•Facial
•Continental
•Body Massage
Breakfast
•Manicure
•Facial
•Pedicure
•Manicure •Conditioning
•Hair Conditioning
Treatment
Treatment
•Haircut & Styling
•Hair Styling
•Make-up
•Make-up
•Complimentary. •
Lunch;
$85
Approx. 5-6 hours.
•Continental Breakfast
•Facial
•Manicure
•Conditioning
Treatment
•Haircut
•Styling
•Complimentary Lunch
Approx. 3 hours
$90
$155
T^air Spectrum
UNICO support recognized
Complete Full-Service Family Salon
200 Central Ave., Westfield • 232-8843
Clip and Save
OPEN
MON. - SAT.
_
All Gift Certificates in any amount.
Tullio's Hair Spectrum
All Retail Items
1 0 % Savings
The Scotch Plains-Fanwood Chapter of UNICO was
honored by the Occupational Center for their
outstanding financial aid to the disabled. The award
was given at the Center's annual benefit which raised
over $20,000 for handicapped rehabilitation programs. Receiving the plaque from Jo Ann Kovalcik,
Special Events Committee Chairperson are UNICO
executive members (from left) Ross Engallena, Ray
D'Amato, Nat Buro, Pat Capone and John Appezzano.
200 Central Ave.
Westfield, NJ 07090
201-232-8843
Purchased before Dec. 16, 1990
Must present this coupon
Free
Gift
Wrapping
• Hair • Skin • Nails
ADDITIONAL HOLIDAY SERVICE
For your convenience
Phone Orders Accepted
WE WILL GIFT WRAP
Day • 201-232-8843
<
AND MAIL
HOLIDAY MAGIC IN SCOTCH PLAINS
Sponsored by the
SCOTCH PLAINS DEPARTMENT
OF PARKS & RECREATION
Santas
performance by
Moderne
Academie of
Fine Arts
6:45 pm
Sprinkles
The Clown
SANTA'S COMING
Singing by
Tiny Tim
Carolers
When: FRIDAY, DECEMBER 7, 1990 - 6:30 p.m.
Where: SCOTCH PLAINS MUNICIPAL BUILDING
When: 6:30 p.m. for Tree-Lighting Ceremony.
Program: Children from Toddlers to Age Seven Will Have the
Opportunity to Talk to Santa. Parents May Take Photographs.
Each child will be given a treat, which, as in the past, has been
donated by the Scotch Plains/Fanwood Chamber of Commerce.
QUESTIONS: CALL 322-6700, EXT. 221/222
OR 654-5542 CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
courtesy of
Kid's Country
6 & 7:15 pm
I
I
n
m
to
m
IN OUR OPINION
w
PQ
S
w
u
w
Q
W
H
W
K
PLEDGE YOUR
ALLEGIANCE!
In an era when it is
fashionable to burn flags
and boast that the very
freedom
the
flag
represents is what makes it
alright to burn one, it is
refreshing to see a town
concerned about increasing the symbol which
allows for life, liberty and
the pursuit of happiness.
The Beautification Committee has planned to purchase 50 new flags in time
for Memorial Day, and a
campaign has been initiated to raise funds for
the flags and their installation.
Although money is tight
and there are worries of
war, and even though
taxes continually go up,
we still live in the Super
Power known a s ; the
United States of America.
We,
as Americans
represented by our flag,
can vote and express our
interest or disapproval of
anything at any time. We
can practice any religion
or none at all; we can
speak out to anyone who
will listen, and we can
assemble at will. The USA
has advanced technology
and medicine, we have a
court system and laws.
There are times when we
complain about the inefficiency of these gifts (and
•com nun
they really are gifts) but
just look at the countries
struggling to obtain one
fifth of what we take for
granted. In the USA there
is. no slavery, men and
women are seen as equals,
and we can elect our officials, to name a few. Our
flag represents all the
positive aspects of the
USA, and it should
therefore be seen and
respected highly. Our flag
is a piece of the past which
our founding fathers
handed down to all of the
country as a reminder and
a message - we live in the
greatest of all countries,,
the land of the free; ' .
In . addition to our
rights, the flag also
represents a democratic
government which has
allowed us to grow into a strong; rich country.
Due to our success as a nation, we are sometimes
called upon to help other
countries. In this light our
flag means hope and
security to many outside
of the USA.
Our flag speaks to'
everyone in our country,
and around the world. So
show it proudly on your
own property or support
the Beautification Committee of Scotch Plains by
sending in your donations
today.
to tfce Scbfoft
Open House Christmas
Party a success
I would like to thank all
the dedicated workers and
participants who were involved in making our open
house Christmas party at
the Osborn Cannonball
Museum, 1840 Front
Street, such a success. We
welcomed many old and
met many new friends.
The highlight of our
festivities was when Dan
Goscicki, a student at
Evergreen School visited
with his family, and upon
learning that we did not
have music this year, went
home and returned in colonial attire. He then set up
his music stand and proceeded to play Christmas
carols for his delighted audience who joined in
singing along. It was the
highlight of the party and
we were all grateful for
this delightful addition to
the festivities.
Our party was the
culmination of a year of
hard work, dedication and
pleasure in what we do to
keep our heritage before
the public.
Thank you all and a
very Merry Christmas and
Happy New Year.
Betty Lindner
Cannonball
House Museum
The following letter was
received by E. Dennis
Hardie,
Co-chairman
SP/F CAAN from Congresswoman
Marge
Roukema.
Dear Mr. Hardie:
I want to let you know
of action taken in the last
hours of Congress to forge
a national aircraft noise
policy. Included in the
final budget package passed by Congress were
several air noise provisions for which we have
long been fighting.
Nonethless, there still remains much work to be
done in solving a problem
that has only grown worse
since 1987.
First and foremost, the
Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is now
required by law to conduct
and make public an Environmental Impact Statement on the Expanded
East Coast Plan (EECP)
within 180 days. This
analysis-which I have
Please turn to page 20
CALENDAR
OF
EVENTS
vf THE T I M E S *
Published Every Thursday by Foster Publications
DONALD A. FOSTER
AUDREY C. LIPINSKI
MARY ANN M. FOSTER
MILIDAFERENCE
JOY BAVOSA
DAN WELKER
GLORIA SNELL
Publisher
Editor
Business Manager
Office Manager
Production Assistant
Advertising Director
Production Assistant
THE TIMES (USPS 485-200) is published every Thursday for
$12 per year, $15 out-of-county by Foster Publications, 1600
East Second Street, Scotch Plains, N.J. POSTMASTER Send
address changes to THE TIMES, P.O. Box 368, Scotch Plains,
N.J. 07076, 322-5266.
Thursday, December 6
-6:30 P.M. Scotch Plains
Council, Regular.
Thursday, December 6
-7:30 P.M. Scotch Plains
Listening Post.
Thursday, December 6
-7:30 P.M. Committee of
the Whole.
Thursday, December 6
-8:00 P.M. Fanwood
Council, Agenda.
Thursday, December 6
-8:30 P.M. Scotch Plains
Council, Regular.
Monday, December 10
•8:00 P.M. Board of
Education, Committee of
the Whole.
Report from
Washington
Monday, December 10
•8:30 P . M . Fanwood
Library,
Board
of
Trustees.
Tuesday, December 11
-7:00 P.M. Scotch Plains
Local Assistance Board.
Tuesday, December 11
•8:00 P.M. Scotch Plains
Recreation Commission,
Regular.
Wednesday, December 12
- 8:00 P.M. Scotch Plains
Health Advisory Board.
Thursday, December 13
-7:30 P.M. Board of
Education, Open Agenda.
Thursday, December 13
-8:00 P . M . Fanwood
Council, Regular.
By
Congressman
Matt Rinaldo
7th District, New Jersey
The battle against government waste must be one
of the top priorities in the new Congress. The reasons
are evident. There is not enough money in the budget
to adequately cover essential services, such as health
care, mass transit, environmental cleanup, and drug
control and to service the national debt while at the
same time the government wrestles with unworkable
and poorly managed programs that have outlived
their usefulness.
Five years ago, the federal debt stood at $1.6
trillion and the deficit was $185 billion. Now the debt
exceeds $3 trillion and the deficit is growing, despite
a commitment to reduce spendine bv $500 billion
over the next five years. With a sharp slowdown in
the economy, the deficit this year could exceed $200
billion as revenues decline.
Those who believe that deficits do not matter that
much in relationship to the size of our economy
should take another look at the costs to the taxpayers. Last year 54 cents of every dollar paid by taxpayers was used to service the government debt. If we
continue to borrow heavily to pay interest on the
debt, by the turn of the century more than 100 percent of every dollar paid in income taxes will be required just to meet interest payments.
Raising taxes would not solve the problem but
make it worse by shrinking investment, growth and
revenue. What is needed is an all-out, sustained commitment to reduce government spending, starting
with the recommendations of the Grace Commission.
As Peter Grace, chairman of the commission, has
pointed out, we have 1,139 social programs funded
by the federal government. We can do with a lot less.
The commission came up with 2,478 ways to
eliminate waste and inefficient programs in 1984.
The few hundred recommendations that have been
adopted have saved the taxpayers $152.4 billion, according to the Office of Management and Budget.
The potential for savings billions more is still there
waiting to be implemented. Citizens Against
government Waste, which has 350,000 members,
cited the following examples of waste and
mismanagement in the federal government:
—The Internal Revenue Service is failing to collect
$66 billion in delinquent taxes.
—The General Accounting Office has reported that
poor auditing and weak financial management in a
slew of federal programs is costing the government
$22 billion.
—Unnecessary inventories in the Department of
defense can be trimmed by $29 billion without hurting our military forces.
—Double subsidies are paid to irrigate land on which
farmers are paid not to plant. They amount to $800
million annually.
OF SCOTCH PLAlMS YAW>
BY
IKl DESrWItoMi I K S0H6Eo|J
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to
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Calvary Lutheran speaker
to look at refugees 12/9
AREA RELIGIOUS
SERVICES
Scotch Plains Baptist
Church, 333 Park Ave.,
Scotch Plains, 322-5487. Sunday Morning Worship 11:00
a.m., (Child care provided),
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Sunday Youth Fellowship
Groups 7:00 p.m. Tuesday
Bible Study 7:30 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Service 7:00 p.m. Pastor: Rev.
Dr. James Brix. Director of
Christian Education: Mr.
Charles Hutchison.
Assembly of God Evangel
Church, 1251 Terrill Road,
Scotch Plains, 322-9300. Sunday Worship 10:45 a.m. and
6:00 p.m. Sunday School
9:30 a.m. Bible Study
Wednesday 7:30 p.m.
Terrill Road Baptist Church
(SBC), 1340 Terrill Road,
Scotch Plains, 322-7151. Sunday Worship 11:00 a.m. and
7:15 p;m. Pastor: David E.
Buck.
Terrill Road Bible Chapel,
535 Terrill Road, Fanwood,
322-4055 or 754-7775. Family
Bible Hour & Sunday School
11:00 a.m. Elder: Philip
Carter.
First Church of Christ, Scientist, 275 Midway Ave., Fanwood, 322-8461. Sunday
Worship 11:00 a.m., Sunday
School for children and
young adults up to age of 20,
11:00 a.m. Christian Science
Reading
Room
open
Monday-Thursday, 11:00
a.m.-3:00 p.m., Saturday,
10:00 a . m . - 1 : 0 0
p.m.
Wednesday
Evening
Testimony Services 8:00 p.m.
Calvary Lutheran Church,
108 Eastman Street, Cranford, 276-2418! Sunday Worship 8:30 and 11:00 a.m.;
Sunday Church School, 9:45
a . m . Paul Strockbine,
Pastor; Ralph Konschak,
Asst. Pastor; Mary Lou
Stevens, Director of Music.
All Saints Episcopal Church,
59 Park Avenue, Scotch
Plains, 322-8047 or 322-9631.
Sunday Worship 8:00 a.m.
and 10:00 a.m. Rector: The
Rev. John R. Nielson.
Temple Israel of Scotch
Plains and Fanwood, 1920
Cliffwood Street, Scotch
Plains, 889-1830. Worship
Services, Friday 8:30 p.m.,
Saturday 9:30 a.m., Sunday
9:00 a.m. Monday and
Thursday 7:00 a.m.
Scotch Plains Christian
Church, 1800 Raritan Road;
Phone, 889-1690 or 889-1771.
Sunday School, 10:00 a.m.;
Worship Service, 11:00 a.m.;
Bible Study, Wednesday 7:30
p.m.; Pastor, Douglas McCulley.
SI. Bartholomew The Apostle Church, 2032 West field
Avenue, Scotch Plains,
322-5192. Masses Saturday,
5:00 p.m. and Sunday, 7:30
a.m., 9:00 a.m., 10:30 a.m.
and 12 noon. Pastor: Very
Reverend Peter J. Zaccardo,
V.F.
Redeemer Lutheran Church,
Corner of Clark and Cowperthwaite (one block north of
the Westfield Y), 232-1517.
Services are at 8:30 a.m. and
11:00 a.m. Sunday School at
9:50 a.m. Paul E. Kritsch,
Pastor.
Fanwood
Presbyterian
Church, Martine and Marian
Avenues, P.O. Box 69, Fanwood, 889-8891. The Rev.
Dr. Donald Gordon Lewis,
Jr., Senior Pastor; The Rev.
Miss Cynthia S. Wickwire,
Associate Pastor; Robert H.
