Step One (Student)

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Step One (Student)
(1)
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Overview: Preparing for College
Students who are eligible for college admission and state financial aid under SB1528 are required to
follow a unique and exacting process, which at times differs from the process U.S. citizens follow. The
follow section clarifies the elements of the college preparation process which specifically apply to
students who are eligible for admission and state financial aid under SB1528.
This section includes:
1) A checklist/quick reference guide and overview of the process.
2) ITIN and tax information (Foundation Communities)
In order for SB1528 students to apply for state financial aid, they must submit a completed income
tax form. Those without a social security number can file taxes through an ITIN (Individual Taxpayer
Identification Number); however, the process can take time depending on the circumstances. Thus,
long before the student is actually applying for financial aid, they and/or their parents should have
an ITIN.
3) Specific information about applying for financial aid.
2
Frequently Asked Tax Questions: Undocumented Students or Parents Q: How can you file an income tax return if you don’t have a social security number? The IRS wants everyone to file their taxes, regardless of their immigration and citizenship status. Individuals without social security numbers may apply for an Individual Taxpayer Identification Number (ITIN). ITINs are tax processing numbers that are nine‐digits, begin with the number 9 and have a 7 or 8 as the fourth digit. ITINs are for federal tax reporting only, and are not intended to serve any other purpose. An ITIN does not authorize work in the U.S. or provide eligibility for Social Security benefits or the Earned Income Tax Credit. ITINs are not valid identification outside the tax system. IRS issues ITINs to help individuals comply with the U.S. tax laws, and to provide a means to efficiently process and account for tax returns and payments for those not eligible for Social Security Numbers. Q: Is it safe to file if you are an undocumented worker? Yes, it is safe to apply for and ITIN and file your taxes. ITINs are not used by the government to track undocumented workers.i In fact, filing taxes is considered to be a mark of good citizenship by the federal government. Q: Why should you file an income tax return if you are an undocumented worker? What are the benefits? Many people filing taxes will receive a refund. If you are an undocumented worker, you can only get your refund by applying for an ITIN and filing your taxes. ITINs also allow you to claim dependents and obtain the child tax credit if applicable. Finally, you can also use your ITIN to build a wage record with the Social Security Administration. Your ITIN will not make you eligible for Social Security benefits. But you can start a wage record so that later you may become eligible for Social Security benefits.ii Filing a tax 3
return also will help when you file to adjust your immigration status; it is proof of your “good moral character,” your residency in the U.S., and your marital status. Q: Who can get an ITIN? Examples of individuals who need ITINs include: * Non‐resident alien filing a U.S. tax return and not eligible for a SSN * U.S. resident alien (based on days present in the United States) filing a U.S. tax return and not eligible for a SSN * Dependent or spouse of a U.S. citizen/resident alien * Dependent or spouse of a non‐resident alien visa holder Q: How do you get an ITIN? An ITIN is obtained by filling out a Form W7, attaching it to an original tax return and providing two forms of identification to the IRS. These documents must be originals, certified by the agency that issued them, or notarized by a U.S. notary. If you get your taxes done at a Community Tax Center through Foundation Communities, they will guide you through this process. For Community Tax Center locations visit www.foundcom.org Q: Are you self employed? If you are in business for yourself, or carry on a trade or business as a sole proprietor or an independent contractor, you probably are self‐employed and will file Schedule C or Schedule C‐EZ with your Form 1040.iii Q: How can you file an income tax return if you are paid in cash or with checks by a company or contractor? What documents do you need? The IRS requires you to report all of your income, whether you’re paid by cash or check. If you are hired to do a job and you decide when, where and how to complete that work, you are probably self‐employed. You may receive a Form 1099‐MISC, and you will need this document when you file your taxes. IF you work for yourself or as a contractor, it is important to keep a calendar or notebook in which you write your income. You may use this same calendar or notebook to keep track of all your business expenses. (Examples of some such expenses may include tools, mileage, and business insurance.) If you are hired to do a job and the person who hires you tells you when, where and how to do the work, you are probably an employee and should receive a Form W‐2. Q: Will you get a refund if you are self­employed? Won't you have to always pay taxes on that income? When you are an employee, your employer pays half of your payroll taxes and withholds the other half from your paychecks. When you are self‐employed, you must pay these taxes yourself. This is called self‐employment tax and is the Social Security and Medicare tax owed on your earnings. Q: How can you file an income tax return if you use an invalid SSN to work? Can you still file if your W­2 shows that SSN? Can you get back any of the taxes withheld? If you use an invalid SSN to work, you may get an ITIN to file your tax return. Your earnings under the SSN will be attributed to your ITIN. If you are eligible for a refund, the IRS will send your refund after you file your taxes. Again, if you get your taxes done at a Community Tax Center through Foundation Communities, they will guide you through this process. For Community Tax Center locations visit www.foundcom.org. Q: When should a dependent (young, high school­age or college­age) file their own income tax return? Do I include my dependent’s income on my income tax return? You will not include your dependent’s income on your own tax return. Dependents complete their own tax forms but indicate that someone else is claiming them as a dependent. Dependents are required to file their own taxes if their income was more than $7,100 in 2009. If their income was less than this, they still may want to file in order to get a refund of any federal withholdings. 4
Q: What are the income amounts at which people are not required by the IRS to file an income tax return? The amounts below are for 2009 only: these numbers change every year. For single people: • Under 65‐‐$9,350 • 65 or older‐‐$10,750 For the head of household: • Under 65‐‐$12,000 • 65 or older‐‐$13,400 Married, filing jointly: • Both under 65‐‐$18,700 • One 65 or older‐‐$19,800 • Both 65 or older‐‐$20,900 Married, filing separately: • Any age‐‐$3,650 Qualifying widow(er) with dependent child(ren): • Under 65‐‐$15,050 • 65 or older‐‐$16,150iv i
IRS ITIN information http://www.irs.gov/individuals/article/0,,id=96287,00.html#
what ii
Texas Taxpayer Assistance Project ITIN information http://lawhelp.org/program/4290/RTF1.cfm?pagename=Indi
vidual%20Taxpayer%20%20Identification%20Number%20%2
8ITIN%29 iii
IRS Small business information http://www.irs.gov/businesses/small/article/0,,id=115045,00
.html iv
IRS Publication 4012, page A‐1 APPLYING TO COLLEGE STEP BY STEP
(For immigrant students who qualify under SB1528, formerly HB1403)
Before you apply, please make sure that you meet the requirements for SB1528. You must be a) graduating from
a Texas high school or receiving a GED in Texas, b) have lived in Texas at least 3 consecutive years at the time
of graduating from high school or receiving a GED, and c) you must fill out an affidavit of intent stating that
you will apply to become a U.S. permanent resident as soon as you are eligible to do so. SB1528 applies to
public colleges and universities only – private and out-of-state colleges have their own rules and policies for
undocumented students. However, you can get state financial aid at public and private universities, and public
community and technical colleges.
Step 1:
If you are in
the free or
reduced lunch
program you
can request a
registration fee
waiver from
your counselor
for both the
SAT and the
ACT.
Register for and take the SAT and the ACT college admission tests. These are offered several
times throughout the year on Saturdays in area high schools. If possible, start taking these tests in
the Spring semester of your Junior year. When you register, request that the scores be sent to the
universities/colleges you are interested in. Registration deadlines for these tests are usually a
month in advance from the test date, so make sure you find out when the registration deadlines are.
For a good program to prepare and practice for these tests, go to www.number2.com. This is an
online and completely free resource to prepare for the SAT and the ACT.
Step 2: Obtain an application for admission. If applying to various Texas universities you may
want to use the ApplyTexas Application, which you can fill out online, even without a social
security number. Go to www.applytexas.org. This is the best way to apply to most universities and
some colleges in the State. For most private universities in the state of Texas, you will need to
contact the admissions office to request a paper application, or check to see if you can complete the
online application without a social security number. For many private universities around the
country, you may need to apply using The Common App at www.commonapp.org.
Step 3:
Complete the application for admission by the deadline. If using the
ApplyTexas application:
A. Whenever it asks for a social security number, leave this blank.
You don’t need a
B. Where it asks for information about a visa, leave this blank.
Social Security
C. Make sure you answer “yes” to the question about having
number to use
resided in Texas for “at least 36 consecutive months”.
ApplyTexas. The
college or university
D. Where it asks if you are a legal Texas resident, always answer
will assign you a
YES if you have been living here at least 12 months.
student number and
they will input this
number on your
application when
they process it.
Step 4:
Question C of ApplyTexas
does not refer to your legal
status in the United States,
but whether you or your
parent/guardian have lived
and worked in Texas for at
least 12 months.
Make sure to complete all sections of ApplyTexas and submit essays, if required. Essays can
be submitted electronically through www.applytexas.org.
Print out the “SB1528 affidavit of intent”, which will become available when
you are filling out the ApplyTexas Application online. Your school counselors
and college advisors can provide you with a copy also. Some colleges have this
form on their website also. Take the SB1528 affidavit of intent to a notary
public and fill out all sections and sign. Your high school registrar or secretary
can usually notarize the affidavit or you can take it to any notary public,
usually found at shipping & mailing retail locations, tax assistance centers, etc. A
notary on your high school campus should not charge you at all. A notary in
another location may charge, but should not charge more than $6 per document,
by law. Remember that if you do not turn this form in to each college/university
that you are applying to the institution will not be able to classify you as a TEXAS
RESIDENT, and you will have to pay out-of-state tuition (more expensive) and
will not be eligible for state financial aid.
If you are on
free/reduced
lunch, and you
used a fee waiver
to take the SAT or
ACT, you can
request a college
application fee
waiver from your
counselor. This fee
waiver will cover
your application
fees to several
colleges. Check
with your
counselor to see
how many
colleges you can
apply to using the
fee waiver.
Evangelina
Orozco, Immigrant College Coordinator, Office of Bilingual Ed/ESL, Austin ISD, (512) 4145
6427, [email protected]
Step 5:
If possible
turn in your
application
materials to
an admissions
officer
directly. If
you mail in
your
application
materials,
check in a
few weeks to
make sure it
was received
and
processed.
Submit the completed application (including essay, if required), SB1528 affidavit
application fee (or fee waiver), and an official sealed transcript from your high
school registrar to each university you are applying to. Put all documents in an
envelope and attach a note or letter to the admissions officer stating that you are a
SB1528 student. Include your phone number and the number of a school contact, like
your counselor or college advisor. If using ApplyTexas, submit application and
essay(s) electronically, and mail in the SB1528 affidavit, application fee or fee
waiver, and transcript.
Step 6: Most schools will assign you an account number for access to their online
system as soon as you submit an application. You will need to check in on the
status of your application and what steps you need to take after applying. You will
probably get a Student ID#, user name and a password. You will either receive an
email or a letter with this information. For each college/university you apply to, you
will have different account information, so watch out for it, and as soon as you get it
WRITE it down somewhere that you can find it later. It will also be helpful to put
your Student ID # on your FAFSA or TASFA applications later on.
of intent,
The transcript
that you will
send with the
application is
either your 6th
or 7th semester
transcript.
Once you’ve
been admitted
you will need
to send a
FINAL
TRANSCRIPT
that shows you
have met all
requirements
to receive a
high school
diploma. Talk
to your college
advisor or your
counselor
about how to
request a
transcript.
Step 7:
Apply for scholarships. Most colleges have their freshman scholarship
applications available through ApplyTexas. If your college of interest does not
have a scholarship application in ApplyTexas, check the school’s website for an
online or a downloadable paper application. Note that often the scholarship
application deadline is earlier than the admission deadline. Also, scholarship
applications usually require additional essays and letters of recommendations. You should also
apply for scholarships from scholarship organizations, community agencies, corporations, and
state or federal government. You cannot apply for most scholarships through the FAFSA or
TASFA – they require separate applications. You can find many scholarship opportunities at
www.austinisd.org/scholarship.
Step 8:
After January 1st of your Senior year in high school, you will need to fill out a FAFSA or a
TASFA form. These are the federal and state financial aid applications where you provide
important information about your family’s income and expenses. It is crucial that you fill out these
forms to receive money from the government and from colleges/universities to pay for college. You
must find out from each university which form they want you to use. For the FAFSA, fill out a
paper application (in English or Spanish) and turn in a copy to each college/university you are
applying to. Do not mail it to the federal government or fill it out online. It is best if you have the
Student ID number you were given by each college/university. You can pick up a FAFSA from your
college advisor and ask assistance with filling it out. For the TASFA, download an electronic
application (also available in Spanish) from www.collegefortexans.com, fill it out on the computer
and print copies to mail to each university.
Step 9:
Four-year universities will usually mail you letters, or send you emails to let you know they’ve received
your application and/or whether you are missing certain documents. If you do not hear back at all
from a four-year university within four weeks, you should contact the admissions officer that has been
helping you. If you hear that you are missing documents, please try to provide these documents as soon
as possible, or contact the university if you have questions. You should also check your online account
with each university as often as possible to make sure you are not missing anything. Most likely,
this is also how you can first find out whether you have been admitted.
Step 10:
If admitted, four-year universities will send you more information that will give you dates for
orientation sessions in the summer, where you will learn very important things you need to know before
you can start taking classes. Make sure you register to attend those sessions and provide all information
the university requests. You may also receive information about how to reserve campus housing if you
indicated you want to live on the university campus.
Evangelina
Orozco, Immigrant College Coordinator, Office of Bilingual Ed/ESL, Austin ISD, (512) 4146
6427, [email protected]
APPLYING FOR FINANCIAL AID STEP BY STEP
(For immigrant students who qualify under SB1528, formerly HB1403)
Students who are not U.S. citizens or U.S. legal permanent residents do not qualify for federal
financial assistance to pay for college. However, TX Senate Bill 1528, signed into law in August,
2005, makes it possible for these students in the state of Texas to be eligible for state-funded
financial aid. You can get state financial aid at public and private universities, and at public
community and technical colleges.
SB1528 students are eligible to receive the TEXAS Grant and the Texas Public Education
Grant (TPEG) at public four-year universities. They are eligible to receive the Texas Grant and
the Texas Educational Opportunity Grant (TEOG) at public two-year colleges or technical
colleges. And at some private universities in the state, SB1528 students may be eligible for the
Texas Equalization Grant (TEG). At any four-year institution, whether private or public,
SB1528 students could be eligible to apply for a College Access Loan (CAL). This is a statefunded loan, which functions like a federal student loan in that the loan interest is very low, the
loan interest is subsidized while the student is enrolled, and repayment of the loan does not begin
until 6 months after the student is no longer enrolled in an institution of higher education. You
will need to have a co-signer that will fill out a portion of the application, and this person must:
a) be either a U.S. Citizen or a U.S. legal permanent resident, b) have good credit, c) be over 21
years of age. This person does not have to be a family member, but should understand that h/she
will be responsible for repayment of the loan if the student does not pay in the future. You can
find the CAL loan application at www.thecb.state.tx.us, the Texas Higher Education
Coordinating Board’s website. To login to the application you will have to send them an
email request asking that they assign you a number to substitute for a Social Security
number.
To get all of these forms of financial aid, you and your parents must fill out the Texas
Application for Student Financial Aid (TASFA), or depending on the university’s preference,
a paper copy of the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). In these applications
you provide important information about your family’s income and expenses. Colleges and
universities will use the FAFSA or TASFA to determine how much state financial aid you are
eligible for. You can find out which application a university prefers by calling the financial aid
office, or by looking at the list on the back of the TASFA that includes the universities that
accept the TASFA. If your college or university is not on that list, then they probably prefer that
you submit a FAFSA application. You can download and print a copy of the FAFSA or the
TASFA from the Internet: FAFSA – www.fafsa.ed.gov; TASFA – www.collegefortexans.com.
You can also get these forms from your college advisor or counselor, and you can request them
from the college admission or financial aid office. Both applications become available on
January 1st of every year. You must fill it out in the early Spring if you are planning to start
college in the fall. The sooner after January 1st you fill out and submit the FAFSA or TASFA, the
greater your chances of getting good financial aid. It is highly recommended that you submit
your TASFA or FAFSA to all institutions by March 31st.
Most high schools offer financial aid information sessions for students and parents. In February
of each year Austin ISD offers a series of Financial Aid Saturdays at various high schools,
where you and your parents can get assistance in filling out and submitting the FAFSA or the
TASFA. Don’t miss those!!
7
Evangelina Orozco, Immigrant College Coordinator, Office of Bilingual Education/ESL, Austin ISD
(512) 414-6427, or send an email to [email protected]
When filling out the FAFSA or the TASFA, keep in mind:
1. You must make sure you qualify for Senate Bill 1528 – talk to Evangelina Orozco,
Immigrant College Coordinator with the Austin ISD Office of Bilingual Ed/ESL (4146427).
2. If the university asks you to fill out the FAFSA, complete a paper FAFSA by filling out
with a black pen. You cannot do the online FAFSA application because it requires a
Social Security number. You can do it in either English or Spanish.
3. If the university prefers that you submit a TASFA, go to www.collegefortexans.com, to
download the application, fill it out on the computer, and print it out, OR you can get
a paper TASFA and fill out with a black pen. The TASFA is also available in English
or Spanish.
4. You must complete a separate application for each college/university you are applying to.
Hand in directly, or mail in, a completed FAFSA or TASFA (with any required
supporting documents) to the financial aid officer at the college(s)/university(s) you are
applying to. Do not mail either of these forms to the federal or state government.
5. Remember that the FAFSA and TASFA ask about your and your parents’ income. Even
if your parents do not file an income tax return, these forms can be filled out by putting
down estimates of your household income. If your parents do file an income tax return
but haven’t filed yet this year, urge them to file as soon as possible because it is best
if you have their income tax returns ready before filling out these applications.
6. If you are submitting a TASFA application, and your parents are planning to file an
income tax return, then the TASFA requires that you submit copies of the income tax
returns with the application. If your parents will not be filing an income tax return, then
you can put down estimates of the annual income. Make sure to check with the university
about any additional forms or supporting documents they may require if your parents are
not filing an income tax return.
7. If submitting a FAFSA, at the top of the first page, write your name, student ID and
SB1528, so that your FAFSA gets processed appropriately. You do not have to do this if
submitting a TASFA application.
8. If you are male, please read: The U.S. government requires that all males between the
ages of 18 and 26 years old register with the Selective Service. You will not be able to
receive funds from any institution of higher education if you are not registered, according
to law. Therefore, all SB1528 male students must register by filling out a Selective
Service registration card, signing it and mailing it in to the address on the card. You can
find these cards at most post offices and some libraries. Also, your counselors or college
advisors can help you find it. In 4-6 weeks after submitting the card (if 18 years old
already) you will receive a letter which will include a registration number. You will need
to submit this number to the financial aid office of your college as soon as possible. The
letter will include a small card that you should detach and put in your wallet to keep with
you at all times. This registration number is a good form of identification for other
purposes as well.
8
Evangelina Orozco, Immigrant College Coordinator, Office of Bilingual Education/ESL, Austin ISD
(512) 414-6427, or send an email to [email protected]
Procedures for Applying for College Financial Aid
Students who ARE United States
Citizens or Legal Permanent Residents
Students who ARE NOT United States
Citizens or Legal Permanent Residents
Check with counselor/college
which form to use:
FAFSA or TASFA
GET a PIN #
For you & parent
www.pin.ed.gov
↓
↓
GET FAFSA (Free
Application for
Federal Student Aid)
WORKSHEET
→
from counselors
In English/Spanish
Check with colleges for
additional financial aid
application forms that
may be required, such as
←
CSS/PROFILE
COLLECT PERSONAL DATA
2009 W-2’s & financial data
2009 Tax Return, if parents file
Other documentation of cash income
COLLECT PERSONAL DATA
2009 W-2’s & financial data
2009 Tax Return, if parents file
Other documentation of cash income
↓
↓
→
www.fafsa.ed.gov
Federal Student Aid)
**These students only qualify for state
financial aid
↓
↓
FILL OUT FAFSA
ONLINE
GET TASFA (Texas Application for
State Financial Aid) and/or
GET FAFSA (Free Application for
Check with Colleges
for
PRIORITY
DEADLINE DATES
←
If TASFA: Download, fill out on computer &
print forms
www.collegefortexans.com
If FAFSA: Fill out paper copies by hand
MAIL/HAND-IN FORMS DIRECTLY TO
YOUR CHOSEN COLLEGE(S)
↓
↓
STUDENT AID REPORT (SAR)
determines ESTIMATED FAMILY
CONTRIBUTION (EFC) U.S. Dept. of Ed. sends to you & your
chosen colleges
ESTIMATED FAMILY
CONTRIBUTION (EFC)
will be determined by your chosen
colleges
↓
↓
FINANCIAL AID PACKAGE
FINANCIAL AID PACKAGE
Based on EFC, colleges offer you a
financial aid package (grants,
scholarships, loans & work-study)
Based on EFC, colleges offer you a
financial aid package (grants,
scholarships & loans)
↓
REVIEW FINANCIAL AID
PACKAGES
Compare financial aid packages
from colleges & make decision by
deadline date set by colleges
9
↓
Evangelina Orozco
Immigrant College Coordinator,
Office of Bilingual Ed/ESL, Austin ISD
(512) 414-6427, [email protected]
REVIEW FINANCIAL AID
PACKAGES
Compare financial aid packages
from colleges & make decision by
deadline date set by colleges
Overview: Dispelling Myths
Because immigration is a highly charged and emotional issue facing our society today, there are many
misconceptions regarding undocumented students, especially concerning their options after high school. This
section attempts to promote the facts as they pertain to immigrant students in Texas, and dispel some
prominent misunderstanding. These selected factsheets are representative of the information available about
immigration and educational access.
10
9 THINGS EVERY UNDOCUMENTED YOUTH
SHOULD KNOW
If you do not have legal immigration status in the United States, you are at risk. Keep these points in mind:
1. If approached by immigration authorities, do not sign any papers and do not
talk to them unless you check with a lawyer first.
2. Stay out of trouble with the law. In some places, police will hand your name over to immigration
authorities. In many places, the police will not do that – but if you commit a crime, that will make it harder to
get legal status in the future.
3. If you are charged with a crime, make sure your lawyer knows your immigration status. That will allow them to best help you.
4. Don’t cross the border. Once you leave the country, you can’t legally re-enter the U.S.
5. If you are working illegally, you should still pay taxes. This will improve your chances of
getting legal papers in the future. See the section “How to get a green card” for more info.
6. If you’re male, register for the “Selective Service” when you turn 18. The immigration police will NOT see your information. Like paying taxes, this will make it easier to get legal papers in
the future.
7. If at all possible, try to become a legal
resident. See the section “How to get a
green card.”
8. Having a child will not help
you become legal. Some people
believe this, but it is not true. A child
can only help its parent get papers if
the child is over 21 years old.
9. Do not lie and say you are
a U.S. citizen when you are
not. This could hurt your chances
of ever getting a green card or get
you deported.
11
Immigration Basics
WHO IS AN IMMIGRANT?
WHO IS AN UNDOCUMENTED IMMIGRANT?
According to U.S. law, an immigrant is a foreign-born individual who
has been admitted to reside permanently in the United States as a
Lawful Permanent Resident (LPR).
HOW DO IMMIGRANTS GET ADMITTED TO
PERMANENTLY RESIDE HERE?
An undocumented immigrant is a person who is present in the United
States without the permission of the U.S. government. Undocumented
immigrants enter the U.S. either illegally, without being inspected by
an immigration officer, or by using false documents, or legally, with a
temporary visa, and then remain in the U.S. beyond the expiration date
of the visa.
Typically, a foreign-born individual seeking to become an LPR
can do so in one of three ways:
WHO IS A NON-IMMIGRANT?
† Through family-sponsored immigration, a U.S. citizen can
sponsor his or her foreign-born spouse, parent (if the sponsor is over
the age of 21), minor and adult married and unmarried children,
and brothers and sisters. A Lawful Permanent Resident can sponsor
his or her spouse, minor children, and adult unmarried children.
Our immigration system divides the family members eligible for
sponsorship into two tiers. Immediate relatives of U.S. citizens—that is,
spouses, unmarried minor children and parents, but not brothers
and sisters or unmarried and married adult children—are admitted
as their applications are processed.
A non-immigrant is an individual who is permitted to enter the U.S.
for a period of limited duration. Nonimmigrants include: students,
tourists, temporary workers, business executives, diplomats, artists and
entertainers, and reporters. Depending on where they are from and the
