Drugs Don`t Work in Georgia - Thomson

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Drugs Don`t Work in Georgia - Thomson
IN GEORGIA
A Guide For Building
A Drug-Free Workplace Program
In Your Business
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Your company must have a
Substance Abuse Policy
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Drugs Don't Work in Georgia
INSTRUCTIONS:
The following policy should have the first page printed on company letterhead. The
sections which are in italics (may appear orange or bright on the computer screen) are to
be removed. They are for your instructio n only.
If you do not include some of the sections in your company policy, you will need to
renumber the sections that follow the removed section.
Sample letters and forms follow the policy. These should each be printed on company
letterhead. Some companies incorporate the "Pre-employment Drug Testing Consent and
Release Form" into their employment application form to streamline the employment
process.
The Georgia Chamber of Commerce, your local Chamber of Commerce, and the Georgia
State Board of Workers' Compensation disclaim any responsibility for the
implementation of these policies. All employers are advised to seek legal counsel prior to
implementing substance abuse policies.
The Sections Are As Follows:
Substance Abuse Policy Instructions
Substance Abuse Policy
Employee Assistance Program Letter
NO Employee Assistance Program Letter
Drug Test Consent Release
Active Employee Certificate Agreement
SUBSTANCE ABUSE POLICY STATEMENT
(Company Name) is committed to providing a safe work environment and to fostering the
well-being and health of its employees. That commitment is jeopardized when any
(Company Name) employee illegally uses drugs on or off the job, comes to work under
their influence, possesses, distributes or sells drugs in the workplace, or abuses alcohol on
the job. Therefore, (Company Name) has established the following policy:
1. It is a violation of company policy for any employee to use, possess, sell, trade, offer
for sale, or offer to buy illegal drugs or otherwise engage in the illegal use of drugs on or
off the job.
2. It is a violation of company policy for any employee to report to work under the
influence of or while possessing in his or her body, blood, or urine illegal drugs in any
detectable amount.
3. It is a violation of company policy for any employee to report to work under the
influence of or impaired by alcohol.
4. It is a violation of the company policy for any employee to use prescription drugs
illegally, i.e., to use prescription drugs that have not been legally obtained or in a manner
or for a purpose other than as prescribed. (However, nothing in this policy precludes the
appropriate use of legally prescribed medications.)
5. Violations of this policy are subject to disciplinary action up to and including
termination.
Section 6 is for companies that are subject to the requirements of the Drug-Free
Workplace Act of 1988 (If you have a contract in which the federal government pays your
company $25,000 or more annually). If your company is not subject to the Drug-Free
Workplace Act delete paragraph #6. In either case, remove this instructional paragraph.
6. As a condition of employment, employees must abide by the terms of this policy and
must notify (The Company) in writing of any conviction of a violation of a criminal drug
statute occurring in the workplace no later than five calendar days after such conviction.
Section 7, which immediately follows, refers to Employee Assistance Programs. The
second "Section 7" refers to other means of employee assistance. If you are including an
EAP (you have contracted with an outside counseling company) in your company's
program, use the first "Section 7." If you are providing other means of employee
assistance such as a referral list, use the second "Section 7." Do not include both. In
either case, remove this instructional paragraph.
7. EMPLOYEE ASSISTANCE PROGRAM
The Company offers an Employee Assistance Program (EAP) benefit for employees and
their dependents. The EAP provides confidential assessment, referral and short-term
counseling for employees who need or request it. If an EAP referral to a treatment
provider outside the EAP is necessary, costs may be covered by the employee's medical
insurance, but the cost of such outside services are the employee's responsibility.
Confidentiality is assured. NO information regarding the nature of the personal problem
will be made available to the supervisors nor will it be included in the permanent
personnel file.
Participation in the EAP will not affect an employee's career advancement or
employment, nor will it protect an employee from disciplinary action if substandard job
performance continues. The EAP is a process used in conjunction with discipline; it is not
a substitute for discipline. The EAP can be accessed by an employee through self- referral
or through referral by a supervisor.
Or,
7. EMPLOYEE ASSISTANCE
The Company offers resource information on various means of employee assistance in
our community, including but not limited to drug and alcohol abuse programs.
Employees are encouraged to use this resource file, which is located (insert where). In
addition, we will distribute this information to employees for their confidential use.
8. GENERAL PROCEDURES
An employee reporting to work visibly impaired will be deemed unable to properly
perform required duties and will not be allowed to work. If possible, the employee's
supervisor will first seek another supervisor's opinion to confirm the employee's status.
Next the supervisor will consult privately with the employee to determine the cause of the
observation, including whether substance abuse has occurred. If, in the opinion of the
supervisor, the employee is considered impaired, the employee will be sent home or to a
medical facility by taxi or other safe transportation alternative - depending on the
determination of the observed impairment – and accompanied by the supervisor or
another employee if necessary. A drug test may be in order. An impaired employee will
not be allowed to drive.
9. OPPORTUNITY TO CONTEST OR EXPLAIN TEST RESULTS
Employees and job applicants who have a positive confirmed test result may explain or
contest the result to the Company within five (5) working days after the Company
contacts the employee or job applicant and shows him/her the positive test result as it was
received from the laboratory in writing.
10. CONFIDENTIALITY
The confidentiality of any information received by the employer through a substance
abuse testing program shall be maintained, except as otherwise provided by law.
11. PRE-EMPLOYMENT DRUG TESTING
All job applicants at this Company will undergo testing for the presence of illegal drugs
as a condition of employment. Any applicant with a confirmed positive test will be
denied employment. Applicants will be required to submit voluntarily to a urinalysis test
at a laboratory chosen by this Company, and by signing a consent agreement will release
this Company from liability. If the physician, official, or lab personnel has reasonable
suspicion to believe that the job applicant has tampered with the specimen, the applicant
will not be considered for employment. This Company will not discriminate against
applicants for employment because of a past history of drug abuse. It is the current abuse
of drugs, preventing employees from performing their job properly, that this Company
will not tolerate. Individuals who have failed a pre-employment test may initiate another
inquiry with the Company after a period of not shorter than six (6) months; but they must
present themselves drug-free as demonstrated by urinalysis or other test selected by this
Company.
12. EMPLOYEE TESTING
This Company has adopted testing practices to identify employees who use illegal drugs
on or off the job or who abuse alcohol on the job. It shall be a condition of employment
for all employees to submit to substance abuse testing under the following circumstances:
A. When there is reasonable suspicion to believe that an employee is using illegal
drugs or abusing alcohol. "Reasonable suspicion" is based on a belief that an
employee is using or has used drugs or alcohol in violation of the employer's
policy drawn from specific objective and articulable facts and reasonable
inferences drawn from those facts in light of experience. Among other things,
such facts and inferences may be based upon, but not limited to, the following:
1. Observable phenomena while at work such as direct observation of
substance abuse or of the physical symptoms or manifestations of being
impaired due to substance abuse;
2. Abnormal conduct or erratic behavior while at work or a significant
deterioration in work performance;
3. A report of substance abuse provided by a reliable and credible source;
4. Evidence that an individual has tampered with any substance abuse test
during his or her employment with the current employer;
5. Information that an employee has caused or contributed to an accident
while at work; or
6. Evidence that an employee has used, possessed, sold, solicited, or
transferred drugs while working or while on the employer's premises or
while operating the employer's vehicle, machinery, or equipment.
B. When employees have caused or contributed to an on-the-job injury that
resulted in a loss of worktime, which means any period of time during which an
employee stops performing the normal duties of employment and leaves the place
of employment to seek care from a licensed medical provider. The company may
also send employees for a substance abuse test if they are involved in on-the-job
accidents where personal injury or damage to company property occurs.
C. As part of a follow-up program to treatment for drug abuse when an employee
has involuntarily entered a rehabilitation program because of a positive confirmed
test result. The frequency of such testing shall be a minimum of at least once a
year for a two year period after completion of the rehabilitation program.
Advance notice of testing shall not be given to the employee.
D. When a substance abuse test is conducted as part of a routinely scheduled
employee fitness- for-duty medical examination that is part of the employer's
established policy or that is scheduled routinely for all members of an
employment classification or group.
If your company chooses to implement random testing; insert the following paragraph
and delete these instructions.
E. Random testing is conducted without individualized suspicion of a violation of
the company's substance abuse policy. Selection is made by neutral criteria so that
all employees eligible for testing have an equal opportunity of being tested.
Employees with a confirmed positive test result may, at their option and expense,
have a second confirmation test made on the same specimen. An employee will
not be allowed to submit another specimen for testing. If the physician, official, or
lab personnel has reasonable suspicion to believe that the employee has tampered
with the specimen, the employee is subject to disciplinary action up to and
including termination.
13. ALCOHOL ABUSE
Two policy versions follow on alcohol abuse. The first policy is only one paragraph and
immediately follows. The second policy consists of three paragraphs. Select either policy
and delete the other. In both cases either "positive," ".05 or higher," or ".08 or higher"
needs to be inserted where indicated. This instructional paragraph and the "or"
separating the policies should also be deleted.
The consumption or possession of alcoholic beverages on this Company's premises is
prohibited. (Company sponsored activities which may include the serving of alcoholic
beverages are not included in this provision.) An employee whose normal faculties are
impaired due to the consumption of alcoholic beverages, or whose blood alcohol level
tests (insert level), while on duty/company business shall be guilty of misconduct, and
shall be subject to discipline up to and including termination. Failure to submit to a
required substance abuse test also is misconduct and also shall be subject to discipline up
to and including termination.
Or
An employee who is under the influence of alcoholic beverages at any time while on
company business or at any time during the hours between the beginning and ending of
the employee's work day, whether on duty or not and whether on (Company Name)
business or property or not, shall be guilty of miscond uct and is subject to discipline up to
and including termination. An employee shall be determined to be under the influence of
alcohol if the employee's normal faculties are impaired due to the consumption of
alcohol, or if the employee has a blood alcohol level of (insert level) or higher.
Failure to submit to a substance abuse test also is misconduct and also shall be subject to
discipline up to and including termination. It is the responsibility of the Company's
supervisors to counsel employees whenever they see changes in performance or behavior
that suggest an employee has a drug problem. Although it is not the supervisor's job to
diagnose personal problems, the supervisor should encourage such employees to
seek help and advise them about available resources for getting help. Everyone shares
responsibility for maintaining a safe work environment, and co-workers should
encourage anyone who has a drug problem to seek help.
The goal of this policy is to balance our respect for individuals with the need to maintain
a safe, productive, and drug-free environment. The intent of this policy is to offer a
helping hand to those who need it, while sending a clear message that the illegal use of
drugs, and the abuse of alcohol are incompatible with employment at (Company Name).
LETTER TO ALL EMPLOYEES
The illegal use of drugs and the abuse of alcohol are problems that invade the workplace,
endangering the health and safety of the abusers and those who work around them. This
Company is committed to creating and maintaining a workplace free of substance abuse
without jeopardizing valued employees' job security.
To address this problem, our Company has developed a policy regarding the illegal use of
drugs and the abuse of alcohol that we believe best serves the interests of all employees.
Our policy formally and clearly states that the illegal use of drugs or abuse of alcohol or
prescription drugs will not be tolerated. As a means of maintaining our policy, we have
implemented pre-employment and active employee drug testing. This policy was
designed with two basic objectives in mind: (1) employees deserve a work environment
that is free from the effects of illegal drug use or alcohol abuse and the problems
associated with such, and (2) this Company has a responsibility to maintain a healthy and
safe workplace.
To assist us in maintaining a safe and healthful workplace, we have created an Employee
Assistance Program (EAP). The EAP provides employees and their families confidential
assessment, referral, and follow-up for personal or health problems.
An employee whose conduct viola tes this Company's Substance Abuse Policy and who
does not accept the help we offer under the EAP will be disciplined up to and including
termination.
I believe it is important that we all work together to make this Company a drug- free
workplace and a safe, rewarding place to work.
Sincerely,
LETTER TO ALL EMPLOYEES
The illegal use of drugs and the abuse of alcohol are problems that invade the workplace,
endangering the health and safety of the abusers and those who work around them. This
Company is committed to creating and maintaining a workplace free of substance abuse
without jeopardizing valued employees' job security.
To address this problem, our Company has developed a policy regarding the illegal use of
drugs and the abuse of alcohol that we believe best serves the interests of all employees.
Our policy formally and clearly states that the illegal use of drugs or abuse of alcohol or
prescription drugs will not be tolerated. As a means of maintaining our policy, we have
implemented pre-employment and active employee drug testing. This policy was
designed with two basic objectives in mind: (1) employees deserve a work environment
that is free from the effects of illegal drug use or alcohol abuse and the problems
associated with such, and (2) this Company has a responsibility to maintain a healthy and
safe workplace.
To assist us in providing a safe and healthy workplace, we maintain a resources file of
information of various means of employee assistance in our community, including but
not limited to drug and alcohol abuse programs. Employees are encouraged to use this
Insert where
resource file, which is located (insert
where list
list isis located
located). In addition, we will distribute
this information to employees for their confidential use.
An employee whose conduct violates this Company's Substance Abuse Policy will be
disciplined up to and including termination.
I believe it is important that we all work together to make this Company a drug- free
workplace and a safe, rewarding place to work.
Sincerely,
PRE-EMPLOYMENT DRUG TESTING CONSENT AND RELEASE FORM
I hereby consent to submit to urinalysis and/or other tests as shall be determined by
The Company in the selection process of applicants for employment, for the purpose of
determining the drug content thereof.
physician/lab
I agree that Insert
(insertthe
thename
nameofofthe
physician
or lab) may collect these specimens for these tests and
may test them or forward them to a testing laboratory designated by the Company for analysis.
I further agree to and hereby authorize the release of the results of said tests to the Company.
I understand that it is the current use of illegal drugs that would prohibit me from being
employed at this Company.
I further agree to hold harmless the Company and its agents (including the above named
physician or clinic) from any liability arising in whole or part, out of the collection of specimens,
testing, and use of the information from said testing in connection with the Company's
consideration of my application of employment.
I further agree that a reproduced copy of this pre-employment consent and release form shall
have the same force and effect as the original.
I have carefully read the foregoing and fully understand its contents. I acknowledge that my
signing of this consent and release form is a voluntary act on my part and that I have not been
coerced into signing this document by anyone.
APPLICANT:
Print Name: ____________________________ S.S.#: __________________
Signature: ____________________________ Date: ___________________
WITNESS:
Print Name: ___________________________
Signature: ____________________________
ACTIVE EMPLOYEE CERTIFICATE OF AGREEMENT
Insert Company
I do hereby certify that I have received and read the (Company
Name)Name
Substance Abuse and Testing Policy and have had the Georgia Workers' Compensation DrugFree Workplace certification program (O.C.G.A. 34-9-410) explained to me. I understand that if
my performance indicates it is necessary, or in the case of random testing, I will submit to a
substance abuse test. I also understand that failure to comply with a substance abuse test request,
or a positive result may lead to termination of employment and denial of unemployment benefits.
I understand that failure to submit to a substance abuse test, or a positive test result may affect
my right to obtain workers' compensation benefits. I further agree to and hereby authorize the
release of the results of said tests to the company. Nothing in this consent form is to be construed
as a contract between the parties.
Name (please print): _________________________________________________
Signature: _________________________________________________________
Date: ________________________
Declaración del reglamento de consumo abusivo de sustancias
(Nombre dela Compañía)_ se compromete a proveer un ambiente seguro en el
trabajo que contribuya al bienestar y a la salud de los empleados. Este acuerdo
se pone en peligro cuando cualquier de (Nombre de la Compañía) usa ilegalmente
drogas dentro o fuera del trabajo, viene al trabajo bajo la influencia de una droga,
posee, distribuye, o vende drogas en el trabajo, o consume alcohol en el trabajo.
Por lo tanto, (Nombre de la Compañía) ha establecido el reglamento siguiente:
1. Es una violación del reglamento de la compañía que un empleado use, posea,
venda, intercambie, ofrezca para vender o para vender o para comprar drogas
ilegales, o que se disponga a usar drogas ilegales en el trabajo o fuera del trabajo.
2. Es una violación del reglamento de la compañía que un empleado se reporte al
trabajo bajo la influencia de una droga, o mientras que dicha droga se pueda
detectar en el cuerpo, en la sangre, o en la orina.
3. Es una violación del reglamento de la compañía que un empleado reporte al
trabajo bajo la influencia o incapacitado por el uso del alcohol.
4. Es una violación del reglamento de la compañía que un empleado use medicina
ilegalmente habiéndola obtenido sin receta medica, o habiéndola usado pare otro
propósito que la que dice la receta. (Sin embargo, este reglamento no limita el
uso legal de medicinas recetadas por el medico).
5. La violación de este reglamento tendrá por consecuencia que se someta el
empleado a la acción disiparía de la compañía o que se le termine el contrato de
empleo.
La sección 6 se refiere a las compañías que tienen que cumplir con los requisitos
del Drug-Free Workplace Act de 1988. Si su compañía no esta sometida a los
reglamentos del Drug-Free Act elimine el párrafo 6.
6. El contrato tiene como condición que los empleados cumplan con todas las
condiciones de esta póliza y que notifiquen por escrito (a la Compañía) dentro de
un periodo de cinco días de cualquiera convicción referente a la violación del
estatuto de drogas que haya ocurrido en el lugar de empleo.
La Sección 7 siguiente se refiere a Programas de Asistencia al Empleado (EPA).
La segunda “sección 7” se refiere a otros medios de asistencia para los
empleados. Si usted incluye un EAP en el programa de su compañía. Use la
primera “sección 7”. Si usted provee otros medios de asistencia al empleado,
como por ejemplo, listas de referencia, use la segunda “sección 7”. No incluya
ambos. En todo caso elimine este párrafo de instrucciones.
7. PROGRAMA DE ASISTENCIA AL EMPLEADO
La compañía ofrece un programa de asistencia (EPA) que beneficia al empleado y
a sus dependientes. El EPA provee evaluación, recomendación, consulta inicial,
para cualquier empleado que lo pida o lo necesite. Si un empleado necesita
tratamiento fuera de los servicios que ofrece el EPA, el costo se le cobrara al
seguro medico del empleado y será el empleado el responsable de dichos
servicios.Se la garantiza al empleado una privacidad absoluta. Ninguna
información de carácter personal estará a la disposición de los supervisores o se
incluirá en el archivo personal del empleado.
La participación en el EPA no perjudicara de ninguna manera al empleado con
respecto a las oportunidades del empleado de avanzar en su carrera, como
tampoco lo protegerá de acción disciplinaria si su producción continua bajando. El
EPA se usa en conjunto con el reglamento de disciplina establecido por la
compañía; en ningún momento el EPA sustituye a la acción disciplinaria.
El EPA se pueda obtener a través de la recomendación del mismo empleado o de
un supervisor.
7. ASISTENCIA AL EMPLEADO
La Compañía ofrece recursos de información en varios medios de asistencia en
nuestra comunidad, incluyendo y sin limitar los programas de consumo abusivo de
drogas y de alcohol. Al empleado se le estimula a usar esta fuente de recursos
que se encuentra. Además nosotros nos ocupamos de distribuir esta información a
los empleados para su uso personal.
8. PROCEDIMIENTO GENERAL
Un empleado que reporte al trabajo visiblemente incapacitado se considerara
incapaz de ejecutar eficientemente sus deberes y no se le permitirá trabajar. Si es
posible el supervisor solicitará la opinión de otro supervisor antes de confirmar el
estado del empleado. Entonces el supervisor consultara en privado con el
empleado para determinar la causa de tal observación, y para concluir si ha
ocurrido consumo abusivo de una sustancia. Si la opinión del supervisor es que el
empleado esta incapacitado, se le enviara a la casa o a un centro medico en un
taxi u otro medio seguro de transporte acompañado por un supervisor u otro
empleado de acuerdo a la severidad de su estado. Se exigirá un examen medico
que determine la sustancia abusiva. Un empleado incapacitado no podrá conducir.
9. OPORTUNIDAD DE RECLAMAR O DE EXPLECAR LOS
RESULTADOS DE LOS EXAMENES
Los empleados y los aspirantes a un puesto que hayan tenido un resultado
positivo en el examen medico podrán explicar o reclamar los resultados dentro de
un periodo de tiempo de cinco días laborables después de haber recibido por
escrito los resultados del laboratorio.
10. CONFIDENCIALIDAD
Cualquier información que se reciba a través del programa de examen De
sustancia abusiva será confidencial al no ser que la ley no lo permita.
11. EXAMEN MEDICO DE DROGAS PREVIO AL EMPLEO
Todos los aspirantes a un examen medico que determine la presencia de drogas
ilegales como condición del empleo. Se espera que los aspirantes se sometan
voluntariamente a un análisis de orina en un laboratorio escogido por esta
Compañía, y que al firmar el consentimiento libren de responsabilidad a la
Compañía. Si el medico, un funcionario, o un asistente de laboratorio tiene razón
para sospechar que el aspirante ha alterado la muestra del análisis, el aspirante
perderá toda oportunidad para obtener empleo. Esta Compañía no discriminara a
nadie por su historia previa de consumo abusivo de drogas. Es el abuso de drogas
en el presente lo que la Compañía no tolera va que no permite que el empleado
desempeñe su labor. Individuos que no hayan pasado el examen medico al
principio podrán iniciar nuevamente su solicitud de trabajo después de un periodo
de seis meses, pero deben presentarse libre de drogas y así demostrarlo
sometiéndose a un examen de orina u otro examen que la Compañía escoja.
12. EXAMEN DEL EMPLEADO
Esta Compañía ha seleccionado exámenes que identifican empleados que usan
drogas ilegales dentro o fuera del trabajo o que abusan del uso del alcohol en el
trabajo. Es una condición del empleo para todos los empleados que estos se
sometan a exámenes de sustancia abusiva bajo las circunstancias siguientes:
A. Cuando existe una razón valida para sospechar que un empleado esta
usando drogas ilegales o que esta bajo la influencia del alcohol. La “razón
valida” se basa en la creencia que el empleado usa o ha usado drogas o
alcohol violando el reglamento establecido de objetivos, hechos que se
pueden articular, de los hechos de acuerdo con la experiencia. Entre otras
cosas, estos hechos e inferencias se pueden basar sin estar limitados a lo
siguiente:
1. Observación de una conducta extraña en el trabajo como por
ejemplo observación directa del consumo de la sustancia abusiva o
de los síntomas físicos u otras manifestaciones que impidan el
desempeño del trabajo y que se deban al consumo abusivo.
2. Conducta anormal o irregular en el trabajo que resulte en el
deterioro de la calidad de producción.
3. Un reporte de consumo de sustancia abusiva presentado por una
fuente acreedora.
4. Evidencia que un individuo ha alterado el resultado de cualquier
examen de sustancia abusiva durante su periodo de empleo con la
Compañía.
5. Información que indique que un empleado haya causado o haya
contribuido a un accidente en el trabajo.
6. Evidencia que un empleado ha usado, poseído, vendido,
solicitado, o traficado drogas durante el trabajo, en los alrededores,
o mientras que operaba vehículos, maquinaria, o equipo de la
Compañía.