Gangewere, Jr., Director of
Music and the Fine Arts.
Public Worship -Sundays
10:45 a.m.
Willow Grove Presbyterian
Church, 1961 Raritan Road,
Scotch Plains, 232-5678. Sunday 9 a.m. - Sunday School
for all ages; 10 a.m. - Coffee
and Fellowship; 10:30 - Worship Service (nursery and
child care p r o v i d e d ) ;
Wednesday 8:00 p.m.-New
Bible Study, Thurs. 10 a.m.
and Wed. 8 p.m. "Being a
Christian in a non-Christian
World". Ralph A. Acerno,
Pastor.
St. John's Baptist Church,
2387 Morse Avenue, Scotch
Plains, 232-6972. Sunday
Worship 11:00 a.m. Pastor:
Kelmo C. Porter Jr.
Immaculate Heart of Mary
Church, 1571 South Martine
Avenue, Scotch Plains,
889-2100. Masses -Saturday,
5:30 p.m., Sunday, 7:45
a.m., 9:00 a.m., 10:15 a.m.,
11:30 a.m. and 12:45 p.m.
Pastor: Rev. Wilfred C. Yeo.
First United Methodist
Church, 1171 Terrill Road,
Scotch Plains, 322-9222. Sunday Worship 9:15 a.m. and
10:30 a.m. Church School
9:13 a.m. Nursery Care 10:30
a.m. Diane Zanetti Johnson,
Pastor.
Woodsldc Chapel, Morse
Avenue, Fanwood, 889-237S
or 232-1525. Sunday Worship
11:00 a.m. and 6:00 p.m.
Sunday School 11:00 a.m.
Metropolitan
1—4
Members of the professional staff of the Scotch
Plains-Fanwood Public
Schools have made
various presentations
throughout the state during this fall.
In October, high school
l i b r a r i a n Betty Lou
Canright participated in
the annual Fall Colloquium of the Master of
The Adult Forum is Arts in Liberal Studies
held in the lounge of program at Kean College
Calvary's education of New Jersey. Mrs.
building. The public is Canright, a 1990 M.S.
degree honors graduate of
cordially invited.
For further information Kean, discussed "Eleanor
please call the church of- of Aquitaine and her
Court of Love".
fice at 276-2418.
At the New Jersey
School Boards Workshop
November 1, Superintendent of Schools Dr.
Robert J. Howlett conducted an action lab on
"Managing Stress: A
Brighter Day Ahead".
OBITUARIES
Joseph Peterson, Jr.
Joseph J. Peterson, Jr.,
45, of Green Brook, died
Sunday, December 2,1990
at home.
He was born in Plainfield and lived in Fanwood
before moving to' Green
Brook 10 years ago.
Mr. P e t e r s o n was
retired from the Fanwood
Police Department where
he was a safety officer until 1980. For the past nine
years he worked as an office manager for Monarch
Disposal in Middlesex.
He was a member of the
Fanwood P.B.A. and St.
Luke's Roman Catholic
Church in North Plain-
field.
Surviving are his wife,
Jean M. Zukowski Peterson, of Green Brook; his
mother, Dorothy J. Peterson of Fanwood; two
brothers, William J., of
Staunton, Virginia and
Louis G., of Jutland, N.J.
Services will be held at
10 A.M. on Thursday,
December 6, 1990 at St.
Luke's Roman Catholic
Church. Interment Lake
Nelson Memorial Park,
Piscataway.
Arrangements are by
Memorial Funeral Home
in Fanwood.
Also presenting an action
lab at the NJSBA
Workshop were Scotch
Plains-Fanwood Assistant
Superintendent for Instruction George R.
Gagliardi and Roberta
Frederickson, district
Elementary Supervisor.
Mr. Gagliardi and Mrs.
Frederickson's seminar
was entitled "Curriculum:
The Price Is Right".
Also last month, Terrill
Middle School teachers
James Canterbury and
Patricia Farrell and Terrill
Principal John Foulks
gave a workshop on "The
Value of 4-Mat Planning
with Cooperative Learning Strategy" at the New
Jersey Principals & Supervisors Association Fall
Convention. Their present a t i o n occurred on
November 8.
'SHOW LOVE FOR THE HOLIDAY'
Scotch Plains-Fanwood
High School
DECA
in cooperation with the
Fanwood-Scotch Plains
JAYCEES
TOY DRIVE
(new or like-new)
[help needy children in Plainfiel
celebrate Christmas
Margrit Marthaler
Margrit Etterli Marthaler, 88, of Scotch
Plains, died Tuesday,
November 27, 1990 in
Muhlenberg Regional
Medical Center, in Plainfield.
She was born in Beruzwil, Switzerland and lived
in Plainfield before moving to Scotch Plains 26
years ago.
Mrs. Marthaler was a
member of the Swiss
Benevolent Society of
New York.
Her husband, Ernest
Marthaler died January
20, 1961. She was also
preceeded in death by two
daughters, Mildred Butler
and Denise VanAnda.
Survivors include a
sister, Claire Nelson, of
Aircraft Noise
meeting 12/6
The Scotch Plains/Fanwood Citizens Against
Aircraft Noise will meet
on Thursday, December 6
at 7:30 PM in the meeting
room of the Scotch Plains
Library on Bartle Avenue.
All interested citizens are
encouraged to attend. The
hotline
number
is
755-2933.
Briarcliffe Manor, New
York; six grandchildren
and
10
greatgrandchildren.
Donations may be made
to the Fanwood-Scotch
Plains YMCA or Swiss
Benevolent Society of
New York, 37 West 67th
Street, New York, N.Y.
10023.
Arrangements were by
Memorial Funeral Home
in Fanwood.
m
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munity position, is a
graduate of Harvard Law
School and the University
of Colorado. Since 1985
he has represented
Lutherans at the United
Nations in New York,
concentrating on issues of
human rights, Namibia
and South Africa. He has
extensive background in
world affairs.
Calvary
Lutheran
Church, 108 Eastman
Street, Cranford will look
at population migration
and refugee resettlement
around the world during
the church's Adult Forum
hour
on
Sunday,
December 9 at 9:45 a.m.
Ralston H. Deffenbaugh, Jr., director of the
Lutheran Office for
World Community, New
York City, will discuss the
plight of uprooted populations and the
unprecedented migration of
people in the world today.
Deffenbaugh, recently
appointed to the Lutheran
Office for World Com-
Baptist
Church, 823 Jerusalem Road,
Scotch Plains. Sunday Worship 11:00 a.m.; Church
School for all ages 9:30 a.m.;
Prayer & Praise Service,
Wednesday 7:30; Walter G.
Hailey, Pastor.
Faith Lutheran Church, 524
South Street, New Providence, 464-5177. Sunday
Worship Services 8:30 and
11:00 a.m. Sunday School
Youth and Adults Forums
9:40 a.m. Nursery School
daily. Evening Study, Monday 7:45 p.m. Murdock MacP h e r s o n nnd Michael
Gebharl, Pastors; Thomas
Mushtachio, Minister of
Music.
School district staff
give presentations
for more information
.please call DECA 889-8600$
^
X
It is far easier for the family, if a family plot is arranged
prior to need. The considerate staff at Hillside Cemetery
will assist your selection. All lots are in fully developed
areas and include perpetual care.
Hillside Cemetery, located on Woodland Avenue in Scotch
Plains, is a non-profit organization. Telephone 756-1729.
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Applicants sought for College Club scholarships
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Applications
for
scholarships offered by
the College Club of
Fanwood-Scotch Plains
are now available at the
Scotch Plians-Fanwood
High School Guidance Office for high school
seniors. Present college
students may receive an
application from cochairpersons
Nancy
Anderson at 889-7624 or
Linda
DeFouw
at
889-7921.
The scholarships for the
Locally produced video
titled
1991-1992 school year are of $10,000 to seven deseroffered for young women ving students.
Completed applications
residing in either Fanwood
must
be mailed to Mrs.
or Scotch Plains and who
are attending or plan to at- Nancy Anderson, 175
tend a four year college. Herbert Avenue, FanThis year the College Club wood, N.J., 07023, no
was able to award a total later than March 1, 1991.
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11 TI urnwi ill
Robert R. Rybilski, USAF (RET), Asst.
Aerospace Science Instructor, SP-F HIGH
SCHOOL, Henry Laws, III, Vice Chairman, SP
Senior Citizen Advisory Committee, Louis Coviello,
Program Coordinator, Union County Division on
Aging, and Roy Rusk, Chairman, SP Senior Citizen
Advisory Committee.
Chairman Rusk is presenting a copy of the firstever locally produced video to be included in the
County's library of video tapes on aging. This tape,
titled "Grandparenting-A Real Challenge," will be
distributed through the county resources to television
stations, etc. The entire Senior Citizen Committee, as
well as members of the two community senior citizen
groups, and high school ROTC Jr. members, are all
shown participating in the film.
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ShopRite Of
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Sirloin Tip Roast H 2
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FRESH, STORE MADE MEATBALLS (VEAL, BEEF, PORK & SPICES) OR
Ib.
FOR GOURMET COOKING, 2-LBS. OR MORE
Ib.
TRIMMED BEEF
Mercedes
Porsche
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IN SCOTCH PLAINS
PORK, CHICKEN OR
2380 BERYLLIUM RD.
SCOTCH PLAINS
Ib.
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Wed,, Dec. 5 thru Sat,, Dec. 8,1990.
TOWARD T H E PURCHASE OF A N Y
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Wed.j.Oec. S thru Sal., Dec. 8,1990.
P r i n t tHectto In Ntw Jeruy, North ol Tnxilon l o . Monltgue, N.J.J Including Kingilon ind E. Wlndtor, N.J. I Rocklind 1 Richmond
Countltt, N.Y. Inortw lo m u r e i tuHicltnl lupply ol u k iUmi lex ill out cuilomtrt, wt mull ntttvt Iht Mhl lo limit purctiiu to 4 ol i m
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doti nol neceiMiilirrepnwnt lltmi on u l t . II it Iw ditpli) pumout only. Sunday u m iud)Kl to IouI blot liwi. Copyrighl WAKEFERN
FOOD CORPORATION. 19W. E H K I I > I Wtd.. Otc. i thru SJI.. D«c. 1,1990.
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older baby may be
meeting most nutritional
needs with other foods, he
still receives emotional
nourishment by nursing.
Nurturing at the breast
satisfies both the physical
and psychological needs
of the child. As with
teething, walking, or any
other aspect of development, the young child will
grow out of nursing and
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For more information
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persons may contact
Marilyn at 789-8910 or
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This month's meeting
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discuss "Nutrition and
Weaning". The meeting
will be held on Thursday,
December 13, at 8 PM at
2315 Mountain Ave. in
Scotch Plains. Babies are
always welcome.
At what age should a
baby be weaned? This is a
question that many
mothers consider as their
babies grow older. They
are concerned that nursing
beyond infancy might
hamper a child's development and cause him to
become overly dependent
upon the mother.
La Lech? League
reassures mothers that this
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BEEF SIRLOIN TIP
>
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LaLeche League to discuss
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\ Meats
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RT. 22 WATCHUNG, N J .
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Valerie Cerritto becomes bride of David Hausman
Valerie Cerrito, of
Scotch Plains, daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Richard
Cerritto, of Scotch Plains,
was married on October
21, 1990 to David Paul
Hausman, of Howell, son
of Mr. and Mrs. Gary
Hausman, of Howell.
Rabbi Fredrick Dworkin
and Father Joseph Orlandi officiated an outdoor
ceremony at the Birchwood Manor in Whippany, with the reception
following.
The bride was given in
marriage by her father.
Suzanne
Cerritto
was her sister's maid of
honor. Bridesmaids included Adriene King,
Stacey Hausman and Lori
Mancuso, sisters of the
groom; Erika Populus,
Dierdre Sheils and Heidi
Alboher. Erin Williams,
cousin of the bride was
flower girl.
Larry Hausman was his
brother's best man. Vince
Mancuso, brother-in-law
of the groom; Doug
Jones, Mitchel Hausman,
cousin of the groom;
Howard Shtab, Jon
Bryant and Joe Curcio
served as ushers.
The bride is a graduate
of Rutgers College of
Engineering and is
employed by Public Service Electric & Gas as an
electrical engineer.
The groom attended
Rugers University. He is
employed
by
V.P.
Securities Inc.
After a wedding trip to
St. Martin, the couple
resides in Westfield.
Winter Music Festival at
Woman's Club meeting
MR. AND MRS. DAVID HAUSMAN
| Holiday Happenings
A Winter Music festival
is scheduled for the
December 12 meeting of
the
Scotch
Plains
Woman's Club (GFWC)
starting at noon at the
Scotch Hills Country
Club. The Westfield Glee
Club, directed by Evelyn
Bleeke, will feature selections of traditional sacred
and contemporary music
of the season and the audience will participate.
Preceding the program,
a lunch will be served. The
chairman of the Lunch
Committee will be Mrs.
Christian F. Ballantyne
assisted by Mrs. Alan M.
Augustine, Mrs. Thomas
Burnes, Mrs. James
Caruso, Mrs. Gilbert
Guarino, Mrs. T. Hudson
and Mrs. Joseph Muoio.
Mrs. Arthur Taylor,
President, will conduct the
business meeting.
The Drama Department
will celebrate Christmas*
by having a luncheon on
December 6 at Palmieri's
at the Westwood in Garwood. The American
Home Department is having their Christmas
celebration on December
20 at the Stage House in
Scotch Plains.