purpose of their visit, non-immigrants may be required to apply for and
obtain a visa from the U.S. government. The application process entails
an interview with a U.S. consular official in the nearest U.S. consulate,
who has the sole authority to grant or deny a visa. Even if granted, the
visa is merely a travel document. All non-immigrants—regardless of
whether they have a U.S. visa—must also pass immigration inspection
upon arrival in the U.S.
† Through employment-based immigration, a U.S. employer
can sponsor an individual for a specific position where there is a
demonstrated absence of U.S. workers.
WHO IS A NATURALIZED CITIZEN?
† By winning one of a limited number of immigrant visas available in
the annual diversity visa lottery that is open to immigrants from
certain countries.
WHO IS A REFUGEE?
A refugee is a person outside of the United States who seeks protection
on the grounds that he or she fears persecution in his or her homeland.
To obtain refugee status, a person must prove that he or she has a
“wellfounded fear of persecution” on the basis of at least one of five
specifically-enumerated and internationally recognized grounds. Those
grounds include the person’s race, religion, membership in a social group,
political opinion, or national origin. A person who has already entered the
United States, and who fears persecution if sent back to his or her
country, may apply for asylum here. Once granted asylum, the person
is called an “asylee.” Like a refugee, an asylum applicant must also
prove that he or she has a “well-founded fear of persecution” based on
the same enumerated grounds. Both refugees and asylees may apply
to become LPRs after one year.
12
Lawful Permanent Residents are eligible to apply for U.S. citizenship
through a process called naturalization. To qualify for naturalization,
applicants generally must reside in the U.S. for five years (three if they
are married to a US. citizen) without having committed any serious
crimes, show that they have paid their taxes and are of “good moral
character,” and demonstrate a knowledge of U.S. history and
government as well as an ability to understand, speak, and write
ordinary English.
WHAT’S THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN A
REFUGEE AND AN ASYLEE?
Refugees and asylees are people seeking protection in the U.S. on
the grounds that they fear persecution in their homeland. A refugee
applies for protection while outside the United States. An asylee differs
from a refugee because the person first comes to the United States and,
once here, applies for protection. Refugees generally apply in refugee
camps or at designated processing sites outside their home countries.
In some instances, refugees may apply for protection within their home
countries, such as in the Former Soviet Union, Cuba, and Vietnam.
If accepted as a refugee, the person is sent to the U.S. and receives
assistance through the “refugee resettlement program.”
JUSTICE FOR IMMIGRANTS
a journey of hope
HOW DOES SOMEONE GAIN REFUGEE STATUS?
NON-IMMIGRANT VISAS
To qualify for refugee resettlement in the U.S., a person must come
from a country designated by the Department of State. The person
must meet the definition of a refugee by proving that she has a
well-founded fear of persecution. The refugee applicant must
prove that this fear is based on the possibility of persecution because of
her race, religion, membership in a social group, political opinion, or national
origin. In addition, a refugee must fit into one of a set of “priority”
categories, which factor in degree of risk to the refugee’s life, membership in certain groups of special concern to the U.S., and existence of
family members in the U.S. A person claiming refugee status must
undergo a vigorous screening process before being resettled in the U.S.
First, the person is screened by the United Nations High Commissioner
for Refugees (UNHCR) to determine if she qualifies as a refugee under
international law. If she qualifies, she next is screened by the U.S.
embassy in the host country, which contracts with private organizations to collect personal information about refugees. The embassy will
check the name of the refugee in its Consular Lookout and Support
System (CLASS), which contains the names of millions of persons who
have been denied visas, or who may be otherwise ineligible for entry
into the U.S. If she passes that test, an officer from U.S. Citizenship and
Immigration Services (USCIS) conducts a face-to-face interview and
reviews the file. The refugee is then photographed and fingerprinted by
the State Department. Certain refugees must receive clearance from the
FBI. If no problems arise in all of this screening, the refugee proceeds to
the U.S., where an inspector from the Bureau of Customs and Border
Protection conducts one more interview and compares the refugee with
host country U.S. embassy records. While these redundant checks
ensure that no one who is not entitled to refugee status will get it, they
have greatly slowed the admissions system, and hampered our ability to
protect vulnerable individuals. Thousands of refugee “slots” have gone
unused in recent years, even as the admission ceilings have been greatly reduced from those of the recent past. Without additional resources,
the U.S. is falling short of its commitment to protect refugees.
“Non-immigrants” are tourists, students, and other persons who come
temporarily to the U.S. for pleasure, business, study, diplomacy, or other
purposes on an alphabet soup of visa categories. The total number of
immigrants—family-sponsored, employment-based, and diversity
immigrants—is small compared to the number of people who come
here for short periods of time. These non-immigrants outnumber
immigrants by about 30 or 40 to 1. In fiscal year 2003, nearly
28 million persons came to this country temporarily. Of those,
more than 24 million came here as tourists or business visitors.
After refugees have been in the U.S. for one year, they are eligible to
become permanent residents. There is no limit to the number of
refugees who may become permanent residents each year.
FAMILY-SPONSORED IMMIGRATION
Family-sponsored immigration is the way U.S. citizens and lawful
permanent residents bring family members from other countries to
live permanently in America. Citizens may sponsor only their spouses,
children, parents (if the citizen is older than 21 years), and brothers and
sisters (if the citizen is older than 21 years). LPRs may sponsor only their
spouses and unmarried children. Neither citizens nor LPRs may bring in
more distant family members, such as aunts, uncles, and cousins.
Our immigration system divides the family members eligible for
sponsorship into two tiers. Immediate relatives of U.S. citizens—that is,
spouses, unmarried minor children and parents, but not brothers and
sisters or13unmarried and married adult children—are admitted as their
applications are processed.
VISAS FOR TOURISTS AND BUSINESS VISITORS
The vast majority of people coming to the U.S. temporarily do so for
tourism or business. In most countries, these individuals must obtain
a visa from a U.S. embassy or consulate. In reviewing an application
for a temporary visa, U.S. immigration law requires consular officers
to ensure that the applicant does not intend to stay permanently.
Therefore, a visa applicant must prove that he or she plans to return
on or before the time the visa expires. The applicant can do this by
showing that he or she has a residence outside the U.S. and other ties
that will insure he or she will return before the expiration date of
the visa. In addition to proving they are not “intending immigrants,”
visa applicants are fingerprinted and photographed, and information
about them is check against government databases of persons who
are ineligible to enter the U.S. because of criminal activity, past visa
problems, or links to terrorist groups.
VISAS FOR STUDENTS
Over one-half million students come to the U.S. each year. A person is
considered a student if he or she comes to the U.S. to enroll in coursework of 18 hours or more per week. To obtain a student visa, a person
must first apply to a U.S. academic institution, be accepted, and receive
an immigration form “I-20” from the school. The student must then
apply for a visa at a U.S. Consulate in his or her home country.
Among the things the student may need to show in the visa application
process are acceptance to a U.S. school, availability of sufficient funds to
cover all expenses for the entire course of study without resorting to
employment in the U.S., evidence of family and/or economic ties to the
home country sufficient to induce him or her to return after completing
the coursework and, if required by the school, proficiency in English.
Students are usually allowed to remain in the U.S. for the duration of
their studies. If there is any change in the student’s status—that is,
if his or her coursework drops below the minimum required, or if the
student changes field of study—the school is required to report this
information to the government.
The increased scrutiny of visa applications for students in recent
years has led to months-long delays for some students, and a
perception that the U.S. is a less-welcoming place to study. For the first
time in three decades, enrollment of foreign students in U.S. colleges
and universities fell in 2004. Information about foreign students is
collected via the Student and Exchange Visitor Information System
JUSTICE FOR IMMIGRANTS
a journey of hope
(SEVIS), an internet-based system which maintains immigration status
information, such as admission at a port of entry, as well as personal
and academic information about students, such as their course load,
field of study, current address, and other information. Any change in
this information must be reported to the government by the school,
using SEVIS.
the visitor complied with the terms of his or her stay. By February
2005, the program had not been fully implemented, but procedures to
collect information from foreigners exiting the U.S. were being tested at
a number of airports.
The schools themselves must have permission to enroll foreign
students. Most U.S. colleges and universities have been approved by the
government to enroll foreign students. With the requisite permission,
other institutions—including vocational schools, junior colleges,
public high schools, and language training schools—may also enroll
foreign students.
Naturalization is the process by which eligible legal immigrants become
U.S. citizens. Through the naturalization process, immigrants display a
willingness to become full members of our society. The process is not an
easy one. It requires that immigrants live in the U.S. for a certain number of years, learn our language, study our history and government,
show that they are of “good moral character” and have not committed
serious crimes and, finally, swear allegiance to the United States. Over
time, most immigrants become citizens.
VISITORS NOT REQUIRED TO OBTAIN VISAS
Canadians crossing over the U.S. border are generally not required to
have a visa.
Citizens from the 27 participating countries in the Visa Waiver Program
also are not required to obtain a visa if they are planning to come to the
U.S. for business or pleasure for a period of 90 days or less. However,
there are strict conditions under which people may come to the U.S.
under the Visa Waiver Program—they must have valid, machinereadable, passports; their stay is limited to a maximum of 90 days;
they must have round-trip tickets, if they arrived by air or sea; and they
must have proof of financial solvency. If they do not have a machinereadable passport, they must apply for and obtain a visitor visa.
The U.S. places strict rules on the participating countries before they are
admitted to the Visa Waiver Program. First, the non-immigrant visitor
visa refusal rate (the rate of visa applications denied by U.S. consular
officers) must be three percent or less for the previous fiscal year.
Second, the participating country must offer reciprocal visa-free travel
for U.S. citizens. Third, the country must have a machine readable passport program in place. Fourth, the country must be politically and economically stable. Fifth, the participating country must have effective
border controls for its own borders. Sixth, law enforcement agencies in
the participating country must be cooperating with their U.S. counterparts. Finally, the U.S. considers any possible security concerns that
might be raised, should a country be admitted to the program.
Countries participating in the Visa Waiver Program are: Andorra,
Australia, Austria, Belgium, Brunei, Denmark, Finland, France,
Germany, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Liechtenstein, Luxembourg,
Monaco, The Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Portugal, San
Marino, Singapore, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, and the
United Kingdom.
Regardless of whether they have a visa, arriving foreigners are
fingerprinted and photographed through the USVISIT program, which
eventually will be deployed to become a regular part of the inspection
procedure at all land, air, and sea ports of entry. Foreigners leaving the
country will again have to check in with US-VISIT so that the
Department
14 of Homeland Security will have information on whether
NATURALIZATION
THE NATURALIZATION PROCESS
Eligibility: An applicant for citizenship must be at least 18 years
of age, and must have resided continuously in the U.S. as a Legal
Permanent Resident for at least five years prior to filing. Permanent
residents who have been married to a U.S. citizen for three years are
eligible to apply for citizenship. There are special expedited provisions
for immigrants serving in the armed forces during a designated period
of armed conflict. Children who are adopted from another country
automatically have U.S. citizenship conferred to them as long as one
or both parents are U.S. citizens, the child is under 18, and the child
is legally residing in the U.S. with the U.S. citizen parent or parents.
Immigrants must be of “good moral character,” usually determined
by checking with the FBI for any record of a criminal background.
A person must also demonstrate an ability to speak, read, and write
ordinary English and have a general understanding of U.S. government
and history. Long-time older permanent residents are exempt from the
English requirement if they are 50 years or older and have been living
in the U.S. for at least 20 years, or if they are 55 years or older and have
been living in the U.S. for at least 15 years. These immigrants must still
demonstrate knowledge of U.S. history and government, but they may
do so in their native language. Certain persons with disabilities are
exempt from the requirement to demonstrate knowledge of U.S. history
and government.
Interview: After submitting an application and fee to U.S. Citizenship
and Immigration Services (USCIS), an appointment is made with the
applicant to take his or her fingerprints, which are checked by the FBI.
An interview is then scheduled with the applicant, during which an
immigration examiner reviews the application and determines if the
applicant meets the requirements for U.S. citizenship. To demonstrate
English proficiency and knowledge of U.S. history and government,
the applicant must be prepared to answer several history and civics
questions. They may also be asked to read a sentence or brief passage
from a USCIS textbook, and to write a sentence dictated by the examiner.
Oath and Swearing-In: Approved candidates for citizenship must take
an Oath of Renunciation and Allegiance, giving up foreign allegiances and
JUSTICE FOR IMMIGRANTS
titles and swearing to support and defend the Constitution and laws of
the U.S. If the person has a severe disability preventing him or her from
understanding, or communicating an understanding of, the meaning
of the Oath, the person may obtain a waiver of the Oath requirement.
The final step in the naturalization process is the swearing-in ceremony,
which can take place before a judge or in an administrative ceremony.
WHAT PUBLIC BENEFITS DO IMMIGRANTS AND
REFUGEES RECEIVE?
Determining whether or not an immigrant qualifies for public benefits
is a complicated matter. Eligibility for benefits depends on a number of
factors, among them:
† her immigration status;
† whether or not she entered the U.S. before or after the 1996
welfare reform law was enacted (August 22, 1996);
† length of residence in the U.S.;
† her income and resources and the income and resources
of the family member who sponsored her;
† work history;
† whether she is a child or adult;
† her state of residence; and
† the various other eligibility requirements of the
particular benefits program.
Most benefits programs are open only to long-term, lawful immigrants.
A small number of programs (such as school lunch programs and
emergency medical services) are open to all people in need.
For federal means-tested public benefits, newly-arrived legal
immigrants generally are:
† barred for their first five years in the U.S.; and
15
a journey of hope
† subject thereafter to a process called “deeming” where the income
and resources of the U.S. citizen or Lawful Permanent Resident
sponsor of the immigrant are added to the immigrant’s own income
to determine whether the immigrant is poor enough to qualify for
the benefit under the program’s financial guidelines.
Deeming continues until the new immigrant either becomes a citizen
or works 40 “qualifying quarters” (at least 10 years). The work of a
spouse (or of a parent in the case of a child under 18) also counts
towards the 40 quarters.
After becoming naturalized citizens, or working for 40 quarters,
legal immigrants are generally eligible for federal and state programs
provided they meet the general program criteria.
SHOULDN’T FAMILY SPONSORS
FOR THE IMMIGRANT’S CARE?
BE RESPONSIBLE
They are. U.S. citizens or Lawful Permanent Residents wishing to
sponsor an immigrant relative for admission to the U.S. must earn
enough (125% of the poverty level for the family size, including the
immigrant) to demonstrate that they are financially capable of
supporting the immigrant so that the immigrant does not need to
rely on public benefits. They also must sign a legally-enforceable
affidavit of support. This document makes the sponsor liable for the
immigrant’s use of means-tested benefits until the arriving immigrant
obtains citizenship or works 40 “qualifying quarters” (at least 10 years)
without using means-tested services.
ARE UNDOCUMENTED IMMIGRANTS ENTITLED TO
ANY FEDERAL GOVERNMENT SERVICES?
While immigrants who are not here legally are ineligible for nearly
all federal benefits, they are still eligible for certain very basic kinds
of assistance, including: emergency Medicaid, immunizations, testing
and treatment for the symptoms of communicable diseases, short-term
non-cash disaster relief, school lunches and breakfasts, and certain
other programs essential to public health and safety.
NATIONAL IMMIGRATION LAW CENTER |
WWW.NILC.ORG
Basic Facts about In-State Tuition for
Undocumented Immigrant Students
Revised: FEBRUARY 2009
■ Background
Ten states currently have laws permitting certain undocumented students who have attended
and graduated from their primary and secondary schools to pay the same tuition as their
classmates at public institutions of higher education. The states are California, Illinois, Kansas,
Nebraska, New Mexico, New York, Oklahoma, Texas, Utah, and Washington.
A majority of America’s undocumented immigrants live in these states, and several other
states are considering a similar change. In many of the states that have already done so, support
has been strongly bipartisan and the vote lopsided in favor of the bill. For example, in the Illinois
General Assembly, the vote in the House was 112 to 4 and, in the Senate, 55 to 1.
■ Requirements of These Laws
To qualify, all ten states that already have such laws require the students to have:
1. attended a school in the state for a certain number of years;
2. graduated from high school in the state; and
3. signed an affidavit stating that they have either applied to legalize their status or will do
so as soon as eligible.
These laws also provide that U.S. citizens or permanent residents who meet these requirements
but no longer live in the state are able to qualify for the same tuition rate.
■ Intent and Impact of These Laws
These bills are primarily intended to help children of immigrants who were brought to the U.S.
by their parents and work hard in school with the hope of going to college but then discover that
they face insurmountable obstacles. Currently, public colleges and universities are inconsistent in
their treatment of such students. A few schools deny them admission. If they are admitted,
students in most states are charged out-of-state tuition, which is several times the in-state tuition
rate. They are not eligible for federal financial aid, and the average income of parents of such
children is low. Even those who are eligible for in-state tuition almost always have to work at
full-time jobs throughout their college careers.
In the current context, very few of these students attend college. Experience in the states that
have passed in-state tuition bills suggests that such legislation does not deprive the states of the
revenue from large numbers of students who would otherwise pay out-of-state tuition. Rather, it
raises the percentage of high school graduates who pursue a college degree.
16
LOS ANGELES (Headquarters)
WASHINGTON, DC
3435 Wilshire Boulevard
Suite 2850
Los Angeles, CA 90010
213 639-3900
213 639-3911 fax
1444 Eye Street, NW
Suite 1110
Washington, DC 20005
202 216-0261
202 216-0266 fax
NATIONAL IMMIGRATION LAW CENTER |
WWW.NILC.ORG
■ Fairness to the Young People Involved
As has been true of immigrants in the past, these students tend to be hard-working and goaloriented, with high academic standing. Many of them do not realize until they are in the process
of applying to college that they will not be able to attend. High school counselors have testified
about the terrible task of breaking the news to the students that the dreams for which they have
worked so hard cannot come true. Many parents are concerned that if their hard-working, earnest
sons and daughters are unable to go forward, their discouragement might lead to problems.
■ Benefits to the State
According to experts in the states that have already passed this legislation, the cost of
implementation has been negligible. In-state tuition is not the same as free tuition. It is a
discount, but in fact the money paid by these students actually tends to increase school revenues
because it represents income that would not otherwise be there.
The bottom line is that our economic future depends on educating these young people.
These young immigrants are key to our ability to counteract the serious demographic
challenges we face. As baby boomers age, the number of retirees in the U.S. will swell. We are
all aware that we can no longer compete with the rest of the world for low-wage jobs. We must
raise the caliber of our workforce through higher education to have a chance to maintain a strong
economy. Each person who attends college and obtains a professional job means one less drain
on the social service (and possibly criminal justice) budgets of the state and an asset in terms of
payment of taxes and the attraction to the state of high-wage employers seeking well-educated
workers.
Currently, only about 5 to 10 percent of undocumented young people who graduate from high
school go on to college, compared with about 75 percent of their classmates.
■ Why These Students Are Undocumented
Some people have asked why the students involved do not apply for a “green card” to legalize
their status. The answer is that most of them would love to apply but that in the overwhelming
majority of cases they cannot. The legal grounds for such petitions have narrowed to the point
where it is almost impossible. The most likely outcome for a student who tries to apply is
deportation of his entire family — sometimes to a “home” nation the student cannot remember.
■ Fully Complies with Federal Law
Contrary to the claims of immigration restrictionists, federal law does not prohibit states from
providing in-state tuition to undocumented immigrants. Such a prohibition would have been
simple to write, but Congress declined to do so.
Rather, section 505 of the Illegal Immigrant Reform and Immigrant Reconciliation Act of
1996 (IIRIRA) prohibits states from providing any higher education benefit based on residency to
undocumented immigrants unless they provide the same benefit to U.S. citizens in the same
circumstances, regardless of their residence.
As discussed above, the ten states that have provided in-state tuition to most of their
undocumented immigrant residents have fully complied with this provision.
17
Basic Facts about In-State Tuition for Undocumented Immigrant Students
| PAGE 2 of 3
NATIONAL IMMIGRATION LAW CENTER |
WWW.NILC.ORG
■ Not a Loophole
It is often stated that these states are “getting around” the federal law, or that they are taking
advantage of a “loophole” in the federal law. This is slanted language. The law is very specific.
It does not preclude states from providing in-state tuition to undocumented residents of the state
so long as nonresidents in similar circumstances also qualify. The states that have passed in-state
tuition laws are complying with this law, not getting around it.
■ What about U.S. Citizens Who Want to Go to College?
Where state proposals have been defeated, anti-immigrant forces have scored rhetorical points
by highlighting the competition between immigrants and other applicants for scarce higher
education dollars. It should be remembered that the numerical impact of in-state tuition is
minimal: Less than 2 percent of this year’s graduating class are undocumented immigrants, and
only a fraction of these will attend college even if they are able to pay the in-state rate. In most
states, we are talking about only a few dozen or a few hundred particularly talented students.
The shortage of education dollars is real, but it is patently unfair to burden motivated and highachieving immigrant youth with this responsibility. Education quickly pays for itself. It is a
benefit to society, not just to those who go to school. And it strongly behooves us to fund
education sufficiently so that all who are qualified may complete their education.
Holding back immigrant students is the wrong way to boost the ambitions of others.
■ Won’t the Federal DREAM Act Solve This Problem?
Broadly supported legislation known as the DREAM Act (S. 2075, H.R. 5131) is currently
pending in the U.S. Congress and stands a reasonable chance of passage in the next year or so.
The DREAM Act would provide a path to legal status for individuals who are undocumented,
even though they were brought to the U.S. years ago as children and have lived most of their lives
here. It would also repeal the provision of law discussed above that penalizes states that provide
in-state tuition to undocumented immigrant residents by requiring them to provide the same
benefits to students who do not reside in the state.
But although the DREAM Act eliminates the federal penalty, it does not require states to
provide in-state tuition to any undocumented immigrants. Therefore, even after the DREAM Act
passes, each state will have to determine for itself whether to do so.
——————————
FOR MORE INFORMATION, CONTACT
Linton Joaquin, general counsel | [email protected]
18
Basic Facts about In-State Tuition for Undocumented Immigrant Students
| PAGE 3 of 3
Overview: Financial Aid and Admissions Documents
In this section, you will find the documents required to help a SB 1528 student apply for admission and
financial aid at colleges and universities in Texas.
Affidavit: This is an official way for the student to declare that (s)he meet the criteria to be eligible for
in-state tuition and state financial aid. Because it is a formal document, it must be notarized. Students
should beware that some notaries will charge them excessively for this. Students should not pay more
than $10-15 for each form, and usually notaries charge far less for each additional affidavit ($2-3). Some
schools, such as Austin Community College, have their own affidavit that they prefer students use.
TASFA: This form, whose acronym stands for the Texas Application for State Financial Aid, is only
available in paper form. The document includes a list of schools that accept it. If a school is not listed,
students should call to find out what steps to follow.
FAFSA: Students without a social security number cannot fill out the FAFSA online, however they can
request a paper copy of the FAFSA (in English or Spanish). Schools who do not accept the TASFA will
generally want this financial aid form. Students should contact the school directly to figure out the best
course of action.
19
AFFIDAVIT
STATE OF TEXAS
COUNTY OF ________________
§
§
§
Before me, the undersigned Notary Public, on this day personally appeared
__________________________________________________________________,
known to me, who being by me duly sworn upon his/her oath, deposed and said:
1. My name is ________________________________________________________.
I am _____ years of age and have personal knowledge of the facts stated herein and they
are all true and correct.
2. I graduated or will graduate from a Texas high school or received my GED certificate in
Texas.
3. I resided in Texas for three years leading up to graduation from high school or receiving my
GED certificate.
4. I have resided or will have resided in Texas for the 12 months prior the census date of the
semester in which I will enroll in _____________________________________________.
(college/university)
5. I have filed or will file an application to become a permanent resident at the earliest
opportunity that I am eligible to do so.
In witness whereof, this ____________day of __________________________, ____________.