B. Cuando empleados han causado o contribuido a una lesión en el trabajo
que resulte en perdida de horas, lo que significa cualquier periodo de
tiempo en el cual el empleado tiene que suspender sus deberes normales
del empleo y sale del trabajo para recibir asistencia medica. El empresario
puede mandar a los empleados a hacerse un examen de sustancia abusiva
si estos están implicados en un accidente en el trabajo en el cual hayan
lesiones o danos a la propiedad de la Compañía.
C. Como parte del programa de post-tratamiento de consumo abusivo de
drogas.
D. Cuando se hace el examen rutinario de sustancia abusive como parte del
examen medico designado por el reglamento o que se hace regularmente
para todos los miembros de un grupo clasificado de empleados.
Si su compañía decide hacer exámenes en cualquier momento, inserte el
párrafo siguiente y borre las instrucciones.
E. Exámenes al azar se hacen sin tener sospechas previas de una violación
del reglamento que se refiere al consume abusivo de drogas o de alcohol.
La selección se hace bajo un criterio neutral para que los empleados
elegibles tengan la misma oportunidad de ser examinados. Empleados
cuyos resultados hayan sido positivos pueden por su propia cuenta pagar
los gastos de repetir el examen con la misma muestra. No se le permitirá al
empleado usar otra muestra. Si el medico, un funcionario, o un tónico de
laboratorio tiene razón para sospechar que el empleado ha alterado la
muestra, el empleado tendrá que someterse a la acción disciplinaria o se le
terminara el contrato de empleo.
13. ABUSO DEL ALCOHOL
Existen dos reglamentos con respecto al uso abusivo del alcohol. El primer
reglamento es solamente un párrafo a continuación. El segundo reglamento
consiste en tres párrafos. Seleccione uno de los dos reglamentos y elimine el otro.
En ambos casos de resultado positivo se necesita insertar uno de estos: :.05 o
más alto”, o el de “. 08 o mas alto.” Este párrafo de instrucciones otros que
separan el reglamento deben ser eliminados.
El consumo o posesión de bebidas alcohólicas en los alrededores de esta
Compañía esta prohibido. (actividades de la Compañía en la cual se sirvan bebidas
alcohólicas no se incluyen en esta provisión). Un empleado que este incapacitado
mentalmente por el consumo de alcohol o que tenga un nivel (inserte el nivel)
durante horas de trabajo / negocios de la Compañía se considerara culpable de
conducta impropia y será sometido a la acción disciplinaria, o se le terminara el
contrato de trabajo.
Al empleado se le determina bajo la influencia de alcohol si sus facultades
normales están afectadas por el de alcohol, o si el nivel de alcohol es (inserte el
nivel) o mas alto. El no someterse al examen obligatorio de sustancia abusiva
también se considera impropia, y por lo tanto resulta en acción disciplinaria o en
la terminación del contrato de empleo.
Es la responsabilidad de los supervisores de la Compañía de aconsejar a los
empleados cuando estos manifiesten cambios en la producción o en la conducta
que puedan sugerir que el empleado tiene un problemas de drogas. Aunque no
sea la tarea del supervisor el diagnosticar problemas personales, el supervisor
debe alentar a estos empleados a que busquen ayuda y consejo informándoles de
los recursos que están a su disposición. Todo el mundo comparte la
responsabilidad de mantener un ambiente seguro en el trabajo, y los compañeros
de trabajo también deben estimular a cualquiera que tenga un problema de
drogas a buscar ayuda.
La meta de esta reglamento es establecer un balance entre el respeto al individuo
y la necesidad de mantener un ambiente seguro, productivo, y libre de drogas.
Este reglamento tiene la intención de ofrecer la mano a aquellos que la necesiten,
mientras que al mismo tiempo reafirma claramente que el uso de drogas ilegales y
el consumo abusivo de alcohol son incompatibles con el empleo en (nombre de la
Compañía).
La carta siguiente es para empresarios que ofrecen un Programa de Asistencia al Empleado (Employee
Assistance Program, EPA). Debe ser escrita en papel oficial de la Compañía. No use la segunda carta que
sigue. Es para compañías que no ofrecen programas de EPA.
La carta siguiente es para empresarios que no ofrecen un Programa de Asistencia al Empleado. Pero que
proveen medios de asistencia en la comunidad. Se debe imprimir en papel oficial de la compañía.
CONSENTIMIENTO Y PERMISO DEL EMPLEADO PARA SOMETESE AL EXAMEN
MEDICO ANTES DE TENER EL CONTRATO DE EMPLEO
Por la presente consiento y me someto al análisis de orina y/o a otros exámenes que
sean designados por la (nombre del la Compañía) para facilitar el proceso de selección
de candidatos a empleo, y paras determinar el contenido de drogas.
Yo estoy de acuerdo (inserte el nombre del medico o de la clínica) a que las muestras
recogidas se examinen y se envíen al laboratorio por la Compañía para
ser analizadas.
Por la presente también autorizo con mi permiso que los resultados de estos exámenes
sean envidos a la Compañía.
Yo se que es el uso ilegal de drogas en el presente el que me prohíbe tener empleo en
esta Compañía.
Yo se que es el uso ilegal de drogas en el presente el que me prohíbe tener empleo en
esta Compañía.
Además yo estoy de acuerdo a no perjudicar la Compañía y a sus agents (incluyendo el
nombre del medico o la clínica mencionada) y a absolverlos de toda responsabilidad en
cualquier circunstancia que se presente debido a la colección de muestras, análisis, y el
uso de la información con respecto a los resultados que tenga que ver con la
consideración de la solicitud de empleo.
Yo estoy de acuerdo de que una copia de esta forma previa de consentimiento y
de permiso debe tener el mismo valor, fuerza y efecto que la original.
Yo he leído cuidadosamente lo antes mencionado y comprendo perfectamente su
contenido. Yo reconozco que la firma de este consentimiento y permiso es un acto
voluntario de mi parte y que en ninguna forma me he sentido obligado a firmar este
documento por otra persona.
CANDIDATO:
Escriba Nombre:___________________________ S.S. # ___ __ ____
Firma: ___________________________________
TESTIGOS:
Escriba el nombre: ____________________________________________
Firma: ______________________________________________________
ACUERDO CERTIFICADO DEL EMPLEADO ACTIVO
Por la presente certifico que yo he recibido y leído el Reglamento de Exámenes de
Sustancias Abusivas de la (nombre de la Compañía) y que me han explicado el
Programa de Mantenimiento de Ausencia de Drogas en el Trabajo. Yo se que si mi
producción de trabajo indica la necesidad estoy dispuesto a someterme a un examen
medico de sustancias abusivas. También recoso que no cumplir con el requisito de
dicho examen, o tener un resultado positivo puede resultar en la terminación del
contrato de empleo.
Además por la presente autorizo permiso para que los resultados de dichos exámenes
se envíen a la compañía.
Este acuerdo no se debe considerar en ningún momento un contrato entre los
dos contratantes.
Nombre (por favor imprima su nombre): _______________________________
Firma:____________________________________________________________
Fecha:___________________________________________________________
CARTA A TODOS LOS EMPLEADOS
El uso ilegal de drogas y el consumo abusivo de alcohol son problemas que abundan en
trabajo, poniendo en peligro la salud y la seguridad de los adictos y la de aquellos que
trabajan con ellos. Esta Compañía se siente obligada a crear y a mantener un lugar libre
de sustancias abusivas sin perjudicar la seguridad de sus estimados empleados.
Para abordar este problema, nuestra Compañía ha diseñado un reglamento en beneficio
del empleado que trata el uso ilegal de drogas y el consumo abusivo de alcohol.
Nuestro reglamento declara oficialmente que no se tolera el uso de drogas ilegales, el
consumo abusivo de alcohol o de medicinas que requieran receta medica. Como medio
de mantener el reglamento, hemos implementado un sistema de exámenes médicos
que se hacen antes y después de la oferta de empleo. Este reglamento tiene dos
objetivos básicos en mente: (1) los empleados se merecen un ambiente en el trabajo
que este libre de las consecuencias del efecto de drogas ilegales, consumo abusivo de
alcohol, y de los problemas asociados con eso, (2) esta Compania tiene la
responsabilidad de mantener un sitio saludable y seguro para sus empleados.
Para ayudarnos a proveer un lugar seguro y saludable, nosotros mantenemos una
fuente de información y de recursos en los archivos de la compañía que ofrece varios
medios de asistencia que tiene la comunidad, y que incluye programas de uso de
drogas y de consumo abusivo de alcohol. Alentamos a los empleados a que usen esta
información que se encuentra (inserte donde se encuentra). Además se distribuirá dicha
información a todas los empleados para su uso personal.
El empleado que viole el Reglamento de Uso de Sustancia Abusiva de la Compañía y
que no acepte la asistencia que le ofrecemos bajo el EPA sera sometido a acción
disciplinaria o se le terminara el contrato de empleo. Sabemos que es importante que
todos trabajemos juntos para lograr la meta común de tener un sitio seguro, con un
ambiente atractivo, libre de drogas.
Atentamente,
Nombre de la persona que envira la carta
Titulo de la personal que envía la carta
CARTA A TODOS LOS EMPLEADOS
El uso ilegal de drogas y el consumo abusivo de alcohol son problemas que abundan en
trabajo, poniendo en peligro la salud y la seguridad de los adictos y la de aquellos que
trabajan con ellos. Esta Compañía se siente obligada a crear y a mantener un lugar libre
de sustancias abusivas sin perjudicar la seguridad de sus estimados empleados.
Para abordar este problema, nuestra Compañía ha diseñado un reglamento en beneficio
del empleado que trata el uso ilegal de drogas y el consumo abusivo de alcohol.
Nuestro reglamento declara oficialmente que no se tolera el uso de drogas ilegales, el
consumo abusivo de alcohol o de medicinas que requieran receta medica. Como medio
de mantener el reglamento, hemos implementado un sistema de exámenes médicos
que se hacen antes y después de la oferta de empleo. Este reglamento tiene dos
objetivos básicos en mente: (1) los empleados se merecen un ambiente en el trabajo
que este libre de las consecuencias del efecto de drogas ilegales, consumo abusivo de
alcohol, y de los problemas asociados con eso, (2) esta Compania tiene la
responsabilidad de mantener un sitio saludable y seguro para sus empleados.
Para ayudarnos a proveer un lugar seguro y saludable, nosotros mantenemos una
fuente de información y de recursos en los archivos de la compañía que ofrece varios
medios de asistencia que tiene la comunidad, y que incluye programas de uso de
drogas y de consumo abusivo de alcohol. Alentamos a los empleados a que usen esta
información que se encuentra (inserte donde se encuentra). Además se distribuirá dicha
información a todas los empleados para su uso personal.
El empleado que viole el Reglamento de Uso de Sustancia Abusiva de la Compañía y
que no acepte la asistencia que le ofrecemos bajo el EPA sera sometido a acción
disciplinaria o se le terminara el contrato de empleo. Sabemos que es importante que
todos trabajemos juntos para lograr la meta común de tener un sitio seguro, con un
ambiente atractivo, libre de drogas.
Atentamente,
Nombre de la persona que envira la carta
Titulo de la personal que envía la carta
Your company must conduct
drug testing.
Here is a list of
drug testing state laws.
Shortcut
Shortcut Tip:
Tip:
You
You DO
DO NOT
NOT have
have to
to test
test your
your
entire
entire workforce
workforce
Any questions? Call Chuck Wade at
404-223-2277 or E-mail at
[email protected]
Click On The Highlighted Lab To Go To Their Website
Federal Register / Vol. 68, No. 148 / Friday, August 1, 2003 / Notices
To maintain certification, a
laboratory must participate in a
quarterly performance testing program
plus periodic, on-site inspections.
Laboratories which claim to be in the
applicant stage of certification are not to
be considered as meeting the minimum
requirements expressed in the HHS
Mandatory Guidelines. A laboratory
must have its letter of certification from
HHS/SAMHSA (formerly: HHS/NIDA)
which attests that it has met minimum
standards.
In accordance with Subpart C of the
Mandatory Guidelines, the following
laboratories meet the minimum
standards set forth in the Mandatory
Guidelines:
ACL Laboratories, 8901 W. Lincoln
Ave., West Allis, WI 53227, 414–328–
7840/800–877–7016, (Formerly:
Bayshore Clinical Laboratory)
ACM Medical Laboratory, Inc., 160
Elmgrove Park, Rochester, NY 14624,
585–429–2264
Advanced Toxicology Network, 3560
Air Center Cove, Suite 101, Memphis,
TN 38118, 901–794–5770/888–290–
1150
Aegis Analytical Laboratories, Inc., 345
Hill Ave., Nashville, TN 37210, 615–
255–2400
Alliance Laboratory Services, 3200
Burnet Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45229,
513–585–6870, (Formerly: Jewish
Hospital of Cincinnati, Inc.)
Baptist Medical Center—Toxicology
Laboratory, 9601 I–630, Exit 7, Little
Rock, AR 72205–7299, 501–202–2783,
(Formerly: Forensic Toxicology
Laboratory Baptist Medical Center)
Clinical Reference Lab 8433 Quivira
Rd., Lenexa, KS 66215–2802, 800–
445–6917
Diagnostic Services Inc., dba DSI, 12700
Westlinks Dr., Fort Myers, FL 33913,
239–561–8200/800–735–5416
Doctors Laboratory, Inc., P.O. Box 2658,
2906 Julia Dr. Valdosta, GA 31602,
912–244–4468
DrugProof, Division of Dynacare/
Laboratory of Pathology, LLC 1229
Madison St., Suite 500, Nordstrom
Medical Tower, Seattle, WA 98104,
206–386–2661/800–898–0180,
(Formerly: Laboratory of Pathology of
Seattle, Inc., DrugProof, Division of
Laboratory of Pathology of Seattle,
Inc.)
DrugScan, Inc., P.O. Box 2969, 1119
Mearns Rd., Warminster, PA 18974,
215–674–9310
Dynacare Kasper Medical Laboratories*,
10150–102 St., Suite 200, Edmonton,
Alberta, Canada TJ5 5E2, 780–451–
3702/800–661–9876
ElSohly Laboratories, Inc., 5 Industrial
Park Dr., Oxford, MS 38655, 662–236–
2609
VerDate jul<14>2003
15:37 Jul 31, 2003
Jkt 200001
Express Analytical Labs, 3405 7th Ave.,
Suite 106, Marion, IA 52302, 319–
377–0500
Gamma-Dynacare Medical
Laboratories*, A Division of the
Gamma-Dynacare Laboratory
Partnership, 245 Pall Mall St.,
London, ONT, Canada N6A 1P4, 519–
679–1630
General Medical Laboratories, 36 South
Brooks St., Madison, WI 53715, 608–
267–6225
Kroll Laboratory Specialists, Inc., 1111
Newton St., Gretna, LA 70053, 504–
361–8989/800–433–3823, (Formerly:
Laboratory Specialists, Inc.)
LabOne, Inc., 10101 Renner Blvd.,
Lenexa, KS 66219, 913–888–3927/
800–873–8845, (Formerly: Center for
Laboratory Services, a Division of
LabOne, Inc.)
Laboratory Corporation of America
Holdings, 7207 N. Gessner Rd.,
Houston, TX 77040, 713–856–8288/
800–800–2387
Laboratory Corporation of America
Holdings, 69 First Ave., Raritan, NJ
08869, 908–526–2400/800–437–4986,
(Formerly: Roche Biomedical
Laboratories, Inc.)
Laboratory Corporation of America
Holdings, 1904 Alexander Dr.,
Research Triangle Park, NC 27709,
919–572–6900/800–833–3984,
(Formerly: LabCorp Occupational
Testing Services, Inc., CompuChem
Laboratories, Inc.; CompuChem
Laboratories, Inc., A Subsidiary of
Roche Biomedical Laboratory; Roche
CompuChem Laboratories, Inc., A
Member of the Roche Group)
Laboratory Corporation of America
Holdings, 10788 Roselle St., San
Diego, CA 92121, 800–882–7272,
(Formerly: Poisonlab, Inc.)
Laboratory Corporation of America
Holdings, 1120 Stateline Rd. West,
Southaven, MS 38671, 866–827–8042/
800–233–6339, (Formerly: LabCorp
Occupational Testing Services, Inc.;
MedExpress/National Laboratory
Center)
Marshfield Laboratories, Forensic
Toxicology Laboratory, 1000 North
Oak Ave., Marshfield, WI 54449, 715–
389–3734/800–331–3734
MAXXAM Analytics Inc., 5540
McAdam Rd., Mississauga, ON,
Canada L4Z 1P1, 905–890–2555,
(Formerly: NOVAMANN (Ontario)
Inc.)
MedTox Laboratories, Inc., 402 W.
County Rd. D, St. Paul, MN 55112,
651–636–7466/800–832–3244
MetroLab-Legacy Laboratory Services,
1225 NE 2nd Ave., Portland, OR
97232, 503–413–5295/800–950–5295
Minneapolis Veterans Affairs Medical
Center, Forensic Toxicology
PO 00000
Frm 00053
Fmt 4703
Sfmt 4703
45263
Laboratory, 1 Veterans Dr.,
Minneapolis, MN 55417, 612–725–
2088
National Toxicology Laboratories, Inc.,
1100 California Ave., Bakersfield, CA
93304, 661–322–4250/800–350–3515
Northwest Drug Testing, a division of
NWT Inc., 1141 E. 3900 S., Salt Lake
City, UT 84124, 801–293–2300/800–
322–3361, (Formerly: NWT Drug
Testing, NorthWest Toxicology, Inc.)
One Source Toxicology Laboratory, Inc.,
1705 Center St., Deer Park, TX 77536
713–920–2559, (Formerly: University
of Texas Medical Branch, Clinical
Chemistry Division; UTMB PathologyToxicology Laboratory)
Oregon Medical Laboratories, P.O. Box
972, 722 East 11th Ave., Eugene, OR
97440–0972, 541–687–2134,
Pacific Toxicology Laboratories, 9348
DeSoto Ave., Chatsworth, CA 91311,
800–328–6942, (Formerly: Centinela
Hospital Airport Toxicology
Laboratory)
Pathology Associates Medical
Laboratories, 110 West Cliff Dr.,
Spokane, WA 99204, 509–755–8991/
800–541–7891x8991
PharmChem Laboratories, Inc., 4600 N.
Beach, Haltom City, TX 76137, 817–
605–5300, (Formerly: PharmChem
Laboratories, Inc., Texas Division;
Harris Medical Laboratory)
Physicians Reference Laboratory, 7800
West 110th St., Overland Park, KS
66210, 913–339–0372/800–821–3627
Quest Diagnostics Incorporated, 3175
Presidential Dr., Atlanta, GA 30340,
770–452–1590/800–729–6432,
(Formerly: SmithKline Beecham
Clinical Laboratories; SmithKline BioScience Laboratories)
Quest Diagnostics Incorporated, 4770
Regent Blvd., Irving, TX 75063, 800–
824–6152, (Moved from the Dallas
location on 03/31/01; Formerly:
SmithKline Beecham Clinical
Laboratories; SmithKline Bio-Science
Laboratories)
Quest Diagnostics Incorporated, 4230
South Burnham Ave., Suite 250, Las
Vegas, NV 89119–5412, 702–733–
7866/800–433–2750, (Formerly:
Associated Pathologists Laboratories,
Inc.)
Quest Diagnostics Incorporated, 400
Egypt Rd., Norristown, PA 19403,
610–631–4600/877–642–2216,
(Formerly: SmithKline Beecham
Clinical Laboratories; SmithKline BioScience Laboratories)
Quest Diagnostics Incorporated, 506 E.
State Pkwy., Schaumburg, IL 60173,
800–669–6995/847–885–2010,
(Formerly: SmithKline Beecham
Clinical Laboratories; International
Toxicology Laboratories)
E:\FR\FM\01AUN1.SGM
01AUN1
45264
Federal Register / Vol. 68, No. 148 / Friday, August 1, 2003 / Notices
Quest Diagnostics Incorporated, 7600
Tyrone Ave., Van Nuys, CA 91405,
818–989–2520/800–877–2520,
(Formerly: SmithKline Beecham
Clinical Laboratories)
Scientific Testing Laboratories, Inc., 450
Southlake Blvd., Richmond, VA
23236, 804–378–9130,
Sciteck Clinical Laboratories, Inc., 317
Rutledge Rd., Fletcher, NC 28732,
828–650–0409,
S.E.D. Medical Laboratories, 5601 Office
Blvd., Albuquerque, NM 87109, 505–
727–6300/800–999–5227
South Bend Medical Foundation, Inc.,
530 N. Lafayette Blvd., South Bend,
IN 46601, 574–234–4176 x276
Southwest Laboratories, 2727 W.
Baseline Rd., Tempe, AZ 85283, 602–
438–8507/800–279–0027
Sparrow Health System, Toxicology
Testing Center, St. Lawrence Campus
1210 W. Saginaw Lansing, MI 48915.
517–377–0520. (Formerly: St.
Lawrence Hospital & Healthcare
System)
St. Anthony Hospital Toxicology
Laboratory, 1000 N. Lee St.,
Oklahoma City, OK 73101, 405–272–
7052
Sure-Test Laboratories, Inc., 2900 Broad
Ave., Memphis, TN 38112, 901–474–
6026
Toxicology & Drug Monitoring
Laboratory, University of Missouri
Hospital & Clinics, 2703 Clark Lane,
Suite B, Lower Level, Columbia, MO
65202, 573–882–1273
Toxicology Testing Service, Inc., 5426
N.W. 79th Ave., Miami, FL 33166,
305–593–2260
US Army Forensic Toxicology Drug
Testing Laboratory, 2490 Wilson St.,
Fort George G. Meade, MD 20755–
5235, 301–677–7085,
The following laboratory withdrew
from the National Laboratory C
certification Program on July 14, 2003:
Cox Health Systems, Department of
Toxicology, 1423 North Jefferson Ave.
Springfield, MO 65802, 800–876–
3652/417–269–3093, (Formerly: Cox
Medical Centers)
llllll
* The Standards Council of Canada (SCC)
voted to end its Laboratory Accreditation
Program for Substance Abuse (LAPSA)
effective May 12, 1998. Laboratories certified
through that program were accredited to
conduct forensic urine drug testing as
required by U.S. Department of
Transportation (DOT) regulations. As of that
date, the certification of those accredited
Canadian laboratories will continue under
DOT authority. The responsibility for
conducting quarterly performance testing
plus periodic on-site inspections of those
LAPSA-accredited laboratories was
transferred to the U.S. HHS, with the HHS’
VerDate jul<14>2003
15:37 Jul 31, 2003
Jkt 200001
NLCP contractor continuing to have an active
role in the performance testing and
laboratory inspection processes. Other
Canadian laboratories wishing to be
considered for the NLCP may apply directly
to the NLCP contractor just as U.S.
laboratories do.
Upon finding a Canadian laboratory to be
qualified, HHS will recommend that DOT
certify the laboratory (Federal Register, July
16, 1996) as meeting the minimum standards
of the Mandatory Guidelines published in the
Federal Register on June 9, 1994 (59 FR
29908) and on September 30, 1997 (62 FR
51118). After receiving DOT certification, the
laboratory will be included in the monthly
list of HHS certified laboratories and
participate in the NLCP certification
maintenance program.
Anna Marsh,
Acting Executive Officer, SAMHSA.