Chapter I staff presents
evening of storytelling
The Scotch PlainsFanwood Chapter I staff
will be reading, telling and
acting out their favorite
stories for Chapter I
students on Friday,
December 7th at 7:00 P.M.
in the Media Center,
Brunner School.
" T h e Gingerbread
Boy" and "Frosty The
Snowman" are among the
selections to be presented.
All Chapter I students
are invited to attend wearing pajamas, and can bring their parents.
IT'S A BOY!
NA'AMAT will celebrate
anniversary & Hannukah
The Medina Chapter of
N A ' A M A T USA, a
charitable organization of
young Jewish women
from the Westfield area,
will celebrate both the
65th anniversary of the
founding of NA'AMAT
and Hannukah with a party on Monday, December
17th. The event will be
held at the Jewish Community Center at 1391
La Leche League of
Scotch Plains-Fanwood
will discuss "Baby Arrives: The Family and The
Breastfed Baby" during
their monthly meeting at
the home of Kathy
Kaplan, 10 Michael Lane,
Scotch Plains on Tuesday,
December 11th at 9:30
a.m. The group follows
SHOP EARLY
Join us for Refreshments
Friday, December 7th
7-9 P.M.
We Close
Christmas Eve
at 5 PM
beautiful things
1838 East Second St., Scotch Plains
908-322-1817
30-50% OFF RETAIL
(Jewelry, Belts & Hair Accessories Excluded)
26 Prospect St., Westfield
654-0001
Martine Ave., Scotch
Plains from 4 to 6 p.m.
Children are welcome at
party which will feature a
sing-along with a guitarist,
refreshments and games.
Admission of $5 per family will be collected at the
door. For further information about the party or
membership, please call
Cindy at 654-8919.
Breastfeeding & Family
topic of league meeting
GIANT HOLIDAY SALE
Holiday Hours:
Mon.-Fri. 10-9
Saturday 10-6
Sunday 12-5
\
Mr. and Mrs. James Allen Wheeler of
Scotch Plains, are proud to announce
the birth of their son, James Allen, Jr.,
born November 15, 1990 in Overlook
Hospital.
James Allen weighed 7 lbs., 10 ozs.
and measured 19 inches.
The maternal grandmother is Mrs.
Constance Klein of Mountainside.
The paternal grandparents are Mr.
and Mrs. William Wheeler of Scotch
Plains.
Tues.-Sat. 11-5:30
Thurs. til 9
the
topic's informal
discussion
with
refreshments. Participants
share
experiences, offer
encouragement, and lend
support to aid in successful breastfeeding.
Trained leaders are on
hand to answer questions
and provide background
information on the topic.
Questions or problems
relating to any area of
breastfeeding may also be
discussed.
All women are invited
to attend and are encouraged to bring along
their babies. Pregnant
women are extended a
special invitation as it is
especially helpful to attend before the baby is
born. It has been found
that having accurate information and being part of a
support group can greatly
smooth over many of the
adjustments of the first
few weeks with a new
baby. This topic address
the whole family's adjustments, particularly
those of dad and other
siblings.
More information may
be obtained by calling
Maureen at 241-3657 or
Mari at 233-6514.
Future Business students
"Link With Leaders"
On November 14,
members of the Future
Business Leaders of
America chapter at Scotch
Plains-Fanwood High
School " s h a d o w e d "
various members of the
Fanwood-Scotch Plains
Rotary Club in their
respective professions.
The activity was part of a
pilot program with Rotary
clubs called "Linking
With Leaders", for which
FBLA in New Jersey has
been chosen.
Students participated
"on the job" with Rotary
members who work as
an accountant, physician,
chiropractor, lawyer,
franchiser, counselor, college placement officer,
and investment professional. Following their
half-day internship, the
FBLA members attended
a local Rotary Club luncheon and presented cer-
Annual Holiday Auction
sponsored by NJAWBO
Products and services
from approximately 50
local businesses will be
auctioned off at the annual holiday auction conducted by the Union
County Chapter of the
New Jersey Association of
Women Business Owners.
The auction serves as a
fundraiser for the chapter.
The meeting will be held
on Tuesday, December 11,
1990 at 6:00 p.m. at
Rudolpho's Ristorante at
the Mansion Hotel in Fanwood.
tacts. The chapter offers
programs that assist
women business owners in
the
start-up
and
maintenance of their
businesses.
Cost for the dinner
meeting
is $20.00
(members), $25.00 (nonmembers). For reservations, please contact
Rosalie Goldberg at
381-7173.
tificates of appreciation to
Rotary members.
Those SPFHS students
who were involved in the
"Linking With Leaders"
project included Allison
Butz, an FBLA State Officer; Nikki Biondi,
Charles Clement, Mike
Coviello, Kurt Gabriel,
Nicole Gentile, Tracy
Kolberg, Kowan Larkin,
and Jim Malfetti. Others
participating were Brian
Martin, Leslie Moore,
Peter O'Connor, Brian
O'Grodnick,
Megan
O'Sullivan, Hollie Schnirman, and Christine
Welsh.
Members
of the
Fanwood-Scotch Plains
Rotary Club who served
as mentors included Nancy Benz, Dr. Jim Checchio, Fred Chemidlin,
Karin Dreixler, Sean Duffy, Hank Freidrichs,
Robert Kraus, Dr. Carlo
Pallini, and Joe Qutub.
Advisor to FBLA at the
high school is Frances
DeSalvo.
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CELLULAR COMMUNICATIONS CONNECTION, INC. II
QIpJIolid
Shopping
NJAWBO is a statewide
organization
dedicated to support and
encourage business ownership by women. There are
presently over 1000
members in NJAWBO.
The Union County
Chapter of NJAWBO
conducts its monthly
meetings the second Tuesday of the month at 6 p.m.
at Rudolpho's Ristorante
in Fanwood. The meeting
and program is preceded
by a half hour of networking which allows attendees
to meet other women
business owners and form
valuable business con-
The rush is on! But you don't have to rush from
one place to another looking for holiday goodies.
They're all here for you. Gift items. Gift wrap.
Cards. And all the trimmings. Everything at prices
that are worth celebrating.
•
Super Selection
gift Wrap&cJrimmtne
*
All Chanukah and Christmas
gift wrap, ribbons, bows, gift
bags, tags and trimming. Plus
single cards, boxed cards,
candles, ornaments, figurines.
Look for top-of-the-line
Carlton designs and others
from American Greetings.
CHIT CHAT
The following local
students have been named
to the Headmaster's
Honor Roll for the First
Quarter period of the
1990/91 school year:
First Honors: Adrian
Dubyk and Ricardo
Moreno, both of Scotch
Plains.
Second Honors: Jon
Potian and Thomas
Peeney, of Fanwood, and
Jeffrey Blazowski and
Joseph Rizzolo, of Scotch
Plains.
*•*
•
t
David Roberts of Fanwood has been awarded a
Saul Tischler Scholarship
by Rutgers School of LawNewark.
Roberts, who will
graduate from the law
school in 1991, has a 3.92 • 4
academic average. He • •
graduated from Rutgers'
• 4
Livingston College in 1988
•
•
with highest honors.
Roberts is active in the • •
• 4
Rutgers Law Review and
while at Livingston served • 0
• 4
as chair of the activities
committee of the Ad- • •
ministration of Justice
• 4
•
Society.
•
•
•Mr
Everyone loves cuddly, snuggly stuffed friends. One of
the largest selections around includes your favorite
classics from Gund, Dakin and Russ Berrie.
Plus, new this year, Babar.
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Always FREE Delivery
• FREE Parking Behincl Store
•
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• •
scotenwood
Fanwood Center, N|
322-4050
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• Sat.-Sun. 9-6
VO
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SEASON'S EATINGS
8
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A trip back in time
W
£
Jonathan Wong and Andrew Loomis listen as Mrs.
Leppert explains how the foot warmer was used.
On November 16,
children in the Chapter
One Pre-Kindergarten
classes in the Scotch
Plains-Fanwood Public
Schools went on an imaginary trip back to the
year 1690. Their guide for
the journey was Mrs. Leppert, assistant curator of
the Cannonball House
Museum on Front Street
in Scotch Plains.
Through "Good Wife
Leppert's" story, the
children set sail for New
Jersey in large wooden
sailboats. They built their
homes, searched for food,
and heard about the many
chores they would have
been expected to do.
When they returned to
the year 1990, the children
had an opportunity to examine many of the articles
that Mrs. Leppert spoke
of in her story. Wooden
bowls, utensils, candles,
bayberry, blackberry tea,
a betsy lamp, foot warmer
and a traveling trunk are
some of the items that the
children were able to handle.
Mrs. Leppert provided
cider and scones for the
children to sample. It was
quite an adventure and
quite an enjoyable way for
the children to become
aware of our cultural
heritage and colonial
times.
Keepsake calendars honor
Centennial Anniversary
Now is the time to start
planning for 1991, and
Children's specialized
Hospital is ready to help
you with that task.
In honor of the Centennial Anniversary of
Children's Specialized
Hospital, 1991 calendars
have been produced and
are now available. The
keepsake calendars incorporate brightly colored
photographs with large
spaces for the dates. Important days and events to
remember are indicated.
The photo for each month
features a different aspect
of the hospital and depicts
the various services and
therapies of Children's
Specialized.
The calendars, which
cost $10 each, are
available through the
Children's Specialized
Foundation, 233-3720 ext.
310. Children's Specialized, located in Mountainside, is a comprehensive
pediatric rehabilitation
hospital and will celebrate
100 years of caring for
children and adolescents
in 1991. The hospital provides extensive outpatient
and community services at
its outpatient center in
nearby Fanwood.
Park M.S. children
celebrate education
On Friday, November
16, 1990, the 7D wing of
Park Middle School was
filled with approximately
one hundred guests,
young and adult, from
7:45 a.m. to 8:30 a.m.
During that time 7D
students
hosted
a
breakfast for parents,
staff and themselves in
h o n o r of American
Education Week.
Several weeks before,
the Breakfast Committee
formed to begin creating
invitations, and planning
the event. Meanwhile
within their English
classrooms each studentselected a teacher who was
special in his life and
wrote a personal letter to
him or her, acknowledg-
Thanksgiving tradition
at Evergreen School
ing favorite memories and
giving thanks for being inspirational.
During
American E d u c a t i o n
Week each student sent his
letter. Copies of these letters hung with other student projects for parents
and guests to enjoy during
the breakfast.
The 7D s t u d e n t s
selected a Pilgrim theme
for their breakfast.
Marissa Impalli and
Angelique Leone designed
and created the costumes.
All the foods were
prepared and donated by
7D students and families.
Proud students, parents
and teachers agreed that
the breakfast was a success.
Mrs. Torella's Kindergarten class at Evergreen
School are pictured preparing pumpkin muffins for
their Thanksgiving Feast. This was a culminating activity which helped the children become aware of
Thanksgiving traditions.
Open House for new 0
Child Birth Center
»
Muhlenberg Regional
Medical Center will conduct an open house of its
—^••tl^-K.
„ . •on
new
Child Birth Center
Saturday, Dec. 8 from 10
a.m. to 3 p.m. to give the
public a preview of the
new facility.
The center, located in
the new Thomas S. P.
Fitch, M.D., Memorial
Pavilion on Randolph
Road, will begin operations the following week.
NO Need To Go To Florida
THE FLORIDA
FRUIT SHOPPE
226 South Ave.
Fanwood • 322-7606
Has All The Florida Citrus
You'll Ever Want!
• • •
Premium Quality Indian River
Grapefruit & Florida Navels
In Large & X-Lge. Sizes
Buy Them By The Sack,
By The Carton, Or Loose
rourmet Foods &
Gift Items
Now Accepting
Holiday Orders
May We Suggest
Holiday Greetings
Visions of Sugar Plums
Holiday Delights
Come for Cocktails
Classic
Fruit Baskets and Budget
Gift Cartons Available.
Drop In To See Our
Large Selection
Shipping dates for gift cartons
Dec. 10th & Dec. 17th
Delivery & Shipping Available
411 South Ave. West, Westfield
233-5778
Free Parking in Rear.
^Major Credit Cards Accepted.^
Corporate Accounts,
Welcome
The open house will
feature child birth infor. m a t i o n , tours and
refreshments. Staff personnel will be available to
answer questions.
"This
attractive,
modern facility is designed
for the ultimate in patient
privacy and the celebration of birth as a family
event," said David M.
Ridgway, president and
chief executive officer of
the medical center. "Built
around a two-story
atrium, the center is
custom decorated for the
comfort of parents and
their visitors."
The center's features include: 14 private and eight
semi-private post-partum
rooms; state-of-the-art
ultrasound and fetal
monitoring equipment;
new Special Care Nursery
for babies needing special
medical and nursing
care;
combined
labor/delivery/recovery
suites for a more comfortable and private birth experience; early labor
lounge for patient comfort; VIP candlelight dinner for the new parents
and special visitation
hours for grandparents
and siblings.
In 1989, there were
1,990
births
at
Muhlenberg and approximately 2,000 births are
projected for 1990.
The center is the latest
in a series of medical
center departments that
will have relocated into
the Fitch Memorial
Pavilion. The others are
the Emergency Department, Quality Assurance
and Medical Records.