_________________________________________
(Signature)
_________________________________________
(Printed Name)
_________________________________________
(Student I.D.#)
SUBCRIBED TO AND SWORN TO BEFORE ME, on the ___________________ day of
________________________________________, ___________________________, to
certify which witness my hand and official seal.
__________________________________
Notary Public in and for the State of Texas
20
SM
Free Application for Federal Student Aid
July 1, 2010
U.S. Department of Education
Federal Student Aid
—
Use this form to apply free for federal and
state student grants, work-study and loans.
Or apply free online at
www.fafsa.gov.
®
Applying by the Deadlines
For federal aid, submit your application as early as possible, but no earlier than
January 1, 2010. We must receive your application no later than June 30, 2011.
Your college must have your correct, complete information by your last day of
enrollment in the 2010-2011 school year.
STATE AID DEADLINES
Check with your financial aid administrator for these
states and territories:
AL, AS *, AZ, CO, FM *, GA, GU *, HI *, MH *, MP *, NC,
NE, NM, NV *, PR, PW *, SD *, TX *, UT, VA *, VI *, VT *,
WA, WI and WY *.
Pay attention to the symbols that may be listed after
your state deadline.
AK
AR
For state or college aid, the deadline may be as early as January 2010. See the table
to the right for state deadlines. You may also need to complete additional forms.
Check with your high school guidance counselor or a financial aid administrator at
your college about state and college sources of student aid and deadlines.
If you are filing close to one of these deadlines, we recommend you file online at
www.fafsa.gov. This is the fastest and easiest way to apply for aid.
Using Your Tax Return
If you are supposed to file a 2009 federal income tax return, we recommend that
you complete it before filling out this form. If you have not yet completed your 2009
tax return, you can still submit your FAFSA using best estimates. After you submit
your tax return, correct any income or tax information that is different from what
you initially submitted on your FAFSA.
Filling Out the FAFSA
SM
For more information or help in filling out the FAFSA, go to
www.studentaid.ed.gov/completefafsa or call 1-800-4-FED-AID
(1-800-433-3243). TTY users (for the hearing impaired) may call 1-800-730-8913.
Fill the answer fields directly on your screen or print the form and complete it by hand.
Your answers will be read electronically; therefore, if you complete the form by hand:
t
tQSJOUDMFBSMZJO$"1*5"-MFUUFSTBOETLJQB
CPYCFUXFFOXPSET
tSFQPSUEPMMBSBNPVOUTTVDIBT
MJLFUIJT
Correct
1 5
$
Incorrect
E L M
x √
CA
CT
DC
DE
FL
IA
ID
IL
IN
KS
KY
LA
MA
MD
ME
MI
MN
MO
MS
MT
ND
NH
NJ
S T
1 2 3 5 6
,
no cents
Blue is for student information and purple is for parent information.
Mailing Your FAFSA
SM
After you complete this application, make a copy of pages 3 through 8 for your
records. Then mail the original of pages 3 through 8 to:
NY
OH
OK
OR
PA
Federal Student Aid Programs, P.O. Box 4692, Mt. Vernon, IL 62864-4692.
After your application is processed, you will receive a summary of your information
in your Student Aid Report (SAR). If you provide an e-mail address, your SAR will be
sent by e-mail within 3-5 days. If you do not provide an e-mail address, your SAR will
be mailed to you within three weeks. If you would like to check the status of your
FAFSA, go to www.fafsa.gov or call 1-800-4-FED-AID.
Let’s Get Started!
Now go to page 3 of the application form and begin filling it out. Refer to the
21
notes as instructed.
RI
SC
TN
WV
April 15, 2010 (date received)
Academic Challenge - June 1, 2010 (date received)
Workforce Grant - Contact the financial aid office.
Higher Education Opportunity Grant
- June 1, 2010 (fall term) (date received)
- November 1, 2010 (spring term) (date received)
Initial awards - March 2, 2010 + *
Additional community college awards
- September 2, 2010 (date postmarked) + *
February 15, 2010 (date received) # *
June 30, 2010 (date received by state) # *
April 15, 2010 (date received)
May 15, 2010 (date processed)
July 1, 2010 (date received)
Opportunity Grant - March 1, 2010 (date received) # *
As soon as possible after 1/1/2010. Awards made
until funds are depleted.
March 10, 2010 (date received)
April 1, 2010 (date received) # *
March 15, 2010 (date received) #
July 1, 2010 (date received)
May 1, 2010 (date received) #
March 1, 2010 (date received)
May 1, 2010 (date received)
March 1, 2010 (date received)
30 days after term starts (date received)
April 1, 2010 (date received) #
MTAG and MESG Grants - September 15, 2010 (date
received) #
HELP Scholarship - March 31, 2010 (date received) #
March 1, 2010 (date received) #
March 15, 2010 (date received)
May 1, 2010 (date received)
2009-2010 Tuition Aid Grant recipients - June 1, 2010
(date received)
All other applicants
- October 1, 2010, fall & spring terms (date received)
- March 1, 2011, spring term only (date received)
May 1, 2011 (date received) + *
October 1, 2010 (date received)
April 15, 2010 (date received) #
OSAC Scholarship - March 1, 2010
Oregon Opportunity Grant - Contact the financial aid
office.
All 2009-2010 State Grant recipients & all non2009-2010 State Grant recipients in degree program
- May 1, 2010 (date received) *
All other applicants - August 1, 2010 (date received) *
March 1, 2010 (date received) #
Tuition Grants - June 30, 2010 (date received)
SC Commission on Higher Education - no deadline
State Grant - February 15, 2010 (date received) #
State Lottery - September 1, 2010 (date received) #
April 15, 2010 (date received) # *
# For priority consideration, submit application by date specified.
+ Applicants encouraged to obtain proof of mailing.
* Additional form may be required.
Federal Student Aid logo, arrow symbol and FAFSA are service marks or registered service marks of Federal Student Aid, U.S. Department of Education.
STATE AID DEADLINES
If you or your family has unusual circumstances that might affect your financial
situation (such as loss of employment), complete this form to the extent you can, then
submit it as instructed and consult with the financial aid office at the college you plan
to attend.
tVTFCMBDLJOLBOEöMMJODJSDMFTDPNQMFUFMZ
®
June 30, 2011
Notes for questions 14 and 15 (page 3)
If you are an eligible noncitizen, write in your eight- or nine-digit Alien
Registration Number. Generally, you are an eligible noncitizen if you are
(1) a permanent U.S. resident with a Permanent Resident Card (I-551); (2)
a conditional permanent resident (I-551C); or (3) the holder of an ArrivalDeparture Record (I-94) from the Department of Homeland Security showing
any one of the following designations: “Refugee,” “Asylum Granted,” “Parolee”
(I-94 confirms that you were paroled for a minimum of one year and status has
not expired), “Victim of human trafficking,” T-Visa holder (T-1, T-2, T-3, etc.) or
“Cuban-Haitian Entrant.”
If you are in the U.S. on an F1 or F2 student visa, a J1 or J2 exchange visitor
visa, or a G series visa (pertaining to international organizations), select “No,
I am not a citizen or eligible noncitizen.” You will not be eligible for federal
student aid; however, you should still complete the application because you
may be eligible for state or college aid.
Notes for question 22 (page 3)
The Selective Service System, and the registration requirement for young
men, preserves America’s ability to provide manpower in an emergency to the
U.S. Armed Forces. Almost all men—ages 18 through 25—must register. For
more information about Selective Service, visit www.sss.gov.
Notes for question 30 (page 4)
For undergraduates, select the enrollment status for the college you will most
likely attend.
t “Full-time” generally means taking at least 12 credit hours in a term or 24
clock hours per week.
t “Three-quarter-time” generally means taking at least 9 credit hours in a
term or 18 clock hours per week.
t “Half-time” generally means taking at least 6 credit hours in a term or 12
clock hours per week.
Notes for question 32 (page 4)
The Teacher Education Assistance for College and Higher Education (TEACH)
Grant Program provides grants to students enrolled in a participating college
who intend to teach in a high-need field in a public or private elementary
or secondary school that serves students from low-income families. Answer
“Yes” to learn more about the TEACH Grant. Answer “No” if you are not
interested in the TEACH Grant. Answer “Don’t know” if you are not sure but
would like more information about the TEACH Grant. Additional information
about the TEACH Grant Program is available at www.teachgrant.ed.gov.
Notes for questions 34 (page 4)
and 81 (page 6)
If you filed or will file a foreign tax return, a tax return with Puerto Rico,
another U.S. territory (e.g., Guam, American Samoa, the U.S. Virgin Islands,
Swain’s Island or the Northern Marianas Islands) or one of the Freely
Associated States (i.e., the Republic of Palau, the Republic of the Marshall
Islands or the Federated States of Micronesia), use the information from that
return to fill out this form. If you filed a foreign return, convert all monetary
units to U.S. dollars, using the exchange rate that is in effect today. To view
the daily exchange rate, go to www.federalreserve.gov/releases/h10/
update.
Notes for questions 35 (page 4)
and 82 (page 6)
Notes for questions 38 (page 4)
and 86 (page 7) — Notes for those who filed a 1040EZ
On the 1040EZ, if a person didn’t check either box on line 5, enter
01 if he or she is single, or 02 if he or she is married. If a person
checked either the “you” or “spouse” box on line 5, use 1040EZ
worksheet line F to determine the number of exemptions ($3,650
equals one exemption).
Notes for questions 42 and 43 (page 4)
and 90 and 91 (page 7)
Net worth means current value minus debt. If net worth is
negative, enter 0.
Investments include real estate (do not include the home you
live in), trust funds, UGMA and UTMA accounts, money market
funds, mutual funds, certificates of deposit, stocks, stock options,
bonds, other securities, installment and land sale contracts
(including mortgages held), commodities, etc.
Investments also include qualified educational benefits or
education savings accounts (e.g. Coverdell savings accounts, 529
college savings plans and the refund value of 529 prepaid tuition
plans). For a student who does not report parental information,
the accounts owned by the student (and/or the student’s spouse)
are reported as student investments in question 42. For a student
who must report parental information, the accounts are reported
as parental investments in question 90, including all accounts
owned by the student and all accounts owned by the parents for
any member of the household.
Investments do not include the home you live in, the value
of life insurance, retirement plans (401[k] plans, pension funds,
annuities, non-education IRAs, Keogh plans, etc.) or cash, savings
and checking accounts already reported in questions 41 and 89.
Investments also do not include UGMA and UTMA accounts for
which you are the custodian, but not the owner.
Investment value means the current balance or market value of
these investments as of today. Investment debt means only those
debts that are related to the investments.
Business and/or investment farm value includes the market
value of land, buildings, machinery, equipment, inventory, etc.
Business and/or investment farm debt means only those debts for
which the business or investment farm was used as collateral.
Business value does not include the value of a small business
if your family owns and controls more than 50 percent of the
business and the business has 100 or fewer full-time or full-time
equivalent employees. For small business value, your family
includes (1) persons directly related to you, such as a parent,
sister or cousin, or (2) persons who are or were related to you by
marriage, such as a spouse, stepparent or sister-in-law.
Investment farm value does not include the value of a family
farm that you (your spouse and/or your parents) live on and
operate.
Notes for questions 49 (page 5)
Answer “Yes” if you are currently serving in the U.S. Armed Forces
or are a National Guard or Reserves enlistee who is on active duty
for other than state or training purposes.
In general, a person is eligible to file a 1040A or 1040EZ if he or she makes
less than $100,000, does not itemize deductions, does not receive income
from his or her own business or farm and does not receive alimony. A person
is not eligible to file a 1040A or 1040EZ if he or she makes $100,000 or more,
itemizes deductions, receives income from his or her own business or farm,
is self-employed, receives alimony or is required to file Schedule D for capital
gains. If you filed a 1040 only to claim Hope or Lifetime Learning credits, and
you would have otherwise been eligible for a 1040A or 1040EZ, you should
22
answer “Yes” to this question. If you filed a 1040 and were not required to file
a tax return, you should answer “Yes” to this question.
Page 2
Answer “No” if you are a National Guard or Reserves enlistee who
is on active duty for state or training purposes.
Notes continued on page 9.
SM
Free Application for Federal Student Aid
July 1, 2010
U.S. Department of Education
Federal Student Aid
—
June 30, 2011
®
Step One (Student): For questions 1-32, leave blank any questions that do not apply to you (the student).
OMB # 1845-0001
Your full name (exactly as it appears on your Social Security card)
1. Last
name
3. Middle
initial
2. First
name
Your mailing address
4. Number and
street (include
apt. number)
5. City (and
country if not
U.S.)
6. State
8. Your Social Security Number
–
9. Your date
of birth
–
MONTH
DAY
7. ZIP code
10. Your permanent telephone number
YEAR
(
MM DD 1 9 Y Y
)
–
Your Driver’s license number (if you have one)
11. Driver’s license
number
12. Driver’s license
state
13. Your e-mail address. If you provide your e-mail address, we will communicate with you electronically. For example, when your FAFSA has been processed, you will
be notified by e-mail. Your e-mail address will also be shared with your state and the colleges listed on your FAFSA to allow them to communicate with you. If you
prefer to be contacted by postal mail or do not have an e-mail address, please leave this field blank.
@
14. Are you a U.S.
citizen?
Mark only one.
See Notes page 2.
Yes, I am a U.S. citizen (U.S. national). Skip to question 16.
1
No, but I am an eligible noncitizen. Fill in question 15.
2
No, I am not a citizen or eligible noncitizen. Skip to question 16.
3
15. Alien Registration Number
A
Report your marital status as of the date you sign your FAFSA.
If your marital status changes after you sign your FAFSA, you cannot change this information.
17. Month and year you
16. What is your
1
3
I am single
I am separated
were married,
marital status as
separated,
2
4
of today?
I am married/remarried
I am divorced or widowed
divorced or widowed
18. What is your
state of legal
residence?
21. Are you male
or female?
STATE
19. Did you become a legal
resident of this state
before January 1, 2005?
Male
1
Female
2
If female, skip to question 23.
Yes
1
No
2
20. If the answer to question 19
is “No,” give month and year
you became a legal resident.
MONTH
YEAR
MM Y Y Y Y
MONTH
YEAR
MM Y Y Y Y
22. Most male students must register with Selective Service to receive
federal aid. If you are male, age 18-25 and not registered, fill in the
circle and we will register you. See Notes page 2.
Register me
1
No
1
Yes
3
23. Have you been convicted for the possession or sale of illegal drugs for an offense that occurred while you were receiving
federal student aid (such as grants, loans or work-study)?
Answer “No” if you have never received federal student aid or if you have never had a drug conviction while receiving federal student aid.
If you have a drug conviction for an offense that occurred while you were receiving federal student aid, answer “Yes,” but complete and
submit this application, and we will mail you a worksheet to help you determine if your conviction affects your eligibility for aid. If you are
unsure how to answer this question, call 1-800-433-3243 for help.
Some states and colleges offer aid based on the level of schooling your parents completed.
24. Highest school your father completed
Middle school/Jr. high
1
High school
2
College or beyond
3
Other/unknown
4
25. Highest school your mother completed
Middle school/Jr. high
1
High school
2
College or beyond
3
Other/unknown
4
26. When you begin college in the 2010-2011 school year, what will be your high school completion status?
High school diploma ....................................................................
23
General Educational Development (GED) certificate ........
For Help–www.studentaid.ed.gov/completefafsa
1
Homeschooled ....................................................................
3
2
None of the above ..............................................................
4
Page 3
Step One CONTINUED from page 3
27. Will you have your first bachelor’s degree before July 1, 2010?
Yes
28. When you begin the 2010-2011 school year, what will be your
grade level?
No
1
2
29. When you begin the 2010-2011 school year, what degree or certificate
will you be working on?
Never attended college and 1st year undergraduate .........................
0
1st bachelor’s degree .........................................................................................................
1
1
2nd bachelor’s degree .........................................................................................................
2
Attended college before and 1st year undergraduate ........................
2
3rd year undergraduate/junior ....................................................................
3
4th year undergraduate/senior ....................................................................
4
5th year/other undergraduate ....................................................................
5
Associate degree (occupational or technical program) ..........................................
Associate degree (general education or transfer program) ..................................
Certificate or diploma (occupational, technical or education program of
less than two years) ............................................................................................................
Certificate or diploma (occupational, technical or education program of
two or more years) ................................................................................................................
3
2nd year undergraduate/sophomore .......................................................
6
Teaching credential (nondegree program) ................................................................
Graduate or professional degree ....................................................................................
7
1st year graduate/professional ....................................................................
Continuing graduate/professional or beyond ......................................
7
Other/undecided ..................................................................................................................
9
30. When you begin the 2010–2011 school year, what do you expect
your enrollment status to be? See Notes page 2.
4
5
6
8
31. In addition to grants, are you interested in being considered for workstudy or student loans?
Full-time ...............................................................................................................
1
Work-study (student aid that you earn through work) ..........................................
1
Three-quarter-time ..........................................................................................
2
Student loans (which you must pay back) ..................................................................
2
Half-time ..............................................................................................................
3
Both work-study and student loans ..............................................................................
3
Less than half-time ...........................................................................................
4
Neither ......................................................................................................................................
4
Don’t know .........................................................................................................
5
Don’t know ..............................................................................................................................
5
32. Are you planning to complete course work necessary to become an elementary or secondary
school teacher, either now or in the future? See Notes page 2.
Step Two (Student):
Yes
No
1
2
Don’t know
3
Answer questions 33–58 about yourself (the student). If you are single, separated, divorced or widowed,
answer only about yourself. If you are married as of today, include information about your spouse
(husband or wife).
33. For 2009, have you (the student) completed your IRS income tax
return or another tax return listed in question 34?
34. What income tax return did you file or will you file for 2009?
IRS 1040 ...................................................................................................................................
1
I have already completed my return. ........................................................
1
IRS 1040A or 1040EZ ...........................................................................................................
2
I will file, but I have not yet completed my return. ...............................
2
A foreign tax return. See Notes page 2. .....................................................................
3
I’m not going to file. Skip to question 39. .............................................
3
A tax return with Puerto Rico, another U.S. territory or Freely Associated
State. See Notes page 2. ..................................................................................................
35. If you have filed or will file a 1040, were you eligible to file a 1040A or 1040EZ?
See Notes page 2.
Yes
No
1
2
Don’t know
4
3
For questions 36–45, if the answer is zero or the question does not apply to you, enter 0. Report whole dollar amounts with no cents.
36. What was your (and spouse’s) adjusted gross income for 2009? Adjusted gross income is on IRS Form 1040—
line 37; 1040A—line 21; or 1040EZ—line 4.
$
37. Enter your (and spouse’s) income tax for 2009. Income tax amount is on IRS Form 1040—line 55; 1040A—
line 35; or 1040EZ—line 11.
,
$
,
38. Enter your (and spouse’s) exemptions for 2009. Exemptions are on IRS Form 1040—line 6d or Form 1040A—
line 6d. For Form 1040EZ, see Notes page 2.
Questions 39 and 40 ask about earnings (wages, salaries, tips, etc.) in 2009. Answer the questions whether or not a tax return was filed. This information
may be on the W-2 forms, or on IRS Form 1040—lines 7 + 12 + 18 + Box 14 of IRS Schedule K-1 (Form 1065); or 1040A—line 7; or 1040EZ—line 1. If any
individual earning item is negative, do not include that item in your calculation.
39. How much did you earn from working in 2009?
$
40. How much did your spouse earn from working in 2009?
$
41. As of today, what is your (and spouse’s) total current balance of cash, savings and checking accounts?
Do not include student financial aid.
$
42. As of today, what is the net worth of your (and spouse’s) investments, including real estate? Don’t include the
home you live in. Net worth means current value minus debt. See Notes page 2.
$
43. As of today, what is the net worth of your (and spouse’s) current businesses and/or investment farms?
Don’t include
a family farm or family business with 100 or fewer full-time or full-time equivalent employees.
24
$
See Notes page 2.
For Help — 1-800-433-3243
Page 4
,
,
,
,
,
Step Two CONTINUED on page 5
Step Two CONTINUED from page 4
44. Student’s 2009 Additional Financial Information (Enter the combined amounts for you and your spouse.)
a. Education credits (Hope and Lifetime Learning tax credits) from IRS Form 1040—line 49 or 1040A—line 31.
$
b. Child support paid because of divorce or separation or as a result of a legal requirement. Don’t include support for children in
your household, as reported in question 94.
$
c. Taxable earnings from need-based employment programs, such as Federal Work-Study and need-based employment portions
of fellowships and assistantships.
$
d. Student grant and scholarship aid reported to the IRS in your adjusted gross income. Includes AmeriCorps benefits (awards,
living allowances and interest accrual payments), as well as grant and scholarship portions of fellowships and assistantships.
$
e. Combat pay or special combat pay. Only enter the amount that was taxable and included in your adjusted gross income.
Do not enter untaxed combat pay reported on the W-2 (Box 12, Code Q).
$
f. Earnings from work under a cooperative education program offered by a college.
,
,
,
,
,
$
,
45. Student’s 2009 Untaxed Income (Enter the combined amounts for you and your spouse.)
a. Payments to tax-deferred pension and savings plans (paid directly or withheld from earnings), including, but not limited
to, amounts reported on the W-2 forms in Boxes 12a through 12d, codes D, E, F, G, H and S.
$
b. IRA deductions and payments to self-employed SEP, SIMPLE, Keogh and other qualified plans from IRS Form 1040—line 28 +
line 32 or 1040A—line 17.
$
c. Child support received for any of your children. Don’t include foster care or adoption payments.
$
d. Tax exempt interest income from IRS Form 1040—line 8b or 1040A—line 8b.
$
e. Untaxed portions of IRA distributions from IRS Form 1040—lines (15a minus 15b) or 1040A—lines (11a minus 11b).
Exclude rollovers. If negative, enter a zero here.
$
f. Untaxed portions of pensions from IRS Form 1040—lines (16a minus 16b) or 1040A—lines (12a minus 12b).
Exclude rollovers. If negative, enter a zero here.
$
g. Housing, food and other living allowances paid to members of the military, clergy and others (including cash payments and cash
value of benefits). Don’t include the value of on-base military housing or the value of a basic military allowance for housing.
$
h. Veterans noneducation benefits, such as Disability, Death Pension, or Dependency & Indemnity Compensation (DIC) and/or VA
Educational Work-Study allowances.
i. Other untaxed income not reported in items 45a through 45h, such as workers’ compensation, disability, etc.
Don’t include student aid, earned income credit, additional child tax credit, welfare payments, untaxed Social Security benefits,
Supplemental Security Income, Workforce Investment Act educational benefits, on-base military housing or a military housing
allowance, combat pay (if you are not a tax filer), benefits from flexible spending arrangements (e.g., cafeteria plans), foreign
income exclusion or credit for federal tax on special fuels.
j. Money received, or paid on your behalf (e.g., bills), not reported elsewhere on this form.
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
$
,
$
,
$
,
Step Three (Student): Answer all questions in this step to determine if you will need to provide parental information.
46. Were you born before January 1, 1987? ......................................................................................................................................................................................
Yes
1
No
2
47. As of today, are you married? (Also answer “Yes” if you are separated but not divorced.) ...........................................................................
48. At the beginning of the 2010–2011 school year, will you be working on a master’s or doctorate program (such as an
MA, MBA, MD, JD, PhD, EdD, graduate certificate, etc.)? ....................................................................................................................................................
Yes
1
No
2
Yes
1
No
2
49. Are you currently serving on active duty in the U.S. Armed Forces for purposes other than training? See Notes page 2.
Yes
1
No
2
50. Are you a veteran of the U.S. Armed Forces? See Notes page 9. ....................................................................................................................................
Yes
1
No
2
51. Do you have children who will receive more than half of their support from you between July 1, 2010 and June 30, 2011?
52. Do you have dependents (other than your children or spouse) who live with you and who receive more than half of
their support from you, now and through June 30, 2011? .............................................................................................................................................
53. At any time since you turned age 13, were both your parents deceased, were you in foster care or were you a
dependent or ward of the court? See Notes page 9. .............................................................................................................................................................
Yes
1
No
2
Yes
1
No
2
Yes
1
No
2
54. Are you or were you an emancipated minor as determined by a court in your state of legal residence? See Notes page 9.
Yes
1
No
2
55. Are you or were you in legal guardianship as determined by a court in your state of legal residence? See Notes page 9.
56. At any time on or after July 1, 2009, did your high school or school district homeless liaison determine that you were
an unaccompanied youth who was homeless? See Notes page 9. .............................................................................................................................
57. At any time on or after July 1, 2009, did the director of an emergency shelter or transitional housing program funded
by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development determine that you were an unaccompanied youth who
was homeless? See Notes page 9. ....................................................................................................................................................................................................