[FR Doc. 03–19581 Filed 7–31–03; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4160–20–P
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND
HUMAN SERVICES
Substance Abuse and Mental Health
Services Administration
Statement of Organization, Functions,
and Delegations of Authority
Part M of the Substance Abuse and
Mental Health Services Administration
(SAMHSA) Statement of Organization,
Functions, and Delegations of Authority
for the Department of Health and
Human Services as amended most
recently at 68 FR 12929, March 18, 2003
is amended to: Replace the functional
statement of the Division of the Center
for Mental Health Services (CMHS), the
Division of Prevention, Traumatic Stress
and Special Programs. The changes are
to update the significant growth of its
existing program areas which has
assumed several new initiatives and to
strengthen and better manage the
mission of SAMHSA. The changes are
as follows:
Section M.20, Functions is amended
as follows:
Under the heading, Division of
Prevention, Traumatic Stress and
Special Programs (MSC), delete the
functional statement and substitute the
following functional statement:
The Division of Prevention, Traumatic
Stress and Special Programs (DPTSSP):
(1) Serves as the focal point in planning
for alcohol, drug abuse, and mental
health services during national
disasters; (2) cooperates with the Office
of Emergency Response and the Federal
Emergency Management Agency
(FEMA) and other Federal agencies to
coordinate disaster assistance,
community response, and other mental
PO 00000
Frm 00054
Fmt 4703
Sfmt 4703
health emergency services as a
consequence of national disasters or
mass criminal events, such as terrorism
and school shootings; (3) serves as a
focal point for refugee mental health
programs, including liaison with other
Federal agencies; (4) conducts program
development activities and engages with
the faith community, when appropriate,
to promote effective programs and
policies to special populations
including women, minorities, youth in
juvenile justice facilities, and elderly
persons living in rural areas; and (5)
administers youth violence and suicide
prevention programs, trauma and
terrorism/bio-terrorism initiatives, and
programs that prevent mental and
behavioral disorders and promote
mental health and resilience across the
life cycle.
Section M.40, Delegations of
Authority. All delegations and
redelegations of authority to officers and
employees of SAMHSA which were in
effect immediately prior to the effective
date of this reorganization shall
continue in them.
These organizational changes are
effective June 20, 2003.
Dated: July 8, 2003.
Charles G. Curie,
Administrator.
[FR Doc. 03–19626 Filed 7–31–03; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4160–01–M
DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND
SECURITY
Coast Guard
[USCG–2003–15731]
Great Lakes Pilotage Advisory
Committee
Coast Guard, DHS.
Notice of meeting.
AGENCY:
ACTION:
SUMMARY: The Great Lakes Pilotage
Advisory Committee (GLPAC) will meet
to discuss various issues relating to
pilotage on the Great Lakes. The
meeting will be open to the public.
DATES: The GLPAC will meet on
Tuesday, August 19, 2003, from 2 p.m.
to 5:30 p.m. and on Wednesday, August
20, 2003, from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. The
meeting may close early if all business
is finished. Written material and
requests to make oral presentations
should reach the Coast Guard on or
before August 15, 2003. Requests to
have a copy of your material distributed
to each member of the committee
should reach the Coast Guard on or
before August 15, 2003.
E:\FR\FM\01AUN1.SGM
01AUN1
U.S. Department of
Labor
Office of the Secretary
www.dol.gov
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Home | Resources | Archives | Drug Policy | About Us
July 2003
Subscribe
Print Version
In The News
●
WELCOME to the Drug Free Workplace e-Newsletter!
Designed to provide you with timely information regarding ongoing anti-drug activities in the business
community, key issues include recent events affecting awareness and attitudes towards drug-use in the work
environment. Although geared toward small business, the newsletter contains a broad range of topics
ranging from national trends, government policy, and recent findings to employee and parent education.
We welcome your comments and suggestions and look forward to presenting you with the most current data
you want and the important information you need. -- The publishers
Parents Arrested for Teen
Partying
●
White House Anti-Drug Effort
●
Heroin Problem
●
●
California State PTA Passes
Resolution
Letter to the Editor
Parents Arrested for Teen Partying
back to top
A married couple in Naperville, Ill., was arrested for allowing minors to consume alcohol in their home, the Chicago Sun-Times reported June 4.
Police learned about the high-school graduation party at the home of Kathleen and James Connor, both 52, when the couple called for permission to leave
cars parked on the street overnight. They told police they didn't want the teens to drive home after drinking.
When the Connors explained the reason for their request, police went to the home and arrested them for allowing underage drinking. The parents may have
had good intentions, but, "you just can't do that," said Naperville Police Sgt. Joel Truemper.
Seven youths, ages 17 to 20, including the Connors' son, Patrick, were also cited for underage drinking.
Join Together Online
Wins Top PR Industry Award
back to top
6/11/2003
Office of National Drug Control Policy
Washington, DC 20503
www.whitehousedrugpolicy.gov
Washington, DC - A national effort to inform parents about the harms of youth marijuana use received the PR industry's highest
honor, a Silver Anvil, for outstanding achievement in strategic public relations planning and implementation of a government
public service campaign. The Marijuana Initiative of the Office of National Drug Control Policy's National Youth Anti-Drug
Media Campaign was recognized by the Public Relations Society of America (PRSA) at an awards ceremony June 5th in New
York. The effort, launched last September, is dispelling common myths about marijuana through a series of media briefings,
public events, community partnerships, Web sites and printed resources.
"Since the launch of our marijuana prevention campaign last September, we have alerted parents across the country to the risks of youth marijuana use and
given them tools they need to help keep their children drug-free," said John P. Walters, Director of National Drug Control Policy. "Marijuana is riskier than
many people think -- in fact, more teens are in treatment for marijuana than for all other illicit drugs combined."
FULL STORY
Office of National Drug Control Policy
Small-Town America Deals with Heroin Problem
back to top
Small towns in the Midwest are looking for ways to address a rise in heroin use among young people, the Chicago Tribune
reported May 9.
In Lexington, Ohio, for example, the adult sons of Steve and Chris Thomas have stolen more than $50,000 from the family
business to support their heroin addiction. Mark Thomas, 22, and Matt Thomas, 18, were arraigned on felony drugpossession charges. The next day, Mark was back to using heroin.
"I don't know what we're going to do," said Chris Thomas.
The family is one of many in the region with children addicted to heroin. Hospitals and drug counselors report an alarming
increase in overdoses in small communities throughout the Midwest. According to law-enforcement officials, the heroin
market has expanded beyond the typical clientele.
Workplace Resource
Center
SAMHSA - Substance
Abuse & Mental Health
Services Administration
Join Together Online
Resolution Rejecting Zero Tolerance
back to top
Marsha Rosenbaum wins PTA support
Wed., June 11, 2003
Marsha Rosenbaum, well known pro-drug legalization advocate, persuades CA State PTA to teach our children how to be a
"responsible" illicit drug users.
The 104th California State Parent Teachers Association (PTA) voted to reject zero tolerance responses to student drug use. Instead
of suspension and expulsion, compassionate alternative programs that encourage prevention, treatment, and education will be
advocated.
In voting “yes,” California's PTA accepts that drug use continues to be prevalent in schools, yet punishing students with ineffective
suspension or expulsion without attempting to alter behavior does not solve the problem. The solution, according to the
resolution, lies in “school connectedness.”
Julie Bauer, author of the resolution and Vice President for Community Concerns in California’s 3rd District, was first exposed to the approach advocated
by Safety First before drafting the PTA resolution. The language in the successful resolution is echoed in Safety First, a reality-based approach for parents
to address teens, drugs, and drug education.
Read the resolution
Drug Free American Foundation
Letter to the Editor
back to top
Dear Editor:
I see a lot of information out there about the importance of having a drug free workplace, but I’m not convinced that I should start a program at my small
warehouse business. Is substance abuse more common in certain occupations and industries than others?
Signed,
Doubting Thomas
Dear Doubting:
Heavy alcohol and illicit drug use is highest among construction workers and food preparers. Auto mechanics, laborers and light-truck drivers are among
those more susceptible to alcohol abuse. And tobacco use is more common among blue-collar workers than white-collar workers.
Consider this, more than 14 million Americans use illicit drugs. Roughly three-quarters of these individuals are employed, and when they arrive for work,
they don’t leave their problems at the door. American businesses pay a high price for substance abuse in the workplace. Some costs—increased absences,
accidents and errors—are obvious. Others, such as low employee morale and high illness rates are less obvious, but the effects are equally harmful.
Small businesses are greatly disadvantaged when it comes to drugs and alcohol in the workplace. They are less likely than large companies to have
programs in place to combat the problem, yet they are more likely to be the “employer-of-choice” for illicit drug users. Individuals who can’t adhere to a
drug-free workplace policy seek employment at precisely those firms that don’t have one, and the cost of just one error caused by an impaired employee can
devastate a small company.
Feedback & Comments...
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imply endorsement of opinions, products, or services. This program is a partnership with The University of
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Drug Free Workplace Coordinator
The Council on Alcohol and Drugs
6045 Atlantic Blvd.
Norcross, Georgia 30071
Drug Free Workplace Coordinator
Official Newsletter of Drug Free Workplaces in Georgia
August 2003 Vol.4 No.8
Published by The Council on Alcohol and Drugs
Tel (770) 239-7442 | Fax (770) 239-7443 | www.LiveDrugFree.org
[email protected]
The Costs of Parity for Substance Abuse
Treatment
•
Writing in the Journal of the American Medical Association, prominent addiction researchers Tom McLellan, Ph.D.,
David Lewis, M.D., Charles O'Brien, M.D., Ph.D., and Herbert
Kleber, M.D., conclude drug dependence has much in common
with chronic illnesses such as diabetes, hypertension and asthma,
and should be insured, treated and evaluated in a like manner. Additionally, the article states that while many physicians believe
there are no effective interventions for addiction, the research says
otherwise, especially when outcomes are compared with type 2
diabetes, hypertension and asthma, diseases "well studied and are
widely believed to have effective treatments, although they are not
yet curable." JAMA, October 4, 2000.
•
Between 13 million and 16 million people need treatment
for alcoholism and or drug abuse annually, yet only 3 million receive such care. 1998 National Household Survey on Drug Abuse,
SAMHSA, 1999; The Substance Abuse Treatment System, Institute
of Medicine, 1997. 55% of the costs of alcohol and other drug
abuse are borne by society, either governments, private insurance
companies or victims; and 45% of the costs of alcohol and other
drug abuse are borne by the abuser. Center for Substance Abuse
Research, University of Maryland. September 30, l998.
Smoking Increases Panic Attack Risk
Studies in the past suggested an association between smoking and mental disorders. Now, new
research finds a unique connection between
smoking and the risk of a panic attack.
For the research, authors used data from the
Early Developmental Stages of Psychopathology Study. The study included adolescents
and young adults in Munich, Germany. Researchers assessed number of cigarettes smoked,
nicotine dependence, panic attacks, panic disorder, other anxiety disorders, and other mental
disorders. Study participants were followed for
four years.
•
At the start of the study researchers note a clear
association between panic attacks and disorders
and regular smoking and nicotine dependence.
After analyzing the data, researchers say they
also found an increased risk for the onset of a
panic attack in those who smoked regularly and
were nicotine dependent. Prior nicotine dependence also increased a person's risk for the onset
of a panic disorder, whereas those who had
panic problems did not show a tendency to turn
to smoking.
•
Researchers say this study shows a rather unique
and specific relationship between smoking and
the increased risk for a panic attack or panic disorder. They say their results suggest smoking
and nicotine dependence increase the risk for
panic attacks and disorder but not for most other
anxiety disorders. Furthermore, prior smoking
increases the risk for a panic problem, but there
is no higher incidence of smoking among cases
with an anxiety disorder.
Aetna Federal Employee Health Benefit Plan showed
overall health care costs of alcoholics rose from $130 to $1,370
per month prior to treatment and fell to $190 per month three
years after treatment. Substance Abuse in Brief, Center for Substance Abuse Treatment, January 1999. An extensive body of federally funded research shows that with treatment, primary drug use
decreases by nearly half. In addition, reported alcohol and drugrelated medical visits decline by more than 50%, criminal activity
decreases and financial self-sufficiency improves (e.g. employment increases, and welfare receipt and homelessness decline.)
National Treatment Improvement Evaluation Study, SAMHSA,
1999.
Cost estimates of "full substance abuse parity" to
"typical" benefit plans range from an increase in premium rates of
$0.14 per member/month for HMO/EPO plans to $1.35 per member for fee-for-service plans. The estimated composite increase in
premium rates is $0.66 per member per month, or less than $8 per
year. Premium Estimates for Substance Abuse Parity for Commercial Health Insurance Products. Stephen P. Melek, FSA, MAAA,
Bruce S. Pyenson, FSA, MAAA. Milliman & Robertson, Inc. for
The Coalition for Nondiscriminatory Coverage of Addiction
Treatment, September 1997.
•
On average, full parity of mental health and substance
abuse treatment is estimated to increase premiums by 3.6% based
on an actuarial model. Health maintenance organizations that
tightly manage care would have a 0.6% premium increase for full
parity for mental health and substance abuse services. The Cost
and Effects of Parity for Mental Health and Substance Abuse Insurance, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Rockville, MD. March 1998.
Substance Abuse Internet
Referral System (SAIR)
is a free and easy to use service for
searching alcohol and drug treatment
resources online.
www.LiveDrugFree.org
Drug Free @ WorkPlace
| August 2003 Vol. 4 No. 8 | www.LiveDrugFree.org
Get the Facts about Drugged
Driving
While the consequences of drunk driving have become well known over the last twenty years, the
subject of drugged driving has received fairly limited attention. Unfortunately, too many Americans
are unaware of the dangers and uncertain about
the possibility of being arrested for drugged driving.
• Over 8 million persons aged 12 or older, or
3.6% of the U.S. population, reported driving under the influence of illegal drugs during the past year (2001). This was an increase from the rate of 3.1 percent in 2000
according to the 2002 National Household
Survey of Drug Abuse (NHSDA).
• Rates of drugged driving for young adults
aged 18 to 34 increased from 2000 to
2001.
• The 2002 NHSDA revealed that the rate of
drugged driving increased with each year
of age peaking among 19 year olds at 16
percent and generally decreased with increasing age among those aged 20 or
older.
• According to a 2002 survey among teen
drivers conducted by SADD, Inc. (Students
Against Destructive Decisions/Students
Against Driving Drunk) and Liberty Mutual
Group, driving after marijuana use is more
prevalent (68 percent) than driving after
alcohol use (48 percent of those who drink
"regularly"). More than half the teens who
reported illegal drug use also reported that
they were not concerned about riding in a
car with a driver who is using illegal drugs
(57 percent).
• The 2002 NHSDA also revealed that
among adults aged 18 or older, those who
were unemployed were more likely than full
or part-time workers to report driving under
the influence of illegal drugs during the
past year.
• According to the National Highway Traffic
Safety Administration (NHTSA), illegal
drugs are used by approximately 10-22
percent of drivers involved in all motor vehicle crashes, often in combination with alcohol. In 1996, the percentage of drivers
aged 16 to 20 who drove within 2 hours
after using marijuana and another illegal
drug was 39.7 percent.
•
•
•
•
| Tel (770) 239-7442
The Department of Transportation has
published two studies examining the
impact of marijuana on driving performance. Marijuana - the most widely
abused illegal drug - slows a driver's
perception of time, space, and distance.
Research indicates that cocaine
causes drivers to speed, change lanes
without signaling and puts other innocent people at risk of a deadly accident.
NHSTA estimates that only 15 percent
of all drivers involved in fatal crashes
had their blood alcohol content tested,
suggesting that the incidence of driving
while impaired by alcohol or other
drugs is potentially significantly underestimated.
While it is illegal in all states to drive a
motor vehicle while under the influence
of alcohol, drugs other than alcohol, or
a combination of alcohol and other
drugs, there is no consistent method
across states for identifying drug impairment. As a result, we do not know
the full impact of illegal drug use on
public safety.
Statistics of Interest
Among employed adults, the highest rates of
current drug use and heavy drinking are reported by white, non-Hispanic males, 18-25
years old, with less than a high school education. By occupation significantly higher rates
were reported by those employed as food
preparation workers, waiters, waitresses and
bartenders (19%), construction workers
(14%), and transportation and material moving workers (10%).
More than 10% of Drivers in the US
Under the Influence of Alcohol
New national survey indicates that more than
1 in 10 driving Americans drove under the influence of alcohol at least once in the previous year.
Source: 2001 National Household Survey on
Drug Abuse (NHSDA)
Boletín oficial de no dependencia de drogas y bebidas alcohólicas
en el establecimiento de trabajo en Georgia
Julio de 2003 Vol. 2 No. 7| Tel (770) 239-7442 | www.LiveDrugFree.org
DFW en Español
Información para personas que están en
contacto cercano con pacientes con SRAS
Una nueva enfermedad llamada SRAS
El Síndrome Respiratorio Agudo Severo (SRAS) (En inglés:
Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome, SARS) es una enfermedad respiratoria cuya aparición ha sido reportada recientemente en Asia, América del Norte y Europa. Esta hoja informativa proporciona información básica sobre la enfermedad y
sobre lo que se está haciendo para combatir su propagación.
Para más información en inglés sobre el SRAS vaya a www.
cdc.gov/ncidod/sars/ y www.who.int/csr/sars/en/. Estos sitios
Web son actualizados diariamente.
Síntomas del SRAS
El SRAS empieza generalmente con una fiebre superior a los
100.4ºF [>38.0ºC]. Otros síntomas pueden ser dolor de cabeza, una sensación general de incomodidad y dolor en el
cuerpo. Algunas personas experimentan también síntomas
respiratorios leves. Después de 2 a 7 días, los pacientes el
SRAS pueden presentar tos seca y problemas para respirar.
Cómo se propaga el SRAS
La forma principal de propagación del SRAS parece ser el
contacto cercano entre las personas. La mayoría de los casos
de SRAS se han presentado entre personas que han cuidado
de alguien infectado con SRAS, han vivido con esa persona o
han tenido contacto directo con el material infectado (por
ejemplo, secreciones respiratorias) de una persona que tiene
SRAS. Las formas potenciales en que puede propagarse el
SRAS son, entre otras, tocar la piel de otras personas u objetos que están contaminados con partículas infectadas y luego
tocarse los ojos, la nariz o la boca. Esto puede ocurrir cuando
alguien enfermo con el SRAS tose o estornuda gotitas o
partículas que caen sobre sí mismo, sobre otras personas o
sobre superficies cercanas. Es posible también que el SRAS
se propague más ampliamente a través del aire o de otras formas que se desconocen por el momento.
Quién corre el riesgo de contraer el SRAS
La mayoría de los casos del SRAS en Estados Unidos han
ocurrido en personas que regresan a los EE.UU. después de
un viaje a otras partes del mundo afectadas por el SRAS. Han
habido muy pocos casos como resultado de un contagio entre
personas que tienen un contacto cercano como familiares y
trabajadores sanitarios. Actualmente, no existe evidencia de
que el SRAS se esté propagando más ampliamente en la
comunidad en Estados Unidos.
Qué hacer para protegerse a sí mismo
Los CDC han publicado recomendaciones provisionales para
pacientes de quienes se sospecha que tengan SRAS en los
centros de asistencia médica y en hogares.
Estas recomendaciones pueden cambiar a medida que tengamos más información sobre el SRAS. Si usted presenta los
síntomas descritos anteriormente y ha estado cerca de alguien
que pudiera tener SRAS, consulte a su proveedor de asistencia médica y siga las recomendaciones que se dan a continuación.
RECOMENDACIONES
Si usted piensa que usted o alguien en su familia pudiera
tener SRAS, debe: Consultar a un proveedor de asistencia
médica tan pronto como sea posible.
•
Cubrirse la boca y la nariz con un pañuelo para toser o
estornudar. Si tiene una mascarilla quirúrgica, úsela
cuando esté cerca de otras personas. Una mascarilla
puede reducir el número de gotitas que caen al aire al
toser.
Si usted tiene SRAS y están cuidando de usted en casa, debe:
•
Seguir las instrucciones de su proveedor de asistencia
médica.
•
Limitar las actividades fuera de la casa durante un
período de 10 días. Por ejemplo, no vaya para el trabajo, la escuela ni a otras áreas públicas.
•
Lavarse bien las manos a menudo, especialmente
después de soplarse la nariz.
•
Cubrirse la boca y la nariz con un pañuelo para toser o
estornudar.
•
Si es posible, usar una mascarilla quirúrgica cuando
esté cerca de otras personas en la casa. Si usted no
puede usar la mascarilla, entonces, deberán usarla las
otras personas que viven en su casa cuando estén cerca
de usted.
•
No compartir cubiertos, toallas, ni lencería con nadie
en la casa hasta que dichos artículos hayan sido lavados
con jabón y agua caliente.
•
Limpiar las superficies (superficies de trabajo, mesas,
puertas, manillas, accesorios de baños, etc.) que hayan
sido contaminadas con líquidos corporales (sudor, saliva, moco e incluso vómito u orine) del paciente con
SRAS con un desinfectante de hogar utilizado según
las instrucciones del fabricante. Usar guantes desechables durante las actividades de limpieza. Botar los
guantes cuando haya terminado. No volver a usarlos.
•
Seguir estas instrucciones durante 10 días después de
que se hayan ido la fiebre y los síntomas respiratorios.
Si usted está cuidando de alguien con SRAS en la casa,
debe:
•
Asegurarse de que la persona con SRAS haya consultado a un proveedor de asistencia médica y esté
siguiendo las instrucciones en cuanto a su cuidado y a
los medicamentos.
•
Asegurarse de que todos en la casa se laven las manos
frecuentemente con jabón y agua caliente o con algún
detergente para las manos a base de alcohol.
•
Usar guantes desechables si tiene contacto directo con
los líquidos corporales del paciente con SRAS. Sin
embargo, el uso de los guantes no sustituye la buena
higiene de las manos. Después de haber tenido contacto
con los líquidos corporales de un paciente con SRAS,
quítese los guantes, bótelos y lávese las manos. No
lavar ni volver a usar los guantes.
•
Invite a la persona que tiene SRAS a que se cubra la
boca y la nariz con un pañuelo cuando tosa o estornude.
Si es posible, la persona con SRAS debe usar una mascarilla quirúrgica mientras esté en contacto cercano con
otras personas en la casa. Si la persona con SRAS no
puede usar la mascarilla, entonces deberán usarla las
otras personas que estén en casa en la misma habitación
de la persona con SRAS.
DFW en Español | www.LiveDrugFree.Org
Metanfetamina
La metanfetamina es una droga estimulante adictiva que
activa mucho ciertos sistemas del cerebro. Guarda una estrecha relación química con la anfetamina, pero su efecto en el
sistema nervioso central es mayor. Ambos productos tienen
algunos usos médicos, sobre todo para el tratamiento de la
obesidad, pero su uso terapéutico es limitado.
La metanfetamina se fabrica en laboratorios ilegales y hay
una alta probabilidad de que se abuse y se dependa de ella.
El producto vendido en la calle se conoce por muchos nombres, tales como "speed", "meth" y "chalk" (anfetas, meta y
tiza). El clorhidrato de metanfetamina consiste en cristales
transparentes en pedazos parecidos al hielo, que se pueden
inhalar al fumarlos y se llaman "ice", "crystal" y
"glass" (hielo, cristal y vidrio).