H
X
m
H
w
on
O
SEASON'S EATINGS
m
n
tn
td
m
RESTAURANT
Your Hosts Karin and Rolf Gaebele
CHAMPAGNE BRUNCH
EVERY SUNDAY
11:30 AM to 2:30 PM
LUNCHEON BUFFET
0
Tuesday-Friday - 11:30 AM to 2:30 PM
Hot & Cold fare - Soup - Dessert - Coffee
$8.95 Per Person
65 Stirling Road, WARREN, N.J. 201-754-5500
5 Hours Open Bar
Cocktail Hour
7 Course Dinner, Tiered Wedding Cake
Silver Candelabras and Flowers
Flaming Jubilee Show, Private Bridal
Rooms, White Glove Service
Caruso s
FINE ITAUAN RESTAURANT
For your
dining pleasure:
A restaurant often
imitated but
never duplicated
ELEGANT
ROOMS WITH
SEPARATE BANDS
Chrinlmm Seafood
Bufffl f 19.95
* 6-HOUR OPEN BAR
* SHRIMP COCKTAIL
* FULL COURSE
PRIME RIB DINNER
Per person
CHAMPAGNE TOAST
tax & gratuity
CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST
included
Purchase your tickets early
Caruso's is open from 11:30 to 3
p.m. for lunch on Tuesday through
Friday and from 5 to 10 p.m. for
dinner. Saturday hours are from 5
to 11 p.m. and from 4 to 10 p.m. on
Sunday.
1370 SOUTH AVE.
PLAINFIELD, NJ
(FANWOOD BORDER)
(201) 757-2244
Chef-Owner Pasquale Caruso
Rated • • • •
Wine & Dine-Star Ledger
The Country Marketplace
475 Park Avenue, Scotch Plains, N.J. 07076 • Phone: 322-2520 • Fax: 322-2522
Your One Stop Headquarters
For All Your Holiday Needs!
WE PROUDLY OFFER:
Rollout
SUPER SURF & TURI
BUFFET
•Cheese and Cracker Platters
•Pate and Imported Cheese Baskets
•Gourmet Gift Baskets
•"Home Baked" Gift Baskets
•Fresh Fruit or Vegetable Platters
•Decorative Holiday Cookie Platters
•Buffet Dessert Platters
•Holiday "Goodie" Baskets
Every Monday & Tuesday
All the prime rib, shrimp, etc.
you can eat for only
GIVE A SPECIAL HOLIDAY GIFT THAT SAYS,
$11.95
TO YOUR STAFF OR ASSOCIATES.
complete with dessert & coffee.
OUR PROFESSIONAL GIFT IDEAS ARE TAILORED
TO FIT ANY BUDGET.
SUNSET DINNER
: 4-6:30 PM Monday-Friday, 4-6 PM Saturday
1-4 PM Sunday
In December dance lo the sound of MATRIX
LADIES FRI. NITE SPECIAL
1/2
PRICE DRINKS AT BAR AND LOUNGE 1
DINNER SPECIALS AFTER 6:30
FOR RESERVATIONS CAM. 889.(900
1900 Rarllun Rd. (Al Marline) Scotch I'lulns
BANQUET FACILITIES
For All Occasions
OPEN 7 DAYS
"Thank You"
•Small Platters or Baskets
•Medium Platters or Baskets
"Large Platters or Baskets
$ 1 9 . 9 5 and up
$ 2 7 . 5 0 and up
$ 3 7 . 5 0 and up
QUANTITY DISCOUNTS AVAILABLE ON ORDERS OF
5 OR MORE GIFT BASKETS OR PLATTERS
OR ANY COMBINATION OF THE TWO.
WE WILL DELIVER OR SHIP ANY BASKET OR PLA TTER.
Please Order Early!
GOLF RESULTS
Fanwood
Sr. Men's
Basketball
w
CQ
w
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Q
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Marion upped their
record to 2-0 with a strong
second half in which they
consistently beat the manto-man defense of Poplar
(1-1). Poplar held a 23-22
half time lead on strong
outside shooting and a
good zone defense. The
switch to man-to-man was
their undoing. Rich Comer of Marion led all
scorers with 14 points, 10
of which were in the second half. Don Urenovich
and Brian Murphy also
chipped in with 10 and 9
points. Poplar was led by
Tom Smith and Bryson
Culver who each had 11
points and Mike Kelly
who scored 10 points.
The second game took
an extra period to decide a
winner. After tying the
game at 59 on a three
point shot at the very end
of regulation, Shady Lane
(sponsored by Nissan
Motor Corp.) earned their
first victory by racing to a
big lead in the overtime
and coasting to a 71-69
win over Hunter. Gordon
and Salciens led the
newcomers with 25 (21 in
the second half) and 17
points,
respectively.
Hunter, last year's
league champs, has
opened the season with
two defeats. They were led
by Bob Kelly's 34 points,
20 of those in the second
half. Rick Reddington
also scored 9 and Steve
Mahoney had 8 points.
Willoughby evened
their record at 1-1 with a
48-43 win over Montrose
who now also stands at
1-1. Willoughby raced to
22-12 half time lead and
held off a hot shooting
Dave Berry to earn the victory. The winners were led
by Fred Walls who scored
12 points, Marc Romano
who scored 10 and Charlie
Bochi who had 8 points.
Berry led all scorers with
16 for the evening, 14 in
the second half on the
strength of four threepoint shots in trying to
lead the comeback. Mark
Thomas
and
Pete
Shergalis also scored 8
points each.
SOCCER SKILLS
AND DRILLS, INC.
EVEN SANTA MISSED
THIS GIFT OPPORTUNITY!
This winter, give the gift of a skill that will be
enjoyed for a lifetime! (Gift Certificates
available).
Soccer Skills and Drills, Inc. is a year round
soccer tutoring school located in the Scotch
Plains-West field area, specializing in the development and improvement of ball control skills.
For more information on our program,
please call 889-2339 and ask for
Tom Turnbull, School Director
Soccer Skills And Drills, Inc.
Vf\\
Make the right decision
Ashbrook
The
Ashbrook
Women's Golf Association celebrated it's 30th
year with a luncheon on
Nov. 8th at the Chanticler
Chateau. After a brief
business meeting held by
President Nancy Bowers,
prizes were awarded to the
winners of the 1990
season. Prize chairman
Maggie Swist, assisted by
Janice Lawyer, presented
the following awards:
Club Champion: Anna
Chung (18) and Maura
Guillaume (9). Runnersup: Jayne Deo (18) and
Janice Lawyer (9),
A Flight Champion:
Audrey Young (18) and
Lillian Haworth (9).
Runners-up:
Carol
Madeira (18) and Kathy
Blatt (9).
B Flight Champion:
Audrey Said (18) and Betty McGarry (9). Runnersup: Natalie Pines (18) and
Maddie Cochran (9).
President's Cup Winner: Carol Madeira.
Runner-up: Kay Fordam.
Vice President's Cup
Winner: Jane Brower.
Runner-up: Sandi Conti.
Medalist: Marj Ruff.
Sally Gresham Day
Winners: Estelle Hiller,
Juanita Trubilla (18) and
Janice Lawyer, Rusti
Squires (9).
Member/Member Winners (3 players mixed 18
and 9 holers): Nancy
Bowers, Marie Hollander
(18) and Helen Reaney (9).
Bull's Eye winners
(lowest gross score during
the season in each flight):
A Flight (18): Anna
Chung. B Flight (18):
Juanita Trubilla and
Carol Madeira. C Flight
(18): Marlane Deara. A
Flight (9): Eleanor Riccardi. B Flight (9): Nancy
Jackson. C Flight (9):
Gert Simons.
Ringer's Winners: A
Flight (18): Anna Chung.
B Flight (18): Joyce A.
Bukowiec. C Flight (18):
Jean Privitere. A Flight
(9): Maura Guillaume. B
Flight (9): Jane Brower. C
Flight (9): Gert Simons.
First Time Ever Broke
100 at Ashbrook: Pat
Bader (97), Joyce A.
Bukowiec (96), and Olga
Rose (95).
First Time Ever Broke
90 at Ashbrook: Juanita
Trubilla (88), Carol
Madeira (88), and Marge
Perretta (88).
First time Ever Broke 80
at Ashbrook: Anna
Chung (79).
Most Improved.Golfer:
Anna Chung (18) and Pat
Bolta (9).
Senior Golfer's WAGS
Match Play Tournament
Winner: Estelle Hiller.
Runner-up: Meg Williamson.
Officers for 1991-92
are: President: Donna
Cluse; Vice President:
Nancy Jackson; Secretary:
Mary Anderson; and
Treasurer: Nancy Phares.
SCHOOL LUNCH MENU
Mon.
Dec.
10
Chicken Pally
Or
Hard Salami w/Checse Sand.
Tues.
Dec.
11
Wafer Sleak w/Chcesc
or Bologna w/Chcese/
Lelluce Sandwich
Wed.
Dec.
12
Frankfurter
Or
Ham/Cheese on Rye Bread
Thurs.
Dec.
13
Pizza w/Cheesc
Or
BLT w/Cheesc Sandwich
Fri.
Dec.
14
Assorted Subs
Tuna-llalian-Turkcy
Ham/Cheese
FQWbER'5
Union County College to
introduce new program
Union County College applications such as word
will introduce this Spring processing, electronic filan Information Process- ing, spreadsheets and
ing option to its Office other financial packages,
Systems Technology and information utilities.
degree program, it was an- The course uses prenounced by Dr. Thomas packaged programs rather
than student designed proH. Brown, president.
Through the two-year grams.
"Management of the
degree option, students
will learn automated of- Automated Office" profice equipment operation vides the student with the
on some of the most history of the traditional
highly sophisticated office and an evolutionary
equipment available in in- perspective into its current
dustry. Graduates will be transition to full automaqualified
for
ad- tion. The student will exministrative positions amine administrative
upon completion of the functions, replications,
program, a step above the records management,
traditional secretarial communications, and
duties. They will learn of- ergonomics. They also will
fice managerial skills, in- develop an understanding
cluding Lotus 1-2-3 and of the information processing flow. "Informadesktop publishing.
To effectuate the new tion Processing I I " is a
program's curriculum, the hands-on approach to adcollege rearranged the vanced information procourse requirements to in- cessing applications include "Technical Editing cluding personal services,
for the Automated spreadsheets, business
Office", "Applications graphics, communication
Using Microcomputers", applications, and desktop
"Management of the publishing.
Automated Office", and
These courses will be of"Information Processing fered instead of the
II".
regular Office Systems
"Technical Editing for Technology requirements
the Automated Office" of upper-level Shorthand,
emphasizes developing "Dictation and Transcriptechnical editing skills t i o n " ,
"Secretarial
needed for successful Specialization", and a
employment in all word cooperative experience.
processing positions.
Those interested in furStudents apply these skills ther information should
to typical word processing call Prof. Paula Dubitsky,
correspondence. "Applica- coordinator, at 889-8583
tions Using Microcom- or the College's Admisputer" illustrates the uses sions Hotline at 709-7500.
of the microcomputer for
New group forming for
SBT software users
The Central Jersey SBT
User's Group will hold its
next meeting on Friday,
December 13 at 12:30 pm
at Rudolfo's Restaurant,
295 South Avenue, Fanwood. The topic will be
"Corporate Contract
Manager", which is a
sophisticated sales and
lead tracking system
which fully intergrates
with SBT's Accounting
Software. All SBT software users (and potential
users) throughout Central
New Jersey are invited to
attend. For more information on the group or to
reserve a space in advance,
call the group's sponsor,
Pat Sigmon at LPS Consulting Company, at
889-6300.
GARDEN EENTER
FULL LINE OF
$ ;Sft
GARDEN & LAWN MATERIALS ^
FOR EVERY SEASON J£ < ^
•House Plants , F i r e w o o d ^
•Peat Moss
,Seeds
L.—<
•Garden Plants . F e r t n . z e r s •Shrubs
i'Cv Large Selection of Flower Pots & Pottery
Open 7 Days
We Accept Major Credit Cards
1375 South Ave., Plainfield • 753-4071
INSPECTOR WOODFAN
OF SCOTCH PLAINS YARD
CHRISTMAS TREE ORNAMENTS!
Every tree in Scotch Plains-Fanwood
expects one!
$4.00 EACH; DELIVERED FREE
in Scotch Plains, Fanwood and Westfield
CALL 889-2339 TO ORDER,
ASK FOR TOM TURNBULL.
Emergency Dept. passes its first major test
The new Emergency
Department
of
Muhlenberg Regional
Medical Center had been
in operation less than
three hours opening day,
Nov. 28, when it met and
passed its first major testtreating six victims from
two motor vehicle accidents.
Earlier that morning,
the d e p a r t m a n t was
relocated into the new
Thomas S.P. Fitch, M.D.,
Memorial Pavilion on
Randolph Road at the
front of the medical
center. The new Emergency Department, twice as
large as its predecessor,
has state-of-the-art equipment and c o m p u t e r
technology designed to
reduce waiting times.
"We now triage patients first, then register
them," said Catherine
Igo, R.N., nurse manager
of the Emergency Departmant. "And it worked
well when five victims
from a school bus accident
in Piscataway and a
woman from an accident
in Plainfield arrived here
at the same time, shortly
before 9 a.m."
Triage is a system which
establishes priorities for
treating patients. The five
victims from the school
bus accident, which included three 13-year-old
students, and a woman
motorist injured in a
Plainfield accident were
treated and released.