58. At any time on or after July 1, 2009, did the director of a runaway or homeless youth basic center or transitional living
program determine
that you were an unaccompanied youth who was homeless or were self-supporting and at risk of
25
being homeless? See Notes page 9. ................................................................................................................................................................................................
Yes
1
No
2
Yes
1
No
2
Yes
1
No
2
Yes
1
No
2
For Help–www.studentaid.ed.gov/completefafsa
Page 5
If you (the student) answered “No” to every question in Step Three, go to Step Four.
If you answered “Yes” to any question in Step Three, skip Step Four and go to Step Five on page 8.
(Health professions students: Your college may require you to complete Step Four even if you answered “Yes” to any Step Three question.)
If you believe that you are unable to provide parental information, see Notes page 9.
Step Four (Parent Information): Complete this step if you (the student)
answered “No” to all questions in Step Three.
Answer all the questions in Step Four about your parents even if you do not live with them. Grandparents, foster parents, legal guardians, aunts and uncles are not
considered parents on this form unless they have legally adopted you. If your parents are living and married to each other, answer the questions about them. If your
parent is single, widowed, divorced, separated or remarried, see the Notes on page 9 for additional instructions.
59. What is your parents’ marital status as of today?
Married or remarried
1
Divorced or separated
3
Single
2
Widowed
4
60. Month and year
they were married,
separated, divorced
or widowed
MONTH
YEAR
MM Y Y Y Y
What are the Social Security Numbers, names and dates of birth of the parents reporting information on this form? If your parent does not have a
Social Security Number, you must enter 000-00-0000. Enter two digits for each day and month (e.g., for May 31, enter 05 31).
61. FATHER’S/STEPFATHER’S SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBER
–
62. FATHER’S/STEPFATHER’S LAST NAME, AND
–
66. MOTHER’S/STEPMOTHER’S LAST NAME, AND
67. FIRST INITIAL
–
64. FATHER’S/STEPFATHER’S DATE OF BIRTH
MM DD 1 9 Y Y
,
65. MOTHER’S/STEPMOTHER’S SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBER
–
63. FIRST INITIAL
68. MOTHER’S/STEPMOTHER’S DATE OF BIRTH
MM DD 1 9 Y Y
,
69. Your parents’ e-mail address. If you provide your parents’ e-mail address, we will let them know your FAFSA has been processed. This e-mail address will
also be shared with your state and the colleges listed on your FAFSA to allow them to communicate with your parents.
@
70. What is your
parents’
state of legal
residence?
STATE
71. Did your parents
become legal
residents of this state
before January 1, 2005?
Yes
1
No
2
72. If the answer to question 71 is “No,”
give month and year legal residency
began for the parent who has
lived in the state the longest.
MONTH
YEAR
MM Y Y Y Y
73. How many people are in your parents’ household?
Include:
t yourself, even if you don’t live with your parents,
t your parents,
t your parents’ other children if (a) your parents will provide more than half of their support between July 1, 2010 and June 30, 2011, or
(b) the children could answer “No” to every question in Step Three on page 5 of this form, and
t other people if they now live with your parents, your parents provide more than half of their support and your parents will continue to
provide more than half of their support between July 1, 2010 and June 30, 2011.
74. How many people in your parents’ household will be college students between July 1, 2010 and June 30, 2011?
Always count yourself as a college student. Do not include your parents. You may include others only if they will attend, at least half- time
in 2010-2011, a program that leads to a college degree or certificate.
In 2008 or 2009, did you, your parents or anyone in your parents’ household (from question 73) receive benefits from any of the federal benefits
programs listed? Mark all the programs that apply. Answering these questions will not reduce your eligibility for student aid or for these other benefits. Food Stamps
or TANF may have a different name in your parents’ state. Call 1-800-4-FED-AID to find out the name of the state’s program.
75. Supplemental
Security
Income
76. Food
Stamps
77. Free or
Reduced
Price Lunch
78. Temporary Assistance
for Needy Families
(TANF)
80. For 2009, have your parents completed their IRS income tax return
or another tax return listed in question 81?
79. Special Supplemental
Nutrition Program f o r W om e n ,
Infants and Children (WIC)
81. What income tax return did your parents file or will they file for 2009?
IRS 1040 ...................................................................................................................
1
IRS 1040A or 1040EZ ...........................................................................................
2
A foreign tax return. See Notes page 2. .....................................................
3
My parents have already completed their return .....................................
1
My parents will file, but they have not yet completed their return ....
2
3
A tax return with Puerto Rico, another U.S. territory or Freely
Associated State. See Notes page 2. ............................................................
My parents are not going to file. Skip to question 87. ........................
82. If your parents have filed or will file a 1040,
were they eligible to file a 1040A or 1040EZ?
See Notes page 2.
26
For Help — 1-800-433-3243
83. As of today, is either of your parents a
dislocated worker? See Notes page 9.
4
Yes
1
Yes
1
No
2
No
2
Don’t know
3
Don’t know
3
Page 6
Step Four CONTINUED on page 7
Step Four CONTINUED from page 6
For questions 84–93, if the answer is zero or the question does not apply, enter 0. Report whole dollar amounts with no cents.
84. What was your parents’ adjusted gross income for 2009? Adjusted gross income is on IRS Form 1040—line 37;
1040A—line 21; or 1040EZ—line 4.
$
85. Enter your parents’ income tax for 2009. Income tax amount is on IRS Form 1040—line 55; 1040A—line 35; or
1040EZ—line 11.
$
,
,
86. Enter your parents’ exemptions for 2009. Exemptions are on IRS Form 1040—line 6d or on Form 1040A—line 6d.
For Form 1040EZ, see Notes page 2.
Questions 87 and 88 ask about earnings (wages, salaries, tips, etc.) in 2009. Answer the questions whether or not a tax return was filed. This information may be on
the W-2 forms, on IRS Form 1040—lines 7 + 12 + 18 + Box 14 of IRS Schedule K-1 (Form 1065); on 1040A—line 7; or on 1040EZ—line 1. If any individual earning item is
negative, do not include that item in your calculation.
87. How much did your father/stepfather earn from working in 2009?
$
88. How much did your mother/stepmother earn from working in 2009?
$
89. As of today, what is your parents’ total current balance of cash, savings and checking accounts?
$
90. As of today, what is the net worth of your parents’ investments, including real estate? Don’t include the home
you live in. Net worth means current value minus debt. See Notes page 2.
91. As of today, what is the net worth of your parents’ current businesses and/or investment farms?
Don’t include a family farm or family business with 100 or fewer full-time or full-time equivalent employees. See
,
,
,
$
,
$
,
Notes page 2.
92. Parents’ 2009 Additional Financial Information (Enter the amounts for your parent[s].)
a. Education credits (Hope and Lifetime Learning tax credits) from IRS Form 1040—line 49 or 1040A—line 31.
$
b. Child support paid because of divorce or separation or as a result of a legal requirement. Don’t include support for children
in your parents’ household, as reported in question 73.
$
c. Your parents’ taxable earnings from need-based employment programs, such as Federal Work-Study and need-based
employment portions of fellowships and assistantships.
$
d. Student grant and scholarship aid reported to the IRS in your parents’ adjusted gross income. Includes AmeriCorps benefits
(awards, living allowances and interest accrual payments), as well as grant and scholarship portions of fellowships and
assistantships.
$
e. Combat pay or special combat pay. Only enter the amount that was taxable and included in your parents’ adjusted
gross income. Do not enter untaxed combat pay reported on the W-2 (Box 12, Code Q).
$
f. Earnings from work under a cooperative education program offered by a college.
$
,
,
,
,
,
,
93. Parents’ 2009 Untaxed Income (Enter the amounts for your parent[s].)
a. Payments to tax-deferred pension and savings plans (paid directly or withheld from earnings), including, but not limited to,
amounts reported on the W-2 forms in Boxes 12a through 12d, codes D, E, F, G, H and S.
$
b. IRA deductions and payments to self-employed SEP, SIMPLE, Keogh and other qualified plans from IRS Form 1040—line 28 +
line 32 or 1040A—line 17.
$
c. Child support received for any of your parents’ children. Don’t include foster care or adoption payments.
$
d. Tax exempt interest income from IRS Form 1040—line 8b or 1040A—line 8b.
$
e. Untaxed portions of IRA distributions from IRS Form 1040—lines (15a minus 15b) or 1040A—lines (11a minus 11b).
Exclude rollovers. If negative, enter a zero here.
$
f. Untaxed portions of pensions from IRS Form 1040—lines (16a minus 16b) or 1040A—lines (12a minus 12b).
Exclude rollovers. If negative, enter a zero here.
$
g. Housing, food and other living allowances paid to members of the military, clergy and others (including cash payments and
cash value of benefits). Don’t include the value of on-base military housing or the value of a basic military allowance for
housing.
$
h. Veterans noneducation benefits, such as Disability, Death Pension, or Dependency & Indemnity Compensation (DIC) and/or
VA Educational Work-Study allowances.
i. Other untaxed income not reported in items 93a through 93h, such as workers’ compensation, disability, etc.
Don’t include student aid, earned income credit, additional child tax credit, welfare payments, untaxed Social Security benefits,
Supplemental Security Income, Workforce investment Act educational benefits, on-base military housing or a military housing
allowance,27
combat pay (if your parents are not tax filers), benefits from flexible spending arrangements (e.g., cafeteria plans),
foreign income exclusion or credit for federal tax on special fuels.
For Help–www.studentaid.ed.gov/completefafsa
Page 7
$
$
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
Step Five (Student): Complete this step only if you (the student) answered “Yes” to any questions in Step Three.
94. How many people are in your household?
Include:
t yourself (and your spouse),
t your children, if you will provide more than half of their support between July 1, 2010 and June 30, 2011, and
t other people if they now live with you, you provide more than half of their support and you will continue to provide more than half of
their support between July 1, 2010 and June 30, 2011.
95. How many people in your (and your spouse’s) household will be college students between July 1, 2010 and June 30, 2011?
Always count yourself as a college student. Include others only if they will attend, at least half-time in 2010-2011, a program that leads to
a college degree or certificate.
In 2008 or 2009, did you (or your spouse) or anyone in your household (from question 94) receive benefits from any of the federal benefits programs
listed? Mark all the programs that apply. Answering these questions will not reduce your eligibility for student aid or for these other benefits. Food Stamps or TANF may
have a different name in your state. Call 1-800-4-FED-AID to find out the name of the state’s program.
96. Supplemental
Security
Income
97. Food
Stamps
98. Free or
Reduced
Price Lunch
99. Temporary Assistance
for Needy Families
(TANF)
100. Special Supplemental
Nutrition Program for W om e n ,
Infants and Children (WIC)
101. As of today, are you (or your spouse) a dislocated worker? See Notes page 9.
Yes
1
No
2
Don’t know
3
Step Six (Student): Indicate which colleges you want to receive your FAFSA information.
Enter the six-digit federal school code and your housing plans. You can find the school codes at www.fafsa.gov or you can call 1-800-4-FED-AID. If you
cannot get the code, write in the complete name, address, city and state of the college. For state aid, you may wish to list your preferred college first. To
have more colleges receive your FAFSA information, read What is the FAFSA? on page 10.
1ST FEDERAL SCHOOL CODE
102.a
OR
OR
OR
1
with parent
2
off campus
NAME OF
COLLEGE
ADDRESS
AND CITY
3
102.d
on campus
1
with parent
2
off campus
3
NAME OF
COLLEGE
ADDRESS
AND CITY
102.f
on campus
1
with parent
2
off campus
3
on campus
1
with parent
2
off campus
3
STATE
4TH FEDERAL SCHOOL CODE
102.g
ADDRESS
AND CITY
on campus
STATE
3RD FEDERAL SCHOOL CODE
102.e
102.b
STATE
2ND FEDERAL SCHOOL CODE
102.c
HOUSING PLANS
STATE
NAME OF
COLLEGE
OR
NAME OF
COLLEGE
ADDRESS
AND CITY
102.h
Step Seven (Student and Parent): Read, sign and date.
If you are the student, by signing this application you certify that you (1) will use federal
and/or state student financial aid only to pay the cost of attending an institution of higher
education, (2) are not in default on a federal student loan or have made satisfactory
arrangements to repay it, (3) do not owe money back on a federal student grant or have
made satisfactory arrangements to repay it, (4) will notify your college if you default on a
federal student loan and (5) will not receive a Federal Pell Grant from more than one college
for the same period of time.
If you are the parent or the student, by signing this application you agree, if asked, to
provide information that will verify the accuracy of your completed form. This information
may include U.S. or state income tax forms that you filed or are required to file. Also, you
certify that you understand that the Secretary of Education has the authority to verify
information reported on this application with the Internal Revenue Service and other
federal agencies. If you sign any document related to the federal student aid programs
electronically using a Personal Identification Number (PIN), you certify that you are the
person identified by the PIN and have not disclosed that PIN to anyone else. If you purposely
give false or misleading information, you may be fined up to $20,000, sent to prison, or both.
If you or your family paid a fee for someone to
fill out this form or to advise you on how to fill
it out, that person must complete this part.
Preparer’s name, firm and address
105. Preparer’s Social Security Number (or 106)
–
–
106. Employer ID number (or 105)
–
103. Date this form was completed
MONTH
DAY
MM DD
2010
or
2011
104. Student (Sign below)
1
Parent (A parent from Step Four sign below.)
2
COLLEGE USE ONLY
D/O
Federal School Code
1
FAA Signature
1
107. Preparer’s signature and date
28
For Help — 1-800-433-3243
DATA ENTRY
USE ONLY:
1
Page 8
P
*
L
E
Notes for question 50 (page 5)
Answer “Yes” (you are a veteran) if you (1) have engaged in active duty
in the U.S. Armed Forces (Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines or Coast Guard)
or are a National Guard or Reserve enlistee who was called to active duty
for other than state or training purposes, or were a cadet or midshipman
at one of the service academies, and (2) were released under a condition
other than dishonorable. Also answer “Yes” if you are not a veteran now
but will be one by June 30, 2011.
Answer “No” (you are not a veteran) if you (1) have never engaged in
active duty in the U.S. Armed Forces, (2) are currently an ROTC student or
a cadet or midshipman at a service academy, (3) are a National Guard or
Reserve enlistee activated only for state or training purposes, or
(4) were engaged in active duty in the U.S. Armed Forces but released
under dishonorable conditions.
Notes for students unable to provide parental
information on pages 6 and 7
Under very limited circumstances (for example, your parents
are incarcerated; you have left home due to an abusive family
environment; or you do not know where your parents are and
are unable to contact them), you may be able to submit your
FAFSA without parental information. If you are unable to
provide parental information, skip Steps Four and Five, and go
to Step Six. Once you submit your FAFSA without parental data,
you must follow up with the financial aid office at the college
you plan to attend, in order to complete your FAFSA.
Notes for Step Four, questions 59–93 (pages 6 and 7)
Additional instructions about who is considered a parent on this
form:
Also answer “No” if you are currently serving in the U.S. Armed Forces
and will continue to serve through June 30, 2011.
t If your parent is widowed or single, answer the questions
about that parent.
Notes for question 53 (page 5)
t If your widowed parent is remarried as of today, answer the
questions about that parent and your stepparent.
Answer “Yes” if you had no living parent (biological or adoptive) at any
time since you turned age 13, even if you are now adopted.
Answer “Yes” if you were in foster care at any time since you turned age
13, even if you are no longer in foster care as of today.
Answer “Yes” if you were a dependent or ward of the court at any time
since you turned age 13, even if you are no longer a dependent or ward of
the court as of today. Note that for federal student aid purposes, a ward of
the court is not someone who is incarcerated.
t If your parents are divorced or separated, answer the
questions about the parent you lived with more during the
past 12 months. (If you did not live with one parent more
than the other, give answers about the parent who provided
more financial support during the past 12 months, or during
the most recent year that you actually received support
from a parent.) If this parent is remarried as of today, answer
the questions about that parent and your stepparent.
Note that the financial aid administrator at your school may require you
to provide proof that you were in foster care or a dependent or ward of
the court.
Notes for questions 83 (page 6)
and 101 (page 8)
Notes for questions 54 and 55 (page 5)
In general, a person may be considered a dislocated worker if he
or she:
Answer “Yes” if you can provide a copy of a court’s decision that as of
today you are an emancipated minor or are in legal guardianship. Also
answer “Yes” if you can provide a copy of a court’s decision that you were
an emancipated minor or were in legal guardianship immediately before
you reached the age of being an adult in your state. The court must be
located in your state of legal residence at the time the court’s decision was
issued.
t is receiving unemployment benefits due to being laid
off or losing a job and is unlikely to return to a previous
occupation;
Answer “No” if you are still a minor and the court decision is no longer
in effect or the court decision was not in effect at the time you became
an adult.
t is a displaced homemaker. A displaced homemaker is
generally a person who previously provided unpaid
services to the family (e.g., a stay-at-home mom or
dad), is no longer supported by the husband or wife, is
unemployed or underemployed, and is having trouble
finding or upgrading employment.
Note that the financial aid administrator at your college may require
you to provide proof that you were an emancipated minor or in legal
guardianship.
Notes for questions 56–58 (page 5)
Answer “Yes” if you received a determination at any time on or after
July 1, 2009, that you were an unaccompanied youth who was homeless or,
for question 58, at risk of being homeless.
t “Homeless” means lacking fixed, regular and adequate housing,
which includes living in shelters, motels or cars, or temporarily living
with other people because you had nowhere else to go.
t “Unaccompanied” means you are not living in the physical custody of
your parent or guardian.
t “Youth” means you are 21 years of age or younger or you are still
enrolled in high school as of the day you sign this application.
Answer “No” if you are not homeless, at risk of being homeless or if you
do not have a determination. You should contact your financial aid office
for assistance if you do not have a determination but believe you are an
unaccompanied youth who is homeless or are an unaccompanied youth
providing for your own living expenses who is at risk of being homeless.
Note that the financial aid administrator at your college may require you
to provide a29
copy of the determination if you answered “Yes” to any of
these questions.
Page 9
t has been laid off or received a lay-off notice from a job;
t was self-employed but is now unemployed due to
economic conditions or natural disaster; or
If a person quits work, generally he or she is not considered
a dislocated worker even if, for example, the person is
receiving unemployment benefits.
Answer “Yes” to question 83 if your parent is a dislocated
worker. Answer “Yes” to question 101 if you or your spouse is a
dislocated worker.
Answer “No” to question 83 if your parent is not a
dislocated worker. Answer “No” to question 101 if neither
you nor your spouse is a dislocated worker.
Answer “Don’t know” to question 83 if you are not sure
whether your parent is a dislocated worker. Answer “Don’t
know” to question 101 if you are not sure whether you
or your spouse is a dislocated worker. You can contact
your financial aid office for assistance in answering these
questions.
Note that the financial aid administrator at your school may
require you to provide proof that your parent is a dislocated
worker, if you answered “Yes” to question 83, or that you or
your spouse is a dislocated worker, if you answered “Yes” to
question 101.
What is the FAFSA ?
Information on the Privacy Act and use of
your Social Security Number
SM
Why fill out a FAFSA?
The Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) is the first step in the financial aid
process. You use the FAFSA to apply for federal student aid, such as grants, loans and
work-study. In addition, most states and colleges use information from the FAFSA to award
nonfederal aid.
Why all the questions?
The questions on the FAFSA are required to calculate your Expected Family Contribution
(EFC). The EFC measures your family’s financial strength and determines your eligibility
for federal student aid. Your state and the colleges you list may also use some of your
responses. They will determine if you may be eligible for school or state aid, in addition to
federal aid.
How do I find out what my Expected Family Contribution (EFC) is?
Your EFC will be listed on your Student Aid Report (SAR). Your SAR summarizes the
information you submitted on your FAFSA. It is important to review your SAR to make sure
all of your information is correct and complete. Make corrections or provide additional
information, as necessary.
How much aid do I get?
Using the information on your FAFSA and your EFC, the financial aid office at your college
will determine the amount of aid you will receive. The colleges use your EFC to prepare a
financial aid package to help you meet your financial need. Financial need is the difference
between your EFC and your college’s cost of attendance (which can include living
expenses), as determined by the college. If you or your family have unusual circumstances
that should be taken into account, contact your college’s financial aid office. Some
examples of unusual circumstances are: unusual medical or dental expenses or a large
change in income from last year to this year.
When do I get the aid?
Any financial aid you are eligible to receive will be paid to you through your college.
Typically, your college will first use the aid to pay tuition, fees and room and board (if
provided by the college). Any remaining aid is paid to you for your other educational
expenses. If you are eligible for a Federal Pell Grant, you may receive it from only one
college for the same period of enrollment.
How can I have more colleges receive my FAFSA information?
If you are completing a paper FAFSA, you can only list four colleges in the school code step.
You may add more colleges by doing one of the following:
1. Use the Federal Student Aid PIN you will receive after your FAFSA has been processed
and go to FAFSA on the Web at www.fafsa.gov. Select the “Add or Delete a School Code”
link.
2. Use the Student Aid Report (SAR), which you will receive after your FAFSA is processed.
Your Data Release Number (DRN) verifies your identity and will be listed on the first page
of your SAR. You can call 1-800-4-FED-AID and provide your DRN to a customer service
representative, who will add more school codes for you.
3. Provide your DRN to the financial aid administrator at the college you want added, and
he or she can add their school code to your FAFSA.
Note: Your FAFSA record can only list up to ten school codes. If there are ten school codes
on your record, any new school codes that you add will replace one or more of the school
codes listed.
Where can I get more information on student aid?
The best place for information about student financial aid is the financial aid office at the
college you plan to attend. The financial aid administrator can tell you about student aid
available from your state, the college itself and other sources.
t You can also visit our web sites www.FederalStudentAid.ed.gov or
www.studentaid.ed.gov.
t For information by phone you can call our Federal Student Aid Information Center
at 1-800-4-FED-AID (1-800-433-3243). TTY users (for the hearing impaired) may call
1-800-730-8913.
t You can also check with your high school counselor, your state aid agency or your
local library’s reference section.
Information about other nonfederal assistance may be available from foundations, religious
organizations, community organizations and civic groups, as well as organizations related
to your field of interest, such as the American Medical or American Bar Association. Check
with your parents’
30 employers or unions to see if they award scholarships or have tuition
payment plans.
Page 10
We use the information that you provide on this form to determine
if you are eligible to receive federal student financial aid and the
amount that you are eligible to receive. Sections 483 and 484 of the
Higher Education Act of 1965, as amended, give us the authority to
ask you and your parents these questions, and to collect the Social
Security Numbers of you and your parents. We use your Social
Security Number to verify your identity and retrieve your records,
and we may request your Social Security Number again for those
purposes.
State and institutional student financial aid programs may also use
the information that you provide on this form to determine if you
are eligible to receive state and institutional aid and the need that
you have for such aid. Therefore, we will disclose the information
that you provide on this form to each institution you list in questions
102a - 102h, state agencies in your state of legal residence and the
state agencies of the states in which the colleges that you list in
questions 102a - 102h are located.
If you are applying solely for federal aid, you must answer all of the
following questions that apply to you: 1-9, 14-16, 18, 21-23, 26-28,
33-37, 39-59, 61-68, 70, 73-85, 87-101, 103-104. If you do not answer
these questions, you will not receive federal aid.
Without your consent, we may disclose information that you
provide to entities under a published “routine use.” Under such a
routine use, we may disclose information to third parties that we
have authorized to assist us in administering the above programs;
to other federal agencies under computer matching programs,
such as those with the Internal Revenue Service, Social Security
Administration, Selective Service System, Department of Homeland
Security, Department of Justice and Veterans Affairs; to your parents
or spouse; and to members of Congress if you ask them to help you
with student aid questions.
If the federal government, the U.S. Department of Education, or
an employee of the U.S. Department of Education is involved in
litigation, we may send information to the Department of Justice, or
a court or adjudicative body, if the disclosure is related to financial
aid and certain conditions are met. In addition, we may send
your information to a foreign, federal, state, or local enforcement
agency if the information that you submitted indicates a violation
or potential violation of law, for which that agency has jurisdiction
for investigation or prosecution. Finally, we may send information
regarding a claim that is determined to be valid and overdue to a
consumer reporting agency. This information includes identifiers
from the record; the amount, status and history of the claim; and the
program under which the claim arose.
State Certification
By submitting this application, you are giving your state financial
aid agency permission to verify any statement on this form and to
obtain income tax information for all persons required to report
income on this form.
The Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995
The Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 says that no one is required to
respond to a collection of information unless it displays a valid OMB
control number, which for this form is 1845-0001. The time required
to complete this form is estimated to be three hours, including
time to review instructions, search data resources, gather the data
needed, and complete and review the information collection. If you
have comments about this estimate or suggestions for improving
this form, please write to:
U.S. Department of Education, Washington, DC 20202-4700.
We may request additional information from you to process
your application more efficiently. We will collect this additional
information only as needed and on a voluntary basis.
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40