Peligros para la salud
La metanfetamina libera altos niveles del neurotransmisor
llamado dopamina, que estimula las células cerebrales y
mejora el estado de ánimo y los movimientos del cuerpo.
También parece tener un efecto neurotóxico, ya que daña las
células cerebrales que contienen dopamina y serotonina,
otro neurotransmisor. Con el tiempo, la metanfetamina
parece reducir los niveles de dopamina, lo que puede resultar en síntomas similares a los de la enfermedad de Parkinson, un trastorno grave del movimiento.
La metanfetamina se toma por vía oral o intranasal
(inhalación del polvo), se inyecta por vía intravenosa y se
fuma. Inmediatamente después de la inhalación o la inyección intravenosa, el usuario experimenta una intensa sensación inicial, conocida como "rush" o "flash" (arrebato o
fogonazo) que dura algunos minutos y se dice que es sumamente placentera. El uso oral o intranasal produce euforia,
es decir, un estímulo, pero no una sensación intensa. Los
usuarios de este producto pueden convertirse rápidamente en
adictos y usarlo con más frecuencia y en dosis cada vez
mayores.
Algunas investigaciones hechas con animales durante más
de 20 años muestran que las altas dosis de metanfetamina
dañan las terminaciones de las neuronas. Las neuronas que
contienen dopamina y serotonina no se mueren después del
uso de metanfetamina, pero sus terminaciones (terminales)
se recortan y parece que el proceso de volver a crecer es
limitado.
La acción que tiene en el sistema nervioso central el consumo aun de pequeñas cantidades de metanfetamina incluye
prolongación del estado de vigilia, mayor actividad física,
reducción del apetito, aumento de la frecuencia respiratoria,
hipertermia y euforia.
Otros efectos en ese mismo sistema incluyen irritabilidad,
insomnio, confusión, temblores, convulsiones, ansiedad,
paranoia y agresividad. La hipertermia y las convulsiones
pueden causar la muerte.
Además, la metanfetamina aumenta la frecuencia cardíaca y
la tensión arterial y puede causar lesión irreversible de los
vasos sanguíneos cerebrales, por lo que produce derrames
cerebrales. Otros de sus efectos incluyen problemas respiratorios, irregularidad de los latidos del corazón y anorexia
extrema.
| Tel (770) 239-7442 | Fax (770) 239-7443
Su uso puede ocasionar colapso cardiovascular y la muerte.
Un estudio realizado en Seattle confirmó que el uso de
metanfetamina estaba generalizado entre las poblaciones
homosexuales y bisexuales de la ciudad. De estos grupos,
aquellos que usaban metanfetamina declararon que tienen
costumbres sexuales y de uso de agujas que los exponen al
riesgo de contraer y transmitir el VIH y el SIDA.
Alcance del uso
Estudio de observación del futuro (MFT)*
El estudio de observación del futuro evalúa las proporciones del uso de drogas por adolescentes (estudiantes de
8o, 10o y 12o grados) y adultos jóvenes en todo el país.
Los datos recientes de la encuesta muestran lo siguiente:
•
En 1997, 4,4 por ciento de los estudiantes de
último año de secundaria habían usado metanfetamina en cristales al menos una vez en la vida,
cifra que representa un aumento en comparación
con la de 2,7 por ciento registrada en 1990.
•
Los datos recopilados muestran que 2,3 por
ciento de los estudiantes de ese grupo habían
usado metanfetamina en cristales en 1997, cifra
que representa un aumento en comparación con
la de 1,3 por ciento registrada en 1990.
Grupo de Trabajo Epidemiológico Comunitario (CEWG)
**
La metanfetamina es el problema principal de drogas ilícitas en San Diego. Honolulu y San Francisco también cuentan con importantes poblaciones que usan metanfetamina.
Se ha observado tendencias de uso creciente en Denver,
Los Angeles, Minneapolis, Phoenix, Seattle y Tucson.
Nuevos patrones de tráfico han aumentado la disponibilidad de la droga en Missouri, Nebraska y Iowa.
Encuesta domiciliaria nacional sobre abuso de drogas
(NHSDA)t
Según la encuesta domiciliaria nacional sobre abuso de
drogas realizada en 1996, 4,9 millones de personas de 12
años o más habían usado metanfetamina al menos una vez
en la vida (2,3 por ciento de la población). Esta cifra no
representa un aumento estadístico significativo en comparación con la de 4,7 millones de personas (2,2 por
ciento) registrada en la encuesta de 1995.
•
Limpiar las superficies
(superficies de trabajo, mesas,
manillas, accesorios de baños, etc.) que hayan sido
contaminadas con líquidos corporales (sudor, saliva, moco e incluso vómito u orine) con un desinfectante de hogar utilizado según las instrucciones
del fabricante. Usar guantes desechables durante
las actividades de limpieza. Botar los guantes
cuando haya terminado. No volver a usarlos.
Seguir estas instrucciones durante 10 días después
de que a la persona enferma se le hayan ido la
fiebre y los síntomas respiratorios.
Si usted tiene fiebre o presenta síntomas respiratorios, debe contactar a su proveedor de asistencia
médica inmediatamente y decirle que ha tenido
contacto cercano con un paciente con SRAS.
Continúe : SRAS
•
•
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Dear Employers:
Preventing accidents and injuries in the work force is a top priority with the State
Board of Workers’ Compensation. When strong safety programs are in place,
workplace accidents are decreased, resulting in fewer lost time days and lower
medical and indemnity costs. A healthy work force is a productive work force.
The Safety Library is one of the ways the Board supports and encourages each
employer’s efforts at accident prevention. The State Board of Workers’
Compensation Safety Library contains a large number of videos on a wide variety
of safety topics and is available to all employers in Georgia at no charge. The
only cost to you is the postage required to return the video tapes to the Board.
We strongly encourage you to use the Workers’ Compensation Video Library and
tell other employers about this valuable recourse.
Let’s work together to make Georgia the number one state in accident
prevention.
Sincerely,
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SAFETY LIBRARY REQUEST
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Library User Agreement on the reverse side; use the material properly; report any problems or damage of the
materials to the Library Administrator; and, return the programs by the due date. I understand that failure to do
so may result in discontinuation of the privilege to use the Library.
GEORGIA STATE BOARD OF WORKERS’ COMPENSATION LIBRARY USER AGREEMENT
WHEREAS , the Board has developed a library of various publications, videotapes, audio tapes, slides, and movies related to the
promotion of work place safety that the Board has agreed to lend to employers of the State of Georgia; and
WHEREAS , User is an employers of the State of Georgia, authorized by the agency identified below, would like to borrow from the
Board from time to time, on behalf of said agency, certain materials described above (the "Materials") for the purposes of and in
accordance with the terms set forth in this Agreement.
NOW, THEREFORE, in consideration of the mutual promises flowing to and from the parties, the parties, intending to be legally bound,
hereby agree as follows:
1. Grant of Right to Use. The Board grants User, and User accepts from the Board the right to borrow and use the Materials from time
to time during the dates specified by the Board. Upon the conclusion of its use of the Materials, or upon the prior termination of this
Agreement, User shall immediately return the Materials to the Board in as good a condition as they were when delivered to User.
2. Scope of Use. User acknowledges and agrees that the user will use the Materials only for the purpose of promoting safety in its work
place. User may not use the Materials for any other purpose without the Board’s express prior written permission. User shall use the
Materials only in the manner for which they were intended, and will, at the user’s own cost and expense, maintain each item of the
Materials in as good a condition as when such Materials were delivered to User.
3. Cost. User is required to pay a fee of $5.00 per videotape, publication, audio tape, slide or movie.
4. No Warranty. THE BOARD SHALL PROVIDE THE MATERIALS TO USER "AS IS." THE BOARD MAKES NO
REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EITHER EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, WITH REGARD TO THE MATERIALS,
INCLUDING, WITHOUT LIMITATION, THE CONTENT OF THE MATERIALS, THEIR MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR ANY
PARTICULAR PURPOSE, OR THE QUALITY OF THEIR CONTENTS (INCLUDING WITHOUT LIMITATION, THE ACCURACY,
EFFECTIVENESS OR LEGALITY OF ANY SAFETY MEASURES DISCUSSED IN THE MATERIALS), AND THE BOARD HEREBY
DISCLAIMS ANY SUCH REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTY. THE BOARD SHALL NOT BE LIABLE TO USER OR TO ANY
THIRD PARTY FOR ANY DAMAGES, INJURIES, LOSSES OR COSTS: (A) RESULTING DIRECTLY OR INDIRECTLY FROM
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ASSERTED INADEQUACY OR INACCURACY OF ANY PORTION OF THE MATERIALS. MOREOVER, THE BOARD DISCLAIMS
ANY LIABILITY FOR INCIDENTAL OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES (INCLUDING WITHOUT LIMITATION, INJURIES TO
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with respect to the Materials, and (b) releases the Board from any liability to User with respect to the Materials.
6. Indemnification. User, at their expense, shall indemnify the Board and hold the Board harmless for and against any and all losses,
costs (including court costs and reasonable attorney's fees), damages, settlements, suits, actions, expenses, liabilities, and claims
sustained by or involving the Board arising out of or resulting from (a) any use of the Materials by or on behalf of User or by or on behalf
of a party to whom User has provided the Materials or who gains access to the Materials from User (whether with or without
authorization), or (b) any Materials breach by User of the terms and conditions of this Agreement.
7. Intellectual Property Rights. User acknowledges that some or all parts of some or all of the Materials may constitute or contain the
"intellectual property" of third parties. User agrees to respect and observe all applicable laws and regulations related to the protection or
preservation of such third parties' intellectual property rights in the Materials (including, without limitation, any copyrights in the Materials
held by such third parties). User agrees not to copy or duplicate in any manner all or any portion of the Materials without the express
written permission of the Board, and any parties owning any intellectual property rights in the portion of the Materials to be copied or
duplicated.
8. Entire Agreement. This Agreement (including any schedules) constitutes the entire Agreement between the parties with respect to
the subject matter hereof, and supersedes any prior statement or writing not a part of this Agreement or otherwise referenced in this
Agreement, and neither party shall be bound by any prior or contemporaneous representation, statement, promise, warranty, covenant,
or agreement pertaining thereto unless set forth or referred to in this Agreement.
9. Amendments and Waiver.
(a) No amendment, change or modification of this Agreement or any of the terms, conditions or provisions hereof, and no waiver of a
right, remedy, privilege or power, or discharge of an obligation or liability, conferred upon, vested in, or imposed upon any party under
or pursuant to this Agreement, and no consent to any act or omission pertaining hereto shall be effective unless duly embodied in a
written instrument signed by the duly authorized representatives of both parties.
(b) No failure to exercise and no delay in exercising any right, remedy, privilege or power under or pursuant to this Agreement shall
operate as a waiver thereof; nor shall any single or partial exercise of any right, remedy, privilege, or power provided for under or
pursuant to this Agreement by either party hereto preclude or limit such party from any other or further exercise thereof or from pursuing
any other right, remedy, privilege, or power available pursuant to this Agreement, at law or in equity.
10. Miscellaneous. This Agreement shall be governed by and interpreted under State of Georgia law. Neither party may assign this
Agreement to another party without the prior written consent of the other party. The terms of this Agreement shall be binding upon and
inure to the benefit of the parties, their successors and permitted assigns.
THIS LIBRARY USER AGREEMENT (this "Agreement") is made and entered into this day
between the Georgia State Board of Workers’ Compensation and
of _
(Name of Agency)
______________
of
, 20
, by and
______________________________________
(Signature of User)
Please Contact Leanne Mulherin at 770-239-7442
Drug Free Workplace Coordinator
Video Library
Drug Free Workplace videos are highlighted in red.
Please look for tapes that are also available in Spanish.
A Cry for Help -28.47 minutes
Adams’s Last Day-16 minutes
Addictions: Getting In, Getting Out-57 minutes
Addictive Vo ice Recognition Techniques 41 minutes
Adolescent Treatment Approaches-25 minutes
Adult Children of Alcoholics -30 minutes
Alcohol, Children, and Family -51 minutes
Alcoholism and Drug Addiction…The Disease -17 minutes
Alcohol and The Mind-30 minutes
America in Jeopardy-30 minutes (Workplace) Spanish and English
American Cities against Drugs-51 minutes
And down will come baby-17 minutes
A Thin Line-29 minutes
Back to Reality -29 minutes
Before It’s Too Late -Getting Help -71 minutes (Workplace )
Black and Recove ring-18 minutes
Brainstorm-4 -15minute segments
Brandon Tells His Story-28 minutes
Breaking the dysfunctional bonds: relationships and codependency -72 minutes
Brother Earl’s Street Talk-60 minutes
Changing Channels -24 minutes
Channel 2: Series on people coming into city to buy crack-n/a
Changing Lives
Spanish and English
Children of Alcoholics-56 minutes
Classroom Connections: Making a Difference -24 minutes
Climbing High-26 minutes
Cracked Lives-32 minutes (Workplace)
Coming together on prevention -26 minutes
Community Covenant-23 minutes
Communities taking Charge-n/a
Coping with pressures-30minutes
Counseling children of Alcoholics-34 minutes
Detroit Urban League Male Responsibility Program-16 minutes
Developing positive self images and discipline in black communities-60 minutes
Discovery Kit -42 minutes
The Disease of Addiction-60 minutes (Workplace)
The Dog who dared to keep kids of drugs and alcohol-25 minutes
Do I have and addiction problem-30 minutes (Workplace)
Donnie Dinosaur in tobacco trouble -12 minutes
Dread-56 minutes
Driving Ambition: New laws, new responsibilities-30 minutes
Drug Abuse-17 minutes
Drug Abuse Treatment in Prison -23 minutes
Drug Wars -n/a
Drug Avengers-73 minutes
Drug Babies-30 minutes
Drugs Don’t Work :Chuck Wade –45:09 Minutes (Workplace/Speaker Video)
Drug Free Zones-27 minutes
Drugs and Alcohol-Part 1, Part 2 -30 minutes
Drugs and Youth-23 minutes
Drugs in Black and White -40 minutes
Dual Diagnosis-NIDA
Drug Testing in the workplace (2) (Workplace)
America in Jeopardy: Drugs in the Workplace - 20.06minutes
Drugs in the Workplace: Employee Version- 23 minutes
Prevention Works: Workplace Version(2)- 30 minutes
Educate -Creating Inhalant Abuse Awareness Together-n/a
Everybody’s Business: Drug Free Schools and Communities- 300 minutes (5hrs)
Facing the Future: The Search for Identity-15 minutes
Fast Forward Future -61 minutes
Fighting Back: Community Initiatives to Reduce Demand for Illegal Drugs and
Alcohol-16 minutes
Finding Out-30 minutes
Finding Solutions-19 minutes
Florida’s Challenge: A guide to educating substance exposed children -45 minutes
Folktales of Peace-22 minutes
Front Page Crusade -48 minutes
Getting Help -23 minutes
Get Real About Violence - 12 minutes
I live in an alcoholic family -36 minutes
If you change your mind-31 minutes
Inhalant Abuse -20 minutes
Inhalants: The adult premier-8 minutes
Inhalants: The silent epidemic-24 minutes
Intervention: Facing Reality-35 minutes
It’s only beer-14 minutes
Joey and me -8 minutes
Just for me: “For parents, too-family ties-14 minutes
Just for me: I do care -14 minutes
Just
Just
Just
Just
Just
for me: I don buy it -14 minutes
for me: My choice -15 minutes
for me: My family, myself-15 minutes
for me: The real me15 minutes
for me: Who are you 150 minutes
Kids at risk: Covering up for Kevin -20 minutes
Kids, Chemicals, and America -30 minutes
The last dance -8 minutes
Learning the ropes of competitive double dutch -20 minutes
Living Sober Series:
A.
Resisting Social Pressures to Use Chemicals-11 minutes
B.
Coping with cra vings and thoughts of using-13 minutes
C.
Managing Anger in Recovery -15 minutes
E. Coping with Family and Interpersonal Conflict -17 minutes
F.
Building a recovery network and sponsorship -18 minutes
G.
Coping with relapse warning signs-17 minutes
I.
Motivation and Recovery -18 minutes
J.
Relationships 1. Amends, Assertiveness-24 minutes
K.
Relationships 2. Passion, Rejection-23 minutes
L.
Relationships 3. HIV & Sexuality Issues-20 minutes
M. Other Addictions Gambling, Sex & Tobacco -20 minutes
N.
Balanced Living-20 minutes
O.
Compliance with aftercare/outpatient-23 minutes
P.
Low motivation to change-21 minutes
Q.
Relationship to therapist and group -21 minutes
R.
Compliance with Medicine/ Self help -17 minutes
S.
Compliance with lifestyle change-16 minutes
Mara’s Breathtaking Story-22 minutes
Marijuana: What can parents do?-4 minutes
Marijuana and the mind :Intoxication and Addiction (Workplace)
Marketing booze to blacks-17 minutes
Masquerade -30 minutes
Methadone-33 minutes
Misadventures of wags & freckles-8 minutes
Mood and Anxiety Disorders-31 minutes
Multiple Choice: Film on juvenile justice-35 minutes
Murals Reflecting Division-10 minutes
Nassau Boces: Project Support-35 minutes
Natural born leaders-35 minutes
Nine to Five- Substance Abuse in Workplace -28 minutes
Olympic Spirit: Building Resiliency in Youth -16 minutes
Opening Doors -60 minutes
Personal Disorders-31 minutes
Portrait of Addiction- 45 minutes Spanish and English
Positive Voices-35 minutes
Prevention Works: Workplace Version
The Prevention Story :Programs that make a difference Part 1&2 -16 minutes
Project Alert -11 minutes
Raise Drug Free Kids-n/a
Rage, Recidivism, & Recovery -n/a
Reflections from the heart of a child -30minutes
Relapse Prevention-24 minutes
Respect & Project-28 minutes
Right Turns Only-15 minutes
Risk & Reality-20 minutes
Safe Spaces: Drug & Alcohol Prevention Education for Special Needs Drug Exposed
Children -30 minutes
Saying NO: You can choose-28 minutes
Secret Addictions: Women, Drugs, and Alcohol-35 minutes
Secret Addictions: Women in Treatment-32 minutes
Selling Lies: Kids, Ads and Smoking-16 minutes
Sentenced to Life:The Tonya Tozer Story - 30 Minutes
Sons & Daughters-35 minutes
Sooper Puppy: Drink, Drank, Drunk-16 minutes
Sooper Puppy: Puff of Smoke -15 minutes
Sooper Puppy: Self-Esteem-20 minutes
Step back to reality: Technology Addiction-n/a
Stolen Lives: Children of Addicts-n/a
Stop the Sale: Prevent the Addiction -26 minutes
Straight At Ya-44 minutes
Substance Abuse Treatment for Women: Success of the Little Rock Fighting Back 11 minutes
Supervising the Drugfree Workplace
Taking Action II – What you should know about drugs-32 minutes
Teens: Through the eyes of tobacco The Epidemic continues: Kids, Drugs and Alcohol
The High jacked Brain: 45 minutes Spanish and English
The Next Generation: Prevention Programs that works with addicted parents to
repair damage with in families and another
The Politics of Addiction Spanish and English
Thin Line
Tobacco: Behind the smoke and mirrors-18 minutes
Tobacco & Health – You Decide-25 minutes
Tobacco X -Files-30 minutes
Town Hall Meeting: MADD National Summit to prevent underage drinking-8
minutes
Trap: Selling Drugs in the inner city -27 minutes
Treatment Solution s-19 minutes
Treatment Issues for Women -22 minutes
Truth about drugs- 30 minutes
Truth about sex-30 minutes
Trying to find normal-20 minutes
Twelve Steps-35 minutes
Ultimate Choice-30 minutes
Understanding A Need -15 minutes
Under the Influence: Alcoholism & Other Drug Abuse Prevention for People with
Disabilities-n/a
Understanding A Need: Kids, Ads, & Alcohol-15 minutes
Using the Asi to access client needs and treatment planning part 1 -65 minutes
part 11-64 minutes
Walls that speak-29 minutes
What should I tell my child about drinking-46 minutes
What’s wrong with my child?-33 minutes
Why are you so angry? -14 minutes
Why is it always me?20 minutes
Word from the joint 27-minutes
The wounded healer-20 minutes
Workplace Drug Abuse: Training for supervisors and Managers -56 minutes
********** Highly Recommended*********
Voices of experience-26 minutes
Voices on the road back: a program about drugs-n/a
We can help 2000-37 minutes
Please Contact Leanne Mulherin @ 770 -239 -7442
Drug Free Workplace Coordinator
The Council on Alcohol and Drugs
6045 Atlantic Blvd.
Norcross, Georgia 30071
Click Below For
Videotape Resources
FREE Video Training Tapes
or
Additional Videotape Resources
or
Request Tape From DDW
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Drugs Don't Work in Georgia
Trainers
The Atlanta Field Office of the Drug Enforcement Administration has free trainers available on a
limited basis. For information call: Chuvalo Truesdell at………………………… (404) 893-7124
Check with your local chamber of commerce and local law enforcement agencies to find out if they
offer drug-free workplace training seminars.
Your company must conduct
two hours of supervisor training
each year.
Supervisor Training Overview
View Supervisor Forms
Training Completion Form
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Working Partners
for an Alcohol- and Drug-Free Workplace
Articles
Training Supervisors: A Critical
Link in a Successful Substance
Abuse Prevention Program
Introduction
Steps to a
Drug-Free Workplace
Web-Based Tools
Supplies for Success
Benefits of Drug-Free
Workplaces
Facts and Figures
Industry Specific Materials
Workplace Substance Abuse
Articles
Workplace Substance Abuse
Posters
Small Business
Workplace Kit
Working Partners Home Page
DOL Home Page
On August 28, 1991, a New York subway operator crashed
his train near a station in lower Manhattan. Tragically, five
people were killed and more than 200 others were injured.
After the accident the operator was tested for drugs and
alcohol. He tested positive for alcohol with a blood alcohol
content level of .21, more than twice the legal limit in the
state of New York.
The next day the New York Times ran a story that quoted
two of the operator's supervisors who admitted that they
knew the man had a substance abuse problem, but they
didn't know what to do about it.
Supervisors and managers are critical links between the
implementation of a workplace substance abuse program
and its successful maintenance. Without their commitment
to the program, your objectives - a safe, healthy work force,
and a more productive and profitable business - will go
unrealized. However, for supervisors to demonstrate solid
commitment to the program, they must first understand what
the program is, what it requires, and their role - they must be
trained.
Many of the problems encountered when implementing and
maintaining a substance abuse workplace program can be
avoided if you have the full support and participation of your
supervisors and managers. In concert with employee drug
education, a thorough, ongoing supervisor training program
will support your company's policy statement and, if
included, make your drug testing and employee assistance
programs more effective.
Where to Start
The first step in beginning a training program is to consider
what you want to accomplish. An effective training program
should allow supervisors to do the following:
●
●
●
●
●
Know the company's policy and understand their role
in its implementation and maintenance.
Observe and document unsatisfactory job
performance.
Confront workers about unsatisfactory job
performance according to company procedures.
Understand and be able to recognize the effects of
substance abuse in the workplace.