"We've changed approaches to giving care,"
said Igo, alluding to triage
procedure. In addition,
she said nursing staffing
patterns have been changed so that a greater
number of nurses are on
duty during the Emergency Department's peak
period from 11 a.m. to 7
p.m.
There was a smooth
transition in making the
changeover from the old
to the new Emergency
Department, Igo said.
Jane Wernig, R.N., the
Director of Nursing in
charge of the Emergency
Department, echoed Igo's
sentiments. " I t was
especially exhilarating seeing the results of efforts
by 1,000 employees who
worked to get the department ready for its opening
day," Wernig said.
Wernig was among the
speakers at the medical
center's dedication of the
Emergency Department
on Nov. 26. Garrett M.
Keating, M.D., chairman
of the Board of Directors,
Musical Club sponsors
program on December 12
On December 12th at
1:00 pm the Musical Club
of Westfield invites guests
and members
to an
outstanding program to be
presented in the sanctuary
of the First Baptist
Church at 170 Elm St.,
Westfield.
Janet Somers, flutist of
Westfield, with Paul
Somers at the harpsichord, will perform
"Sonata in C Major for
flute and continuo" by
Georg Philipp Telemann.
Sally Beckwith, soprano
of Summit, will sing "Vision of Christmas in
Music and Words", composed and written by Paul
Somers of Westfield and
Penny Harter of Scotch
Plains. Victoria Griswold
of Plainfield will be the
accompanist.
Then
Carolle-Ann
Mochernuk,
concert
pianist of N. Plainfield,
will perform Etudes of
Karol Szymanowski and
of A. Scriabine, followed
by two preludes of Serge
Rachmaninoff:
Op.
32-#12 and Op. 23-#5. In
conclusion, William R.
Mathews, organist of
Westfield, will play
"Prelude
on
Greensleeves" by Richard
Purvis and "God Rest
You Merry Gentlemen"
by Myron Roberts.
Program chairperson
for this open meeting is
Jane Stoner of Westfield.
Hospitality is chaired by
Margaret Swett of Scotch
Plains.
m
thanked National Starch
and Chemical Co., of
Bridgewater for contributing the key gift of
$125,000 that helped
Muhlenberg to build the
new Emergency Department in the Fitch Pavilion.
Consequently,
the
Emergency Department
was dedicated to National
Starch.
"Today's ribbon cutting ceremony and dedication is a major milestone
in Muhlenberg's $43
million construction and
renovation project," said
David M. Ridgway, president and chief executive
officer. " L a s t year,
Muhlenberg's Emergency
Department staff treated
more than 36,000 patients.
Nearly 70 percent of our
critical care patients are
first seen in the Emergency Department."
Ridgway added that the
needs of the patients were
considered in planning the
Fitch Pavilion. Some of
the features of the
Emergency Department
include: central nursing
station for immediate
medical
response;
dedicated radiology and
diagnostic rooms; modern
orthopedic room; fully
equipped trauma rooms
and separate critical care
and cardiac evaluation
rooms.
Other speakers included
John Douherty, vice president, External Affairs for
National Starch, Frances
M. Hulse, M.D., sr. vice
president, Medical Affairs,
A.
Patricia
Johnson, R.N., vice president for Nursing Affairs,
Michelle Black, manager,
Medical Records Department, and Diane Mikell,
R.N., director, Quality
Assurance Department.
Medical Records and
Quality Assurance departments also were dedicated
on Nov. 26. Both have
been relocated into the
Fitch Pavilion.
Personal Service
Professional Results
419 Park A\c.
Saudi Plains, N.
322-8911
Rocco 1.. Cornac
Dispensing Opuc
X
END OF SEASON SALE
H
S
w
w
O
ffl
I
fcd
til
\8
Snipping the ceremonial ribbon are, left to right, David M. Ridgway, president
and chief executive officer of the medical center; Catherine Igo, R.N., nurse
manager of the department; A. Patricia Johnson, R.N., vice president, Nursing Affairs; John Douherty, vice president, External Affairs, National Starch;
Frances M. Hulse, M.C., sr. vice president, Medical Affairs; Garrett M.
Keating, M.D., chairman of the medical center's Board of Governors and
Jane Wernig, R.N., director of Nursing in charge of the Emergency Department.
"SPRINKLES
THE CLOWN"
"SPRINKLES"
is coming to
SCOTCH PLAINS
HOLIDAY MAGIC NITE
bringing
Balloon Sculpturing,
Fun, Games
and Music
at
2 FREE SHOWS
D FRIDAY, DEC. 7th
6:00 to
6:45 p.m.
7:45 to
8:00 p.m.
Country
Also Showing...
The World's Most Fabulous
Collection of Kid's Holiday Clothing
and Accessories
•KNICKER Sets by Good Lad
•VELVET Dresses in lavender, teal,
dusty rose and navy
•CHRISTMAS & HANUKKAH BIBS
from Mullins Square
•FLORAL PRINT DRESS by Mousefeathers
• Huge Selection of
Holiday Gift Items
O
sizes newborn to 14 years
ALL AT
DISCOUNT
PRICES
Up to
30%
Off on
Selected
Bikes
T H E
BIKE
S T A N
Up to
30%
Off on
Selected
Bikes
D
1818 E. Second Street, Scotch Plains NJ 07076, Phone 322-9022
ids Country
Park in Rear
FREE
Gift Wrap
1283 Springfield Ave.
Extended Christmas
New Providence
refund policy
464-4455
Open Monday-Saturday
431 Park Ave.
Scotch Plains
322-3888
Mount St. Mary Academy
presents radio show
DECA students attend
conference in Florida
Mount
St.
Mary
Academy will present the
big band musical of "The
1940's Radio Hour", a
rebroadcast of a radio
hour sent to our boys
oberseas durine WWII at
Christmastime, on Friday
Dec. 14th & Saturday Dec.
15th at 8:30 p.m. and
again on Sunday, Dec.
16th at 3 p.m. in the
Twenty one Scotch Plains-Fanwood DECA
students were among 3,000 students from over 30
states who attended the Northern and Southern
Leadership Conference in Orlando, Florida. The
conference included workshops in leadership training
and career opportunities in Marketing. The students
were able to take side trips to several attractions in
Orlando.
Jean D.
Ruland,
municipal court clerk for
Summit, has been elected
president of the New
Jersey Municipal court
Clerks' Association. Mrs.
Ruland is a resident of
Scotch Plains.
,
NOW OPEN!
Muhlenberg's NEW
Emergency Department
Designed with your comfort in mind, our NEW
Emergency Department in the Fitch Memorial
Pavilion is NOW OPEN and read)' to care for
your emergency medical needs. When you arrive,
you'll he seen by a medical professional in a
modem Emergency Department now twice as
large as before! Features include:
• Access to the latest in medical technology;
• Fully equipped trauma rooms;
• Separate critical care and cardiac evaluation
rooms;
• Dedicated radiology and diagnostic rooms;
• Modern orthopedic room;
• Central nursing station for more efficient
treatment;
• Attractive, new waiting area.
Our dedicated and compassionate professional
Emergency Department staff is ready to respond
to your emergency medical needs.
I'or your conwuii'iuv, clip ond s.iw this nwp to
Miihk'nluMg's NEW limorj'i.'iKy Department.
RANDOLPH ROAD
MUIILKNBERG REGIONAL
MEDICAL CENTER, INC.
schools Mercy Hall.
Students from Oratory,
Westfield, and St. Josephs
high schools as well as
girls from the Mount will
be featured.
Tickets: $8 adults, $6
students and seniors. Call
756-1751 between 9 a.m.
& 3 p.m. weekdays for
reservations.
S.P. resident will preside
over state association
T5TLV
EMERGENCY
ENTRANCE
1'iirk Awiine1& Rr
I'l.iinl'k-kl, \|07l)dl
Kivid
Keeping in close contact
Installation took place
at a brunch for court
clerks held at the annual
convention of the New
Jersey
League
of
Municipalities. Summit
Municipal Court Judge
Edwin M. Dotten Jr.
swore in Mrs. Ruland, and
New Jersey Supreme
Court Chief Justice
Robert N. Wilentz was
the keynote speaker.
Judge Dotten paid
tribute to New Jersey's
municipal court clerks,
saying, "The high standard of judicial excellence
in the courts today is attributed to the personal
dedication and zeal of our
court clerks, and these
traits are personified in
Summit's court clerk, and
newly elected president of
New Jersey Municipal
Court Clerk's Association, Jean Ruland."
Before her election as
president of the association, Mrs. Ruland held the
positions of first vice
president, recording
secretary and treasurer.
Currently, she is also
president of the Union
County Court Clerks'
Association.
Mrs. Ruland became
Summit's court clerk in
1987, after serving as
court clerk for the borough
of New Providence and
deputy court clerk for the
Township of Scotch
Plains.
CHIT CHAT
Joseph Mortarulo, of
Scotch Plains, has been
named in the 1991 edition
of Who's Who Among
Students in American
Junior Colleges. He is a
student at Fairleigh
Dickinson University's
Edward Williams College,
Hackensack.
• • •
The following local
students recently received
degrees from Kean College:
Fanwood - Abraham L.
Jacinto.
Scotch Plains - Diane
H. Heath, William M.
Kurry, Beverly Smolsky
Lust, John Elbert Moore,
Jr., Jason Brett Summers,
Robert F. Wagner,
Richard Glen Washington
and Keith Nicholas
Young.
* • •
Diane Dibello of Scotch
Plains, has been awarded
a sophomore academic
scholarship by Marymount University, in Arlington, Va.
* • •
George Kress, a sixth grade student at Park Middle
School, is writing to one of our service members in
Saudi Arabia. He started writing him through the
GIFT Project, GI Friend Today at Park. George and
his friend, Terry King, have been corresponding since
September. The Kress family recently called Terry's
wife and three children in Tennesse to share messages
from Terry and family experiences.
A GLANCE
ASKANCE
By Skip Ungar
"Early Negative Campaigning"
(Little Known Facts From History)
With all the talk of negative campaigning these
days, it is interesting to note that this form of vote
getting goes back to the earliest times. Anything nasty that could be dug up about someone was used and
no holds were barred. When David was running for
re-election for the office of King of Israel, the thing
that almost cost him his royal job was the Bathsheba
incident. Uriah's brother-in-law, who wanted to
unseat David, took a huge ad in the Jaffa'Sentinel
telling the whole sordid story. It was fortunate for
David that he was the incumbent and was able to
raise millions of shekels from the slingshot industry
which paid for counter ads proving that his opponent's family originally came from Sodom and that
some of his campaign slogans were previously used
bv Saul but not attributed to him.
The next famous negative campaign involved
David's son, Solomon. When he came up for election, his rival tried to imply that Solomon's chief
delight was hacking infants in half. It took Solomon
a long time to convince the electorate that this was
not the case, and although he won by a narrow
margin, it was substantiated by random exit polls
that he had lost his popularity with the female voters.
Negative campaigning certainly played a huge part
when Paris tried to run again for mayor of Ilium
aeainst Hector. The whole mess about Paris kidnapping Helen came out and so divided the city that
it led to its downfall. Paris, who was desperate for
funds, allowed the wooden horse through the Trojan
gates, thinking it was filled with campaign funds
from CREEP (Committee to RE-Elect Paris). Out
popped not drachmas but Greeks, and that was the
end of Troy and Paris.
But negative campaigning reached its disgusting
depths with the saga of Oedipus. Today, no one
would believe what they said about him. But in those
days, politics knew no bounds and when the story
came out that he had murdered his father and married his own mother, that was even a little too much
for the Greeks. Not only was he rejected by his constituents, but after he was defeated, just to make sure
he'd never run again, they blinded him and threw
him out of the country. Now that's negative!
The Romans also indulged in negative campaigning. A southern senator, Jesse Tillers, ran on the
negative platform that his opponent had been in
favor of a grant by the Roman Endowment for the
Arts to a sculptor in Milo who was carving an
obscene statue, a nude. Not only did he win his seat
in the Roman senate, but the grant was rescinded and
as a result, the sculptor ran out of money before he
could finish the statue's arms.
Probably the most famous form of negative campaigning also occurred in Rome and had to do with
Julius Caesar's trying to graduate from consul to
emperor. Brutus and Cassius, who disliked Caesar
because they thought he was not giving enough credit
to Imogene Coca, discovered that he had been fooling around with a cute little Egyptian queen named
Cleopatra. They knew this would not sit well with the
Roman citizens who adored Caesar's wife, Calpurma, who was not only above "Suspicion" but also
"Rear Window". The scandal so recked Rome that
Brutus and Cassius, along with some other ward
heelers, took matters into their own hands and
assassinated Caesar, which is about as negative as
you can get.
Noise control bill presented
On November 27 the tion of the quieter Stage 3
Assembly Transportation jets. Chairman Spadoro
Committee met in Edison. indicated that Mr. CanChairman
George toni's suggestion would
Spadoro (D-Middlesex) indeed be added to the
introduced a noise control bill.