2010-2011
Texas Application
for State Financial Aid

(For students ineligible to complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid)
Which financial aid application should I use?
Free Application for
Federal Student Aid
(FAFSA)
Texas Application for
State Financial Aid (TASFA)
Status
I am a U.S. citizen

I am a permanent resident with
an Alien Registration Card (I-551)

I am a conditional permanent
resident with visa type I-551C

I am an eligible noncitizen with an
Arrival/Departure Record (I-94)
showing one of the following:

• Refugee
• Asylum granted
• Parolee (for a minimum of one
year)
• Cuban-Haitian entrant
I do not meet one of the statuses
above; however, I have been
classified as a Texas resident and
therefore am eligible to pay the
Texas in-state tuition rate. My
classification as a Texas resident
is NOT due to an in-state
scholarship or assistantship.

Note: If you meet one of the citizenship statuses to complete the FAFSA, go to www.fafsa.ed.gov. For
more information on the eligibility requirements for federal student aid programs, go to
www.studentaid.ed.gov.
41
Student’s Checklist

Contact the appropriate office, typically the registrar’s or admissions office of your college or
university, in order to find out if you meet the requirements to be classified as a Texas resident
under House Bill 1403 / Senate Bill 1528.

Complete your admissions application.

Complete the TASFA and print it out for submission to the college or university you will be
attending. You are only required to submit pages 3-7 to your college or university.
The TASFA can be found online at www.CollegeForAllTexans.com.
Note: Attached is a list of schools that currently accept the TASFA (see Appendix A). If the college or
university that you plan to attend is not on this list, you will most likely have to complete a paper copy of
the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). Check with the school's financial aid office to
determine which application the school prefers.

If you and/or your parents filed a federal income tax return, attach a copy of your and/or your
parents’ W-2s and income tax returns to the TASFA. The application will not be processed
until all required documents are submitted.

If you and/or your parents did not file a federal income tax return, but earned wages in 2009,
report those wages on item 31 of this application. Check with the college or university that
you plan to attend to find out if additional documentation is required.

If you are a male between the ages of 18 and 25, you must register with the Selective Service in
order to qualify for any type of state student financial aid (regardless of residency status). You
can obtain a registration form at your local post office.
Note: If you have already received your Selective Service Number, attach a copy of your
Selective Service Card to this application.

To check the status of your application, contact your college or university’s financial aid office.

Make sure the TASFA is filled out completely. Do not leave any blanks. Enter “N/A” if the question
does not apply to you.
42

2010-2011
Texas Application
for State Financial Aid

(For students ineligible to complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid)
Name
Street Address
City, State, ZIP Code
Telephone
E-Mail Address
Date of Birth
Student ID#
Certain categories of foreign-born and immigrant students in the state of Texas can meet state requirements
for residency under House Bill 1403/Senate Bill 1528. Such students are able to pay the resident tuition rate
while attending public institutions of higher education in Texas. In addition, by meeting this residency
requirement, such students are eligible to apply for some student financial aid programs offered by the state
of Texas.
Please Note: In order to qualify for state student financial aid, the college/university must first make the
determination on the student's residency status. Also, keep in mind that the state's definition of residency
does not make a student eligible for federal financial aid.
Section I: Student Information
Were you born before January 1, 1987?
As of today, are you married?
Are you in a graduate program of study? (e.g. master's or doctorate program)
Do you have at least one child that you support?
Do you have dependents other than your children or spouse that you support?
Are you an orphan or ward of the court?
As of today, are you an emancipated minor as determined by a court?
As of today, are you in legal guardianship as determined by a court?
Did your high school or school district homeless liaison determine that you were an
unaccompanied youth who was homeless?
10. Did the director of an emergency shelter program funded by the U.S. Department of
Housing and Urban Development determine that you were an unaccompanied youth who
was homeless?
11. Did the director of a runaway or homeless youth basic center or transitional living
program determine that you were an unaccompanied youth who was homeless or were
self-supporting and at risk of being homeless?
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
No
No
No
No
No
No
No
Yes
No
Yes
No
Yes
No
For purposes of this application, if you answered “No” to all of the questions above, you are considered a
dependent student and must include parental income information on this form.
If you answered “Yes” to any of the questions above, you are considered an independent student and therefore,
not required to include parental income information on this form. An independent student who is married must
include information about his or her spouse.
Print Full Name Here: _______________________________________
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3
Section II: Household Information
12. If you are a dependent student, please list the names of ALL family members who will be supported by your
parents from July 1, 2010 to June 30, 2011. If you are an independent student, you should include family
members who are supported by you. (See instructions for additional information.) Attach additional sheets if
necessary.
Names
[Include parent(s) and sibling(s), or
spouse (if applicable)]
Date of Birth
Relationship to
Student
Which college/university will
student be attending?
Self
13. Independent Students only: As of today, are you or your spouse a dislocated worker?
Yes
No
Don't know
Section III: Additional Information
Student:
14. Did you file a federal income tax return for 2009?
Yes (must attach copy)
No
Will file (must provide copy)
15. Are you a male between the ages of 18 and 25?
Yes
No
16. Have you been convicted of a felony or a crime involving a controlled substance while receiving state financial
aid?
Yes
No
17. Do you have a visa that allows you to be employed in the U.S.?
Yes
No
18. Housing plans for 2010-2011: Where do you plan to live?
On campus
Off campus
Commuter/With parent or relative
19. At the start of the 2010-2011 school year, I will enroll:
Full time
3/4 time
1/2 time
Less than 1/2 time
Not sure
20. Have you received grant funds from the Texas Grant Program while attending a prior institution?
Yes
No
Parent:
21. Did you file a federal income tax return for 2009?
Yes (must attach copy)
No
22. As of today, are either of your parents a dislocated worker?
Yes
No
23. Marital status
Married/Remarried
Single
Separated/Divorced
24. Mother/Stepmother’s highest level of education completed
Middle school/Jr. high
High school
Other/unknown
24b. Enter your mother’s/stepmother’s age: _________
25. Father/Stepfather’s highest level of education completed
Middle school/Jr. high
High school
Other/unknown
25b. Enter your father’s/stepfather’s age:_________
Print Full Name Here: _______________________________________
44
Will file (must provide copy)
Widowed
College or beyond
College or beyond
4
Section IV: Income and Assets
Do not leave any blanks. Enter “0” where appropriate.
Dependent students: Complete both the Student and Parent columns.
Independent students: Complete the Student/Spouse column only.
Student/Spouse
Parents
26. Child support received
$
$
27. Tax exempt interest income
$
$
28. Housing, food, and other living allowances
paid on your behalf
$
$
Part A. Annual Untaxed Income
29. Other untaxed income not reported, such
as worker's compensation, disability, etc.
30. Money received, or paid on your behalf
(e.g. bills) not reported elsewhere on this
form
31. Wages not listed on taxes or W-2 forms
$
Student
Spouse
Mother
Father
$
$
$
$
Total Untaxed Income $
0.00
$
0.00
Part B. Annual Income Exclusions
32. Child support paid
$
$
33. Taxable earnings from work-study or other
need-based work programs
$
$
34. Scholarships and grants reported on 2009
income tax return
$
$
35. As of today, balance of cash, savings, and
checking accounts
$
$
36. As of today, investment net worth (do not
include the home you live in or the balance
of retirement plans)
$
$
37. As of today, net worth of current business
or investment farms
$
$
Part C. Assets
Print Full Name Here: _______________________________________
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Section V: Total Family Income
38. Was your TOTAL FAMILY INCOME less than $6500 in 2009? (Total family income is the income reported on
your parents’ and your W-2 IRS tax forms plus the total untaxed income reported on Section IV, Part A of this
form)
Yes
No
If YES, please include a breakdown of your living expenses (e.g., rent, food, utilities, etc.) and provide a written
explanation that explains how you were able to pay for your living expenses in 2009.
Section VI: Statement of Selective Service Registration Status
39. Certification of Registration Status (Please check the appropriate box)
I certify that I am female and, therefore, not required to register with the Selective Service System.
I certify that I am a male age 18 to 25 and am registered with the Selective Service System.
Please provide Selective Service registration number (if known)
I certify that I am not of an age required to register with Selective Service System. (over 25)
I certify that I have been determined by the Selective Service System to be exempt from registration.
I certify that I have not reached my 18th birthday and understand that I will be required by law to register at
that time.
I certify that I do not have a Social Security number, but have submitted my Selective Service registration
form to the financial aid office for submission to the Selective Service System.
Print Full Name Here: _______________________________________
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6
Section VII: Signatures
40. Student and Parent Signatures
I understand that under Texas Education Code, Section 51.9095, I must be registered with the Selective Service
System according to the requirements of federal law in order to receive student financial aid funds from the State
of Texas. I further certify that the information provided on this form is true, complete, and correct to the best of my
knowledge. I understand that any false statements may void my eligibility for state financial aid and that the
information provided on this form will be used only for evaluation of eligibility for state financial aid.
Also, I understand that I may need to provide additional information in order to determine eligibility for state
financial aid.
Student signature
Date
Parent signature*
(*parent signature required only for dependent students)
Date
41. High School Counselor: Not required if parent signature already provided above.
High school counselor signature __________________________ Date ________________________________
Printed name ______________________________________________________________________________
Title _____________________________________________________________________________________
Telephone number _________________________________________________________________________
Address __________________________________________________________________________________
E-mail address _____________________________________________________________________________
Print Full Name Here: _______________________________________
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Instructions
Section I: Student Information
1.
Were you born before January 1, 1987?
Note that if you were born on January 1, 1987, you should answer “No.”
2.
As of today, are you married?
Answer “Yes” if you are married as of the date that you complete the application. Answer “Yes” if you
are separated but not divorced.
In the state of Texas, common-law marriages are recognized. Therefore, if you meet the state’s
requirements to be considered common-law married, answer “Yes” to this question. For more
information on common law marriage in Texas, go to www.co.travis.tx.us/dro/common_law.asp
3.
Are you in a graduate program of study?
You should answer “Yes” if you will be enrolled in a master’s or doctoral program in the initial term you
attend in the 2010-2011 academic year. If you will be finishing your bachelor's degree in the initial term
of the academic year and then moving on to a master’s or doctoral degree you should first answer this
question as “No.” Once you have completed the bachelor’s degree, you must notify the financial aid
office at the college or university that you will be attending.
4.
Do you have at least one child that you support?
Answer “Yes” if you have at least one child who receives at least 50% of his or her financial support
from you. An applicant whose unborn child will be born before the end of the academic year (June 30,
2011) may answer “Yes.” Note that financial support is the issue here; it does not matter whether the
child lives with you or not.
5.
Do you have dependents other than your children or spouse?
Answer “Yes” only if the dependents live with you and receive more than half of their support from you,
now and through June 30, 2011.
6.
Are you an orphan or ward of the court?
Answer "Yes" if you had no living parent (biological or adoptive) when you were age 13 or older, even
if you are now adopted.
Answer "Yes" if you were in foster care when you were age 13 or older, even if you are no longer in
foster care as of today.
Answer "Yes" if you were a dependent/ward of the court when you were age 13 or older, even if you
are no longer a dependent/ward of the court as of today.
Note that the financial aid administrator at your school may require you to provide proof that you were in
foster care or a dependent/ward of the court.
48
8
7 & 8.
As of today are you an emancipated minor or in legal guardianship as determined by a court in
your state of legal residence?
Answer "Yes", if you can provide a copy of the court's decision that you are an emancipated minor or
are in legal guardianship. The court must be located in your state of legal residence. If the court order
is no longer in effect, answer "No." Note that the financial aid administrator at your school may require
you to provide additional information such as a copy of the court's decision.
9, 10, & 11. Are you an unaccompanied youth who was homeless or at risk of being homeless?
Answer "Yes" if you received a determination at any time on or after July 1, 2009, that you were an
unaccompanied youth who was homeless or, for question 11, at risk of being homeless.
Homeless - means lacking fixed, regular and adequate housing, which includes living in shelters,
motels or cars, or temporarily living with other people because you had nowhere else to go.
Unaccompanied - means you are not living in the physical custody of your parent or guardian
Youth - means you are 21 years of age or younger or you are still enrolled in high school as of the
day you sign this application.
Answer "No" if you are not homeless, at risk of being homeless or if you do not have a determination.
You should contact your financial aid office for assistance if you do not have a determination but believe
you are an unaccompanied youth who is homeless or are an unaccompanied youth providing for your
own living expenses who is at risk of being homeless.
Note that the financial aid administrator at your college may require you to provide a copy of the
determination if you answered "Yes" to one of these questions.
Section II: Household Information
12.
If you are classified as a dependent student (according to Section I of this application), list the
names and birthdates of ALL family members who will be supported by your parents between
July 1, 2010 through June 30, 2011.
These should include:
yourself
your custodial parent (your mother or father)
your custodial parent’s spouse (e.g., your mother or stepmother, or father or stepfather)
any dependent child under the age of 18 who lives in your custodial parent’s household
any sibling that is a dependent student attending college
any other person receiving more than 50 percent of his or her financial support from your custodial
parent
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9
If you are classified an independent student (according to Section I of this application), list the names
and birthdates of ALL family members in your household whom you will support between July 1, 2010,
through June 30, 2011, including:
yourself
your spouse
any dependent child under the age of 18 who lives with you
any dependent child of your spouse
any other person receiving more than 50 percent of his or her financial support from you or your
spouse
For any dependent student who is attending college on at least a half-time basis, write the name of the
college. Do not include your parent if he or she is going to college. Attach an additional sheet if
necessary.
A foster parent, a legal guardian, or a grandparent or other relative is not considered a parent for
purposes of filing this application unless that person has legally adopted the applicant. A person who
has been granted power of attorney for a student is not a legal guardian.
13.
As of today, are you or your spouse a dislocated worker?
In general, a person is considered a dislocated worker if they meet one of the following conditions:
They have lost their job.
They have been laid off or received a lay-off notice from their job.
They are receiving unemployment benefits due to being laid off or losing a job and are unlikely to
return to a previous occupation.
They are self employed but are unemployed due to economic conditions or natural disaster.
They are a displaced homemaker. A displaced homemaker is generally a person who previously
provided unpaid services to the family (e.g. stay at-home mom or dad), is no longer supported by
the husband or wife, is unemployed or underemployed, and is having trouble finding or upgrading
employment.
If a person quits work, generally they are not considered a dislocated worker.
Answer "Yes" to question 13 if you or your spouse is a dislocated worker.
Answer "No" to question 13 if you or your spouse is not a dislocated worker.
Answer "Don't know" to question 13 if you are not sure that you or your spouse is a dislocated worker.
You can contact your financial aid office for assistance in answering this question. Note that the
financial aid administrator may require you to provide proof if you answer Yes to question 13.
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10
Section III: Additional Information
14.
Did you file a federal income tax return for 2009?
Indicate whether you have already completed, are going to complete, or will not file a tax return for
2009. If "Yes", you must attach a copy of your tax return to this application.
15.
Are you a male between the ages of 18 and 25?
If you are male between the ages of 18 and 25, you must register with Selective Service in order to
qualify for any type of state aid (regardless of residency status).
You may obtain a Selective Service registration form from any local post office. Complete this form and
mail it to the Selective Service office or you may turn it in to your financial aid office to be mailed for you.
If you are required to register, you must provide your registration number on this application.
16.
Have you been convicted of a felony or a crime involving a controlled substance?
This question asks whether you have been convicted of possessing or selling illegal drugs while you
were receiving state financial aid. If you have been convicted, you are not necessarily ineligible for aid.
If you answer “Yes” to this question, contact your financial aid administrator for further instructions.
17.
Do you have a visa that allows you to be employed in the U.S.?
If you have a visa and your visa type allows you to be employed in the U.S., you could be eligible for the
Texas College Work-Study Program.
18.
What are your housing plans for 2010-2011?
Indicate whether you will be living on-campus, living off-campus, or living at your parent’s or relative’s
home.
19.
At the start of the 2010-2011 school year, indicate whether you will be enrolled:
Full time - 12 credit hours or more
3/4 time - 9-11 credit hours
1/2 time - 6-8 credit hours or
Less than half time - less than 6 credit hours
20.
Have you received grant funds from the Texas Grant Program while attending a prior institution?
In determining your awards package, schools will take into consideration your receipt of funds at a
previous institution. Depending on the availability funds, you may qualify for additional funds at the
current institution.
21.
Did you file a federal income tax return for 2009?
Indicate whether your parent(s) have already completed, are going to complete, or will not file a tax
return for 2009.
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11
22.
As of today, are either of your parents a dislocated worker?
In general, a person is considered a dislocated worker if they meet one of the following conditions:
They have lost their job.
They have been laid off or received a lay-off notice from their job.
They are receiving unemployment benefits due to being laid off or losing a job and are unlikely to
return to a previous occupation.
They are self employed but are unemployed due to economic conditions or natural disaster.
They are a displaced homemaker. A displaced homemaker is generally a person who previously
provided unpaid services to the family (e.g. stay at-home mom or dad), is no longer supported by
the husband or wife, is unemployed or underemployed, and is having trouble finding or upgrading
employment.
If a person quits work, generally they are not considered a dislocated worker.
Answer "Yes" to question 22, if your parent is a dislocated worker.
Answer "No" to question 22 if your parent is not a dislocated worker
Answer "Don't know" to question 22 if you are not sure that your parent is a dislocated worker.
You can contact your financial aid office for assistance in answering this question. Note that the
financial aid administrator may require you to provide proof if you answer Yes to question 22.
23.
Marital status
Indicate the marital status of your primary parent as “married,” “single,” “widowed,” or
“divorced/separated.” If your parents are married, please include income information for both parents in
sections IV and V. If your parents are divorced, but have remarried, please include income information
for your primary parent and his/her current spouse.
24 & 25
Father’s/mother’s highest level of education completed
These questions do not affect your eligibility for state aid. Some institutional programs use the
information provided here to offer aid to first-generation college students.
Section IV: Income and Assets
Part A: Annual Untaxed Income
26.
Child support received
Report child support that you and either your spouse or your parents, as applicable, received for all
children during 2009. Do not include foster care or adoption payments.
27.
Tax exempt interest income
If you filed a tax return, you can find it on IRS form 1040-line 8b or 1040A line 8b.
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12
28.
Housing, food, and other living allowances
Housing, food, and other living allowances provided to you or your parents must be reported. These
allowances must be reported when they are part of a compensation package that some people receive
for their jobs. Include cash payments and cash value of benefits. If you received free room and board in
2009 for a job, you must report the value of the room and board as untaxed income. (For this category,
"housing allowances" excludes rent subsidies for low-income housing.)
29.
Other untaxed income not reported, such as worker's compensation, disability
Don't include student aid, earned income credit, child tax credit, untaxed Social Security benefits,
Workforce Investment Act educational benefits, combat pay(if you are not a tax filer), benefits from
flexible spending arrangements (e.g. cafeteria plans), foreign income exclusion or credit for federal tax
on special fuels.
30.
Money received or paid on your behalf not reported elsewhere on this form
Report any cash support that you (the student) receive from a friend or relative. Cash support includes
payments made on your behalf. For instance, if your aunt pays your rent or utility bill that you would
otherwise be obligated to pay yourself, you must report those payments in this section.
31.
List any income that was paid in cash or other means for which a tax return was not filed or a W2 form was not provided. (Wages not listed on taxes or W-2 forms).
Part B. Annual Income Exclusions
32.
Child support paid
Report any child support payments paid by you and either your spouse or your parents, as applicable,
during 2009 as a result of divorce, separation or some other legal requirement. Keep in mind that these
payments are payments made to children not living in your or your parents’ household.
For purposes of this application, a child is a member of your household if you provide more than half of
the child's support, whether the child lives with you or not.
33.
Taxable earnings from State Work-Study or other need-based work programs
These are earnings from need-based work programs and need-based employment portions of
fellowships and assistantships.
34.
Scholarships and grants reported on a 2009 tax return
Report any student grant and scholarship aid that was reported to the IRS on your or your parents’ 2009
income tax return. This includes benefits such as awards, living allowances, and interest accrual
payments as well as grant and scholarship portions of fellowships and assistantships.
Part C. Assets
35.
As of today, balance of cash, savings, and checking accounts
Do not include student financial aid in this amount.
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36.
As of today, investment net worth (do not include the home you live in or the balance of
retirement plans)
Net worth means current investment value minus current investment debt.
Investment value - investment debt = net worth of investments
If you or your parents own real estate or investments other than your principal residence, investment
value equals the amount the investments are worth today. Investment debt equals how much you and
either your spouse or your parents, as applicable, owe on real estate and investments other than your
principal residence. Investment debt means only those debts that are related to the investments.
Investments include real estate such as rental property, land, and second or summer homes. Do not
include your primary place of residence (that is, your home). Include the value of portions of multifamily
dwellings that are not your principal residence. Investments also include trust funds, money market
funds, mutual funds, certificates of deposit, stocks, stock options, bonds, other securities, Coverdell
Education Savings Accounts (formerly Education IRAs), college savings plans, installment and land
sale contracts (including mortgages held), commodities, etc.
Do not include the value of life insurance and retirement plans (pension funds, annuities, non-education
IRAs, Keogh plans, etc.).
The money in a Coverdell Education Savings Account or a college savings plan is an asset of the
account owner. A Coverdell Education Savings Account is not a retirement account. It is essentially a
savings account to be used for the student's educational expenses. Therefore, if you own the account,
you must report the amount in your Coverdell Education Savings Account with your investments.
37.
As of today, net worth of current businesses and/or investment farms
Business or farm value includes the current market value of land, buildings, machinery, equipment,
inventory, etc. Do not include your primary home.
Business/farm value - business/farm debt = net worth of business/farm
For business or investment farm value, first figure out how much the business or farm is worth today.
An investment farm is a farming business in which you (and your spouse, if married) or your
parents do not reside on the farm, nor do they materially operate the farm.
Business or investment farm debts are what you (and your spouse, if married) or your parents owe on
the business or farm. Include only debts for which the business or farm was used as collateral.
To report current market value for a business, you must use the amount for which the business could
sell as of the date of the application. Also, if you are not the sole owner of the business, you should
report only your share of its value and debt.
Do not include the value of a small business that you (your spouse and/or your parents) own and
control and that has 100 or fewer full-time or full-time equivalent employees.
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Section V: Total Family Income
38.
Was your Total Family Income less than $6,500 in 2009?
In order to accurately assess your financial situation, your college/university needs to account for all
sources of income. In cases where your income falls below $6,500, an explanation is required, as this
amount is considered to be significantly below the 2009 poverty level set by the U.S. Department of
Health and Human Services. In the explanation that you provide to the college/university, make sure
that you list all sources of income and itemize your living expenses.
If a relative claims you on his/her taxes, some schools may require that you provide a copy of his/her
IRS Tax Form. Check with the school that you are planning on attending to find out if additional
documentation is required.
Include a breakdown of your living expenses
In order to accurately assess your financial situation, your college/university needs to account for all
sources of income. In cases where your income falls below $6,500, an explanation is required, as this
amount is considered to be significantly below the 2009 poverty level set by the U.S. Department of
Health and Human Services.
If you answered “yes”, make sure that you provide a letter that explains all your sources of income and
how you were able to cover all your living expenses. You may want to provide an itemized budget.
If a relative claims you on his/her taxes, some schools may require that you provide a copy of his/her
IRS Tax Form. Check with the school that you are planning on attending to find out if additional
documentation is required.
Section VI: Statement of Selective Service Registration Status
39.
Certification of Registration Status
Under Texas Education Code, Section 51.9095, if you are currently of the age and gender requiring
registration with Selective Service, but knowingly and willfully fail to do so, you are ineligible to receive
funds from the State of Texas.
Exemptions
Almost all male U.S. citizens, and male non-citizens living in the U.S. who are 18 to 25 years of age, are
required to register with Selective Service. Some non-citizens are required to register and others are
not. Non-citizens not required to register include men who are in the U.S. on student or visitor
visas, and men who are part of a diplomatic or trade mission and their families. Almost all other
male noncitizens are required to register, including undocumented residents, legal permanent
residents, and refugees.
Non-Registrants
If you are not registered as required, you are presently not eligible to receive state aid and should
register promptly at a United States Post Office. A Certificate of Mailing may be obtained from the Post
Office at such time that you mail your registration and may be used as proof of your application until you
receive your Selective Service Registration Card.
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15
Privacy Act Statement
Because information on your registration status is essential for determining whether you are in
compliance with the Selective Service law, failure to provide the information requested by this
statement will prevent you from receiving state aid. This information is subject to verification with
the Selective Service System.
False Statement Notification
A false statement may be grounds for your state aid to be suspended.
Review
Should any question arise regarding your registration or eligibility for an exemption, you may request an
official “status information” letter from the Selective Service System by calling 1-847-688-6888. As an
alternative, you may send a written request to the Selective Service System at P.O. Box 94638,
Palatine, IL 60094-4638.
Section VII: Signatures
40.
Student and Parent Signature
Remember to sign your name on the application. Also, if you are classified as a dependent student, one
of your parents must sign the application. The application will not be processed until all required
signatures are included.
41.
High School Counselor
This section applies to first-year college students (freshmen) only. If extenuating circumstances
exist that preclude your parent from signing this form, your high school counselor can sign this form.
However, when a high school counselor signs this form on behalf of the student’s parent, the high
school counselor is attesting to the accuracy of the information provided on the application. Also, by
signing the form, the counselor agrees to cooperate with the college or university’s financial aid officer
in providing documentation that verifies the student’s family circumstances and economic situation.
Most college and university financial aid officers will want to contact the high school counselor for
additional information and documentation. Therefore, the high school counselor must provide the
following contact information: name, title, telephone number, e-mail address, and mailing address.
If you are not a first-year college student, but have extenuating circumstances that preclude your
parents from signing this from, contact the financial aid office of the school that you plan to attend for
more information.
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Appendix A
Colleges and universities that accept
the Texas Application for State Financial Aid (TASFA)
College/university
Location
Abilene Christian College
Abilene
Amarillo College
Amarillo
Austin Community College
Austin
Brazosport College
Lake Jackson
Central Texas College
Killeen
College of the Mainland
Texas City
Collin County Community College
Spring Creek Campus, Central Park, Preston Ridge
Concordia University
Austin
Dallas County Community College District- All locations
Brookhaven, Cedar Valley, Eastfield, El Centro
Mountain View, North Lake and Richland
Del Mar College
Corpus Christi
El Paso Community College
El Paso
Frank Phillips College
Borger
Grayson County College
Denison
Hill College
Hillsboro
Howard Payne University
Brownwood
Jarvis Christian College
Hawkins
Lamar University
Beaumont
Laredo Community College
Laredo
Lee College
Baytown
Lon Morris College
Jacksonville
Lonestar College – All Locations
North Harris, Kingwood, Tomball, Montgomery
Cy-fair
McMurry University
Abilene
Midland College
Midland
Midwestern State University
Wichita Falls
Navarro College
Corsicana
Northeast Texas Community College
Mt. Pleasant
Odessa College
Odessa
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Panola College
Carthage
Paul Quinn College
Dallas
Prairie View A&M University
Prairie View
Ranger College
Ranger
Sam Houston State University
Huntsville
San Jacinto College
Pasadena
Schreiner University
Kerrville
South Plains College
Levelland, Plainview,Denver City
Muleshoe,Reese Center-Lubbock,
Lubbock ATC-downtown
Southern Methodist University
Dallas
Southwestern Adventist University
Keene
Southwestern Assemblies of God University
Waxahachie
St. Edwards’s University
Austin
Stephen F. Austin State University
Nacogdoches
Tarrant County College
Fort Worth
Texas College
Tyler
Texas A&M International University -– Laredo
Laredo
Texas A&M University -– College Station
College Station
Texas A&M University --- Commerce
Commerce
Texas A&M University – Corpus Christi
Corpus Christi
Texas A & M University -– Galveston
Galveston
Texas A&M – Health Science Center
All locations
Texas A&M University- Kingsville
Kingsville
Texas A&M University -– Texarkana
Texarkana
Texas Christian University
Fort Worth
Texas Lutheran University
Seguin
Texas State Technical College
Harlingen
Texas State Technical College
West Texas -– Sweetwater
Sweetwater
Texas State Technical College
Waco
Texas State University -– San Marcos
San Marcos
Texas Tech University
Lubbock
Texas Wesleyan University
Fort Worth
Texas Woman’s University
Denton
The University of Texas at Arlington
Arlington
The University of Texas at Austin
Austin
The University of Texas at Dallas
Richardson
The University of Texas at El Paso
El Paso
58
18
The University of Texas at Tyler
Tyler
The University of Texas Health Science Center
San Antonio
The University of Texas Pan American
Edinburg
Trinity Valley Community College
Athens
University of Dallas
Irving
University of Houston Clearlake
Clearlake
University of Houston Downtown
Houston
University of Houston
Houston
University of Houston Victoria
Victoria
University of Mary Hardin Baylor
Belton
University of North Texas
Denton
University of North Texas Health Science Center
Fort Worth
Vernon College
Vernon
Victoria College
Victoria
Weatherford College
Weatherford
Western Texas College
Snyder
Wharton County Junior College
Wharton
59
19