Know how to refer an employee suspected of having
a substance abuse problem to those who are
qualified to make a specific diagnosis and to offer
assistance.
Supervisors' Role
Supervisors are generally in the best position to know if one
of your employees is having a performance problem. Of
course, the problem may be caused by any number of
reasons, one of which could be substance abuse. The
important point for supervisors to understand is that the
company does not expect them to diagnose substance
abuse problems. Rather, supervisors are responsible for
monitoring job performance and, when a problem arises,
follow established company procedures.
Supervisors cannot afford to get involved emotionally in
workers' problems; to do so could compromise their ability to
effectively deal with the troubled employees. Also,
supervisors should be trained not to enable substance
abuse problems to continue by looking the other way, lying
and covering up for workers, failing to document
performance problems, or choosing to not confront
employees directly.
The Signs of Substance Abuse
The signs and symptoms of substance abuse are
sometimes identical to those of other performance problems
such as marital, family, financial or gambling. Nonetheless,
supervisors should be trained to recognize these symptoms
and know that they could be related to substance abuse.
Generally, these signs and symptoms may be reflected by
changes in performance, behavior and appearance, and
safety. Performance issues may involve an employee's
quality of work, work pace, ability to follow instructions, and
successful completion of assignments. Supervisors should
look for mistakes, errors in judgment, inability to meet
deadlines, sick leave usage, and absenteeism patterns
(e.g., Mondays, Fridays, following paydays, etc.).
Sudden behavioral changes may be a sign that an
employee is experiencing personal problems. Supervisors
should be on the alert for employees who are irritable,
moody, argumentive with co-workers, or insubordinate.
Troubled workers may lose interest in their appearance or
begin receiving complaints about their attitude or
appearance from customers, clients, co-workers, or other
supervisors.
Unsafe behavior on the job should always be addressed
immediately. Substance abusing workers tend to be
involved in more accidents than their co-workers, though
they are not always the ones injured. Careless or other risky
behavior needs to be addressed before an accident occurs.
All such signs and symptoms should be identified and
documented.
Who to Turn To
For supervisors to effectively carry out your substance
abuse policy, there must be a source of help to which they
can turn. Who provides that help may depend on the size of
the company and how you have set up your program. For
example, if your company has few employees, problems
may be referred directly to you as the employer. If you have
an internal or outside employee assistance service,
supervisors would be instructed to refer matters to that
person.
In some companies, supervisors may routinely work with the
manager of personnel or safety to address workplace
problems. There are numerous ways in which companies
choose to deal with substance abuse problems. Regardless
of the approach, supervisors must document their
observations and efforts to ensure that appropriate action
has been taken.
Who Can Perform the Training
Supervisor training does not necessarily require you to hire
an outside consultant. The Federal Government's National
Clearinghouse on Alcohol and Drug Information (NCADI,
800/729-6686) is an excellent source of free or low-cost
materials that can serve as the nucleus of a supervisor
training program. Available materials include training
manuals, booklets, pamphlets, videos and posters, some of
which have be developed specifically for supervisor training.
A supervisor or other management-level employee can
review the materials and put together a training program
with the assistance of the Workplace Helpline (800/8434971), a service sponsored by the Center for Substance
Abuse Prevention of the U.S. Department of Health &
Human Services.
Local business organizations, police departments, or
community resources may also be used to supplement or
provide training. Employee assistance professionals
typically offer supervisor training services.
Conclusion
There is no way to determine whether supervisors could
have prevented the tragic New York subway accident. Well
trained supervisors are not an absolute defense against the
problems associated with substance abuse. However,
companies that utilize compreh ensive programs that
include supervisor training generally report fewer positive
results in drug tests as compared to companies that just do
drug testing.
The level of support your supervisors give to the company's
substance abuse program, combined with the fairness of
your program and the firmness of your commitment, will
generally influence its potential for success.
U.S. Department of Labor
Go directly to the form of your
choice by clicking below.
Supervisor Orientation
Supervisor Guidelines
Employee Evaluation Form
Voluntary Submission
Agreement To Improve Job
Performance
Letter Of Reprimand
Last Chance Agreement
Training Completion Form
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“in-house”.
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Drugs Don't Work in Georgia
SUPERVISORS
Supervisors are the people best in a position to evaluate an employee's job performance.
In essence, their documentation role has them do that for which they are already specially
qualified: keeping an accurate record of employee's job performance and conducting
performance evaluation interviews. Your supervisors will require special training to help
them identify the patterns of changed behavior, physical appearance and job performance
that signal impairment. What are these patterns?
Absenteeism
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frequent unauthorized absences
excessive sick days
frequent absences of short duration
frequent day before and day after holiday absences
frequent use of vacation days to cover absences
high absentee rate for vague ailments: colds, flu, headache
On the Job Absences
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frequent away from work station
excessive tardiness after lunch, breaks
frequent trips to the water fountain, parking lot, rest room
High Accident Rate
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accidents off the job that affect job performance
accidents on the job due to carelessness
failure to wear safety gear when applicable
Poor Job Performance
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a pattern of diminished morning or afternoon performance
complaints from coworkers, clients, etc.
missed deadlines
taking longer to do less
wasting materials, damaging/losing equipment
improbable excuses
alternating periods of high and low performance, which becomes unsat.
difficulty with instructions, procedures
difficulty understanding new information
difficulty with complex assignments
uneven work habits
Changes in Personal Habits
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reporting to work in abnormal condition (drunk, dazed, vague, etc.)
different behavior after lunch than before
increasing lack of attention to personal hygiene
increasing lack of interest in personal appearance
Poor Relationships with Coworkers
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over-reaction to real or implied criticism
unrealistic resentments
excessive talking with coworkers
wide mood swings
borrowing money
avoiding coworkers and friends
complaints from coworkers and friends
increasing irritability
increasingly argumentative
inappropriate outbursts of anger, tears, laughter
Naturally, documentation requires documents. Supervisors should be made familiar with
them prior to beginning any documentation procedures. You will want to devise
documents suitable for your organization's need, but the example on the next few pages
will give you some idea of the form they might take.
This is one of the more thorough of supervisors documents and while this is seen by some
employers as its advantage, supervisors who don't like the many pages and headings
complain of "paperwork" and "bureaucracy." If you are concerned about the legal aspects
of documentation and want to provide yourself and your supervisors with the maximum
protection, this document is one of the best available. Also, when dealing with an
employee whose denial is very strong, a document this detailed and precise can be an
extremely powerful tool.
Documenting unsatisfactory job performance has been proven to be a successful means
of eliminating the kind of impaired work behavior that costs companies money.
Identification by documentation takes longer than blood or urine testing, but it is
effective. We know of countless histories illustrating the positive use of documentation.
GUIDELINES FOR SUPERVISORS
1. Make documentation thorough and incontrovertible.
2. Never diagnose or interpret. Stick to the facts of impaired performance.
3. Whenever possible during performance reviews, make positive comments about an
employee's area of competence. By acknowledging the worker's strength, you make it
easier for him to admit his work impairment without a loss of dignity.
4. Don't get involved in excuses, explanations or arguments. You are interested in one
thing only: improved job performance. All else is irrelevant to a performance based
intervention.
5. At each stage, remind the employee that help is available for personal problems that
may be affecting his work.
6. Make it clear that it is the employee's responsibility to get help for his or her problems.
7. At the stage of a formal performance review, use your supervisorial leverage. Make it
clear that the employee's livelihood is at stake. This leverage is what makes workplace
interventions the most successful way of getting help for impaired employees. Drug and
alcohol addicts may be willing to sacrifice their families and their health, but they will do
almost anything to keep from losing their income.
EMPLOYEE EVALUATION FORM
Instructions: Mark each characteristic you have noted about the employee.
Absenteeism
Dates
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_____________
Dates
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_____________
Dates
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Repeated unauthorized leave
Excessive sick leave
Frequent Monday and/or Friday absences
Repeated absences
Excessive tardiness
Frequent long lunches and breaks
Leaving work early
Frequent unscheduled short-term absences
Work-post Absenteeism
Continued absences from post
Frequent trips to water fountain or restroom
Long coffee breaks
Excessive fraternization
Physical illness on the job
Accident Rate
_____________ _____ Accidents on the job
Details:
Problems in Concentration
Dates
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Details:
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Work requires greater effort
Jobs take more time
Trouble taking direction
Trouble learning new routines/procedures
Difficulty recalling instructions, details
Other significant memory problems
Dates
Irregular Work Patterns
_____________ _____ Alternates periods of high/low productivity
_____________ _____ Productivity impaired after lunch, Mondays & Fridays
Dates
Reporting to Work
_____________ _____ Coming to work in an inappropriate condition
_____________ _____ Returning to work in an inappropriate condition
Details:
Additional relevant comments:
Opinion Based On Observations
A. Under influence of alcohol ___________________________________________________
B. Under influence of drugs ____________________________________________________
C. When not sure, either drugs or alcohol/both ______________________________________
D. Unfit to operate machinery or to perform safely in workplace ________________________
E. Unfit for work for other reason (List) ___________________________________________
F. Recommended for physical exam ______________________________________________
G. Does not appear to be under the influence of alcohol _______________________________
H. Does not appear to be under the influence of drugs ________________________________
Remarks:
Signed ___________________________________________ Date ______________________
Witnessed by: _____________________________________ Date ______________________
STATEMENT
Voluntary Submission for Physical Examination
of Drug/Alcohol Testing
and the Release of Findings and Information
I, ______________________________, voluntarily agree to take a physical
examination which may include blood, breath, saliva and/or urine analysis
by physician, medical center, hospital, or medically qualified personnel.
Furthermore, I authorize the release of these tests and examination results to
_____________________________Company or any of its representatives.
By this authorization, I do hereby release any physician, medical personnel,
or any of its representatives from any and all liabilities arising from the
release or use of the information derived from or contained in my physical
examination and test results.
Employee_________________________________ Date_______________
Witness__________________________________ Date________________
AGREEMENT TO IMPROVE JOB PERFORMANCE
This agreement is made between _______________________________(employee) and
___________________________ (supervisor). The supervisor has advised the employee
of the following matters that need correction:
1.
2.
The supervisor has informed employee that assistance is available through the company
EAP (or other). The employee agrees that the following corrective action will be taken:
1.
2.
A review of this plan will be made on _______________________________
If at that time, these matters are settled as planned, this will be noted. If work
performance continues to be unsatisfactory, this agreement will be used as part of any
disciplinary or corrective action as may be necessary.
Signed:
Employee____________________________________________ Date______________
Signed:
Supervisor____________________________________________ Date_____________
LETTER OF REPRIMAND
Date:
On, ______________________ we discussed the continuing problem of
your ______________________________________________ and you were
told that your performance was unsatisfactory according to the terms of your
employment by this company. We agreed (see copy of agreement) that you
would correct the said above.
However, the problem(s) have continued. (See letter)
Persistent work problems such as those mentioned are often the result of
personal problems. In recognition of this fact, I strongly suggest that you
contact ________________________in an effort to clear up these problems.
Unless your job performance shows a substantial improvement within the
next ____(week(s)), ____(month(s)),I will have no choice but to recommend
that formal disciplinary action be taken against you.
Signed ______________________________
CONDITIONS OF EMPLOYMENT
I understand that my reinstatement to employment by the corporation is based upon and constrained
by the following terms:
1. I accept admission to the Employee Assistance Program.
2. I recognize that my reinstatement is contingent upon the participation of my spouse and
adult children in my recovery through the Employee Assistance Program. (If part of the co.
EAP agreement).
3. I will comply with ALL of the program agreement requirements to their successful
conclusion.
4. I recognize the adverse impact that working overtime may have on my recovery and waive
my rights to assignment to overtime. For the same reason, I will accept supervision's
decisions regarding requests for payment in lieu of vacation time off.
5. I understand that my previous job performance warrants close supervision as a constructive
part of my recovery.
6. I understand that upon return to the workplace I must meet all established standards of
conduct and job performance and that I will be subject to the company's disciplinary
procedures for any failure to meet the standards.
7. I understand that I will be subject to the terms of this condition of employment until I have
completed at least twelve months of work. Upon completion of twelve months of work the
appropriate parties will review my job performance and recovery progress and determine if
the terms of this condition of employment will be removed, modified, sustained or added to.
I understand and agree that my reinstatement and continued employment are contingent upon my
meeting satisfactorily all the above terms of this condition of employment and that my failure to do
so relinquishes all defense on my part and subjects me to immediate termination of my employment
with the corporation.
CONDITIONAL REINSTATEMENT AGREEMENT
The undersigned parties hereby agree as follows:
1. That (employee's name) recognizes that the Company was lenient in working with him/her due to
(employee's name) unexcused absence(s) because of alcohol/drug abuse and letting him/her go
through its employee assistance/rehabilitation program to help (employee's name) deal with his/her
drug/alcohol addiction problem.
2. That the company will conditionally reinstate (employee's name) after he/she successfully
completes his/her rehabilitation stay at (hospital name). (Employee's name) will be conditionally
reinstated provided he/she agrees to and performs the following: (insert)
3. If within the next 3 years, employee is unable to perform his job duties at (employer's name) due
to alcohol/drug abuse or fails to continue this alcohol/drug rehabilitation program and the conditions
set forth above as outlined in Item 2 and as required by (employer's name), alcohol/drug counselor
or physician, he or she will be terminated.
4. (Employee's name) understands and agrees that if he has to be admitted to a hospital or
rehabilitation center again within the next three (3) years he/she will be terminated.
5. Statement of Agreement. This agreement is not an employment contract. The company is not
guaranteeing employment to an employee for any term of employment, and may terminate the
employee at any time without notice. Likewise, the employee may terminate his/her employment
with the company at any time without explanation. Where there is a job available and the employee
complies with the terms of the employee assistance program, the employee will be conditionally
reinstated for an indefinite term, as long as that reinstatement is consistent with the business needs
of the company.
______________________________
Union Representative
____________________
Date
______________________________
Employee
____________________
Date
______________________________
Company Representative
____________________
Date
Appendix B
Form documenting completion of Employee Education and Supervisor
Training Program.
Fill out this form and attach a list of attendee's signatures to document their participation. Keep
this documentation in a file for your review by your insurer or the Georgia State Board of
Workers' Compensation Board upon request.
1. Check one:
First Hour of Employee Education Program
(Date of completion:
)
Second Hour of Employee Education Program
(Date of completion:
)
First Hour of Supervisor Training Program
(Date of completion:
)
Second Hour of Supervisor Training Program
(Date of completion:
)
must be completed
before certification
Or N/A if in 2nd year.
must be completed
before certification
Or N/A if in 2nd year.
2. Has employer contracted with an Employee Assistance Program (EAP):
yes
no
3. Title and Description of Program:
4. Length of Program:
5. Means of communication used to teach the employees and/or supervisors:
6. Number of employees
supervisors
7. Number of employees
supervisors
8. Signature of trainer or supervisor who conducted this program:
Date:
participating in program:
Your company must either have
an EAP (Employee Assistance
Program) or, a referral list of
treatment and counseling
centers in your area.
Substance Abuse Internet Referral
(SAIR)
National & State Resources
Clearinghouses, Websites & More
Shortcut
Shortcut Tip:
Tip:
The
The link
link will
will take
take you
you directly
directly to
to
resources.
resources.
Any questions? Call Chuck Wade at
404-223-2277 or E-mail at
[email protected]
Substance Abuse Internet Referral
Before beginning your search for treatment services and facilities, please answer these
few questions about the person that needs assistance.
Sex / Age / Race
Gender Select
Age
Race Select
Georgia County Select County
Drugs Used
Alcohol
Cocaine/Crack Cocaine
Heroin
Marijuana
Methamphetamine
Prescription drugs
Other
Your relation to person
needing assistance Select
The Council respects individual privacy and maintains all information entered
on these fields will be held strictly confidential.
Continue to search page
| The Council on Alcohol and Drugs Home Page |
NATIONAL AND STATE RESOURCES
National Technical Assistance
Drug-Free Workplace Helpline
1-800-843-4971
This National Institute on Drug Abuse toll-free service operates 9:00 a.m. -8:00 p.m. EST. Telephone consultation is
available for business owners, managers, and union leaders on the development and implementation of comprehensive
drug-free workplace programs. These counselors can put you in touch with local resources.
National Clearinghouse for Alcohol and Drug Information
1-800-729-6686
This toll-free service has information specialists available on all aspects of substance abuse -from videos and prevention
materials to specific program descriptions, resources in your State, and the latest research results. Many publications
and educational materials are available free from the Clearinghouse. As these publications are in the public domain, you
may reprint them under your logo without permission.
Center for Substance Abuse Hotline
1-800-662 HELP
This service provides advice and referrals to individuals about the availability of drug and alcohol treatment services, including
referrals to programs for those who cannot pay.
Department of Transportation's Anti-Drug Information Center
1-800-CAL-DRUG
This system is designed to respond to inquiries regarding the U.S. DOT drug-free workplace regulations for the
transportation industry .
Department of Defense
703-697-8335
If your business is subject to the Department of Defense drug testing regulations, call this number for more information.
Employee Assistance Professionals Association (EAPA)
703-522-6272
EAPA provides information on how to select EAP's, the value they can provide, the theory behind them and how they
operate. (EAPA, 4601 North Fairfax Drive, Suite 1001, Arlington, V A 22203)
AL-Anon/Alateen Family Group Headquarters
Alcoholics Anonymous World Service
American Council on Alcoholism Helpline
800 Cocaine -An Information and Referral Hotline
Nar-Anon Family Group Headquarters
Narcotics Anonymous
National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependency
1-800-356-9996
212-870-3400
1-800-527-5344
1-800-COCAINE
310-547-5800
818-780-3951
1-800-NCA-CALL
State Resources
DRUGS DON'T WORK in Georgia
404-223-2264 ext.277
The staff of DRUGS DON'T WORK can be reached at the Georgia Chamber of Commerce in Atlanta. Call with any questions concerning
implementation of a drug-free workplace.
The Drug Abuse Helpline
1-800-338-6745
Since 1987, this Helpline has been available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, even during Holidays. Call the Helpline for referral to the proper
programs and resources addressing specific problems relating to alcohol and drug abuse. Absolutely no recordings are made of any phone
calls to the Helpline. This telephone number should be posted where employees can see it.
AI-Anon Statewide
Alcoholics Anonymous Statewide
Cocaine Anonymous Statewide
Georgia Addiction Counselor's Association Statewide
United Ways' First Call For Help
404-843-0311
404-525-3178
404-255-7787
770-986-9510
404-614-1000
Clearinghouses, Web Sites, and Additional Resources
Clearinghouses
Bureau of justice Assistance Clearinghouse (reference and referral services for criminal justice professionals) P.O. Box 6000,
Rockville, MD 20849-6000, 800-688-4252, Internet address: www.ncjrs.org
Bureau of justice Statistics Clearinghouse (crime and justice data)
P.O. Box 6000, Rockville, MD 20849-6000, 800-732-3277, Internet address: www.ncirs.org
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention -National Prevention Information Network
P.O. Box 6003, Rockville, MD 20849-6003, 800-458-5231, Internet address: www.cdcn12in.org
Drug Information Strategy Clearinghouse
P.O. Box 8577, Silver Spring, MD 20907, 800-955-2232
www.hud.gov
Office of National Drug Control Policy Information Clearinghouse
P.O. Box 6000, Rockville, MD 20849, 800-666-3332, Internet address:
www.whitehousedrugQolicy.gov
National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence, Inc. (NCADD)
12 West 21st Street, New York, NY 10010,212-206-6770, 800-NCA-CALL (24-hour referral),
Internet address: www.ncadd.org
National Criminal justice Reference Service (general criminal justice information)
P.O. Box 6000, Rockville, MD 20849-6000, 800-851-3420, Internet address: www.ncjrs.org
National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health
6001 Executive Blvd., Bethesda, MD 20892-9561, 888-NIH-NIDA (voice), 888- TTY-NIDA (TTY),
Internet address: www.drugabuse.gov and www.clubdrugs.org
Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration
Center for Mental Health Services, National Mental Health Services Knowledge Exchange Network
P.O. Box 42490, Washington, DC 20015, 800- 789-2647, Internet address: www.mentalhealth.org
Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration
Center for Substance Abuse Prevention's Workplace Helpline
800-WORKPLACE (800-967-5752), Internet address: www.health.org
Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration
Center for Substance Abuse Treatment's National Helpline
5600 Fishers Lane, Rockwall II, Rockville, MD 20857, 800-662-HELP, 800-662-4357,
Internet address: www.samhsa.gov or Internet address: www.health.org
Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration
National Clearinghouse for Alcohol and Drug Information (NCADI)
P.O. Box 2345, Rockville, MD 20847, 800- 729-6686, Internet address: www.health.org
National Association of State Alcohol and Drug Abuse Directors
808 17th Street, NW, Suite 410, Washington, DC 20006,202-293-0090,
Internet address: www.nasadad.org
U.S. Department of Defense
Office of Asst. Secretary of Defense for Public Affairs
1400 Defense, Pentagon, Room IE 757, Washington, DC 20301,703-697-5737, Internet address:
www.defenselink.mil
U.S. Department of Labor
Working Partners for an Alcohol- and Drug-Free Workplace, Substance Abuse Information
Database (SAID) and Small Business Initiative
200 Constitution Avenue, NW, Rm S-2312, Washington, DC 20210, 202-219-6001 ext. 152 or 137.
Internet address: www.dol.gov/dol/workingpartners.htm
Web Sites
(Internet addresses are subject to change.)
American Society of Addiction Medicine
www.asam.org
A not-for-profit organization whose mission is to educate physicians to prevent and treat dependence
and addiction to alcohol, nicotine and other drugs, and to prevent and treat related illnesses.
Another Empty Bottle
www.alcoholismhelp.com
Provides individuals with a means to share real experiences about how alcoholism has affected a loved
one and themselves.
Caron Foundation
www.caron.org
A nonprofit organization whose mission is to provide an enlightened, caring community in which all
those affected by the sickness of addiction may begin a new life. The foundation provides
rehabilitation services to adults, adolescents, and their families suffering from chemical dependency
and related addictions.
Center for Substance Abuse Research (CESAR)
www.cesar.umd.edu
CESAR at the University of Maryland, College Park, collects, analyzes, and disseminates information
on the nature and extent of substance abuse and related problems in Maryland and nationally. To
inform policymakers, practitioners, and the general public about substance abuse, its nature, extent,
prevention, treatment and its relation to other problems.
Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse (CASA)
www.casacolumbia.org
CASA is a unique think/action tank that brings together all of the professional disciplines needed to
study and combat all forms of substance abuse as they affect society.
Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA)
The DEA enforces the controlled substances laws and regulations of the United States.
www.usdoj.gov/dea
Hazelden
www.hazelden.org
Hazelden is a nonprofit organization providing high-quality, affordable rehabilitation, education,
prevention, professional services, and publications regarding chemical dependency and related
disorders.
Indiana Prevention Resource Center
www.drugs.indiana.edu
This resource center is a statewide clearinghouse for technical assistance on prevention and
information about alcohol, tobacco, and drugs. It serves Indiana only.
Indian Health Service (IHS)
www.ihs.gov
The IHS is an agency of the Public Health Service providing health services to American Indians and
Alaska Natives.