Bill Healy of the NJ
bill, A-4168, almost identical to Assemblywoman Chamber of Commerce
Maureen Ogden's bill was one of the few
A-2949. The bill seeks to speakers objecting to the
cap the use of Stage 2 air- noise control bill. Mr.
craft with a complete Healy expressed a concern
phaseout of Stage 2 by that jobs would be lost if
industry gets the message
1996.
that NJ regulates their airWhile more than half of ports. This concern is not
the s p e c t a t o r s were supported by the exmembers of Scotch perience of Logan Airport
Plains/Fanwood Citizens in Boston or Orange
Against Aircraft Noise County Airport in the Los
(SP/F CAAN) represen- Angeles area. Both airtatives from other affected ports instituted strict noise
municipalities were pre- guidelines and suffered no
sent as well as represen- loss of revenue or jobs.
tatives of the NJ Coalition
Greg Cummings from
Against Aircraft Noise
SP/F CAAN, also voiced
(NJ CAAN).
concern
about
the
Public testimony was economics of jet noise,
overwhelmingly in favor but his view differed
of the committee bill. substantially from Mr.
Assemblywoman Ogden Healy's. "Working people
spoke and requested that a have struggled to be able
"non-addition" rule be to afford a home in a quiet
attached to the bill which n e i g h b o r h o o d , " said
would prohibit the airlines Cummings, "but the
from adding any more American dream has
Stage 2 jets to the local become a nightmare for
fleets.
those of us bombarded by
Craig Cantoni, presi- jet noise." Mr. Cummings
dent of NJ CAAN, sug- questioned whether any
gested that the bill be study has been done of the
amended to r e q u i r e statewide economic imairlines to serve Port pact of reduced property
Authority airports with values and increased
aircraft which reflect their medical expenses (stresstrue fleet ratio of Stage 2 related disorders) caused
& 3 jets. Currently, the by jet noise. "When NJ
local fleet is heavily becomes known as a less
weighted with Stage 2 desirable place to live and
crafts while airports which industry can't relocate
have noise restrictions are staff to our area, doesn't
served with a high propor- that negatively effect our
community?" asked Cummings.
Barbara Reeder, also of
SP/F CAAN testified on
the severity of the jet noise
in our area and was able to
demonstrae the intensity
of the problem with air
traffic tracking charts supplied by the FAA. The
charts indicate that the
bulk of westbound air
traffic does indeed fly
over our area. Ms. Reeder
questioned the rationale
for subjecting an area
which had no air traffic at
all prior to June 1, 1989
with such a heavy burden
of noise pollution.
Other speakers addressed concern that ocean
routing has not yet been
fully explored and that no
one is officially addressing
the very real issues of air
pollution and public safety. A rollback of the Expanded East Coast Plan,
which routed the heavy
traffic over central NJ,
was also requested.
The Port Authority had
representatives testifying
against the noise control
bill but indicated support
for Federal regulations
which require Stage 2
elimination by 2000 with
extensions to 2003.
Committee Chairman
Spadoro expressed his
belief that the revised
noise control bill requiring
phaseout of Stage 2 by
1996 would be swiftly
passed by the committee
and shortly be before the
State Assembly for an
open vote.
Dr. Estrin co-authors texts
Dr. Herman A. Estrin,
Professor of EnglishEmeritus, N.J. Institute of
Technology, has coauthored the following
texts:
Technical Writing in the
Corporate World - Coauthored with Dr. Norbert
Elliott. Crisp Publications, 1990 and Guidelines
for Scientific and Professional Theses. C o authored with Timothy
Roche. Kendall-Hunt
Publishers, 1990. This text
will be used by students of
NJIT's Graduate Division
to enable them to write
their Master's theses and
Doctoral dissertations.
Dr. Estrin, a resident of
Scotch Plains, has written
more than 375 educational
and scholarly articles and
published 15 books on
various aspects of education, technical writing,
student affairs, and
poetry.
In 1970, Dr. Estrin
received NJIT's Robert
W. Van Houten Award
for
Excellence
in
T e a c h i n g , the 1971
Western Electric Fund
Award for excellence in
the
instruction
of
engineering students, the
Distinguished Teaching
Award by the New Jersey
Council of Teachers of
English, and the "1970
Distinguished Newspaper
Adviser of Colleges and
Universities" by the National Council of College
Publications Advisers. In
1977 he received the
"Outstanding Teacher of
Technical
Writing
Award", given by the
Association of Teachers
of Technical Writing,
which made him a Fellow
in the Council of Fellows
(1984). He was a recipient
of a Silver Medal from the
Mayor of Paris for his
outstanding services to the
students of the University
of Paris (1984). Also, in
1984 he received the
Distinguished Service
Award for National Collegiate Journalism from
the National Council of
College Media Advisers.
He is a listee in '90 editions of Who's Who in
America and Who's Who
in the World.
In 1986 he was the recipient
of
NJEA's
Distinguished Service
Award for his outstanding
achievements in the field
of education. In 1987 he
was the recipient of the
Cullimore Award for
distinguished service to
NJIT. In 1988 Teachers
College,
Columbia
University, named him
Distinguished Alumnus of
the Year.
OPEN HOUSE
7 otn us
to celebrate the opening of our
totally NEW Child Birth Center
on Saturday, December S,1990,
10 a.m.-3 p.m.
THE BUTCHER, THE BAKER,
THE CANDLESTICK MAKER...
Welcome all community residents!
Muhlenberg Regional Medical Center cordially
extends a special opportunity for you to see our
•' NEW Child Birth Center in the Fitch Memorial
Pavilion prior to the official opening during the
week of December 10,1990. Refreshments,
guided tours and child birth information will be
provided by our professional staff.
The attractive, modern facility, designed for
ultimate patient privacy and celebration of birth
as a family event features:
• 14 Single/8 Double patient rooms with
individual showers and bathrooms;
• State-of-the-art ultrasound and fetal monitoring
equipment;
• New Special Care Nursery for babies needing
special medical and nursing care;
• New Nursery for improved visibility and safety;
• Early labor lounge for patient comfort;
• Combined labor/delivery/recovery suites fora
more comfortable and private birth experience;
• Conventional delivery room available;
• VIP candlelight dinner for new moms and dads;
• Special visitation hours for grandparents
and siblings.
Just a lew of the businesses a new homeowner needs after moving in. In fact, the list is endless. So why not help the new families
in your community find your business more quickly by sponsoring
the Getting To Know You program in your area. Join the finest
merchants, professionals and home service companies welcoming new homeowners with our housewarming gift and needed information about exclusive sponsors. Try us and see why Getting
To Know You helps both the new homeowner and YOU.
WELCOMING NEWCOMERS NATIONWIDE
To become a sponsor, call (800) 645-6376
In New York State (000) 632-9400
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Investment Counselor, 27 Yrs.
Member SIPC: Securlllos Investors Protection Corporation
I
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I'l.iinlield, NJ 1)71101
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HONOR ROLL LIST
MARKING PERIOD - 1
CLASS OF 1994 FRESHMEN
HIGH HONOR ROLL
Lauren Arnold, Alexandra Foster, Simona
Gokhin, William A. Holland, Rebecca Nash, Andrea
Oley, Thomas Paterson, Anthony Perfilio, William
Picard, Lauren I. Rogalin, Vincent Santa Lucia,
Frederick Solas, Lee Spector and Regine A. Spector.
HONOR ROLL
Susanne Barna, Ann Bavosa, Prasad Bodas, Vincent Booth, Natasha Brown, David Buleza, Tashira
Burwell, Michael Ceppa, Thomas Clancy, Lauren
Daniels, Rachel J. Davis, Rachel Doebber, James T.
Dougherty, Kristina V. Duranne, Steven Ferrara,
Todd Flannery, Douglas C. Green, Stan Kopylov,
Laura Koszi, Kara Kurek, Heather Lang, Liran
Marom, Sean McDonough, Timothy McGeough,
Jorge Mendez, Scott Mersereau, Amy Murphy, Evan
S. Ochs, Katy O'Connor, Michelle Phillips, David
Roskin, Lori L. Schnedeker, Noelle A. Short,
Katherine Sweeney, Christine Taylor, Sara Ulanet, S.
David Walker, Shannon Weldy, Cheryl Wohlgemuth
and Carole Zempel.
CLASS OF 1993 SOPHOMORES
HIGH HONOR ROLL
Matt Anglim, Louis Chen, Kenneth Erxleben,
Rachael B. Evans, Matthew Horning, Lauren Hsu,
Lisa Kinderlehrer, Jean Luciano, Kara Morreale,
Ethan Nash, Brenda Schwarz, Robin Shea, Raymond Tsao and Jasmine Vasavada.
HONOR ROLL
Clara Averbukh, Sandy J. Banic, Jessica Barba,
Jocelyn Barbier, Maureen Barry, Jennifer Bloch,
David Ehrlich, Emily Faraldo, Eric Fung, Devin
Gannon, Colleen Haight, Ka Lai K. Hung, Shawn
Johnson, John H. Kim, Ann Laudati, Jennifer L.
Lavoie, Kristen A. Maurer, Kelly A. McLaughlin,
Pedro J. Mendez, Jason Mihansky, Monica Patel,
Brandi Rappaport, Allison Rees, John Rusnak,
Susanne Shukis, Garr Stephenson, Keith Swenson,
Stephanie Swetits, Akemi Tanaka, Anthony B.
Temeles, Heather Thompson, Gregory Urbancik and
Natanya Wachtel.
CLASS OF 1992 JUNIORS
HIGH HONOR ROLL
Sharmeela Advani, Patricia Bachiller, Jason
Biegelson, Archana Bodas, Jody Citrano, Peter
Clavin, Donna Costello, Heather Carden, Antoine
Dillon, Brian T. Dougherty, Robin Ewaska, Lori
Gelfand, Dinesh A. Gursahaney, Marjorie Lathrop,
Tej Phatak, Michael Regal, Scott Rosander, Sarah
E. Shore, Jennifer Silver, Carolyn Thierbach,
Danielle Ulanet, Sharon Watts and Nicole Wiley.
HONOR ROLL
Fiona G. Abrams, Anthony Albanese, Lise Andreassen, Jeffrey Bacote, Michael Baron, Karma
Barsam-Brown, Paul Bartlett III, Michael Campion,
Judith Carreiro, Allison Conroy, Stephanie J. Curtin, Christine B. Depena, Candace Drewes, Allison
Emery, Allison B. Fox, David Francisco, Susan
Fredericks, Timothy Hawkins, An Ho, Matthew
Hogan, Ai-Ju Huang, Lisa Jelline, Jamie Kampel,
Carolyn Kiley, Kristen Klimas, Gregory J.
Kowalczyk, Wendy Leff, Kathryn Levins, Stephen
Levitt, Todd Markowitz, Meredith Migliaro, James
Monroy, Kelly Moser, Peter O'Connor, Katerina
Riginos, Sandra Rosenthal, Joseph Roskin,
Elizabeth Rowland, Gregory Santo, Sheila M.
Schnellenberg, Stephanie Sherwin, Charles Shields,
Michael S. Sirdashney, Roberto Sorge, Jennifer
Spagnoli, Jennifer L. Spezzano, Kristin Stelzer,
Julian Tan, Gyll Turteltaub, John Uzzolino, Kimberly C. Vandzura, Tabitha Wright, Christoph Yurchuck and Deanna Zappia.
CLASS OF 1991 SENIORS
HIGH HONOR ROLL
Caroline Barna, Katherine Flynn, Kerri Lyn Garrison, Julie I. Knoller, Lucinda Markham, Leslie
Moore, Michelle A. Ochs, Megan O'Sullivan, Amy
Snyder, Doreen Summa and Elizabeth Weber.
HONOR ROLL
Karen Benkovich, Neil A. Bhargava, Tracey
Brock, Amy Brown, Paul Chuffo, Christine Chung,
Charles Clement, liana Cohen, Carolyn Depko,
Laura L. Douglas, Abby Frank, Kurt Gabriel,
Elizabeth Gibbons, Jennifer Giordano, Eric Hamerman, Jennifer Hansen, Jason Hills, Richard Hunter,
Christine Hies, Mark Kirshenbaum, Tracy Kolberg,
Douglas Kutney, Tara McGeough, Alison Mee, Emily Meyer, Anne Mari Pereira, Katherine Rennie, Armando Salvatore, Reed J. Stepleman, Manya T.
Stypa, Eileen Sweeney, Jeannine Taylor, Laurie A.
Teunisen, Amy Toth, Judyth Valera, Lynda
Walford, Matthew B. Washington, Sharon Waters,
Mark Zeck and Andrew Zipern.
Park Middle School
FIRST MARKING PERIOD
6th Grade
Distinguished Honor Roll — " A " in all subjects
Patrick Dempsey, Michael Gewirtz, Malavika
Godbole, Michael Hwang, Rex Lee, Andrea
L'Heureux, Courtney Pearson, and Anna Marie
Rotella.
Honor Roll — At least 2 " A ' s " and no grade lower
than " B " in major subjects; at least " C " or " S " in
other subjects.
Gillian Andreasen, Kimberly Bethea, Lauren
Biedell, Daniel Biegelson, Alicia Broriski, Kerry
Buckley, Elizabeth Buettner, Kelly Castoro, Jared
Duvoisin, Kimberly Eide, Lesley Halas, Debbie Herrmann, Thomas Hogan, Christine Hoyer, Ryan Kelly, Ursula Kodatt, Jeremy Koscielicki, Darrick Lo,
Ehrlic Lo, Mark Lowyns, Megan McEneely, Keith
Oatis, Lydia Parsons, Deborah Picard, Tara Marie
Poropat, Michael Powell, Jennifer Quintero,
Christine Racinez, Jerome Romero, Leena Ruhlandt,
Jenine Ruiz, Kevin Sanders, Erica Smith, Jonathan
Swartz, Brianne Taylor, Marisa Termine, Robert
Trainor, Ann Marie Weber, Melanie Weinberg,
Jonathan Whitten, Christine Whittish, and Thomas
Walsh.