Solicitud de ayuda económica estatal
de Texas
para 2010-2011

(Para los estudiantes que no califican para llenar la Solicitud Gratuita de Ayuda Federal para Estudiantes)
¿Cuál solicitud de ayuda económica debo utilizar?
Situación
Solicitud Gratuita de
Ayuda Federal para
Estudiantes (FAFSA)
Soy ciudadano estadounidense

Soy residente permanente con una
Tarjeta de Registro de Extranjeros (I551)

Soy residente permanente
condicional con una visa de tipo I551C

Solicitud de Ayuda Económica
Estatal de Texas (TASFA)
No soy ciudadano pero califico y
tengo un Registro de Entradas y
Salidas (I-94) que muestra uno de los
siguientes:
Refugiado
Asilo concedido
Admitido a prueba (por un mínimo
de un año)
Entrante cubano-haitiano
No califico bajo ninguna de las
circunstancias anteriores. Sin
embargo, he sido clasificado como
residente de Texas y, por lo tanto,
cumplo con los requisitos para pagar
los costos de matrícula para
residentes del estado. Mi clasificación
como residente de Texas NO se debe
a una beca o cargo como ayudante
de profesor.


Nota: Si cumples con uno de los estados de ciudadanía para llenar la FAFSA, accede a
http://www.fafsa.ed.gov. Para más información sobre los requisitos para calificar para los programas de
ayuda económica federal accede a www.studentaid.ed.gov.
60
Avisos importantes

Comunícate con la oficina adecuada, típicamente la oficina del registrador o de admisiones de tu
universidad, para averiguar cuáles documentos se requieren para ser clasificado como residente
de Texas bajo la ley estatal 1403/1528.

También no olvides llenar la solicitud para admisiones. Este es un proceso aparte del proceso
de la TASFA.

Llena la TASFA e imprímela para presentarla en la universidad a la que asistirás. Solamente se
requiere que entregas las páginas 3-7.
La TASFA está en línea en www.CollegeforAllTexans.com.
Nota: Adjunto se incluye una lista de universidades que aceptan la TASFA actualmente.
(Consulta el apéndice A.) Si la universidad a la que piensas asistir no está en esta lista, lo más
probable es que tengas que llenar y enviar una copia en papel de la Solicitud Gratuita de Ayuda
Federal para Estudiantes (FAFSA). Pregunta en la oficina de asistencia económica de tu
universidad para determinar cuál solicitud prefiere la universidad.

Si tú o tus padres presentaron una declaración federal de impuestos, adjunta a la TASFA una
copia de sus W-2 y también los tuyos. La solicitud no se procesará hasta que se entreguen
todos los documentos requeridos.

Si tú o tus padres no presentaron una declaración federal de impuestos, pero recibieron ingresos
en el 2009, reporta esos ingresos en la pregunta #31 de esta solicitud. Pregunta en la
universidad a la que tienes planeado asistir para determinar si se requiere algún
documento adicional.

Si eres un hombre entre las edades de 18 y 25 años tienes que inscribirte con el Servicio
Selectivo para poder calificar para cualquier tipo de ayuda económica federal
independientemente de la situación de residencia. Puedes obtener un formulario de inscripción
en tu oficina local de correos.
Nota: Si ya recibiste tu tarjeta de registro del Servicio Selectivo, adjunta a la TASFA una copia.

Para verificar el estado de tu solicitud, comunícate con la oficina de asistencia económica de tu
universidad.

¡Asegúrate de llenar la TASFA completamente! No dejes ningún espacio en blanco. Apunta
“N/A” si la pregunta no aplica a tu situación.
61
2