Inter-University Consortium for Political andSocial Research (ICPSR) at the University of
Michigan
www.icpsr.umich.edu/index.html
Provides access to the world's largest archive of computerized social science data, including data on
substance abuse and mental health.
Join Together
www.jointogether.org
This is a resource center and meeting place for communities working to reduce the harms associated
with the use of illicit drugs, excessive alcohol, and tobacco.
Miami Coalition for a Safe and Drug-Free Community
www.miamicoalition.org
Provides information useful in the planning and implementation of successful community strategies
and programs designed to reduce the problems of drug abuse, addiction, and directly related social
issues in the Miami-Dade Community.
Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MAD D)
www.madd.org
MADD is a nonprofit organization that aims to stop drunk driving, support victims of this violent
crime, and prevent under-age drinking.
National Association of Alcoholism and Drug Abuse Counselors (NAADAC)
ww.naadac.org
NAADAC is the largest national organization representing the interests of alcoholism and drug abuse
professionals in the Nation. The NAADAC Web page contains information on current legislation,
certification, and membership.
National Association for Children of Alcoholics (NACoA)
www.health.org/nacoa
NACoA is the education and advocacy group that works on behalf of the over 11 million children of
alcohol and other drug dependent parents under age 18 in the US. Research-based resources are
available on the web site to help caring adults learn more about providing support and information for
these vulnerable children.
National Clearinghouse for Alcohol and Drug Information's PREVline
www.health.org
This electronic communication system, a service of the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services
Administration, is dedicated to exchanging ideas and information concerning alcohol, tobacco, and
illicit drug problem prevention.
National Council for Community Behavioral Healthcare
www.nccbh.org
Keeps community behavioral healthcare organizations abreast of the rapid changes in behavioral
healthcare and vigorously advocates for the issues most critical to their success.
National Families in Action
www.emory.edu/NFIA/index.html
Provides accurate drug information to parents and young people. Outstanding features of this site
include "ask the experts" and a cultural connection to other ethnic groups working in the area of
substance abuse prevention.
National Institutes of Health (NIH)
www.nih.gov
NIH is one of the foremost biomedical research centers and the Federal focal point for biomedical
research in the United States.
National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)
www.nimh.nih.gov
Conducts and supports research nationwide on mental illness and mental health, including studies of
the brain, behavior, and mental health services.
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA)
www.niaaa.nih.gov
NlAAA supports and conducts biomedical research on the causes, consequences, treatment, and
prevention of alcoholism and alcohol-related problems.
National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)
NIDA brings the power of science to bear on drug abuse and addiction.
www.nida.nih.gov
NIDA Club Drugs Web Site
www.clubdrugs.org
This site provides information on club drugs such as MDMA (Ecstasy), GHB, Rohypnol, ketamine,
methamphetamine, and LSD. The site explains what the drugs look like, their effects, and the varied
street names by which they are known.
National Library of Medicine (NLM)
www.nlm.nih.gov
NLM is the world's largest library dealing with a single scientific/professional topic, carrying over 4.5
million holdings.
Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP)
www.whitehousedrugpolicy.gov
This clearinghouse specializes in information on drug-use trends, drug-related crime issues, and
national drug-control policy.
Partnership for a Drug-Free America's Drug-Free Resource Net
www.drugfreeamerica.org
The Partnership's purpose is to reduce the demand for illegal drugs by changing public attitudes about
drugs and making drug use less acceptable and glamorous. This site provides specific drug information
and the most frequently asked questions on drug-related topics.
Recovery Network
www.recoverynetwork.com
The Recovery Network provides prevention and recovery information, interaction, and support
concerning substance use and abuse, addiction to alcohol and drugs, and behavioral and mental health
problems. The network provides these services through a television and radio network, online services,
and a national help line.
The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation
www.rwjf.org
The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation is the nation's largest philanthropy devoted to health care.
Small Business Administration (SBA)
www.sba.gov
The SBA provides financial, technical, and management assistance to help Americans start, run, and
grow their businesses.
Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)
www.samhsa.gov
SAMHSA ensures that quality substance abuse and mental health services are available to the people
who need them and that prevention and treatment knowledge is used more effectively in the general
health care system. This site also provides access to the home pages of the Center for Substance Abuse
Treatment, Center for Substance Abuse Prevention, and Center for Mental Health Services.
U.S. Business Advisor
www.business.gov
The U.S. Business Advisor provides businesses with one-stop access to Federal Government
information, services,
and transactions.
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS)
www.dhhs.gov
DHHS is the principal agency for protecting the health of all Americans and providing essential human
services, especially for those who are least able to help themselves.
U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC)
www.eeoc.gov
EEOC provides small employers with basic information about EEOC-enforced laws and processes.
U.S. Department of labor (DOL)
www.dol.gov/dol/workingpartners.htm
DOL provides information regarding workplace substance abuse including a free prevention kit and an
online interactive substance abuse information database.
Wisconsin Clearinghouse for Prevention Resources
www.uhs.wisc.edu/wch
The Wisconsin Clearinghouse for Prevention Resources, a part of the University Health Services at the
University of Wisconsin-Madison, provides educational materials and training information.
4-H
1400 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20250-2225 202-720-2908
American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
3651 Wisconsin Avenue, NW
Washington, DC 20016-3007
202-966-7300
American Academy of Pediatrics
141 Northwest Point Boulevard
Elk Grove Village, IL 60007 -1098
847-434-4000
www.4h-usa.org
www.aacap.org
www.aap.org
American Bar Association
750 North Lakeshore Drive Chicago, lL 60611 800-285-2221
American Council for Drug Education
164 West 74th Street
New York, NY 10023 800-488-DRUG
(for information) 800-DRUG HEL(P) www.drughelp.org (for referrals)
American Managed Behavioral Healthcare Association
700 13th Street, NW, Suite 950
Washington DC, 20005
202-434-4565
www.abanet.org
www.acde.org
www.ambha.org
American Medical Association
515 North State Street
Chicago, lL 60610
312-464-5000
www.ama-assn.org
American Probation and Parole Association
P.O. Box 11910
Lexington, KY 40578-1910
606-244-8203
www.appa-net.org
American Psychiatric Association
1400 K Street, NW
Washington, DC 20005
(202) 682-6000
American Psychological Association
750 First Street, NE
Washington, DC 20002-4242
202-336-5857
www.psych.org
www.apa.org
Diversity Resources
AFRICAN AMERICAN FAMILY SERVICES
2616 Nicollet Avenue South
Minneapolis, MN 55408
Phone: 612-871-7878
Fax: 612-871-2567
www.aafs.net
AMERICAN INDIAN COMMUNITY HOUSE
708 Broadway, 8th Floor
New York, NY 10003
Phone: 212-598-0100
Fax: 212-598-4909
www.aich.org
ASIAN AMERICAN CONSORTIUM ON SUBSTANCE ABUSE (APACSA)
P.O. Box 8001
Portland, OR 97207
Phone: 503-254-7467
Fax: 503-254- 7467
ASIAN & PACIFIC ISLANDER AMERICAN HEALTH FORUM (APIAHF)
942 Market Street, Suite 200
San Francisco, CA 94102
Phone: 415-954-9988
Fax: 415-954-9999
[email protected]
ASIAN AMERICAN RECOVERY SERVICES, INC.
965 Mission Street, Suite 325
San Francisco, CA 94103
Phone: 415-541-9285
Fax: 415-541-9986
www.aars-inc.org
ASPIRA ASSOCIATION, INC.
1444 I Street, NW, Suite 800 Washington, DC 20005
Phone: 202-835-3600
Fax: 202-835-3613
www.aspira.org
ASSOCIATION OF BLACK PSYCHOLOGISTS
P.O. Box 55999
Washington, DC 20040-5999
Phone: 202-722-0808
Fax: 202- 722-5941
www.abpsi.org
BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS
Office of Alcohol & Substance Abuse Prevention 1849 C Street, NW
MS-4603-MIB
Washington, DC 20240
Phone: 202-208-6179
www.doi.gov/bureau-indian-affairs.html
'CAUSE CHILDREN COUNT COALITION
3127 Hawthorne Drive, NE
Washington, DC 20017
Phone: 202-745-3560
Fax: 202-234-6545
THE CONGRESS OF NATIONAL BLACK CHURCHES (CNBC)
1225 Eye Street, NW, Suite 750
Washington, DC 20005
Phone: 202-371-1091
Fax: 202-371-0908
www.cnbc.org
HANDS ACROSS CULTURES CORPORATION
P.O. Box 2215
Espanola, NM 87532
Phone: 505-747-1889
Fax: 505-747-1623
www.la-tierra.com/hacc
JACK & JILL OF AMERICA, INC.
7091 Grand National Drive, Suite 102 Orlando, FL 32819
Phone: 407-248-8523 Fax: 407-248-8533 www.jack-and-jill.org
KAPPA ALPHA PSI FRATERNITY, INC.
2322-24 North Broad Street
Philadelphia, PA 19132
Phone: 215-228-7184
Fax: 215-228-7181
www.kapsi.org
LATIN AMERICAN YOUTH CENTER
1419 Columbia Road, NW
Washington, DC 20009
Phone: 202-319-2225
Fa,x: 202-462-5696
E-mail: [email protected] www.layc-dc.org
LUMMI INDIAN NATION
2616 Kwina Road Bellingham, WA 98226 Phone: 360-384-1489
Fax: 360-384-5521
MINNESOTA INDIAN WOMEN'S RESOURCE CENTER
2300 15th Avenue South Minneapolis, MN 55404
Phone: 612-728-2000
Fax: 612-728-2039
E-mail: [email protected] .edu http://NNIC.com/MIWRC.html
NATIONAL ASIAN PACIFIC AMERICAN FAMILIES AGAINST SUBSTANCE ABUSE, INC.
340 East Second Street, Suite 409
Los Angeles, CA 90012
Phone: 213-625-5795
Fax: 213-625-5796
www.napafasa.org
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR EQUAL OPPORTUNITY IN HIGHER EDUCATION (NAFEO)
8701 Georgia Avenue, Suite 200
Silver Spring, MD 20910
Phone: 301-650-2440
Fax: 301-495-3306
www.nafeo.org
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR NATIVE AMERICAN CHILDREN OF ALCOHOLICS
(NANACOA)
P.O. Box 2708
Seattle, WA 98111-2708
Phone: 206-903-6574
Fax: 206-624-4452
E-mail: [email protected]
www.nanacoa.org
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF AFRICAN AMERICAN FOR POSITIVE IMAGERY
(NAAAPI)
P.O. Box 18537
Philadelphia, PA 19129
Phone: 215-477-4113
Fax: 215-477-5535
E-mail: [email protected]
www.naaapi.org
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF BLACK SOCIAL WORKERS (NABSW)
8436 West McNichols
Detroit, MI 48221
Phone: 313-862-6700
Fax: 313-862-6998
www.nabsw.org
NATIONAL COALITION OF 100 BLACK WOMEN
38 West 32nd Street, Suite 1610
New York, NY 10001
Phone: 212-947-2196
Fax: 212-695-4128
NATIONAL BLACK ALCOHOLISM & ADDICTION COUNCIL (NBAAC)
1000 16th Street, NW
Washington, DC 20036
Phone: 202-296-2696
E-mail: [email protected] www.ndpl.org/nbaac.htmi
NATIONAL ALLIANCE FOR HISPANIC HEALTH
1501 16th Street, NW
Washington, DC 20036-1401
Phone: 202-387-5000
Fax: 202-797-4353
www.hispanichealth.org
NATIONAL CONGRESS OF AMERICAN INDIANS
1301 Connecticut Avenue, NW, Suite 200 Washington, DC 20036
Phone: 202-466- 7 767
Fax: 202-466-7797
www.ncai.org
NATIONAL COUNCIL OF LA RAZA (NCLR)
1111 19th Street, NW, Suite 1000
Washington, DC 20036
Phone: 202-785-1670
Fax: 202-776-1792
www.nclr.org
NATIONAL COUNCIL OF NEGRO WOMEN, INC.
777 United Nations Plaza, 10th Floor
New York, NY 10017
Phone: 212-687-5870
Fax: 212-687 -1735
NATIONAL INDIAN HEALTH BOARD
1385 South Colorado Boulevard, #707 Denver, CO 80222
Phone: 303- 759-3075
Fax: 303-759-3674
www.nihb.org
NATIONAL LATINO COUNCIL ON ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO PREVENTION
1875 Connecticut Avenue, NW, Suite 732 Washington, DC 20009
Phone: 202-265-8054
Fax: 202-265-8056
E-mail: [email protected]
www.nlcatp.org
NATIONAL MINORITY AIDS COUNCIL
1931 13th Street, NW
Washington, DC 20009
Phone: 202-483-6622
Fax: 202-483-1135
E-mail: [email protected]
www.nmac.org
NATIONAL MULTI.CULTURAL ASSOCIATES, INC.
Paul Cardenas
Director
2777 Uthica Street
Denver, CO 80212
Phone: 303-480-9934
Fax: 303-480-9608
NATIONAL LATINO CHILDREN'S INSTITUTE
1412 West 6th Street
Austin, TX 78703-5139
Phone: 512-472-9971
Fax: 512-472-5845
E-mail: [email protected]
www.nlci.org
NATIONAL PUERTO RICAN FORUM, INC.
31 East 32nd Street, 4th Floor
New York, NY 10016-5536
Phone: 212-685-2311
Fax: 212-685-2349
www.nprf.org
OFFICE OF MINORITY HEALTH RESOURCE CENTER (OMHRC)
P.O. Box 37337
Washington, DC 20013-7337
Phone: 800-444-6472
Fax: 301-230-7199 (TTY)
E-mail: [email protected]
www.omhrc.gov
ORGANIZATION OF CHINESE AMERICANS
1001 Connecticut Avenue, NW, Suite 601 Washington, DC 20036
Phone: 202-223-5500
Fax: 202-296-0540
E-mail: [email protected]
www.ocanatl.org
PRIDE INSTITUTE (GAY; LESBIAN, BISEXUAL COMMUNITY)
168 5th Avenue, Suite 4 South
New York, NY 10010
800-54- PRIDE
www.pride-institute.com
PUERTO RICAN ORGANIZATION FOR COMMUNITY EDUCATION AND ECONOMIC
DEVELOPMENT. INC. (PROCEED)
815 Elizabeth Avenue
Elizabeth, NJ 07201
Phone: 908-351-7727
Fax: 908-353-5185
www.proceedinc.com
SIGMA GAMMA RHO SORORITY. INC.
8800 S. Stony Island
Chicago, IL60617
Phone: 773-873-9000
Fax: 773-731-9642
www.sgr1922.org
UNITED NATIONAL INDIAN TRIBAL YOUTH. INC. (UNITY)
P.O. Box 25042
Oklahoma City, OK 73125
Phone: 405-236-2800
Fax: 405-971-1071
www.unityinc.org
WHITE BISON, INC.
6145 Lehman Drive, Suite 200 Colorado Springs, CO 80918 Phone: 719-548-1000
Fax: 719-548-9407
E-mail: [email protected] www.whitebison.org
100% DRUG FREE CLUB SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WELFARE S.U.N. Y.
Dr. Frances Brisbane, Ph.D.
Dean
School of Social Welfare
Stony Brook
HSC Level 2, Room 093
Stony Brook, NY 11794-8231
Phone: 631-444-2139
Fax: 631-444-8908
E-mail: [email protected] www.uhmc.sunysb.edu
Application for Certification Form
Rules and Guidelines for
Certification
For more information contact
your:
Local Chamber of Commerce
Any questions? Call Chuck Wade at
404-223-2277 or E-mail at
[email protected]
Georgia CHAMBER OF COMMERCE – DRUGS DON’T WORK
APPLICATION FOR CERTIFICATION OF
DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE PREMIUM CREDIT PROGRAM
Directions: After reading and understanding the rules & guidelines, please answer
the following questions, complete the checklist, and return this application and a
$25 check for the certification fee to the following address. Keep the documentation
of your compliance in your files for review by your insurer or the State Board upon
request.
THIS APPLICATION MUST BE SUBMITTED ANNUALLY!
Georgia State Board of Workers' Compensation
Attn.: Drug-Free Workplace Program
270 Peachtree Street, N. W.
Atlanta, GA 30303-1299
(404) 656-2048
A. Drug-Free Workplace Coordinator:
Company:
Address:________________________________________________________________
County:_________________
Phone number:
E-mail address:___________________________
Number of Employees
Type of business:
……………………………………………………
B.
How many years has your company been certified as a drug-free workplace?
This will be our 1st year.
This will be our 3rd year. ___5th year ___ 7th year
This will be our 2nd year.
This will be our 4th year. ___ 6th year ___ 8th year
_____ Other
C. How is your company insured for workers' compensation?
Purchase a Premium
Private Self-Insured
Group Fund Self-Insured
……………………………………………………
TO BE COMPLETED BY THE GEORGIA STATE BOARD
OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION
Date of First Certification:
OR
Date of Recertification:
Approved By:
Page 2
D. Checklist
1-a. Policy Statement Required for Certification:
(OCGA 34-9-414 (a) (1))
Statement of required types of abuse testing.
(OCGA 34-9-414 (a) (1) (A))
1. Job Applicant Testing Required Certification:
(OCGA 34-9-415 (b)) See page 7 of guidelines for explanation.
2. Reasonable Suspicion Testing Required for Certification:
(OCGA 34-9-415 (b)) See page 8 of guidelines for explanation.
3. Post-Accident Testing Required for Certification:
(OCGA 34-9-415 (b)) See page 9 of guidelines for explanation.
4. Post Rehabilitation Testing Required For Certification:
(OCGA 34-9-415 (b)) See page 9 of guidelines for explanation.
5. Routine-Fitness-for-Duty Testing Required for
Certification: (OCGA 34-9-415 (b)) See page 9 of guidelines
for explanation.
A statement of actions employer may take against employee
or job applicant on the basis of a positive confirmed test
result.
(OCGA 34-9-414 (1) (B)) See page 4 of guidelines for explanation.
A statement of consequences of an employee's or job
applicant's refusal to submit to a drug test.
(OCGA 34-9-414 (4)) See page 4 of guidelines for explanation.
A statement advising employee or job applicant of the
existence of the article outlining a certified drug-free
workplace program. (OCGA 34-9-414 (2)) See page 4 of guidelines
for explanation.
A general confidentiality statement.
(OCGA 34-9-414 (3)) See page 4 of guidelines for explanation.
Either a statement advising employee of Employee
Assistance Program (EAP), if employer offers one.
OR
A statement advising employee of employer's resource file
of assistance programs and other persons, entities, or
organizations designed to assist employees with personal or
behavior problems.
(OCGA 34-9-414 (5)) See page 5 of guidelines for explanation.
Page 3
A statement advising employee or job applicant who
receives a positive confirmed test result that he or she may
contest or explain the result to the employer within five (5)
working days after written notification to the test result.
(OCGA 34-9-414 (6)) See page 5 of guidelines for explanation.
A statement informing an employee or job applicant of the
federal Drug-Free Workplace Act, if it applies to you. If
not, write NA. (OCGA 34-9-414 (7)) See page 5 of guidelines for
explanation.
EITHER sixty (60) days notice was given prior to
implementation of testing.
OR sixty (60) days notice was not required because
implementation of program occurred prior to July 1, 1993.
(OCGA 34-9-414 (b)) See page six of guidelines for explanation.
Notice of substance abuse testing is included on vacancy
announcements for positions in which testing is required.
(OCGA 34-9-414 (c))
Notice of substance abuse testing is posted in an
appropriate and conspicuous location on employer's
premises. (OCGA 34-9-414 (c))
Copies of policy are available to employees and job
applicants in employer's personnel office or other suitable
location. (OCGA 34-9-414 (c))
2. Substance Abuse Testing Required for Certification:
(OCGA 34-9-415 (b)) See page 7 of guidelines for explanation.
Job Applicant Testing Required for Certification:
(OCGA 34-9-415 (b)) See page 7 of guidelines for explanation.
Reasonable Suspicion Testing Required for Certification:
(OCGA 34-9-415 (b)) See page 8 of guidelines for explanation.
Post-Accident Testing Required for Certification:
(OCGA 34-9-415 (b)) See page 9 of guidelines for explanation.
Post Rehabilitation Testing Required for Certification:
(OCGA 34-9-415 (b)) See page 9 of guidelines for explanation.
Routine-Fitness-for-Duty Testing Required for
Certification: or N/A (OCGA 34-9-415 (b)) See page 9 of
guidelines for explanation.
Page 4
2-b. Procedures for Substance Abuse Testing Required for
Certification. (OCGA 34-9-415 (d)) and (e) See page 11 of guidelines for
explanation.
Specimen Collection Responsibilities Required for Certification:
(OCGA 34-9-415 (d)) (1) through (5) See page 12 of guidelines for explanation.
Collection of job applicant and employee specimen is
performed in accordance with the standards and
procedures outlined in the guidelines for certification.
Employer Responsibilities Required for Certification:
(OCGA 34-9-415 (d)) (6) through (12) See page 14 of form for explanation.
The employer is complying with the procedures that are
outlined in the guidelines for certification.
Laboratory Responsibilities Required for Certification:
(OCGA 34-415 (e)) See page 15 of form for explanation.
The laboratory that the employer is using is complying with
the procedures that are outlined in the guidelines for
certification.
Name and address of laboratory
Phone Number:
Certification of laboratory NIDA/HHS
CAP
3. Employee Assistance Required for Certification:
(OCGA 34-9-416) See page 16 of guidelines for explanation.
*Either you have an Employee Assistance Program (EAP)
*OR you maintain and post other means of employee
assistance
4. Employee Education Required for Certification:
(OCGA 34-9-417) See page 19 of guidelines for explanation.
Hour One of the Employee Education program has been
conducted for employees. (Date of program:
)
Page 5
Hour Two of the Employee Education program has been
conducted for employees.
nd
(Date of program:
) Or N/A if in 2 or
subsequent years of certification.
Note: Second half of employee education program may be completed
within six months after certification.
5. Supervisor Training Required for Certification:
(OCGA 34-9-418) See page 22 of guidelines for explanation.
Participation of supervisors with the employees in the
above education program.
AND
During the first year, two hours of supervisor training on
how to recognize signs of substance abuse, how to
document employee substance abuse, and how
to refer substance abusing employees to the proper
nd
treatment providers. (Only one hour required in 2 and
subsequent years of certification).
6.
Note: Second half of supervisor training program may be completed
within six months after certification.
Confidentiality Required for Certification: (OCGA 34-9-420)
All information received through substance abuse testing is
confidential, but may be used or received in evidence, or
obtained in discovery, or disclosed in any civil or
administrative proceeding when the information is relevant
to the employer's defense, e.g., a workers' compensation
hearing.
NOTE: Employers should ensure that they have read and understand the disclaimers of a
drug-free workplace program (see page 24 of guidelines) and the information on the
Maintenance and Revocation of certification (see page 25 of guidelines). MUST BE
NOTARIZED!
7. Notarization of Certified Drug-Free Workplace Program
Employer Name
Please Print Name & Title of
Officer/Owner
Date
Officer/Owner Signature
*Application must be signed by an officer or owner. You must send in this application annually!!