7th Grade
Distinguished Honor Roll
Katie Eisenbarth, Megan Ford, Charles Kiley,
Mark Mitchell, Elizabeth Naldi, Cari Rappaport,
Jane Yagi.
Honor Roll
Marguerite Berg, Brian Bradow, Peter Daniledes,
Diane Delisi, Elaine Depena, Jennifer DelRoio,
Maria Dixon, James Doyle, Jon Finkel, Clara Marie
Foley, Andrew Granda, Laura Heaven, Marisa Impalli, Keith Kopnicki, Kristina Kurek, David Lauro,
Angelique Leone, George L'Heureux, Richard
Lukas, Sean McEneely, Sarah Pachler, Silvia Rebimbas, Christopher Rowland, Rajiv Sharma, Robert
Silver, Joseph Spatola, and Lauren Sturm.
8th Grade
Distinguished Honor Roll
Francis Duque Englert, Sandy Hwang, David
Mor, Stefani Rasch, and Lakeisha Smith.
Honor Roll
Adrian Andrews, Christine Ayala, Tamar Baitel,
Lisa Ciatto, Emily Gray, Dawn Gronski, Jennifer
Heaven, Diane Kapner, Michelle Knoller, Joseph
McClintock, Lisa Morris, Mackenzie Murphy, Brandy Novak, Christopher Racinez, Meilyn Ruiz, Julia
Saenz DeViteri, Tricia Schuller, and Andria Yu.
Suburban Reading Council
hosts International Director
Dr. John Pikulski speaks lo members of the
Suburban Reading Council.
ENTER THE
CREATE-A-SANTA CONTEST!
Send us your version of SanlaClaus on an8'/2 x II inch paper and make
him as colorful and decorative as you like. When you're finished, write
your name, address, phone number and age , attach it lo Ihc back of
Santa, and send to: CREATE-A-SANTA CONTEST,
THETIMKS, 1600 EAST SECOND ST.,
SCOTCH PLAINS, N.J. 07076
The deadline for entries Is Friday, December 14th and
winners from 3 categories will be announced in the
Thursday, December 22nd issue of THE TIMES.
Prizes will consist of toys. The nge categories arc:
5 years and under,
6 to 8 years old and
9 to 12 yours old.
•¥:##
On Tuesday, October 2,
1990 at the West wood
Restaurant in Westfield,
Dr. John Pikulski spoke
to an audience of two hundred members of the
Suburban Reading Council. Thirteen of the participants were from Park
Middle School, Brunner
and Evergreen Schools.
Dr. Pikulski has been a
very active member of the
International Reading
Association. He serves as
one of the nine members
of the Board of Directors
of our Association which
numbers almost 100,000
members. Dr. Pikulski is
currently a Professor of
Education at the University of Delaware.
Dr. Pikulski had been
the recipient of a number
of prestigious awards including an outstanding
alumnus award from
Temple University, a
distinguished teacher
educator award from the
Diamond State Reading
Association, the Delaware
Board of Education's
Award for Excellence, and
he was one of the earliest
winners of the IRA's international award as
Outstanding Teacher
Educator in Reading.
INVESTOR'S
CORNER
Spera elected president
of Women for Women
by
Fred J. Chemidlin
To hear people talk today, the Great Depression is
about to happen all over again. Creeping unemployment, shaky banks, a reckless federal government
and threat of a Persian Gulf war has everyone scared
silly. Certainly caution and concern are warranted as
the scales of justice are balancing in the economic
world. It can't be all bad!
A recession was overdue after eight years of continous expansion. Imports will slow down while exports are booming. Our dollar value drop makes our
products more attractive to foreigners. Our tax rates
and gas prices are among the lowest in the world. We
need to weed out fraud, corruption and featherbedding in our government at all levels. Unfortunately nothing will ever change with less than one-third of
the people voting! Ninety-six percent of all incumbents were re-elected recently. People evidently
are still satisfied with their elected officials and their
performance.
Now if you are heavily in debt, working at a nonproductive job at a high salary, and living off the
labors of others, you have a right to be afraid!
Economic justice will be served sooner or later. There
is no free lunch or big kill without an eventual cost.
For many, pay back time is here or coming in the
year ahead. For others, opportunity is at hand!
Don't let it pass you by!
Maybe we should think hard about the motto
hanging in many small stores, "In God we trust, all
others pay cash." Maybe we need to outlaw all debt
and return to the "one nation, under God," indivisible with liberty and justice for all," as stated in our
"Pledge of Allegiance." Maybe someone up there is
trying to give us a message?
Book Fair held
at Brunner School
MARILYN SPERA
Women for Women of
Union County announces
the selection of Marilyn
Spera as its new president.
Mrs. Spera has been involved with WFW since
1985. She has worked as
an office volunteer, support group facilitator, and
the former Vice President
of the Board of Directors.
She has played an active
role in the growth of this
organization, dedicated to
helping women deal with a
crisis or transition in their
lives.
The purpose of Women
for Women is to offer low
cost one to one counseling
CHIT CHAT
Matt Appel,
a
freshman from Scotch
Plains, recently completed
the 1990 season as a
member
of
the
Washington and Lee
Water Polo team.
The Generals finished
with a 14-9 record and
ended up the year by
finishing 3rd in the
Southern Water Polo
Conference.
Appel is a 1990
graduate of Scotch PlainsFanwood, where he was
on the Swim Team for 4
years. He is the son of
Walter and Sandra Appel,
of Scotch Plains.
• • •
and support groups and
monthly C o m m u n i t y
Education Workshops.
No one is ever refused
help because she is unable
to pay the fee.
So that the needs of
women may be better met,
WFW, has just extended
its office hours in
Westfield to -Monday
through Thursday -10
A.M. to 4 P.M. and 10
A.M. to 1 P.M. on Friday. WFW in Roselle
Park plans to extend its
office hours at the Community Methodist Church
from Monday through
Friday 10 A.M. to 1 P.M.
Anyone interested in sharing her talents a few hours
a week should call
232-5787 for more information.
Pumpkin painting proceeds
will go to charities
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Local children painted almost 200 pumpkins on
Scotch Plains Day at a table hosted by the GFWC
Scotch Plains Junior Woman's Club. They also had
the opportunity to play "Lollypop Land" for a
chance to win a small prize. Proceeds from the pumpkin painting and the game will be distributed to
local charities.
The GFWC Scotch Plains Junior Woman's Club is
a non-profit organization for women 18-40. It promotes community involvement and social activities
for its members. For membership information,
please call Margie Newcomer at 654-7391.
"Alice, did you leave the oven door open?"
Holiday Cleaning
Sale
756-0100
Mix or Match
|Anyl S k i r t s (no pleats)
Slacks
1 Sweaters (plain)
3 *6"
SAVE OVER S3°°
Sarah Silber and Mrs. Maureen Dobis enjoy a new
book at the fair.
During the first two cards and book marks.
The PTA will realize a
weeks in November Bruncash
profit based on a
ner School held its' annual
Book Fair. Chairperson percentage of the total
Ann-Marie Soto schedul- sales. The school library
ed parent volunteers to will also receive over $300
help students, parents and worth of books which Salteachers make their pur- ly Swetits, the school
chases. Over 900 items librarian, will purchase
were purchased including and process for the stubooks, posters, sports dent's enjoyment.
F.M. ROJEK
BLOWN IN INSULATION
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(201) 738 0200
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The Fanwood Senior Citizens Club held their monthly meeting on Monday, November 26th at All
Saints Episcopal Church.
Prior to the opening of the meeting 75 interested
members had their "Living Wills" notarized by
Eleanor McGovern. The entire membership expressed their deep gratitude for a job well done. President
Michael Ciurczak went on to say the "Living Wills"
Bill was taken out of committee and discussed on
Thursday, November 15th. The committee also took
testimony on Assemblyman Ambrosio's Bill (S1211)
that would give full legal effect to "Living Wills".
New Jersey is one of only five states without such a
law.
A brief presentation was then made by Carol
Wood of Century 21.
The meeting was opened by President Ciurczak at
11:30 a.m. Members recited the pledge of allegiance,
led by Treasurer Lillian Mazzi. Vice President Sam
Walczuk said the opening prayer and Secretary Bud
Colombo read minutes of the previous meeting.
Guest speakers Barbara Steinfeld and Bob Rau addressed the membership on senior citizen housing.
They indicated that two parcels of real estate (one at
Third Street and LaGrande Avenue and the second
on Midway Avenue near Terrill Road) were available
for possible development. A questionnaire was
distributed to each member present in an attempt to
ascertain what type of housing was needed and/or
desired. Upon receipt and analysis of the questionnaires, the aforementioned guests will give a more
detailed presentation as to what might be feasible.
The open meeting discussion will continue at the first
two meetings in January, 1991.
Tour Director Stella Ciurczak, with Assistant
Director Evelyn Tamaro, informed members of the
following trips:
February 4, 1991 - Hunterdon Hills Playhouse to
see the play "John Loves" Mary". Cost is $33.50.
March 20, 1991 - Neils New Yorker for the comedy
"Naughty But Nice". Includes a buffet luncheon.
A big trip of the year will be nine scenic and
glorious days in Southern California and Nevada
with visits to San Diego, Los Angeles, Disneyland,
Universal Studios, Palm Springs, Las Vegas and
Zion National Park. The group will depart on May
30th and return on Friday, June 27, 1991. Bus
transportation will be available from Fanwood to
Newark Airport and back. Highlights include a continental breakfast daily, full day tour of San Diego
and Tijuana, ticket to Disneyland, tour of Los
Angeles, Hollywood, Farmer's Market, plus entrance in Universal Studios, full day tour of Palm
Springs, California. While in Las Vegas, the group
will be staying at the deluxe Flamingo Hilton Hotel
and enjoy a scenic ride from Anaheim to Las Vegas,
including a box lunch; two dinners at the hotel, a
show at "City Lites"; two drinks per person and a
full day tour of Zion National Park, Utah. The cost
is only $789.00 per person (double occupancy) and
includes all taxes, trips, services and admissions.
Everyone is welcome to come. Call Mike Ciurczak at
889-8918, Evelyn Tamaro at 233-0411 or Chartwell
Travel at 964-9191 and make your reservations today.
Hostess Ann Dinizio and Refreshment Chairlady
Stella Walczuk announced the 20th Annual
Christmas Party to be held on Monday, December
10th at All Saints Episcopal Church. A hot buffet
luncheon will be catered by Hershey's Delicatessen.
Dear Children...
*
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a
Santa Claus is coming to town. So send
him your Christmas
letters by way of:
THE TIMES
1600 E. Second St.
I Scotch Plains, NJ
0 07076
Scheduled activities include a sing-a-long and gift exchange. Members will be making traditional
Christmas cakes, pies, cookies and candy. This will
be the final meeting for 1990.
Ciurczak wishes to thank the following committee
memberships for setting up chairs and tables, working in the kitchen, serving cake and coffee, etc.:
Hostess Ann Dinizio, Refreshment Chairlady Stella
Walczuk, Paula Alexandra, Kay Devenuto, Mary
Nadolny, Marie Walczuk, Lydia Tabeek, Monica
Holler, Sam Walczuk, Moe Devenuto, Al Alexandra, Walter Nadolny and John Walczuk.
Walter Nadolny called Bingo.
••*••
The Scotch Plains Golden Agers held their meeting
of November 29, 1990 at the Scotch Hills Country
Club.
The meeting was presided over by our Vice President, Josephine Librandy in the absence of our President.
A few items of interest were discussed, such as our
upcoming shopping trip to the Woodbridge Mall and
the bus schedule for the trip.
She announced some good news about our
recouperating member, Phyllis Sully. She is home
from the Rehabilitation Center of Kessler Institute.
We all wish her well and look forward to her return
to the Club.
Our Party Chairman, Laurel Pesinski, gave a
report on our Christmas Party to be held at the
Willows Restaurant on Thursday, December 29,
1990.
Our Trip Coordinator, Rose Frino, was called
upon to speak about our trip to the New Jersey
Flower Show to be held on Thursday, February 28,
1990.
After our meeting, we had the great pleasure to
have as our guest speaker our "home town Senator"
Donald DiFrancesco. He gave a very informative talk
regarding subjects affecting all citizens of Scotch
Plains-Fanwood as well as those in other parts of the
State on New Jersey. The problem of finding a viable
way to help Senior Citizens with lowering/freezing
their Real Estate taxes. A discussion regarding the
problem of the Teacher's Pension Fund as it relates
to taxes. Another topic of discussion was the rising
Health Care costs and problems members of the
community and state are faced with.
After Senator DiFrancesco spoke, he asked for
comments from the floor. One of the concerns aired
was the Homestead Act rebate for 1991 and how it
will be handled under the Florio Administration.
The Senator made available to us complimentary
copies of "A Guide to Senior Citizens Services".
He was given a great round of applause by all. We
would like to publicly thank him for taking time out
of his busy schedule to enlighten us with these issues.
Along with Senator DiFrancisco was Ms. Irene
Schmidt, Councilwoman for Scotch Plains as well as
Legislative Aid to the Senator. She spoke to us regarding the long awaited senior Citizen housing. The
plan to start the project is estimated to begin next
Spring. Her talk was very interesting and some
discussion was had from the floor. We thank her also
for sharing with us this vital subject to all those anticipating Senior Citizen Housing in Scotch Plains.