Solicitud de ayuda económica estatal
de Texas para 2010-2011

(Para los estudiantes que no califican para llenar la Solicitud Gratuita de Ayuda Federal para
Estudiantes)
Número y calle
Ciudad, estado y código postal
Número de teléfono
Dirección de correo electrónico
Fecha de nacimiento
# de identificación del estudiante
Ciertas categorías para estudiantes nacidos en el extranjero y estudiantes inmigrantes en el estado de
Texas pueden cumplir con los requisitos de residencia estatales bajo la ley 1403/1528. Dichos estudiantes
pueden pagar los costos de matrícula como residentes mientras asistan a instituciones públicas de
educación superior en Texas. Además, al cumplir con este requisito de residencia, dichos estudiantes
califican para solicitar algunos de los programas de asistencia económica estatales.
Por favor toma en cuenta lo siguiente: Tienes que estar clasificado como residente de Texas para poder
calificar para recibir ayuda económica del estado. Además, toma en cuenta que las definiciones estatales
de residencia NO afectan el que un estudiante cumpla con los requisitos para recibir ayuda económica
federal.
Sección I: Información del estudiante
1. ¿Naciste antes del 1 de enero de 1987?
Sí
No
2. ¿Estás casado?
Sí
No
3. ¿Estás en un programa de estudios de posgrado?
Sí
No
4. ¿Tienes por lo menos un hijo que tu mantienes?
Sí
No
5. ¿Tienes dependientes aparte de tus hijos o cónyuge?
Sí
No
6. ¿Eres huérfano o estás bajo la tutela de la corte?
Sí
No
7. ¿Eres o eras menor de edad emancipado, según la determinación de un tribunal?
Sí
No
8. ¿Te encuentras o te encontrabas bajo tutela legal, según la determinación de un tribunal?
Sí
No
9. En cualquier momento a partir del 1 de julio del 2009, ¿determinó tu escuela preparatoria (high school), o la
persona de enlace entre el distrito escolar y los alumnos sin hogar, que eras menor no acompañado sin casa ni
hogar?
Sí
No
10. En cualquier momento a partir del 1 de julio del 2009, ¿determinó el director de un programa de refugios de
emergencia o de viviendas de transición financiado por el Departamento de Vivienda y Desarrollo Urbano de
EE.UU. que eras menor no acompañado sin casa ni hogar?
Sí
No
11. En cualquier momento a partir del 1 de julio del 2009, ¿determinó el director de un programa de viviendas de
transición, o de un centro básico de acogida para menores sin hogar o que huyen del hogar, que eras menor no
acompañado sin casa ni hogar o que te mantenías con recursos propios y estabas en riesgo de quedarte sin
hogar?
Sí
No
Para propósitos de esta solicitud, si contestaste “No” en todas las preguntas anteriores, se considera que eres un
estudiante dependiente y tienes que incluir los ingresos de tus padres en este formulario.
Si contestaste “Sí” en alguna de las preguntas anteriores, se considera que eres un estudiante independiente y
por lo tanto no se requiere que incluyas en este formulario la información sobre los ingresos de tus padres. Un
estudiante independiente que esté casado tiene que incluir la información de su cónyuge.
Escribe tu nombre completo en letra de imprenta aquí_______________________________________
62
3
Sección II: Información del hogar
12. Si eres un estudiante dependiente, por favor anota los nombres de TODOS los miembros de la familia que
recibirán sustento de tus padres desde el 1 de julio de 2010 al 30 de junio de 2011. Si eres un estudiante
independiente, debes incluir a los miembros de tu familia a quienes sustentas. (Lee las instrucciones para más
información). Adjunta páginas adicionales si es necesario.
Nombres
[Incluye a tus padres y hermanos o
cónyuge (si aplica)]
Fecha de
nacimiento
Relación con el
estudiante
¿A cuál universidad asistirá el
estudiante?
Estudiante
13. Para estudiantes independientes solamente: A la fecha, ¿eres tú (o tu cónyuge) trabajador desplazado?
Sí
No
No se
Sección III: Información adicional
Estudiantes:
14. ¿Presentaste una declaración federal de impuestos para el 2009?
Sí (adjunta una copia)
No
La presentaré (adjunta una copia)
15. ¿Eres un hombre entre las edades de 18 y 25 años?
Sí
No
16. ¿Te han condenado por un delito grave o un crimen relacionado con sustancias controladas mientras recibías
ayuda estatal para estudiantes?
Sí
No
17. ¿Tienes una visa que te permita estar empleado en los Estados Unidos?
Sí
No
18. Planes de vivienda para 2010-2011: ¿Dónde vivirás?
Dentro del campus
Fuera del campus
Lejos de la universidad/con uno de
tus padres o un familiar
19. Cuando comience el año escolar 2010-2011, estarás matriculado:
A tiempo completo
3/4 partes del tiempo
A 1/2 tiempo
A menos de 1/2 tiempo
Aún no sé
20. ¿Si asististe a una universidad antes de esta, recibiste fondos de la beca de Texas (Texas Grant) allí?
Sí
No
Padres:
21. ¿Presentaron tus padres una declaración federal de impuestos para el 2009?
Sí (adjunta una copia)
No
22. A la fecha, ¿es alguno de tus padres trabajador desplazado?
Sí
No
23. Estado civil de tus padres
Casado/Casado nuevamente
Soltero
Separado o divorciado
24. Nivel más alto de educación alcanzado por tu madre/madrastra
Secundaria
Preparatoria
Otro/no sé
24b. Apunta la edad de tu madre/madrastra?__________
25. Nivel más alto de educación alcanzado por tu padre/padrastro
Secundaria
Preparatoria
Otro/no sé
25b. Apunta la edad de tu padre/padrastro? __________
La presentaré (adjunta una copia)
Viudo
Universidad o estudios de posgrado
Universidad o estudios de posgrado
Escribe tu nombre completo en letra de imprenta aquí_______________________________________
63
4
Sección IV: Ingresos y bienes
No dejes nada en blanco. Escribe “0” si no recibes tal beneficio.
Estudiantes dependientes: Llena ambas columnas para el Estudiante y los Padres.
Estudiantes independientes: Llena solamente la columna para el Estudiante/Cónyuge.
Estudiante/Cónyuge
Padres
26. Pensión alimenticia recibida
$
$
27. Ingreso por intereses sin tributar
impuestos
$
$
28. Hospedaje, alimentos y otras asignaciones $
para gastos de subsistencia pagadas a tu
nombre
$
A. Ingreso anual sin tributar impuestos
29.Otros ingresos no tributables que no se
hayan declarado anteriormente, como la
compensación del seguro obrero, la
indemnización por discapacidad, etc.
30. Dinero recibido o pagado a tu nombre que
no se haya reportado en otra parte de este
formulario
$
31. Ingresos no incluidos en la declaración de
impuestos ni en los formularios W-2
Estudiante
Cónyuge
Madre
Padre
$
$
$
$
Total de ingresos sin tributar impuestos
$
0.00
$
0.00
B. Exclusiones anuales de ingresos
32. Pensión alimenticia pagada
$
$
33. Ganancias tributables de programas de
trabajo-estudio y otros programas basados en
la necesidad
$
$
34.Becas y subvenciones reportadas en la
declaración de impuestos de 2009
$
$
35. Al día de hoy, el balance de las cuentas de $
efectivo, ahorros y cheques
$
$
$
37. Al día de hoy, el valor neto de los negocios $
o inversión en fincas agrícolas
$
C. Bienes
36. Al día de hoy, el valor neto de las
inversiones (sin incluir la casa en la que vives
ni el balance de cuentas de retiro)
Escribe tu nombre completo en letra de imprenta aquí_______________________________________
64
5
Sección V: Total de ingresos de la familia
38. ¿Fue tu INGRESO FAMILIAR TOTAL menos de $6,500 en el 2009?
(El ingreso familiar total es el ingreso reportado en los formularios W-2 del Servicio de Impuestos Internos (IRS)
para tus padres y para ti más el total del ingreso sin tributar impuestos reportado en la Parte A de la Sección IV
de este formulario)
Sí
No
Si la respuesta es SÍ, por favor apunta todos tus gastos de subsistencia (por ejemplo, alquiler, comida y
servicios públicos) y provee una explicación escrita que indique cómo pudiste pagar tus gastos de subsistencia
en el 2009.
Sección VI: Declaración de la situación de inscripción en el Servicio
Selectivo
39. Certificación de situación de la inscripción
(Por favor marca el cuadro que corresponda)
Certifico que soy mujer, y por lo tanto, no tengo la obligación de inscribirme con el Sistema del Servicio
Selectivo.
Certifico que soy un hombre entre las edades de 18 y 25 años y que estoy inscrito en el Sistema del Servicio
Selectivo. Por favor indica el número de inscripción con el Servicio Selectivo (si lo sabes)
Certifico que por mi edad no tengo la obligación de inscribirme con el Sistema del Servicio Selectivo. (Soy
mayor de 25 años.)
Certifico que el Sistema del Servicio Selectivo ha determinado que estoy exento de inscribirme.
Certifico que no he cumplido 18 años y entiendo que tendré la obligación de inscribirme en ese momento.
Certifico que no tengo un número de Seguro Social, pero he presentado mi formulario de inscripción al
Servicio Selectivo en la oficina de asistencia económica para que se le envíe al Sistema del Servicio
Selectivo.
Escribe tu nombre completo en letra de imprenta aquí_______________________________________
65
6
Sección VII: Firmas
40. Estudiante y padre o madre
Entiendo que la Sección 51.9095 del Código de Educación de Texas exige que esté inscrito con el Sistema del
Servicio Selectivo conforme a los requisitos de la ley federal para poder recibir fondos de ayuda estudiantil por
parte del Estado de Texas. Además, certifico que la información provista en este formulario es cierta, completa y
correcta según mi mejor conocimiento. Entiendo que cualquier declaración falsa puede anular el que califique
para recibir ayuda económica estatal y que la información provista en este formulario se utilizará solamente para
evaluar si cumplo con los requisitos para recibir ayuda económica estatal.
Además, entiendo que podría tener que proporcionar información adicional para determinar si califico para recibir
ayuda económica estatal.
Firma del estudiante
Fecha
Firma del padre o la madre*
(*Solamente se requiere de los estudiantes dependientes)
Fecha
41. Consejero/a de preparatoria – No es necesaria esta firma si la firma del padre ya aparece
anteriormente en el #40.
Firma del consejero/a de preparatoria _______________________ Fecha ____________________________
Nombre en letra de imprenta ________________________________________________________________
Título __________________________________________________________________________________
Número telefónico ________________________________________________________________________
Dirección _______________________________________________________________________________
Dirección de correo electrónico: _____________________________________________________________
Escribe tu nombre completo en letra de imprenta aquí_______________________________________
66
7
Instrucciones:
Sección I: Información del estudiante
1. ¿Naciste antes del 1 de enero de 1987?
Ten en cuenta que si naciste el 1 de enero de 1987 debes responder “No.”
2. ¿Estás casado?
Contesta “Sí” si estás casado en la fecha en que llenes la solicitud. Además, contesta “Sí” si estás
separado pero no divorciado.
En el estado de Texas los matrimonios informales son válidos. Por lo tanto, si cumples con los
requisitos del estado para que se te considere como casado informalmente, contesta “Sí” en esta
pregunta. Para más información sobre los matrimonios informales en Texas visita:
http://www.co.travis.tx.us/dro/common_law.asp.
3. ¿Estás en un programa de estudios de posgrado?
Debes contestar “Sí” si estarás matriculado en un programa de maestría o doctorado en el período
inicial al que asistas en el año académico 2010-2011. Sin embargo, si estarás terminando tu título
universitario de cuatro años en el período inicial del año académico para luego continuar con una
maestría o doctorado a mediados del año académico, debes contestar primero esta pregunta con un
“No.” Una vez que hayas completado tu grado universitario de cuatro años, deberás avisarle a a la
oficina de ayuda económica a la que estés asistiendo.
4. ¿Tienes por lo menos un hijo que mantienes?
Contesta “Sí” si tienes por lo menos un hijo que recibe por lo menos el 50% de su sustento económico
de ti. Un solicitante que esté esperando un hijo que nacerá antes del final del año académico (30 de
junio de 2011) puede contestar “Sí.” Ten en cuenta que el sustento económico es el punto importante
aquí. No importa si el niño vive contigo o no.
5. ¿Tienes dependientes aparte de tus hijos o cónyuge?
Contesta “Sí” si tienes a tu cargo personas aparte de tus hijos o tu cónyuge que residen contigo y a las
que les proporcionarás más de la mitad del sustento entre hoy y el 30 de junio del 2011.
6. ¿Eres huérfano o estás bajo la tutela de la corte?
Si los dos de tus padres fallecieron (ya sean biológicos o adoptivos) en cualquier momento desde que
cumpliste 13 años de edad, contesta «Sí» (incluso si ahora eres adoptado).
Si estabas bajo cuidado tutelar en cualquier momento desde que cumpliste 13 años de edad, contesta
«Sí» (incluso si no estás bajo cuidado tutelar actualmente).
Si estabas bajo la tutela de los Tribunales en cualquier momento desde que cumpliste 13 años de
edad, contesta «Sí» (incluso si no estás bajo la tutela de los Tribunales actualmente).
Ten en cuenta que la oficina de asistencia económica de la institución educativa puede pedirte que
aportes pruebas de que estuviste bajo cuidado tutelar o bajo la tutela de los Tribunales.
Escribe tu nombre completo en letra de imprenta aquí_______________________________________
67
8
7 & 8. ¿Eres o eras menor de edad emancipado, o te encuentras o te encontrabas bajo tutela legal, según la
determinación de un tribunal ubicado en el estado en que resides?
Si puedes aportar copia de la resolución judicial por la que actualmente se te considera menor de edad
emancipado o bajo tutela legal, contesta «Sí».
Si puedes aportar copia de la resolución judicial por la que se te consideraba menor de edad
emancipado o bajo tutela legal justo antes de cumplir la mayoría de edad según determinada por el
estado en el que residías, también debes contestar «Sí».
El tribunal emisor de la resolución debe estar ubicado en el estado en el que residías a la fecha de
emisión.
Contesta «No» si todavía eres menor de edad y la resolución dictada por el tribunal ya no tiene
vigencia o no tenía vigencia cuando cumpliste la mayoría de edad.
Ten en cuenta que la oficina de asistencia económica de la institución educativa puede pedirte que
aportes pruebas de que eras menor de edad emancipado o que estabas bajo tutela legal.
9, 10 y 11. En cualquier momento a partir del 1 de julio del 2009, se te considero una persona menor no
acompañado sin casa ni hogar o persona que se mantiene con recursos propios y que estaba
en riesgo a quedarse sin hogar?
Si, a partir del 1 de julio del 2009, se determinó que eras menor no acompañado sin casa ni hogar o,
para efectos de la pregunta 11, estabas en riesgo de quedarte sin hogar, contesta «Sí». ·
«Sin casa ni hogar» significa no tener vivienda fija, habitual ni adecuada, lo cual puede incluir vivir en
refugios, hoteles o automóviles, o vivir temporalmente con otras personas por no tener a dónde ir.
«No acompañado» significa que ninguno de los padres o tutores tiene la guarda y custodia del
estudiante.
«Menor» significa tener 21 o menos años de edad o cursar todavía los estudios de preparatoria (high
school) a la fecha en que se firme la solicitud.
Si no te encuentras sin hogar ni en riesgo de quedarte sin hogar, o si no has recibido una
determinación a tal efecto, contesta «No». Si no has recibido una determinación pero te consideras a ti
mismo un menor no acompañado que carece de hogar, o bien un menor no acompañado que se
mantiene con recursos propios y está en riesgo de quedarse sin hogar, debes comunicarse con la
oficina de asistencia económica para obtener ayuda con esta pregunta.
Si contestas «Sí» a cualquiera de estas preguntas, el administrador de asistencia económica de tu
institución educativa posiblemente te pedirá que aportes copia de la determinación correspondiente.
68
9
Sección II: Información del hogar
12. Si estás clasificado como un estudiante dependiente (conforme a la Sección I de esta solicitud),
anota los nombres y fechas de nacimiento de TODOS los miembros de la familia a quienes tú o tus
padres les proporcionarán sustento entre el 1 de julio de 2010 y el 30 de junio de 2011, incluidos:
tú mismo
tu padre o madre a cargo de tu tutela
el cónyuge de tu padre o madre a cargo de tu tutela (por ejemplo, tu madre o madrastra o
padre o padrastro)
cualquier niño dependiente menor de 18 años de edad que viva en la casa de tu padre o
madre a cargo de tu tutela
cualquier hermano o hermana que sea un estudiante dependiente y que esté asistiendo a la
universidad
cualquier otra persona que reciba más del 50% de su sustento económico por parte de tu
padre o madre a cargo de tu tutela
Si estás clasificado como un estudiante independiente (conforme a la Sección I de esta solicitud),
anota los nombres y fechas de nacimiento de TODOS los miembros de la familia a quienes tú les
proporcionarás sustento entre el 1 de julio de 2010 y el 30 de junio de 2011, incluidos:
tú mismo
tu cónyuge
cualquier hijo dependiente menor de 18 años que viva contigo
cualquier hijo dependiente de tu cónyuge
cualquier otra persona que reciba más del 50% de su sustento económico de ti o de tu
cónyuge
Anota el nombre de la universidad para aquellos estudiantes dependientes en tu familia que estén
asistiendo a la universidad por lo menos a medio tiempo. No incluyas a tus padres si alguno de ellos
está asistiendo a la universidad. Adjunta una página adicional si es necesario.
Un padre adoptivo temporal, tutor legal o un abuelo u otro familiar no se considera un padre para
propósitos de esta solicitud a menos que esa persona haya adoptado legalmente al solicitante. Una
persona a la que se le haya concedido un poder para actuar a nombre del estudiante no es un tutor
legal.
69
10
13. A la fecha, ¿eres tú (o tu cónyuge) trabajador desplazado?
En general, a un trabajador se le podría considerar desplazado si:
recibe compensación por desempleo a causa del despido temporal o definitivo o de la
pérdida de su puesto de trabajo, y tiene pocas probabilidades de volver a trabajar en una
profesión u oficio anterior;
ha sido despedido, ya sea de forma temporal o definitiva, o ha recibido aviso de despido;
trabajaba por cuenta propia pero actualmente se encuentra desempleado a causa de
condiciones económicas desfavorables o de un desastre natural, o
es ama o amo de casa desplazado. En general, tal persona anteriormente prestaba servicios
no remunerados a su familia (p. ej., una madre o un padre que se queda en casa), ya no
cuenta con los ingresos del cónyuge para su mantenimiento, se encuentra desempleada o
subempleada y tiene dificultades para encontrar empleo o para mejorar la calidad de su
empleo.
En general, a las personas que renuncien a su empleo no se les considera trabajadores desplazados,
aunque, por ejemplo, reciban compensación por desempleo.
Si tú o tu cónyuge son trabajadores desplazados, responde «Sí» a la pregunta 13.
Si ni tú ni tu cónyuge son trabajadores desplazados, responde «No» a la pregunta 13.
Si no sabes con certeza si tú o tu cónyuge son trabajadores desplazados, responde «No lo sé» a la
pregunta 13.
Si necesitas ayuda para contestar estas preguntas, puedes comunicarte con la oficina de asistencia
económica de tu institución educativa. Ten en cuenta que, si tú respondiste «Sí» a la pregunta 13, la
oficina de asistencia económica de la institución educativa puede pedirte que aportes pruebas de que
las personas en referencia son trabajadores desplazados.
Sección III: Información adicional
ESTUDIANTE:
14. ¿Presentaste una declaración federal de impuestos para el 2009?
Indica si ya presentaste, vas a presentar o no vas a presentar una declaración de impuestos para el
2009.
15. ¿Eres un hombre entre las edades de 18 y 25 años?
Si eres un hombre entre las edades de 18 y 25 años, tienes que inscribirte con el Servicio Selectivo
para poder calificar para cualquier tipo de ayuda estatal (independientemente de tu situación de
residencia).
También puedes obtener un formulario de inscripción del Servicio Selectivo en cualquier oficina de
correo postal local. Llena el formulario y envíalo a la oficina del Servicio Selectivo o puedes entregarlo
en la oficina de asistencia económica de tu universidad para que lo envíen por ti. Si tienes la obligación
de inscribirte, tienes que proporcionar tu número de inscripción en esta solicitud.
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16. ¿Te han condenado por un delito grave o un crimen relacionado con sustancias controladas mientras
recibías ayuda estatal para estudiantes?
Esta pregunta es para saber si has sido condenado por poseer o vender drogas ilegales a causa de una
infracción cometida mientras recibías ayuda estatal para estudiantes. Si has sido condenado, no
necesariamente serás descalificado para recibir ayuda. Si contestas “Sí” en esta pregunta, comunícate con
el administrador de asistencia económica de tu universidad para recibir instrucciones adicionales.
17. ¿Tienes una visa que te permita estar empleado en los Estados Unidos?
Si tienes una visa y tu tipo de visa te permite trabajar en los Estados Unidos, pudieras calificar para el
Programa Universitario de Trabajo y Estudio de Texas.
18. ¿Cuáles son tus planes de vivienda para el año 2010-2011? Indica si vivirás: dentro del campus, fuera del
campus o si vivirás en la casa de tus padres o algún familiar.
19. Cuando comience el año escolar 2010-2011, estarás matriculado:
A tiempo completo: 12 horas o más
3/4 partes del tiempo: 9 - 11 horas
1/2 tiempo: 6 - 8 horas
Menos de medio tiempo – menos de 6 horas
20. ¿Si asististe a una universidad antes de esta, recibiste fondos de la beca de Texas (Texas Grant) allí?
Las universidades toman en cuenta los fondos que hayas recibido anteriormente en otra universidad.
En caso de que existan fondos, es posible que califiques para fondos adicionales en la nueva
universidad.
21. ¿Presentaron tus padres una declaración federal de impuestos para el 2009?
Indica si tus padres ya presentaron, van a presentar o no van a presentar una declaración de
impuestos para el 2009.
22. A la fecha, ¿es alguno de tus padres trabajador desplazado?
En general, a un trabajador se le podría considerar desplazado si:
recibe compensación por desempleo a causa del despido temporal o definitivo o de la pérdida
de su puesto de trabajo, y tiene pocas probabilidades de volver a trabajar en una profesión u
oficio anterior;
ha sido despedido, ya sea de forma temporal o definitiva, o ha recibido aviso de despido;
trabajaba por cuenta propia pero actualmente se encuentra desempleado a causa de
condiciones económicas desfavorables o de un desastre natural, o
es ama o amo de casa desplazado. En general, tal persona anteriormente prestaba servicios
no remunerados a su familia (p. ej., una madre o un padre que se queda en casa), ya no
cuenta con los ingresos del cónyuge para su mantenimiento, se encuentra desempleada o
subempleada y tiene dificultades para encontrar empleo o para mejorar la calidad de su
empleo.
En general, a las personas que renuncien a su empleo no se les considera trabajadores
desplazados, aunque, por ejemplo, reciban compensación por desempleo.
Si su padre o su madre son trabajadores desplazados, responda «Sí» a la pregunta 22.
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Si ni su padre ni su madre son trabajadores desplazados, responda «No» a la pregunta 22.
Si no sabe con certeza si su padre o su madre son trabajadores desplazados, responda «No lo
sé» a la pregunta 22.
Si necesita ayuda para contestar estas preguntas, puede comunicarse con la oficina de asistencia
económica de su institución educativa. Tenga en cuenta que, si usted respondió «Sí» a la pregunta
22, la oficina de asistencia económica de la institución educativa puede pedirle que aporte
pruebas de que las personas en referencia son trabajadores desplazados.
23. Estado civil de tus padres.
Indica el estado civil de tu padre o madre a cargo de tu tutela como “casado” “soltero,” “viudo” o
“divorciado/separado.” Si tus padres están casados, por favor incluye información sobre el ingreso de
ambos padres en las secciones IV y V. Si tus padres están divorciados, pero se han vuelto a casar, por
favor incluye la información del ingreso del que esté a cargo y de su cónyuge actual.
24 & 25. Nivel más alto de educación alcanzado por tus padres.
Estas preguntas no afectan el que cumplas con los requisitos para recibir ayuda estatal. Algunos
programas institucionales utilizan la información provista aquí para ofrecerles ayuda a los estudiantes
que conforman la primera generación de estudiantes universitarios de su familia.
Sección IV: Ingresos y bienes
A. Ingreso anual que no ha tributado impuestos
26. Pensión alimenticia recibida. (Child Support)
Indica la cantidad de pensión alimenticia que tú y tu cónyuge o padres, según corresponda, recibieron
para todos los niños durante el 2009. No incluyas los pagos por cuidado adoptivo temporal o adopción.
27. Ingreso por intereses sin tributar impuestos.
Indica el Ingreso por intereses exento de impuestos. Si presentaste la declaracion de impuestos esta
cantidad se encuentra en el formulario del IRS 1040 (renglón 8b) o en el 1040A (renglón 8b).
28. Vivienda, comida y otras asignaciones de subsistencia.
Tienes que indicar las asignaciones de vivienda, los alimentos y otras asignaciones de subsistencia
que tus padres o tú hayan recibido. Estas asignaciones se tienen que reportar cuando son parte de un
paquete de compensación que algunas personas reciben por sus trabajos. Incluye los pagos en
efectivo y el valor en efectivo de los beneficios. Si recibiste hospedaje gratis en el 2009 por un empleo,
tienes que reportar el valor del hospedaje como ingreso sin tributar. (Para esta categoría “asignaciones
de vivienda” no incluye los subsidios de alquiler para las viviendas para personas de bajos ingresos.)
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29. Otros ingresos no tributables que no se hayan declarado en la FAFSA, como la compensación del
seguro obrero, la indemnización por discapacidad
Otros ingresos no tributables que no se hayan declarado en la FAFSA, como la compensación del
seguro obrero, la indemnización por discapacidad, etc. No incluya la ayuda estudiantil, ni el crédito por
ingreso del trabajo, ni el crédito tributario adicional por hijos, ni la asistencia social, ni los beneficios no
tributables del Seguro Social, ni el Ingreso Suplementario de Seguridad, ni la asistencia educativa
recibida al amparo de la Ley de Inversión en la Fuerza Laboral (Workforce Investment Act), ni la paga
por combate, ni los beneficios de arreglos especiales para gastos (p. ej., los planes tipo «cafetería»), ni
la exclusión de ingresos obtenidos en el extranjero ni el crédito por impuesto federal a los combustibles
especiales.
30. Dinero recibido o pagado a tu nombre que no se haya reportado en otra parte de este formulario.
Indica cualquier sustento en efectivo que tú (el estudiante) hayas recibido por parte de algún amigo o
pariente. El sustento en efectivo incluye los pagos hechos en tu nombre. Por ejemplo, si tu tía paga tu
alquiler o tus cuentas de servicios públicos que si no tendrías que pagar tú, tienes que indicar esos
pagos en esta sección.
31. Anota cualquier ingreso que se pagó en efectivo o por otros medios para los cuales no se presentó una
declaración de impuestos ni se recibió un formulario W-2. (Ingresos no incluidos en la declaración
de impuestos ni en los formularios W-2)
B. Exclusiones anuales de ingresos
32. Pensión alimenticia pagada.
Indica cualquier pago por pensión alimenticia que tú o tu cónyuge o padres, según corresponda, hayan
pagado durante el 2009 como resultado de un divorcio, separación o algún otro requisito legal. Ten en
cuenta que esos pagos son pagos hechos a niños que no viven en tu hogar ni en el de tus padres.
Para propósitos de esta solicitud, un niño es miembro de tu hogar si tú le proporcionas más de la mitad
de su sustento, aunque el niño viva contigo o no.
33. Ganancias tributables de programas de trabajo-estudio y otros programas basados en la necesidad.
Son ganancias obtenidas de programas de estudio y trabajo basados en necesidad y en porciones de
becas de investigación y cargos como asistente de profesor basados en necesidad.
34. Becas y subvenciones reportadas en la declaración de impuestos de 2009.
Informa cualquier ayuda de subvenciones y becas que se le informó al Servicio de Impuestos Internos
(IRS) en la declaración de impuestos de tus padres para el 2009. Esto incluye beneficios tales como