The above signed certifies that the above information is a true and
factual depiction of their current drug-free workplace
program______________________________________________________
(Notary)
Click Here To Print (Only Print Pages 85-89)
RULES & GUIDELINES FOR CERTIFICATION OF
DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE PREMIUM CREDIT PROGRAM
Intent of Legislation: To promote drug-free workplaces in order that employers in Georgia
be afforded the opportunity to maximize their levels of productivity, enhance their competitive
positions in the marketplace, and reach their desired levels of success without experiencing the
costs, delays, and tragedies associated with work related accidents resulting from substance
abuse by employees. (OCGA 34-9-410)
Directions: Please complete the application and return it with a certification fee of $25.00 in
the form of a check payable to the Georgia State Board of Workers' Compensation. The State
Board will review this application and determine whether all the criteria for certification have
been met. The State Board then either will return this form to you documenting your certified
drug-free workplace program, or in the event that all criteria have not been met -- the State
Board will require additional information or action.
Documentation of certified drug-free workplace program: For purposes of documenting
your certified drug-free workplace program, it is necessary to maintain your policy and the
records required by this application in a separate file for review by your insurer or the Georgia
State Board upon request.
Notification to insurer: An insured employer must notify its insurer in writing of such
certification. When notifying its insurer, the employer should enclose a copy of the certificate
received from the State Board documenting a certified drug-free workplace. (OCGA 34-940.2 (a)). This notification to insurer must occur annually!
When does the premium credit begin to accrue: The premium discount will be applied pro
rata as of the date of certification (the date of approval by the Georgia State Board of
Workers' Compensation).
When does the insured actually receive payment for the credit: The insured employer,
however, will not receive payment for such credit until after the annual final premium audit under
such policy. (OCGA 33-9-40.2 (b) (1))
How long will an insured employer receive the 7-1/2 % discount: The insured employer
is entitled to receive the 7-1/2% premium credit for up to eight years from date of original
certification. Thereafter, the premium discount shall be determined from the insured's
experience rating plan or in the case of an insured not rated upon experience, the premium
discount shall be determined by the Commissioner of Insurance based upon data received from
the insurers. (OCGA 33-9-40.2 (b) (1) and (2))
Page 2
***Annual certification required: An employer must be certified annually and must
maintain its certified drug-free workplace program during each year the employer
receives the discount.***
The following information and checklist should be used as the rules and guidelines to
assist you in implementing a certified drug-free workplace program.
In accordance with the definition of employer in this law, the state or any department,
agency, or instrumentality of the state; county or independent school systems; counties or
municipal corporations may not apply or qualify for the 7-1/2 % discount. Definitions
applicable to the law and to this document have been attached. (OCGA 34-9-411)
If an employer implements a drug-free workplace program substantially in accordance
with this checklist, the employer shall qualify for certification for a 7-1/2% premium discount
under such employer's workers' compensation insurance policy. (OCGA 34-9-412 through
34-9-421)
If an employer misrepresents compliance, however, with its certified drug-free
workplace program, the employer shall be subject to an additional premium for purposes of
reimbursement of a previously granted discount AND to cancellation of the policy. (OCGA
33-9-40.2 (c))
If an employer has made a good faith effort to fulfill certain criteria for certification,
however, this good faith effort will be taken into consideration when determining whether he or
she has complied substantially with certification criteria.
Remember, this law does not require drug-free testing, other forms of testing, or other
actions presently allowed under existing law. (OCGA 34-9-415 (a))
Nor does the law preclude random testing, other forms of testing, or other actions
presently allowed under existing law. (OCGA 34-9-415 (c))
Also included in this form are examples that should be helpful in explaining the
certification requirements.
Page 3
1-a. Elements of a Drug-Free Workplace Program
(OCGA 34-9-413)
The statute defines the elements of a drug-free workplace program as follows:
a) A drug-free workplace program must contain the following elements:
1) Written policy statement as provided in Code Section 34-9-414;
2) Substance abuse testing as provided in Code Section 34-9-415;
3) Resources of employee assistance providers maintained in accordance
with Code Section 34-9-416;
4) Employee education as provided in Code Section 34-9-417;
5) Supervisor training in accordance with Code Section 34-9-418.
b) In addition to the requirements of subsection (a) of this Code section, a
drug-free work place program must be implemented in compliance with the
confidentiality standards provided in Code Section 34-9-420.
c) A drug-free workplace program may offer and include the optimum level
core services of an EAP as described in subparagraph (C) of paragraph (6)
of Code Section 34-9-411.
1-b. Policy Statement Required for Certification:
(OCGA 34-9-414 (a) (1))
Your policy statement must include the following information outlined below
in the form of a checklist.
(For example, see sample policy.)
Statement of required types of substance abuse testing.
(OCGA 34-9-414 (a) (1) (A))
1. Job Applicant Testing Required for Certification:
(OCGA 34-9-415 (b))
Page 4
2. Reasonable Suspicion Testing Required for Certification:
(OCGA 34-9-415 (b))
3. Post Accident Testing Required for Certification:
(OCGA 34-9-415 (b))
(For example, see sample policy or add the following paragraph)
2. “When employees have caused or contributed to an on the job
injury that resulted in a loss of work time, which means any
period of time during which an employee stops performing the
normal duties of employment and leaves the place of employment
to seek care from a licensed medical provider.”
Even though the above is required for certification, an employer
still may send employees for a substance abuse test if they are
involved in on the job-accidents where personal injury or damage
to company property occurs.
4. Post Rehabilitation Testing Required for Certification:
(OCGA 34-9-415 (b))
(For example, see sample policy)
5. Routine -Fitness-for-Duty Testing Required for Certification:
(OCGA 34-9-415 (b))
(For example see sample policy or add the following)
"When a substance abuse test is conducted as part of a routinely
scheduled employee fitness-for-duty medical examination that is
part of the employer's established policy or that is scheduled
routinely for all members of an employment classification or
group."
Page 5
A statement of actions employer may take against employee or job
applicant on the basis of a positive confirmed test result. (OCGA 349-414 (1) (B))
A statement of consequences of an employee's or job applicant's
refusal to submit to a drug test. (OCGA 34-9-414 (4))
IMPORTANT: While the law does not mandate specific actions
employers are to take upon an employee's or job applicant's testing
positive or refusing to submit to a substance abuse test, in the
policy statement employers must notify employees and job
applicants of whatever the consequences are upon testing positive
or refusing to submit to a test-- in other words, the consequences of
violating the employer's policy on testing.
(For example, see sample policy which
declares that violations of the policy statement are subject to
discipline up to and including termination. Also, see
paragraphs 1 and 2, which explain that testing is a condition of
employment for job applicants and employees)
Whatever consequences the employer chooses in the event of a
positive test result or refusal to submit to one, the employer must
implement these actions fairly and consistently among all
employees. In response to a positive test result or refusal to submit
to one, inconsistent or arbitrary actions put employers at risk for
being accused of discrimination.
A statement advising employee or job applicant of the existence of the
article outlining a certified drug-free workplace program. (OCGA 349-414 (2))
(For example: "The [COMPANY NAME] drug-free workplace
program is certified by the Georgia Workers' Compensation Board
in accordance with Title 34, Chapter 9, Article 11 of the Official
Code of Georgia Annotated.")
A general confidentiality statement. (OCGA 34-9-414 (3))
(For example, "The confidentiality of any information received by
the employer through a substance abuse testing program shall be
maintained, except as otherwise provided by the law.")
Page 6
EITHER a statement advising employee of Employee Assistance
Program (EAP), if employer offers one.
OR
A statement advising employee of employer's resource file of
assistance programs and other persons, entities, or organizations
designed to assist employees with personal or behavior problems.
(OCGA 34-9-414 (5))
(For example, see sample policy)
A statement advising employee or job applicant who receives a
positive confirmed test result that he or she may contest or explain the
result to the employer within five (5) working days after written
notification of the test result. (OCGA 34-9-414 (6))
(For example, after the job applicant and employee testing
paragraphs, add: "Employees and job
applicants who have a positive confirmed test result may explain
or contest the result to the employer within five (5) working days,
after the employer contacts the employee and shows him or her the
positive test result as it was received from the laboratory in
writing.")
A statement informing an employee or job applicant of the federal
Drug-Free Workplace Act, if it applies to you. (OCGA 34-9-414 (7))
(Only applies to companies that have a contract with the Federal
Government in the amount of $25,000 or more annually)
1-c. Notice of Drug-Free Workplace Program Required for
Certification: (OCGA 34-9-414 (b) and (c))
Employers must give employees and job applicants a general notice of
testing, one time only, prior to testing. (OCGA 34-9-414 (a))
Employees: Employers must distribute the policy statement to employees in the
following manner: (OCGA 34-9-414 (a))
EITHER sixty (60) days notice was given prior to implementation of
testing.
OR
sixty (60) days notice was not required because implementation of
program occurred prior to July 1, 1993. (OCGA 34-9-414 (b))
Page 7
Job Applicants: Employers must notify job applicants in the following
manners: (OCGA 34-9-414 (a))
Notice of substance abuse testing is included on vacancy
announcements for positions in which testing is required.
(OCGA 34-9-414 (c))
Notice of substance abuse testing is posted in an appropriate and
conspicuous location on employer's premises. (OCGA 34-9-414 (c))
Copies of policy are available to employees and job applicants in
employer's personnel office or other suitable location. (OCGA 34-9414 (c))
2. Substance Abuse Testing Required for Certification:
(OCGA 34-9-415 (b))
Employers must conduct the following types of tests in order to become
certified. (OCGA 34-9-415 (b))
IMPORTANT: Prior to conducting job applicant and employee substance abuse
testing employers should use consent forms like those provided with the sample
policy.
Job Applicant Testing Required for Certification:
(OCGA 34-9-415 (b))
IMPORTANT: 'Job applicant' means a person who has applied
for a position and has been offered employment conditioned upon
successfully passing a substance abuse test and may have begun
work pending the results of the test.
If you wish to limit the job applicants that you test, you may do so
if this limitation is based on a 'reasonable classification of job
positions.
NOTE: Employers with a certified drug-free workplace program
who use temporary workers in positions that require
substance abuse testing must use individuals who already have
submitted to a substance abuse test for the temporary agencies
that actually pay their wages.
Page 8
For example, the following may be reasonable classifications for
which to test, if an employer is not testing all job applicants:
[1] Sensitive positions from a safety, health or security
standpoint versus all other job applicants for non-sensitive
positions.
Sensitive positions as determined by law usually include
positions that involve *National Security *health *safety*
*functions that require a high degree of trust and
confidence *operation of company vehicles, machinery, or
equipment-- the mishandling of which may place fellow
employees or the general public at risk of serious injury, or
the nature of which would create a security risk in the
workplace *the handling of hazardous material.
[2] Full time positions versus part time positions
(For example, an employee who works twenty hours or less
may be considered part time).
[3] Positions in which the employer is responsible for wages
and/ or benefits versus positions in which a temporary agency
or employee leasing agency is responsible for wages and
benefits.
(For example, a worker leased from a temporary agency is
paid wages by the temporary agency and is covered by the
temporary agency's workers' compensation insurance. The
temporary agency is the employer for purposes of
implementing a drug-free workplace program that qualifies
for the 7-1/2 % premium credit. Therefore, it is the temp
agency that is responsible for testing its job applicants for
those positions in which testing is required).
[4] Other reasonable classifications of job positions.
When determining whether to limit job applicant substance
abuse testing, keep in mind that a drug-free workplace
program must be implemented fairly and consistently.
An employer should not test job applicants in an arbitrary
manner.
Reasonable Suspicion Testing Required for Certification:
(OCGA 34-9-415 (b))
Page 9
IMPORTANT: See attached definition of 'reasonable suspicion
testing.' It is essential that reasonable suspicion testing be
implemented on a fair and consistent basis.
If a supervisor has reasonable suspicion that the employee may be
impaired by substances, i.e., drugs or alcohol, the supervisor must
promptly detail in writing the circumstances which formed the
basis of the determination that reasonable suspicion existed to
warrant the testing. (OCGA 34-9-415 (d) (12))
A copy of this documentation shall be given to that employee upon
request and the original documentation shall be kept confidential
by the employer and retained by the employer at least one year.
(OCGA 34-9-415 (d) (12))
The requirement of Supervisor Training, which is necessary for
certification, will teach supervisors how to recognize, document,
and corroborate signs of employee substance abuse.
Post-Accident Testing Required for Certification:
(OCGA 34-9-415 (b))
IMPORTANT: An employer must require employees to submit
to substance abuse testing if an employee has caused or
contributed to an on the job injury that resulted in a loss of
work time.
'Loss of work time' means any period of time during which an
employee stops performing the normal duties of employment and
leaves the place of employment to seek care from a licensed
medical provider.
Post Rehabilitation Testing Required for Certification:
(OCGA 34-9-415 (b))
IMPORTANT: 'Follow-up testing' is required for any
employee who involuntarily entered an Employee Assistance
Program (EAP) or rehabilitation program because of a
positive confirmed test result.
Page 10
When follow-up testing is conducted, the frequency of such testing
shall be a minimum of at least once a year for a two year period, after completion of the EAP or the rehabilitation
program. Advance notice of the testing shall not be given to the
employee.
Routine-Fitness-for-Duty Testing Required for Certification:
(OCGA 34-9-415 (b))
IMPORTANT: If employers require physical examinations for
employees in certain job positions, employers also should require
employees to submit to a substance abuse test during the
examination.
More specifically, 'Routine-fitness-for-duty tests' are those
tests that are performed on eligible employees as part of
physical examinations (e.g., annual, periodic recurring, or
biennial physical examinations), where the examinations are
required by law, regulation, or company policy, or routinely
performed pursuant to company or location policy.
(For example, job positions that typically require physical
examinations are those in which employees participate in an
industry that is regulated to ensure safety, a goal dependent, in a
substantial part, on the health and fitness of employees.
For example, employers involved in the transportation industry,
which is regulated by the Department of Transportation, are
required to have biennial testing of drivers and periodic testing of
pilots. Another example is construction industry firms, which
often require employees to be tested during routinely scheduled
physical examinations.)
Regarding when to test for drugs, alcohol, or both:
IMPORTANT: Regarding drugs: In all substance abuse tests, an
employer is required to test for any or all of the drugs listed in the
definition, and shall not test for any drug not listed in this definition. See
definition of 'drug.' (OCGA 34-9-415 (e) (2))
(For example, NIDA and CAP laboratories offer standard tests that
include the drugs listed in this definition. For example, a '5 Panel', or a 10
Panel are commonly used by employers.)
Page 11
IMPORTANT: Regarding alcohol: See the definition of 'alcohol'. An
employer should test for alcohol, when he or she has reasonable suspicion
to believe an employee is using alcohol on the job in violation of the
employer's policy.
Employers should keep in mind that according to the definition of
reasonable suspicion, 'if an employee has caused or contributed to an
accident while at work', reasonable suspicion may arise.
Employers, however, are not limited to reasonable suspicion testing when
alcohol is concerned. For example, employers also may want to conduct
post-accident testing for alcohol, in addition to drugs.
Because circumstances are different in each instance that an employee is
required to submit to a substance abuse test, it is best for the employer to
determine when the employee should be tested for both drugs and alcohol.
(For example, in 'job applicant testing', post-rehabilitation testing', and
routine-fitness-for-duty testing'-- an employer may decide to test only for
drugs. But in 'reasonable suspicion testing' and 'post-accident testing', an
employer may decide to test for both drugs and alcohol).
These laboratories also offer standard tests for alcohol. For example,
common types of tests for the presence of alcohol include testing the
urine, breath, or blood.
The 'threshold detection level' (see attachment definition) of the
substances tested in initial and confirmation tests are set by NIDA and
CAP laboratories in conformity with federal standards.
2-b. Procedures for Substance Abuse Testing Required for
Certification. (OCGA 34-9-415 (d) and (e))
It is important to remember that all information obtained in substance abuse
testing should be maintained in a medical file separate from the personnel
file.
If an employer has a Medical Review Officer (MRO), the MRO should keep this
file.
Page 12
If an employer does not have an MRO, the employer should appoint a drug-free
workplace program coordinator who is responsible for keeping the documentation
required by this form, for interpreting test results, and most importantly, for ensuring
that confidentiality is maintained.
Specimen Collection Responsibilities Required for Certification:
(OCGA 34-9-415 (d) (1) through (5))
Collection of job applicant and employee specimen are performed in
accordance with the following standards and procedures:
Standards for Specimen Collection:
•
Specimen collection should be conducted in a manner reasonably to protect
the privacy of the individual and to prevent substitution or contamination of
the specimen.
•
Specimen collection should be documented by labeling the containers to
prevent erroneous identification of results.
•
Specimen collection, storage, and transportation to the testing site should be
performed in a manner; which reasonably will preclude specimen
contamination or adulteration.
Procedures for Specimen Collection:
Who may collect:
A physician, a physician's assistant, a registered professional nurse, a
licensed practical nurse, a nurse practitioner, a certified paramedic present
at the scene of an accident, a person certified or employed by a laboratory
certified by National Institute on Drug Abuse, the College of American
Pathologists, or the Georgia Department of Human Resources, or a
qualified person certified or employed by a collection company.
OR
An employer representative who has been trained to collect specimens in
accordance with accepted chain of custody procedures (65 C.F.R. 244)
Chain of custody procedures required:
•
Chain of custody procedures must be used by the above individuals to ensure
proper record keeping, handling, labeling, and identification of all specimens to be
tested.
Page 13
NOTE: NIDA and CAP laboratories provide the specimen collection packages that include
the appropriate forms necessary for chain of custody procedures. These laboratories also may
be able to provide training on proper collection procedures.
NOTE: Proper collection methods are essential in assuring accuracy of test results. As a
result, if a specimen is not collected in accordance with the standards as set forth by
NIDA and CAP laboratories, these laboratories will not accept the specimen for analysis.
Procedures regarding prescription and nonprescription medication:
NOTE: Though not required for certification, employers are STRONGLY encouraged to use
the services of a Medical Review Officer (MRO) in determining the validity of a Laboratory
confirmed drug test result.
If a drug test result is confirmed positive, it is the employer’s responsibility to ensure prescription
medications, over the counter drugs, or other medical history pertinent to the drug screen could
affect the final result of the test.
If the employer does not wish to hire an MRO, the employer may ask the job applicant or
employee for evidence of a prescription that may have affected the test result. In addition,
NIDA and CAP labs offer technical assistance and an MRO to interpret the results.
IMPORTANT NOTE: The employer should be mindful of the American’s with Disabilities Act
(ADA) and pertinent liability issues in making the determination in the use of an MRO as part of
a comprehensive drug-free workplace program.
A list of prescription and over the counter drugs that may affect test results is attached for your
information. This list is included as an educational tool and is NOT exhaustive. In cases where
drugs not included on this list appear in a test result, an employer may wish to consult the
laboratory, an MRO, a pharmacist, or other expert on the effect that prescription and over the
counter drugs have on laboratory test results.
Laboratories that must test specimens:
•
NIDT devices (On-Site Kits) may be used for the initial screening for POST OFFER
(or new hire) testing ONLY.
•
For current employees, (Reasonable Suspicion, Post Accident, Post Rehabilitation, FitFor-Duty), ALL specimens, initial and confirmation testing, must be tested only by a
NIDA or CAP laboratory. (See page 14 of the guidelines of these laboratories. Also
attached is information on how to find out NIDA and CAP laboratories in Georgia.)
•
All non-negatives from initial screening in Post Offer (New Hire) drug testing must be
confirmed by GC/MS method in a NIDA or CAP laboratory.
Page 14
Employer Responsibilities Required for Certification:
(OCGA 34-9-415 (d) (6) through (12))
I am complying with the following procedures that are necessary for
Certification
Notification of positive confirmed test results:
•
Within 5 days after receipt of a positive confirmed test result from the laboratory,
an employer must inform in writing a job applicant or employee the [1] fact that
he or she tested positive, [2] the consequences of testing positive, and [3] the
options available to the job applicant or employee.
•
If the job applicant or employee requests, the employer shall provide a copy of
the test results.
•
An employer must ensure that all initial tests having a positive result are verified by
a confirmation test.
If an employer has been trained to collect specimens:
•
If an employer has been trained to collect specimens, the employer must use chain of
custody procedures to ensure proper record keeping, handling, labeling, and
identification of all specimens to be tested.
Payment for the initial and confirmation tests required by the employer:
•
An employer is required to pay the cost of all substance abuse tests, initial and
confirmation, that the employer requires of employees and job applicants.
Additional tests not required by the employer:
•
If a job applicant or employee chooses to have an additional test not required by the
employer, then the job applicant or employee must pay the cost of any additional
test.
•
Any additional tests, however, must be conducted on the same specimen as the
original test.
Documentation of Reasonable Suspicion Testing:
•
If testing is conducted based on reasonable suspicion, the employer shall promptly
detail in writing the circumstances which formed the basis of the determination that
reasonable suspicion existed to warrant the testing.
This documentation shall be kept confidential pursuant for at least one year.
Page 15
•
A copy of the above reasonable suspicion documentation should be given to the
employee upon request.
Laboratory Responsibilities Required for Certification
(OCGA 34-9-415 (e)
The laboratory that I am using is complying with the following
procedures that are necessary to ensure maximum reliability and
accuracy.
NOTE: These standards are required in order to avoid employer and/ or
laboratory liability for faulty tests results. These standards and procedures are
typical of laboratories approved by NIDA or CAP.
Only laboratories that are approved by the National Institute on Drug Abuse
(NIDA) or the College of American Pathologists (CAP) may perform
confirmation tests.
Name and address of laboratory
Phone number:
NIDA/HHS or CAP Certification
Chain of custody Procedures Required:
•
The laboratory must have written procedures to ensure chain of custody.
Quality Control Procedures Required:
•
The laboratory must follow proper quality control procedures including, but not
limited to [1] the use of internal quality controls including the use of samples of
known concentrations which are used to check the performance and calibration of
testing equipment, and periodic use of blind samples for overall accuracy; [2] an
internal review and certification process for test results, conducted by a person
qualified to perform that function in the testing laboratory; [3] security measures
implemented by the laboratory to preclude adulteration of specimens and test
results; [4] other necessary and proper actions taken to ensure reliable and accurate
test results.
Page 16
Disclosure of Test Results:
•
A laboratory must disclose to the employer a written test result report within seven
(7) working days after receipt of the sample.
•
All laboratory reports of test results shall state at a minimum [1] the name and
address of the laboratory that performed the test and positive identification of the
person tested; [2] positive results on confirmation tests only; [3] negative results
may report from initial or confirmation tests; [4] a list of the drugs for which the
analyses were conducted; [5] the type of tests conducted for both initial and
confirmation tests and the minimum cut-off levels of the tests.
•
No report shall disclose the presence or absence of any drug other than a specific
drug and its metabolites listed pursuant to this article.
Technical Assistance Required:
•
Laboratories should provide technical assistance to the employer and the
employee or job applicant for the purpose of interpreting any positive confirmed
tests results; which could have been caused by prescription or nonprescription
medication.
Confirmation Tests Required for Positive Initial Tests:
•
An employer is not obligated to seek a confirmation test on negative initial tests.
But if an initial test is negative, the employer may at its sole discretion seek a
confirmation test
•
All positive initial tests must be confirmed using the gas chromatography/mass
spectrometry (GC/MS) method or an equivalent or more accurate scientifically
accepted methods approved by NIDA as such technology becomes available in a
cost-effective form.