Before lunch the invocation was given so eloquently by our own, Mary Bugle, in which she asked us all
to remember our boys overseas in our prayers this
day.
After lunch, Bingo was called by our game
hostess, Betty Lindblad.
Brunner first grade makes
its own kind of music
and we will get your letter
to him fast. Please include
your name, address and
age, so he knows who it's
from and then look for
your letter in the December
20th issue of THE TIMES.
Students in Mrs. Bolstein's first grade had a learning
experience as they made their own instruments and
played their own kind of music. As a special music
and science project, students brought in household
items and found different ways to make musical
sounds.
HELP WANTED
HELP WANTED
INSIDE SALES
TELEMARKETING
Looking for retired police officers
to sell telemarketing in Scotch
Plains office. Full time/part time.
No experience necessary. Will
train. Call Bob Davies at:
666-7005
INSIDE SALES
TELEMARKETING
SCOTCH PLAINS - Full time/parttime. Looking for five sales people to
selling advertising. No experience
necessary. Will train. Call Bob Davies,
666-7005
HOMEMAKERS, STUDENTS
MOONLIGHTERS, RETIREES
Earn extra income as a Sears
telephone sales rep. Benefits,
flexible hours, $6/hr. Saturday mornings a must! In
Watchung: Call Mr. Leo
Dunham, Monday thru Friday, 12:30 to 8 p.m. at:
769-4980
POSTAL JOBS
$11.41 to $14.90/hr. For exam and application information call 219-769-6649 ext.
NJ193, 8 am - 8 pm 7 days.
JOBS to S25/HR. $15/call,
The Job Connection, 24 hrs.
a day. Call 1-900-234-3733.
Activity Assistant
Assistant needed to prepare
and lead activities for nursing
home residence. Approximately 14 hours/week. Contact
Debbie
Casado,
889-5500.
HOME
CLEANING
CARE, for people on the
go. Ins., ref. 245-1945.
FOR SALE
Escort Radar Detector. Like
new. Retail $250.00. Sacrifice
$125.00. Call 9-5, 322-5266.
Ask for Audrey.
S.P. Lions host Hospice
Co-founder Father Hudson (pictured above with
President Jack Kresge) of the Center for Hope
Hospice enlightened the Lions with a presentation on
the organization. The center is independent, nonprofit and non-denominational which provides the
terminally ill with the ability to be treated at home
rather than in hospitals and nursing homes. Further
information can be obtained by calling Hope
Hospice at 486-0700.
HONOR ROLL
H
Terrill Middle School
tn
M
FIRST MARKING PERIOD
1990-91 SCHOOL YEAR
""•DISTINGUISHED HONOR ROLL • " A " in all
subjects.
"HONOR ROLL - At least two A's and no grade
lower than " B " in major subjects. All least " C " in
other subjects.
***GRADE 8
Lauren Everitt, Dana Horning, Caroline Luciano,
Shannon Mannigault, Rachel Peris, Scott Powell and
Natasha Vasavada.
'GRADE 8
Vandana Advani, Michael Anglim, Elizabeth Armando, Chhaya Batra, Lindsey Borgia, Allison
Bradshaw, Matthew Cahill, Derwin Chen, Adam
Cote, Lisa Dec, Michael Donovan, Dan Dumitriu,
Andrea Ettore, Kevin Fleming, Jennifer Fox, Russell
Frame, Munesha Goyal, Jordon Hyman, Sharmila
Jaipersaud, Ellen Johnson, Colleen Kraft, Samantha
Kutlik, Angela Lewandowski, Kristine Mager, Greig
Maclntyre, Jacqueline Madden, Kristen Mannix,
Melissa McDonald, Ilka Panasuik, Neil Parikh,
Kevin Rosander, Jennifer Rydarowski, Bryan
Schnedeker, Caroline Stender, Meredith Valenzano,
Christopher Wahlers and Christian Wietsma.
***GRADE 7
Michella Apiar, Claudia Beqaj, Grace Chen,
Laura Cosmas, Amanda Cote, Nicholas Duffy,
Michelle Ferrara, Elizabeth Mattfield, Carolyn
Phillips, Brian Roll, Karen Squires and Zubin
Vasavada.
•GRADE 7
Tiana Barsam-Brown, Elizabeth Billard, Sara
Billard, Colleen Brennan, Lara Brodzinsky, Susan
Buleza, Karen Cummo, Jeffrey Gander, Jonathan
Garcia, Theodore Gicas, Regina Giordano, James
Gleason, Willie Green, Douglas Hahner, Joseph
Han, Jackie Humenik, Heather Johdos, Brian
Klimas, Kristen Konzelman, Elizabeth Kylish, Sara
Kylish, Jay Lasus, Melissa Lies, Joseph Marchand,
Barbara Marcketta, Jessica Mattfield, Jennifer
Mundth, Christina Nichols, Amy Porchetta, Lauren
Rabadeau, Adam Ross, Justin Spagnoli, Kevin
Squires, Kristy Statue, Sarah Stein, Carrie Taillon,
Lourdes Taveras.
***GRADE 6
Joanna D'Agnostino, Brian Donovan, Lindsey
Everitt, Cyrus Golsaz, Lipika Goyal, Alissa Jansen,
Jay Kalyanaraman, Kristi Morse, Kathleen Polito,
Matthew Schwartz, Nicole Schwartz and June Spector.
"GRADE 6
Julianne Arnold, Brian Bell, James Bishop, Lisa
Cahill, David Camera, Jay Campbell, Anthony
Cangialosi, Eva Chan, Kevin Dougherty, Nicole
Frank, Elizabeth Frame, Brad Gillet, James Green,
Joshua Grisi, Deborah Hartelious, Marisa Hyman,
Christopher Irvin, Reema Jain, Sanghee Jeon,
Michelle Kashlak, Thomas Klock, Jonathan
Kretschmer, Ross Maclntyre, Hilary Markham,
Karen McClintock, Caralynne Miller, Anjalee Mitra,
Shakira Moore, Casey O'Connor, Melissa O'Neil,
Susan Pastir, Brian Powell, Tracy Quense, James
Ray, Mandy Reichman, Karina Reyes, Jason
Rogowsky, Aleda Rusnak, Brian Russ, Peter Shea,
JianBon Shih, Amy Stratton, Rachael Strong, Jennifer Taillon and Katherine Tway.
CHIT CHAT
Staff
Sgt.
Diann
Lozowski is a disaster
Lozowski has graduated preparedness chief at
from a noncommissioned Galena Airport, Alaska.
officer leadership school.
She is the daughter of
Mary L. and Walter E.
Lozowski of Scotch
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
Plains.
The sergeant is a 1982
graduate of Scotch PlainsFanwood High School,
Scotch Plains.
i
The Gift
|
That Lasts All Year
For just 23C a week you can give the gift that
comes each week, 52 times a year.
THE TIMES
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IN
CARPETING
CARPETING • VINYL • WORKROOM
Watchung Hills Office Park
775 Mountain Boulevard
Watchung, NJ 07060
(201) 753-1266
THE FINEST IN DINING
4 STAR RATING
CARUSO'S
RESTAURANT
1370 South Ave., Fanwood
757-2244
Featuring Skip Ungar at the Piano
Friday Evenings
READ AUTO PARTS
1632 E. Second St.
Scotch Plains, NJ
Phone 322-4043
MACHINE SHOP
8:00 AM-7:00 PM Mon.-Fri.
8:00 AM-5:30 PM Sat.
9:00 AM-2:30 PM Sun.
AUTO CENTER
FOREIGN •
DOMESTIC
•Complete Mechanical Repairs
•Complete Body Repairs
•Towing'& Road Service - 24 Hrs.
BODY & GLASS SHOP
MECHANICAL SHOP
401-413 Elmer St., Westfield
1144 South Ave., Westfield
233-2651
232-6588
FOR ADVERTISING
INFORMATION
CALL DAN AT
322-5266
EDD'S QUICK QUALITY
100%
BRUSHLESS CAR WASH
($37do
1600 E. Second Street
Scotch Plains, N.J. 07076
One year only $12, $15 for out-of-county, $10 for senior citizens.
AUTOS • TRUCKS
«N.J. Stale Re-Inspection
'Glass Work
•Hi-Pressure Washing
value)
UNDERBODY WASH
WITH PURCHASE OF REGULAR WASH
EXPIRES 3/1/91
NOT GOOD WITH ANY OTHER OFFER!
SALT EATS CARSI
ADDRESS
.ZIP
HAPPY HOUR FRIDAY'S AFTER 5 PM
(No Coupons)
$3.50 wash
THOMAS M, RUSSO
W
PQ
8
in
H
W
H
ATTORNEY AT LAW
1824 Front Street, Scotch Plains
322-7711
PUBLIC NOTICE
The undersigned having applied for
preliminary sile plan approval with
variances for existing conditions and conditional use for Block 55 Lot 19, commonly
known as 193 Suulh Avenue, hereby
notified the public that the Planning Board
of the Borough of Fanwood, after a publichearing did grant approval of said application.
Documents pertaining to this application
arc available for public inspection in the Administration Office or Borough Hall, 75
North Marline Avenue, Fanwood, New
Jersey, during normal business hours.
Mecker/Sharkcy Financial Group
193 South Avenue
Fanwood, N.J. 07023
THE TIMES: December 6, 1990
Criminal Defense
Personal Injuries
Municipal Court
Accidents
Juvenile
Family Law
DWI
Real Estate
No Fee For Initial Consultation
Evenings & Saturdays Available
L-102
FEES: 9.61
TOWNSHIP OF SCOTCH PLAINS
NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the
Township of Scotch Plains, Union County,
New Jersey, will conduct an auction on
December 15. 1990 at Fire Station 11,
Scnger Place, at 9:00 a.m. for the sale of a
1949 Mack Fire Pumper.
This vehicle is being sold "as is", with
minimum bid of $750. The auctioneer has
the discretion to begin the bidding at a different price if deemed in the interest oflhe
Township of Scotch Plains to do so.
This vehicle may be inspected prior losale
during business hours or the day of the sale.
Purchases may be made hy cash or certified check, payable at the time the bid is
accepted by the Township. Said item shall
be removed from the Township premises
within one week from the date of acceptance
of the bidder's offer at the bidder's own expense. The Township reserves the right to
reject any and all bids.
TOWNSHIP OF SCOTCH PLAINS
Barbara Kicpe
Township Clerk
THE TIMES: December 6. 1990
FEES: 13.64
1.-100
LEGAL NOTICE
The 1991 Tax Assessment rolls of the
Borough of Faiiwoiid will be open for inspection at the Borough Hall, 75 Nonh
Marline Avenue, Fanwood, New Jersey, nn
December 18, 1990, between [ I K hours of
9:00 A . M . to 5:00 P.M.
TAX ASSESSOR
BOROUGH OF IANWOOD
THE TIMES: December 6, 1990
FEES: 5.27
L-ioi
Letters...
ACCIDENTS
DON'T JUST
HAPPEN!
A paint rag suddenly catches fire.
Without warning, an electrical outlet begins
to smoke.
That's what can happen when flammable
materials are placed too near a heater. Or an outlet
or extension cord is overloaded.
Prevent accidents like these from happening in
your home. Send away for our free booklet, "Your
Family Guide to Using Electricity and Gas Safely in
the Home." It's filled with all kinds of vital gas and
electrical safety tips. Read it to your children.
Then read it again. And be sure to keep it within
everyone's reach.
Mail this coupon for your free PSE&G safety
guide today. Because safety at home is no accident.
r Mail to: PSE&G
~l
Electric and Gas Safety booklet
26 Parsippany Rd.
Whippany, NJ 07981
• YES, please send my free copy of "Your family
guide to using electricity and gas safely in
the home."
Name
Address.
City
Public Service
M Electric and Gas
JB Company
PSP.G
W ,V-W
Subsidiary of PUBLIC SERVICE ENTERPRISE GROUP INCORPORATED
Continued from page 4
maintained should have
been done before any
routing changes were
implemented-will force
the FAA to stop denying
its responsibility, report
the facts of the EECP's effects on air noise and air
safety owner New Jersey,
and put forth real, solutions to the problem!
Some U.S. Senators
who do not share our
views proposed scrapping
noise restrictions already
in place, and severely
limiting any future attempts to control noise.
That was simply unacceptable, and my colleagues
and I worked to ensure
that all existing regulations on air noise will stay
in place! Furthermore, by
the end of this decade, &5%
of the noisiest Stage 11 aircraft must end operation.
At the same time, no additional Stage II's can be added to any United States
air carrier fleet. Finally,
the Secretary of Transportation is now charged to
craft a national air noise
policy, one that must take
into account the interests,
concerns, comments and
rights of the public . We
cannot stand for more
FAA bureacracy!
Having been handed
this bureaucracy, delay
and deception by the
FAA, we cannot let down
our guard. This fight pitted the powerful airline industry against a united
New
Jersey—whose
residents, local officials
and U.S. representitives
were unanimous in disapproval. While I would not
claim a total victory in the
war, we have made significant inroads with this battle. Future efforts to end
the suffering of those impacted by aircraft noise
are still to come, but if we
continue to show the
tenacity and unity we have
thus far evidenced, 1 am
certain we will prevail.
Marge Roukcma
Member of Congress

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