concesiones, asignaciones de subsistencia y pagos de interés acumulado, así como las porciones de
subvenciones y becas para investigación y trabajo como asistente de profesor.
C. Bienes
35. Al día de hoy, el balance de las cuentas de efectivo, ahorros y cheques.
No incluyas la ayuda económica para estudiantes en esta cantidad.
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36. Al día de hoy, el valor neto de las inversiones (no incluyas la casa en la que vives ni el balance de
cuentas de retiro).
Valor neto significa el valor de las inversiones vigentes menos la deuda vigente de la inversión.
Valor de la inversión – deuda de la inversión = valor neto de la inversión
Si tus padres o tú son propietarios de bienes inmuebles o inversiones aparte de tu residencia principal,
el valor de la inversión equivale a la cantidad del valor que tienen las inversiones hoy. La deuda de la
inversión equivale a cuánto tú o tu cónyuge o padres, según corresponda, deban por concepto de
bienes inmuebles e inversiones aparte de tu residencia principal. Deuda de la inversión significa
solamente aquellas deudas que estén relacionadas con las inversiones.
Las inversiones incluyen los bienes inmuebles tales como las propiedades de alquiler, terrenos y casas
secundarias o para vacaciones. No incluyas tu residencia principal (es decir, tu casa). Incluye el valor
de las porciones de las residencias multifamiliares que no sean tu residencia principal.
Las inversiones también incluyen los fondos de fideicomiso, fondos de cuentas de mercado de dinero,
fondos mutuos, certificados de depósito, acciones, opciones de acciones, bonos, otros valores,
Cuentas Coverdell de Ahorros para Educación (conocidas anteriormente como cuentas IRA para
Educación), planes de ahorros para la universidad, contratos de pagos a plazo o venta de terrenos
(incluyendo hipotecas que tenga) y materia prima, entre otras.
No incluyas el valor de pólizas de seguro ni planes de retiro (fondos de pensión, anualidades, cuentas
IRA que no sean para educación o planes Keogh, entre otros).
El dinero en una Cuenta Coverdell de Ahorros para la Educación o un plan de ahorros para la
universidad es un activo del dueño de la cuenta. Una Cuenta Coverdell de Ahorros para la Educación
no es una cuenta de retiro. Es, en esencia, una cuenta de ahorros para utilizarse para los gastos
educativos del estudiante. Por lo tanto, si eres dueño de la cuenta, tienes que indicar la cantidad
existente en tu Cuenta Coverdell de Ahorros para la Educación junto con tus inversiones.
37. Al día de hoy, el valor neto de los negocios o inversiones en fincas agrícolas. El valor de un negocio o
inversión en una finca agrícola incluye el valor actual en el mercado que tienen el terreno, los edificios,
la maquinaria, el equipo y el inventario, entre otros. No incluyas tu residencia principal.
Valor del negocio/finca agrícola – deuda del negocio/finca agrícola
= valor neto del negocio/finca agrícola
Para el valor de un negocio o la inversión en una finca agrícola primero calcula cuánto vale hoy el
negocio o la finca agrícola. Una inversión en una finca agrícola es un negocio agrícola en el cual
ni tú (ni tu cónyuge, si estás casado) ni tus padres viven en la finca, ni operan la finca
sustancialmente.
Las deudas de un negocio o inversión en una finca agrícola son lo que tú (y tu cónyuge, si estás
casado) o tus padres deban por el negocio o la finca. Incluye solamente las deudas para las cuales se
haya ofrecido el negocio o finca como garantía.
Para indicar el valor actual en el mercado de un negocio tienes que utilizar la cantidad por la cual se
podría vender el negocio en la fecha de la solicitud. Además, si tú no eres el único dueño del negocio,
debes indicar solamente tu porción del valor y la deuda de la inversión.
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No incluyas el valor de un negocio pequeño del que tú (tu cónyuge o tus padres) seas dueño y
controles, y que tenga 100 empleados o menos a tiempo completo o su equivalente.
Sección V: Total de ingresos de la familia
38. ¿Fue tu INGRESO FAMILIAR TOTAL menos de $6,500 en el 2009?
Para poder evaluar con precisión tu situación económica, la universidad a la que asistas tiene que
tener una contabilidad de todas tus fuentes de ingreso. En los casos en que tu ingreso sea menos de
$6,500 se requiere una explicación porque esta cantidad se considera significativamente menor que el
nivel de pobreza establecido por el Departamento de Salud y Servicios Humanos de E.E.U.U. para el
2009. En la explicación que le proporciones a la universidad asegúrate de que incluyas todas las
fuentes de ingreso y que apuntes todos tus gastos de subsistencia.
Si un pariente te reclama en su declaración de impuestos, algunas universidades pueden exigirte que
proporciones una copia de la declaración de impuestos que le envió al Servicio de Impuestos Internos
(IRS). Comunícate con la universidad a la que planeas asistir para averiguar si se requiere algún
documento adicional.
Sección VI: Declaración de la situación de inscripción con el Servicio Selectivo
39. Certificación de situación de la inscripción
La Sección 51.9095 del Código de Educación de Texas exige que si actualmente tienes la edad y eres
del sexo para el que se exige una inscripción con el Servicio Selectivo, y premeditadamente y a
propósito no te inscribes, no calificas para recibir los fondos por parte del Estado de Texas.
Exenciones
Casi todos los hombres ciudadanos americanos y los hombres extranjeros que viven en los Estados
Unidos que tienen entre 18 y 25 años de edad tienen la obligación de inscribirse con el Servicio
Selectivo. A algunos hombres que no son ciudadanos se les exige que se inscriban y a otros no. Los
hombres que no son ciudadanos a los que no se les exige que se inscriban incluyen los que
están en los Estados Unidos con visas de turista y los que forman parte de una misión
diplomática o comercial y sus familias. Casi todos los demás hombres que no son ciudadanos
tienen la obligación de inscribirse, incluyendo los residentes indocumentados, los residentes legales
permanentes y los refugiados.
Personas que no se han inscrito
Si no te has inscrito según los requisitos, en este momento no calificas para recibir ayuda estatal y
debes inscribirte rápidamente en una oficina del Correo Postal de los Estados Unidos. Puedes obtener
un Certificado de Envío en la Oficina de Correos cuando envíes tu inscripción que se puede usar como
prueba de tu solicitud hasta que recibas tu Tarjeta de Inscripción en el Servicio Selectivo.
Declaración de privacidad
Debido a que la información sobre tu situación de inscripción es esencial para determinar si has
cumplido con la ley del Servicio Selectivo, el no proporcionar la información que exige esta
declaración te descalificará para recibir ayuda estatal. Esta información está sujeta a verificación
con el Sistema del Servicio Selectivo.
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Notificación de declaraciones falsas
Una declaración falsa puede ser un motivo para que se suspendan las ayudas estatales que recibes.
Revisión
Si surgiera alguna pregunta sobre tu inscripción, o si calificas para una exención, puedes solicitarle una
carta oficial de “información de situación” al Sistema del Servicio Selectivo llamando al 1-847-6886888. Como alternativa, puedes enviarle una solicitud por escrito al Sistema del Servicio Selectivo al
P.O. Box 94638, Palatine, IL 60094-4638.
Sección VII: Firmas
40. Firma del estudiante y el padre o madre
Recuerda firmar tu nombre en la solicitud. Además, si estás clasificado como estudiante dependiente,
uno de tus padres tiene que firmar la solicitud. La solicitud no será procesada hasta que todas las
firmas requeridas estén incluidas.
41.Consejero/a de la preparatoria
Esta sección es perteneciente a estudiantes de primer año de universidad (solamente los
estudiantes que ingresan por primera vez a la universidad). Si existen circunstancias atenuantes
que les prohíban a tus padres firmar este formulario, el consejero/a de preparatoria puede firmar este
formulario. Sin embargo, cuando un consejero/a de preparatoria firma este formulario a nombre del
padre o la madre del estudiante, el consejero/a certifica que la información provista en la solicitud es
correcta. Además, al firmar el formulario, el consejero acuerda cooperar con el funcionario de
asistencia económica de la universidad para proporcionarle documentos que verifiquen las
circunstancias de la familia y la situación económica. La mayoría de los funcionarios de asistencia
económica de las universidades querrán comunicarse con el consejero/a de tu preparatoria para
solicitar información y documentos adicionales. Por lo tanto, el consejero/a tiene que proporcionar la
siguiente información de contacto: nombre, título, número telefónico, dirección de correo electrónico y
dirección postal.
Si no eres un estudiante de primer año, pero existen circunstancias atenuantes que les prohíban a tus
padres firmar este formulario, comunícate con la oficina de asistencia económica de la universidad a la
que deseas asistir para mayor información.
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Apéndice A
Universidades que aceptan la
Solicitud de Ayuda Económica Estatal de Texas (TASFA)
College/university
Location
Abilene Christian College
Abilene
Amarillo College
Amarillo
Austin Community College
Austin
Brazosport College
Lake Jackson
Central Texas College
Killeen
College of the Mainland
Texas City
Collin County Community College
Spring Creek Campus, Central Park, Preston Ridge
Concordia University
Austin
Dallas County Community College District- All locations
Brookhaven, Cedar Valley, Eastfield, El Centro
Mountain View, North Lake and Richland
Del Mar College
Corpus Christi
El Paso Community College
El Paso
Frank Phillips College
Borger
Grayson County College
Denison
Hill College
Hillsboro
Howard Payne University
Brownwood
Jarvis Christian College
Hawkins
Lamar University
Beaumont
Laredo Community College
Laredo
Lee College
Baytown
Lon Morris College
Jacksonville
Lonestar College – All Locations
North Harris, Kingwood, Tomball, Montgomery
Cy-fair
McMurry University
Abilene
Midland College
Midland
Midwestern State University
Wichita Falls
Navarro College
Corsicana
Northeast Texas Community College
Mt. Pleasant
Odessa College
Odessa
Panola College
Carthage
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Paul Quinn College
Dallas
Prairie View A&M University
Prairie View
Ranger College
Ranger
Sam Houston State University
Huntsville
San Jacinto College
Pasadena
Schreiner University
Kerrville
South Plains College
Levelland, Plainview,Denver City
Muleshoe,Reese Center-Lubbock,
Lubbock ATC-downtown
Southern Methodist University
Dallas
Southwestern Adventist University
Keene
Southwestern Assemblies of God University
Waxahachie
St. Edwards’s University
Austin
Stephen F. Austin State University
Nacogdoches
Tarrant County College
Fort Worth
Texas College
Tyler
Texas A&M International University -– Laredo
Laredo
Texas A&M University -– College Station
College Station
Texas A&M University --- Commerce
Commerce
Texas A&M University – Corpus Christi
Corpus Christi
Texas A & M University -– Galveston
Galveston
Texas A&M Health Science Center
All locations
Texas A&M University- Kingsville
Kingsville
Texas A&M University -– Texarkana
Texarkana
Texas Christian University
Fort Worth
Texas Lutheran University
Seguin
Texas State Technical College
Harlingen
Texas State Technical College
West Texas -– Sweetwater
Sweetwater
Texas State Technical College
Waco
Texas State University -– San Marcos
San Marcos
Texas Tech University
Lubbock
Texas Wesleyan University
Fort Worth
Texas Woman’s University
Denton
The University of Texas at Arlington
Arlington
The University of Texas at Austin
Austin
The University of Texas at Dallas
Richardson
The University of Texas at El Paso
El Paso
The University of Texas at Tyler
Tyler
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The University of Texas Health Science Center
San Antonio
The University of Texas Pan American
Edinburg
Trinity Valley Community College
Athens
University of Dallas
Irving
University of Houston Clearlake
Clearlake
University of Houston Downtown
Houston
University of Houston
Houston
University of Houston Victoria
Victoria
University of Mary Hardin Baylor
Belton
University of North Texas
Denton
University of North Texas Health Science Center
Fort Worth
Vernon College
Vernon
Victoria College
Victoria
Weatherford College
Weatherford
Western Texas College
Snyder
Wharton County Junior College
Wharton
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Scholarships Available to Undocumented Student See LBJ High School’s Scholarship List via Family Connection for more information: https://connection.naviance.com/fc/signin.php?hsid=lbjhs The guest password is “aisd” Type
Name
Deadline
Amount
Inst Inst Inst Inst ACC McDonald's of Central TX Baylor Collins Scholarship Call Me MISTER Teacher Recruitment Program Capital City A&M Club Scholarship 1‐Jun 31‐Jan 15‐Feb 1‐Mar $1,000 $18,000 Varies $4,000 Inst
Colorado College Scholars Program
15-Jan
$50,000
Inst Inst Inst Inst Inst Inst Inst Ohio State Univ‐Austin Chapter Future Buckeye Sch OU Alumni Club of Austin Scholarship PVA&M Presidential Scholarship Program Robertson Scholars Program Sam Houston State Univ. Academic Schol. Sam Houston State Univ. Elliott T. Bowers Hnrs. Prog. Sam Houston State Univ. H.S. Relations Schol. 1‐Feb 1‐Mar FCFS 1‐Dec 15‐Feb 15‐Feb 15‐Mar Varies $2,000 varies Full ride Varies Varies $5,700 Inst
Skidmore-Filene Music Scholarship Competition
15-Jan
$40,000
Inst
Skidmore-Porter Presidential Scholarships
15-Jan
$40,000
Inst
SMU Hunt Leadership Scholars Program
15-Jan
Full ride
Inst Inst Inst St. Edward's Univ. Academic Scholar Awards St. Edward's Univ. Guaranteed Trustees Scholar Award St. Edward's Univ. Holy Cross Scholarship Inst
SW Univ. Bishop Ernest T. Dixon Schol.
15-Jan
$7,500/Full
Inst
SW Univ. Schols. For Incoming Freshmen
15-Jan
Varies
Inst
TCU Youth Entrepreneur of the Year Awards
Inst
Texas Tech-Koh Family Engin. Schol.
15-Jan
$65,000
Inst Inst Inst Inst Inst Inst Inst Inst Inst TX Lutheran U. Pacesetter Awards for College Excellence Univ. of Houston Asian Alumni Schol. Univ. of Houston Assoc. of Hispanic Alumni Sch. Univ. of Houston Austin UH Club Scholarship Univ. of Houston Black Leadership Network UT Arlington Maverick Promise Program UTA Merit‐Based Scholarships UTSA Presidential Honors Scholarship UTSA Rising Roadrunner Scholarship 6‐Feb 19‐Mar 19‐Mar 19‐Mar 19‐Mar 1‐Apr 15‐Feb 15‐Feb 15‐Feb $18,000 $1,000 $1,000 $1,000 Varies Full tuition $32,000 $6,000 $6,000 Inst
Washington Univ.--Annika Rodriguez Schol.
15-Jan
Partial/full
L/S/N national History Day Contest L/S/N Prudential Spirit of Community Awards L/S/N VFW Voice of Democracy Contest L/S/N Violet Richardson Award (Soroptimist Club) Local A.C.E. Awards‐‐Youth of the Year Local ACEA Scholarship Program Local 80Aimee Melissa Davis Memorial Scholarship 20‐Feb 2‐Nov 1‐Nov 1‐Dec 28‐Feb 1‐Apr 9‐Apr $5,000 $5,000 $30,000 1‐Feb $14,000 1‐Feb $40,000 1‐Feb Full tuition 1‐Nov $2,000-$10,000
$1,000 (28)
Up to $10,000 $2,000 Scholarships Available to Undocumented Student Local AISD 125th Ann./Applied Materials Endowed Schol. Local AISD 125th Ann./Webber Fdn Endowed Schol.
9‐Apr $500 9‐Apr $500 Local
Alpha Kappa Alpha Scholarship
26-Feb
various
Local Local Local Local American Public Works Assoc Sch Amigos en Azul‐Austin Hisp. Police Assoc. Amplify Austin Video Scholarship Contest Applied Hispanic Opportunity and Recognition Award $4,000 Local
Applied Materials Youth Legacy Awards
Local Local Local Local Local Local Local Local Local Local Local Local Local Local Local Local Local Local Local Local Local Austin Area Alliance of Black School Edu. Sch. Austin Association of Insurance Professionals Eloise Wood Scholarship Austin Black Lawyers' Association Lott Sch. Austin Board of Realtors Foundation Scholarship Austin Business Travel Association Scholarship Austin Capital City Lions Scholarship Austin Comm. Coll. Boyd Vance Dance/Drama Schol. Austin Community College Connection Scholarship Austin Community College Scholarships Austin Contractors and Engineers Assoc. Sch. Austin Delta Foundation Scholarship 31‐Jan 1‐Mar 30‐Jun 1‐Apr 20‐Nov 12‐Mar 23‐Apr 3‐Apr 12‐Mar 20‐Mar 5‐Apr 1‐May 1‐Apr 1‐Jun 1‐Apr 22‐Mar 9‐Apr 28‐Apr 19‐Apr 10‐Mar 15‐Dec 1‐Apr 5‐Mar 2‐Apr 25‐Apr 31‐Mar Local
Austin Energy/AISD 125th Ann. Schol. For Crockett HS
Austin Professional Chapter of the Society of MAES Austin Retired Teachers Assoc. Fdn. Scholarship Austin Voices Shout-Out Award
Ava Crofford Youth Citizenship Award Barton Hills Elementary PTA Nick Akery Schol. Barton Springs/Edwards Aquifer Conserv. Sch. Bill Buchholtz Mem. Schol. (Austin Chord Rangers) Bowzer and Byars Scholarship Capital Area Tennis Association Scholarship Capitol LaSertoma Club Progressive Youth Service Program
Local Central Texas Medical Center Scholarship Local Clint Small Middle School PTA Scholarship Local Covington Middle School PTA Scholarship Local Education First scholarship Local Excellence in Writing Scholarship (Statesman) Local Fay T. Barnes Scholarship (JP Morgan Chase) Local Gearheads Automotive Technology Scholarship Local Greater Southwest Optimist Club Schol. Local Hays CISD Local Scholarships Local Hays HS Let's Work Foundation Scholarship Local Hispanic Scholarship Consortium Local Housing Authority of Austin Scholarship Local Jamshid & Tahirih Memorial Baha'I Scholarship Local 81Jerry JarmonaISD 125th Ann. Schol. For Travis HS
$1,000
$500‐$7,500 $1,000 $1,000 $500 $1,000 (1) $2,000 $1,000
$1,500 $500 $1,000 $2,500 various Various various
$500 $1,000 $1,000 $1,000 ? $500 $1,500 $600 Varies Varies
15-Jan
Varies
31‐Mar 1‐Apr 15‐Apr 22‐Jan 2‐Mar 22‐Feb 5‐Mar 9‐Apr 26‐Mar 23‐Apr 22‐Feb 12‐Mar 1‐Apr 9‐Apr $1,000+laptop (3) $500 $500 (3) $9,000 & $4,000 $1,500 $14,000 $2,500 (1) $750 Varies various $2,000 Various $500 $500 Scholarships Available to Undocumented Student Local Local Local Local Local Local Local Local Local Local Local Local Local Local Local Local Local Local Local Jessie Copeland Austin Amateur Radio Sch Kester Memorial Scholarship Fund LaSertoma Scholarships
Leroy Hiller Memorial Scholarship Lion's Club Essay Contest Machaca Optimist Club Essay Contest Mathews Elementary School Fund for Excellence Mensa Foundation New Braunfels Area Quilt Guild-Clare Peterson Memorial Scholarships
Nick Reinhart Memorial Scholarship Oak Hill Elementary PTA Scholarship Paredes Barg Faculty/PTA Scholarship Patton Elementary Scholarship Peace Officers Memorial Foundation Scholarship Pedernales Electric Coop Scholarship Phi Beta Kappa Alumni Assoc of Greater Austin Phi Delta Kappa Annual nat'l Educational Sch. Phi Delta Kappa‐Carmen Mercer Scholarship Phi Delta Kappa‐Education Scholarship Local Rising Heroes Time Warner Cable Scholarship Local Rogue Training Systems Michael Argall Schol. Local Ruby Handcox Memorial Scholarship Local
Seton Family of Hospitals Foundation MLK Youth Achievement Awards
Local Local Local Local Simon Youth Foundation Comm Sch Prog SoundWave Music Scholarship
Southwest naHRO Scholarship St. Luke Missionary Baptist Church‐Shawn L. Daniels Jr. Scholarship Local
State of Education in Austin Student Essay Contest
Local Local Local Local Local Local Local Local Local Local Local Local natl Statesman Excellence in Writing Award Sylvia Elizabeth Johnson Schol. Trust Texas naHRO Scholarship The Garden Club of Austin Scholarship Town Lake Chapter ‐ The LINKS, Inc. Scholarship United Daughters of the Confederacy (Chapter 2435) Velma and Bob Miles Scholarship Velocity Credit Union Scholarship Will Davis Elementary Scholarship Young Women in Public Affairs Scholarship YouthLaunch Scholarship for Outstanding Service Zach Maresch Memorial Scholarship Abbott and Fenner Scholarship natl
AES Engineers Scholarship
natl natl AFE Floriculture Scholarships (17 total) AHETEMS General Scholarship 82
31‐Jan 1‐Apr 15‐May 15‐Mar 9‐Apr 11‐Feb 31‐Mar 15‐Jan 10‐Mar 2‐Apr 30‐Apr 15‐May 1‐Apr 23‐Apr 1‐Mar 19‐Mar 1‐Feb 3‐Feb 1‐Feb 1‐Feb 16‐Apr 15‐Apr 20‐Nov 31‐Jan 9‐Apr 2‐Apr 31‐Mar 31‐Oct 2‐Mar 16‐Apr 12‐Feb 24‐Mar 1-Apr
1‐May 15‐Apr 30‐Apr 7‐May 15‐Jan 27‐Feb 5‐Mar 19‐Jun 8‐Oct 1‐May 1‐Apr Varies $1,500 Varies $5,000 $1,500 Varies $500 $1,000 $1,500 (3) Varies $500 $500 $500 $500 $1,000 $2,500 $6,000 $2,000 $6,000 Varies Varies $300 $1,000 $1,400 $500 $4,000 $750‐1500 $1,000 $1,000 $1,600 $20,000 $500 (1) $1,600 $2,000 $500 $1,000 $3,000 $500 $1,000 $500 $1000‐$3000 Scholarships Available to Undocumented Student natl natl natl natl natl natl natl natl natl natl natl
natl natl natl natl natl natl natl natl natl natl natl natl natl natl natl natl natl natl natl natl natl natl natl natl natl natl natl natl natl natl natl natl natl Al's Formal Wear Salute to Education Scholarship American Legion Auxilary Girl Scout Achievement Award American Legion Auxilary nat'l President's Scholarship American Legion Legacy Scholarship Andre Sobel Essay Award Anne Frank Outstanding Scholarship Award ASFA national High School Essay Contest Asian American Journalist Assoc. Schol. Asian Pacific Fund Scholarship Program
B. Davis Scholarship (ScholarshipQuestHelper) Barbara Wiedner & Dorothy Vandercook Memorial Peace Scholarship Best Buy @15 Scholarship Program Big Sun Scholarship Boy Scouts of A. Hall/McElwain Merit Sch Boy Scouts of America Eagle Scout Sch Burger King Employee Scholars Program Burger King Scholars Program Cancer for College Scholarships Cappex/UNCF "Perfect Fit" Scholarship Casey Family Scholars/Foster Care to Success Scholarship Catholic Life Insurance All American Scholarship Dale E. Fridell Memorial Scholarship Davis Putter Scholarship Doors to Diplomacy Award Dr. Seuss's Oh the Places You'll Go Scholarship EngineerGirl!‐Survival Design Challenge Family Dollar/Save and Make the Grade Schol. Fountainhead Essay Contest for 11th & 12th Graders FRA/LA FRA Scholarship Program
Frank Kazmierczak Memorial Migrant Scholarship Friends of Scott Scholarship Program HENAAC Scholars Program Hitachi Yoshiyama Young Entrepreneurs Program Holocaust Remembrance Essay Contest Hydrocephalus Foundation Scholarship KarMel Scholarship La Unidad Latina, Inc (fall deadline) La Unidad Latina, Inc (spring deadline) Leonard M. Perryman Communications Scholarship LIFE Lessons Scholarship Program Lowe's Carl Buchan Scholarship Marine Corps Scholarship Foundation Miles for Migrants Military Commanders' Scholarship Fund 83
31‐May $1,000 1-Apr $1,000 1‐Mar $2,500 15‐Apr Various 1-Apr $5,000 (1) 15‐Jan $10,000 15‐Apr $2,500 26‐Mar $1,000 31‐Mar 28‐May $1,000 1-Mar $500 15‐Feb $1,000 24‐Jun $500 31‐Jan Varies 31‐Jan Varies 15‐Feb $1,000, $5,000 1‐Feb $1,000 1‐Mar $4,000 31‐May $5,000 31‐Mar $10,000 1-Mar $1,000 14‐Apr $1,000 1‐Apr varies 16‐Mar $2,000 15‐Feb $5,000 1‐Mar $500 28‐Feb $2,500 26‐Apr $10,000 15‐Apr $5,000
1‐Feb $1,000 15‐Mar 30‐Apr $5,000 22‐Mar Up to $50,000
2‐Apr $250‐$5,000 1-Apr $500 31‐Mar $400 15‐Oct $250‐1000 15‐Feb $250‐1000 15‐Mar $2,500 15‐Apr $1,000‐$10,000 26‐Feb $5,000 (50) 1‐Apr 15‐Apr 15‐Feb $5,000 Scholarships Available to Undocumented Student natl natl natl natl natl natl
natl natl natl natl natl natl natl natl natl natl natl natl natl natl natl naHJ Ford Motor Company Scholarship
naHJ General Ruben Salazar Scholarship
naSSP Herff Jones Principal's Leadership Award national Co‐op Scholarship national Federation of the Blind Scholarship national Honor Society Scholarship national Peace Essay Contest natonal Future Farmers of America Scholarships NCTE Writing Award for Creative Nonfiction
Ottilie Markholt Memorial Scholarship Pat Charnon Scholarship Patient Advocate Foundation Schlarships
Patsy Mink Foundation Scholarship Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation Scholarship Program Persina/natl Press Club Schol./Diversity in Journ Pfizer Epilepsy Scholarship Award PFLAG national Scholarship Program Que Llueva Café Scholarship Questbridge College Match Rent‐a‐Center Make a Difference Scholarship SALEF Fulfilling Our Dreams Scholarship 31‐Mar 31‐Mar 9‐Dec 15‐Feb 31‐Mar 16‐Jan 1‐Feb 15‐Feb 28‐Apr 1‐Apr 31‐Mar 12‐Apr 1‐Jul 1‐Mar 1‐Mar 15‐Jun 12‐Mar 26‐Feb 30‐Sep 31‐Jan 30‐Apr $2,500 $1,000-$2,000
$1,000‐12,000 $24,000 $12,000 $1,000‐$13,000 $10,000 Varies Various $6,000 $3,000 (10) $2,000 $5,000 $20,000 $2,000 (40) $5,000 $1,000 Full need $1,000 natl
Scholastic Art & Writing Awards (30 categories)
8-Jan
$10,000
natl
Scholastic Art & Writing Awards (novel category)
12-Mar
$10,000
natl
Scholastic Art & Writing Awards (video game category)
12-Feb
$10,000
natl natl natl natl Stockholm Junior Water Prize Straight Forward Media Scholarships Student‐View Scholarship Studio Art Ctrs. Int'l Scholarships 15‐Apr rolling 22‐Apr 15‐Mar $5,000 varies $4,000 Varies natl
TELACU Education Foundation Scholarship Program
13-Mar
natl natl natl natl natl natl natl natl natl natl natl S/L/N S/N S/N State The Christopher's Poster Contest The Lowe's Scholarship The national Press Club Scholarship for Journalism Diversity The Vantagepoint Public Employee Memorial Scholarship UNCF‐Foot Locker Foundation, Inc. Scholarship Union Plus Scholarship Program VFW Scout of the Year Scholarship 15‐Jan 26‐Feb 1‐Mar 15‐Mar 15‐Apr 31‐Jan 1‐Mar 15‐Apr 19‐Mar 5‐Feb 15‐Dec 3‐Oct 1‐Jun 28‐Mar 1‐Feb Walter Beall Scholarship
Weekly Reader Student Publishing Contest Western Union Foundation Family Scholarship Women's Opportunity Award (Soroptimist) Wendy's High School Heisman American Legion Samsung Scholarship nat'l Federation of Press Women Competition A+FCU Scholarship 84
$1,000 $2,500 (140) $2,500 Up to $10,000 $5,000 $500‐4,000 $5,000 $5,000
$500 $5,000 $10,000 $2,000‐$10,000 $20,000 $100 $1,000 Scholarships Available to Undocumented Student State State State State ACET (Assoc. of Compensatory Educators of Tx) Scholarship AgDay Essay Contest American Council for the Blind of TX Schol Barbara Jordan Historical Essay Contest State
Elks Legacy Award
State
Fam/Cons Sci Tchrs Assoc of Tx‐Judth Hetherly Scholarship Family/Consumer Sci. Teachers Assoc. of TX Schol. Girl Scouts of Central Texas Founder's Award Myra Hasty & Dr. Pat McLeod Scholarships Society for Range Management (TX)‐Bill Wyche Memorial Scholarship South TX PGA Foundation Scholarship St. Paul Scholarship Fund State Farm Scholar Athlete TABE Scholarship for Future Bilingual Educators TCTC Best of Texas Awards Texas AFL‐CIO Scholarship Texas Caucus of Black School Board Members Sch Texas Elks Essay Contest Texas History Essay Contest Texas Independent Automotive Association Scholarship Texas PTA High School Senior Scholarship Texas Retired Teachers Foundation Scholarship Texas Student Housing Scholarship Texas Teen Scholarship for Square & Round Dancing High School Graduates Texas Trial Lawyers Association Scholarship State
State State State State State State State State State State State State State State State State State State State State State State State State State State Texas Water Symposium Essay Contest
The Goss‐Michael Foundation Art Scholarship TX Armed Services Scholarship Program TX Asian Ch. Of Comm./TX Asian Fdn Schol Tx Restaurant Association W. Price, Jr. Memorial Scholarship Tx State Elks Assoc. Eagle Scout Award Tx State Elks Assoc. Girl Scout Gold Award Scholarship TX Vegetation Management Assoc. Scholarship Adelante Scholarship Public Housing Authorities Directors Asso. (PHADA) Scholarship 85
26‐Feb 12‐Feb 3‐Jul 2‐Feb $1,000 $2,500 8-Jan
$4,000
$1,000 (20)
1-Mar $1,000 1-Mar $500 13‐Feb $1,000 (10)
26‐Mar $1,000 30‐Apr $2,000 5‐Apr $10,000 1‐Mar $1,000 1‐Apr $1,000 16‐Mar $1,000 20‐Mar Various 1‐Feb $1,000 1‐Feb $1,000 28‐Feb $500‐$1,000 31‐Jan $3,000 1‐Jun $500+ 1‐Mar $1,000 18‐Mar $500 31‐Jan Varies 31‐Mar Varies 20‐Mar $1,000 10‐Mar $1,000‐$4,000 31‐Mar $5,000 5‐Mar $40,000 19‐Jan $1,000 1‐Feb $2,000‐$5,000 15‐Mar $2,500 15‐Apr $2,500 (1)
1‐Apr $2,000 28‐May $1,000 12‐Feb $5,000‐$7,000 Further Reading
The Journal of College Admission – Undocumented Student Edition
*National Association for College Admission Counseling (NACAC) [Winter 2010]
Young Lives on Hold: The College Dreams of Undocumented Students
*College Board [2009]
Dreams Deferred: The Costs of Ignoring Undocumented Students
*Immigration Policy Center (IPC) [2007]
From the “Good” Kids to the “Worst”: Representations of English Language Learners across
Educational Settings
*Linda Harkalau, TESOL Quarterly [2000]
86

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