3. Employee Assistance Required for Certification:
(OCGA 34-9-416)
An employer must provide employee assistance in order to be certified.
(OCGA 34-9-416)
Page 17
EITHER you have an Employee Assistance Program (EAP):
Employees have been informed of the benefits and services of the
Employee Assistance Program (EAP) and have been provided notice
of the policies and procedures regarding access to and utilization of the
program. (OCGA 34-9-416 a))
IMPORTANT: See definition of Employee Assistance Program (EAP).
A comprehensive EAP provides four of the five components of a certified
drug-free workplace program: [1] assistance in policy writing, [2]
employee education and awareness, [3] supervisor training, [4] and
employee assistance.
The Statute (OCGA 34-9-411(6)) defines Employee Assistance Program as follows:
(A) Employee Assistance Program means a worksite focused program
designed to assist:
(i) Employer work organizations in addressing employee productivity
issues; and
(ii) Employee clients in the identification and resolution of job
performance problems associated with employees impaired by personal
concerns, including, but not limited to, health, marital, family, financial,
alcohol, drug, legal, emotional, stress or other personal issues that may
affect job performance.
(B) A minimum level of core services must include consultation and training and
assistance to work organization leadership in policy development,
organizational development, and critical incident management; professional,
confidential, appropriate, and timely problem assessment services;
constructive intervention and short-term problem resolution; referrals for
appropriate diagnosis, treatment, and assistance; follow-up, monitoring, and
case management with providers and insurers; employee education and
supervisory training; and quality assurance.
(C) An optimum level of core services must include, in additional to the
minimum level core services, the designation of an individual who shall be
responsible to administer the employer’s Employee Assistance Program
and to certify that the employer work organization’s drug-free workplace
program contains all elements of the drug-free workplace program required
by Code Section 34-9-413 and that such program satisfies the annual
certification requirements of Code Section 34-9-421; provided, however,
that such individual shall have training and experience with Employee
Assistance Programs in accordance with rules and regulations prescribed
by the State Board of Workers’ Compensation.
Page 18
An EAP is a work-site based service that assists in the identification and
resolution of job performance problems associated with employees
impaired by personal concerns, including, but not limited to health,
marital, family, financial, alcohol, drug, legal, emotional, stress or other
problems which may adversely affect employee productively.
While the function of an EAP is much broader than merely addressing
problems associated with substance abuse in the workplace, an EAP does
play a significant role in a drug-free workplace program. EAP's are
frequently able to identify substance abusing employees before costly
problems such as accidents, errors, absenteeism and increased insurance
utilization occur. Given the time and money it takes to replace an
experienced employee dismissed due to a positive test result, an EAP
offers employers an alternative to firing a valued employee found to use
drugs.
OR you may maintain and post other means of employee assistance:
Maintenance, distribution, and posting of resource information of
providers of other means of employee assistance including drug and
alcohol abuse programs, mental health providers, and other persons,
entities, or organizations available to assist employees with personal or
behavioral problems. (OCGA 34-9-416 (b)
The statute (OCGA 34-9-416) provides that:
If an employer does not have an Employee Assistance Program, the
employer must maintain a resource file of providers of other employee
assistance including drug and alcohol abuse programs, mental health
providers, and other persons, entities, or organizations available to
assist employees with personal or behavioral problems and must notify
the employee in writing of the availability of this resource file. In
addition, the employer shall post in a conspicuous place a current listing
of providers of employee assistance in the area. Such listing of available
providers shall be reviewed and updated by the employer during the
month of July of each year at which time the employer shall, when
necessary, correct and revise information on all providers listed.
Employers shall take reasonable care to identify appropriate providers
and supply accurate telephone numbers and address information on the
posted listing of providers at all times.
Employers must notify employees of the availability of the employer's
resource file containing the information on employee assistance and
update the resource file during the month of July of each year.
Page 19
For more information on employee assistance resources in your
community, contact the 24 hour Drug Abuse Helpline in Georgia at
1-800-338-6745.
Employers should post this number where employees can see it and
distribute this number to employees so as to enable them to access
assistance confidentially.
4. Employee Education Required for Certification:
(OCGA 34-9-417)
REQUIRED FOR THE FIRST YEAR CERTIFICATION as provided by OCGA 34-9-412,
an employer must provide employees with TWO HOURS of education on substance abuse, in
general, and its effects on the workplace, specifically. (OCGA 34-9-417)
Hour One of the Employee Education program has been conducted
for employees. (Date of program:
)
Hour Two of the Employee Education program has been conducted
for employees. (Date of program:
)
Length of the Employee Education Program:
IMPORTANT: During the first year of certification, an employer must
have
completed the first hour of employee education before qualifying
for
certification. The second hour of employee education may be
completed after certification, within the next six months or, in the case of temporary
employees, after an employee has completed 1000 hours of
work since the
first hour of employee education.
If an employer has an Employee Assistance Program (EAP) as defined and
explained in this form, the EAP and employer automatically will meet
the Employee Education Program criteria necessary for certification.
Nevertheless, an employer must conduct two hours of employee
education during the first year of certification and one hour in the second
and subsequent years in order to maintain certification.
Content of the Employee Education Program:
• FIRST HOUR CONTENTS of the Employee Education Program must include but is not
limited to the following information:
(1) The employer’s policies and procedures regarding substance abuse in the workplace
and how employees who wish to obtain a substance abuse treatment can do so.
•. Explanation of the employer's policy against substance abuse and the
consequences for violating this policy.
Page 20
•. If the employer has an EAP: How employees use the EAP and when and
for what purposes would an employee use the EAP.
•. If an employer does not have an EAP: Other means of employee assistance
that are available to the employees.
Explanation of reasonable suspicion.
•. Basic Facts / Statistics
• Q&A period.
In addition, employers my choose any of the following topics and even combine them in
order to comply with the employee education component.
Example Topics:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
The explanation of the disease model of addiction for alcohol and drugs.
The disease of addiction.
Enabling.
Use versus Abuse.
Why People Abuse Substances
Alcohol Anonymous: Review of 12 steps to recovery.
Alcohol Anonymous: History of the AA Program.
The recovering employee.
Relapse in the workplace.
The role of the family in addressing substance abuse and addiction.
The role of co-workers in addressing substance abuse and addiction.
The role of co-workers in maintaining a drug-free workplace.
(2) The effects and dangers of the commonly abused substances in the
workplace:
Example Topics:
•. The most abused drugs in the workplace.
•. A close look at marijuana, cocaine/crack, inhalants, alcohol, opiates,
hallucinogens, or prescription drugs, etc.
•. The return of LSD.
•. The physical and psychological effects of the above drugs and others.
•. Warning signs.
•. Stress and the workplace.
•. Safety and the workplace.
•. Domestic violence and substance abuse.
•. Health, medical risks and substance abuse.
•. Wellness, exercise, and substance abuse.
AND…
Page 21
(3) Insurance utilization and benefits in the context of substance abuse
treatment.
• The role of the family when someone seeks treatment for substance abuse.
• The role of co-workers when someone seeks treatment for substance
abuse.
• Legal issues surrounding substance abuse.
How to communicate the Employee Education Program:
Because resources available to employers across the state will vary from
community to community, the employee education component of the drug-free
workplace is meant to be flexible so that employers may be creative in conducting
employee education. For example, employers may utilize speakers, workshops,
newsletters, videos, written material, in-house supervisors that have been
educated on how to train employees, a combination of the above, and any other
means of educating employees for purposes of a drug-free workplace.
For available resources in the community, an employer may wish to contact the
following individuals and organizations:
•. Georgia 24 Hour Helpline 1-800-338-6745
•. The Georgia Counsel on Substance Abuse (404) 523-3440.
•. Prevention Resource Center at the Georgia. Department of Human Resources and
those that may be located in your community
•. Georgia Employee Assistance Professionals Assoc. (EAPA) (404) 621-5834
•. Treatment centers
•. Private therapists
•. Georgia Addiction Counselors Association
•. Occupational Nurse Association
•. Psychiatric Nurses Association
•. Labor attorneys
•. Speakers Bureaus at chambers of commerce's or other organizations
•. Prevention associations in your community
•. Law enforcement officials (e.g., DEA or GBI)
•. American Society for Training Development
•. Alcoholics Anonymous
•. Cocaine Anonymous
•. Narcotics Anonymous
How to document the Employee Education Program:
In order to document the completion of employee education, an employer should
complete a form like the one attached to this document and maintain these records
of compliance in a file for this purpose.
Page 22
SECOND AND SUBSEQUENT YEAR CERTIFICATION REQUIRES EMPLOYEE
EDUCATION IN THE AMOUNT OF ONE (1) HOUR ANNUALLY.
5. Supervisor Training Required for Certification:
(OCGA 34-9-418))
In addition to the employee education program (two hours 1st year), employers must
provide all supervisory personnel with a minimum of two hours of supervisor training in
the first year of certification and one hour per year thereafter. (OCGA 34-9-418)
(Supervisors should receive a total of four hours of education and training in the first year and
two hours (total) in the second and subsequent years).
Participation of supervisors with employees in the above education
program,
AND
FIRST YEAR REQUIRES two hours of supervisor training on how to
recognize signs of substance abuse, how to document and collaborate
signs of employee substance abuse, and how to refer substance abusing
employees to the proper treatment providers.
IMPORTANT: Supervisors must have completed the first hour of
employee education and at least one hour of annual supervisor training
for an employer to qualify for certification. The second hour of
supervisor training may be completed after certification, within the next
six months (during the first year).
It is absolutely crucial that supervisors are trained before implementing
reasonable suspicion testing and any referrals of employees to the EAP or
for treatment.
If an employer has an Employee Assistance Program (EAP) as defined
and explained in this form, and the EAP and employer have contracted
for the EAP to provide employee education AND supervisor training, the
employer automatically will meet the Employee Education Program
criteria necessary for certification.
• . The Supervisor Training Program should include but not be limited to the following
information. Employers may choose any of the following topics and even combine them in
order to comply with the supervisor training component.
Page 23
Example Topics:
• . Reasonable suspicion: Building and establishing through observation and
documentation .
• EAP referrals: Supervisor referral, voluntary/self referral, last chance
agreement.
• . How to recognize signs of employee substance abuse.
• . How to refer substance abusing employees to the proper treatment
• . How family problems affect the employee's performance.
• . Enabling employees.
• . Intervention.
• . Using positive peer pressure.
• . Using management to gain support for mutual goals.
• . Conducting the performance review.
• . When and if to test? Confront? Interview?
How to communicate the Supervisor Training Program:
See page 20 of the guidelines and use the same resources as listed for Employee
Education Program.
How to document the Employee Education Program:
See pages 20-21 of the guidelines and use the same form as attached for
Employee Education Program.
SECOND AND SUBSEQUENT YEAR CERTICATION REQUIRES SUPERVISOR
TRAINING IN THE AMOUNT OF ONE (1) HOUR ANNUALLY.
6. Confidentiality Required for Certification:
(OCGA 34-9-420)
All information received through substance abuse testing is
confidential, but may be used or received in evidence, or obtained
in discovery, or disclosed in any civil or administrative proceeding
when the information is relevant to the employer's defense, e.g., a
workers' compensation hearing.
IMPORTANT: Information on test results shall not be released or used
in any criminal proceeding against the employee or job applicant.
Information released contrary to this law shall be inadmissible as
evidence in any such criminal proceeding.
Page 24
The consent form must contain at minimum:
[1] The name of the person who is authorized to obtain the information;
[2] The purpose of the disclosure;
[3] The precise information to be disclosed;
[4] The duration of the consent;
[5] The signature of the person authorizing release of the information.
7. Disclaimers regarding a certified drug-free workplace program.
(OCGA 34-9-419
• . No physician-patient relationship is created between an employee or job applicant and an
employer, MRO, or any person performing or evaluating a substance abuse test solely by
the establishment, implementation or administration of substance abuse testing.
• . Nothing in the law creating a drug-free workplace program and nothing in this form shall be
constructed to prevent an employer from establishing reasonable work rules related to
employee possession, use, sale, or solicitation of drugs, including convictions for drug
related offenses, and taking action based upon a violation of those rules.
• . Nothing in the law or in this form shall be constructed to operate retroactively, and nothing
in this article shall abrogate the right of an employer under state or federal law to conduct
substance abuse tests, or implement employee substance testing.
• . Nothing in the law or in this form shall be constructed to prohibit an employer from
conducting medical screening or other tests required, permitted, or not disallowed by any
statute, rule, or regulation for the purpose of monitoring exposure of employees to
responsibilities. Such screening or tests shall be limited to the specific materials expressly
identified in the statue, rule, or regulation, unless prior written consent of the employee is
obtained for other tests.
• . No cause of action shall arise in favor of any person based upon the failure of an employer
to establish or conduct a program or policy for substance abuse testing.
Page 25
8. Maintenance and Revocation of Certification
• . Employers must maintain compliance with the criteria for a certified drug-free workplace
during the entire year that certification is granted.
• . If at any time an insurer has reason to believe that an insured employer with a certified drugfree workplace program has fallen out of compliance, the insurer has the right to physically
review and verify the employer's documentation of its certified drug-free workplace
program.
For example, if the insurer receives an unreasonable number of claims which
involved employee substance abuse from an employer with a certified drug-free
workplace program, such that it appears the employer is not maintaining its drugfree workplace program -- the insurer has the right to physically review and verify
employer's documentation of its certified drug-free workplace program.
The policy statement should be made available to the insurer for review.
Employers should use the forms attached for proof of employee education and
supervisor training.
Employee Assistance may be verified by proof of the employer's contract with an
EAP or by a showing of the maintenance, distribution, and posting of other means
of employee assistance.
Substance abuse testing may be proved by a showing of the employer's bill from
the laboratory and/or collection facilities. An employer should not disclose
specific employee's test results, as information is confidential. But if a positive
confirmed test result is found in relation to post-accident testing, the information
obviously becomes relevant to the employer's defense in any proceeding to deny
the employee's workers' compensation benefits. When a positive confirmed test
result is relevant to an employer's defense, information received in relation to that
test result is no longer confidential.
•. If after reviewing the relevant documentation, the insurer finds that an employer has not
maintained its certified drug-free workplace, the insurer should contact the Georgia State
Board of Workers' Compensation.
•. The State Board will investigate the facts and determine on a case by case basis whether to
revoke certification.
•. The State board has the authority to revoke certification if the State Board finds an
employer has not substantially complied with the certification requirements.
Page 26
Definitions applicable to the law, and rules and guidelines.
(1) 'Alcohol' means ethyl alcohol, hydrated oxide of ethyl, or spirits of wine, from whatever
source or by whatever process produced.
(2) 'Chain of custody' means the methodology of tracking specified materials, specimens, or
substances for the purpose of maintaining control and accountability from initial collection to final
disposition for all such materials, specimens, or substances and providing for accountability at
each stage in handling, testing, and storing materials, specimens, or substances and reporting test
results.
(3) 'Confirmation test' 'confirmed test' 'confirmed substance abuse test' means a
second analytical procedure used to identify the presence of a specific drug or metabolite in a
specimen. The confirmation test must be different in scientific principle from that of the initial
test procedure. This confirmation method must be capable of providing requisite specificity,
sensitivity, and quantitative accuracy. GC/MS is the authorized confirmation test under this
statute.
(4) 'Drug' means amphetamines, cannabinoids, cocaine, phencyclidine (PCP), methadone,
methaqualene, opiates, barbituates, benzodiazepines, propoxyphene, or a metabolite of any
such substances. An employer may test an individual for any or all of these.
(5) 'Employee' means any person who works for salary, wages, or other remuneration for an
employer.
(6) 'Employee Assistance Program' means a worksite focused program designed to assist:
(i) Employer work organizations in addressing employee productivity issues; and (ii) Employee
clients in the identifcation and resolution of job performance problems associatied with
employees impaired by personal concerns, including, but not limited to, health, maritcal, family,
financial, alcohol, drug, legal, emotional, stress or other personal issues that may affect job
performance. A minimum level of core services must include consultation and training and
assistance to work organization leadership in policy development, organizational development,
and critical incident management; professional, confidential, appropriate, and timely problem
assessment services; constructive intervention and short-term problem resolution; referrals for
appropriate diagnosis, treatment, and assistance; follow-up, monitoring, and case management
with providers and insurers; employee education and supervisory training; and quality assurance.
An optimum level of core services must include, in additional to the minimum level core
services, the disgnation of an individual who shall be responsible to administer the employer’s
Employee Assistance Program and to certify that the employer work organization’s drug-free
workplace program contains all elements of the drug-free workplace program required by
Code Section 34-9-413 and that such program satisfies the annual certication requirements of
Code Section 34-9-421; provided, however, that such individual shall hae training and
experience with Employee Assistance Programs in accordance with rules and regulations
prescribed by the State Board of Workers’ Compensation.
(7) 'Employer' means a person or entity that is subject to the provisions of this chapter but
shall not include the state or any independent school system or any municipal corporation for the
purposes of this chapter.
Page 27
(8) 'Initial Test' means a sensitive, rapid and reliable procedure to identify negative and
presumptive positive specimens including “on-site” testing. All initial tests shall use an
immunoassay procedure or an equivalent procedure or shall use a more accurate scientifically
accepted method approved by the National Institute on Drug Abuse or by Georgia law, as such
more accurate technology becomes available in a cost-effective form. An employer may also
use on-site testing kits for post-offer initial testing of job applicants (NOT employees).
(9) 'Job applicant' means a person who has applied for a position with an employer and has
been offered employment conditioned upon successfully passing a substance abuse test.
(10) 'Nonprescription medication' means a drug or medication authorized pursuant to
federal or state law for general distribution and use without a prescription in the treatment of
human disease, ailments, or injuries.
(11) 'Prescription medication' means a drug or medication lawfully prescribed by a
physician for an individual and taken in accordance with such prescription.
(12) 'Reasonable suspicion testing' means substance abuse testing based on a belief that an
employee is using or has used drugs or alcohol in violation of the employer's policy drawn from
specific objective and articulable facts and reasonable inferences drawn from those facts in light
of experience. Among other things, such facts and inferences may be based upon, but not
limited to the following:
(A) Observable phenomena while at work such as direct observation of substance
abuse or of the physical symptoms or manifestations of being impaired due to
substance abuse;
(B) Abnormal conduct or erratic behavior while at work or significant
deterioration in work performance;
(C) A report of substance abuse provided by a reliable and credible source;
(D) Evidence that an individual has tampered with any substance abuse test
during his or her employment with the current employer;
(E) Information that an employee has caused or contributed to an accident while
at work; or
(F) Evidence that an employee has used, possessed, sold, solicited, or
transferred drugs while working or while on the employer's premises or while
operating the employer's vehicle, machinery, or equipment.
(13) 'Rehabilitation program' means an established program capable of providing expert
identification, assessment, and resolution of employee drug or alcohol abuse in a confidential
and timely service. This service shall in all cases be provided by the persons licensed or
appropriately certified as health professionals to provide drug or alcohol rehabilitative services.
(14) 'Specimen' means tissue, blood, breath, urine, or other product of the human body
capable of revealing the presence of drugs or their metabolites or of alcohol.
(15) 'Substance' means drugs or alcohol.
(16) 'Substance abuse test or 'test' means any chemical, biological, or physical instrumental
analysis administered for the purpose of determining the presence or absence of a drug or its
metabolites or of alcohol.
Page 28
(17) 'Threshold detection level' means the level at which the presence of a drug or
alcohol can be reasonably expected to be detected by an initial and confirmatory test
performed by a laboratory meeting the standards specified in these rules and
regulations. The threshold detection level indicates the level at which a valid
conclusion can be drawn that the drug or alcohol is present in the employee's
specimen.
Appendix A
Information on NIDA and CAP laboratories:
NIDA Laboratories:
For more information on whether a laboratory has been certified pursuant to federal
minimum standards contact Donna Bush, Ph.D. at the National Laboratory Certification
Program (NLCP), (301) 443-6014. Also, a list of federally approved laboratories can be
found during the first week of each month in the Federal Register.
The federal agency called the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) has been
renamed the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Laboratories that
were certified by NIDA now have certification by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health
Services Administration, under the federal Department of Health and Human Services (HHS).
This name change occurred after the Georgia General Assembly passed the law creating
the premium discount for certified drug-free workplaces. The name change does not affect
whether a lab is certified pursuant to federal minimum standards. If a lab used to have 'NIDA
certification', it now has 'HHS' certification. Next year, during the legislative session, the name
change will be incorporated into the existing law.
CAP Laboratories:
For all information on whether a laboratory has CAP certification, contact the College of
American Pathologists at (708) 446-8800.
Appendix B
Form documenting completion of Employee Education and Supervisor
Training Program.
Fill out this form and attach a list of attendee's signatures to document their participation. Keep
this documentation in a file for your review by your insurer or the Georgia State Board of
Workers' Compensation Board upon request.
1. Check one:
First Hour of Employee Education Program
(Date of completion:
)
Second Hour of Employee Education Program
(Date of completion:
)
First Hour of Supervisor Training Program
(Date of completion:
)
Second Hour of Supervisor Training Program
(Date of completion:
)
must be completed
before certification
Or N/A if in 2nd year.
must be completed
before certification
Or N/A if in 2nd year.
2. Has employer contracted with an Employee Assistance Program (EAP):
yes
no
3. Title and Description of Program:
4. Length of Program:
5. Means of communication used to teach the employees and/or supervisors:
6. Number of employees
supervisors
7. Number of employees
supervisors
8. Signature of trainer or supervisor who conducted this program:
Date:
participating in program:
Page 30
Appendix C
OVER-THE-COUNTER AND PRESCRIPTION DRUGS THAT
MAY ALTER OR AFFECT THE OUTCOME OF A DRUG TEST
*This information is included only to assist employers in evaluating positive test results in relationship to
prescription or over the counter drugs reported by employees.
*Please note this list is not exhaustive. In cases of drugs not included on this list, an employer may wish to
consult with the laboratory, a MRO, a pharmacist, or other expert for further assistance.
Alcohol
All liquid medications containing ethyl alcohol (ethanol). Please read the label for content. As an example,
Vick's Nyquil is 25% (50 proof) ethynl alcohol, Comtrex is 20% (40 proof), Contac Severe Cold Formula
Night Strength is 25% (50 proof) and Listerine is 26.9% (54 proof).
Amphetamines
Obetrol, Biphetamine, Desoxyn, dexedrine, Didrex
Cannabinoids
Marinol (Dronabinol, THC)
Cocaine
Cocaine HCI topical solution (Roxanne)
Phenecyclidine
Not legal by prescription.
Methaqualone
Not legal by prescription.
Opiates
Paregoric, Parepectolin, Donnagel PG, Morphine, Tylenol with Codeine, Empirin with Codeine, APAPwith
Codeine, Aspirin with Codeine, Rubitussin AC Guiatuss AC Novahistine DH, Novahistine Expectorant,
Dilaudid (hydromorphone), M-S contin and Roxanol (morphine sulfate), Percodan, Vicodin, etc.
Barbituates
Phenobarbital, Tuinal, Amytal, Nembutal, Seconal, Lotusate, Fioricet, Esgic, Butisol, Mebaral,
Butabarbital, Butabital, Phrenilin, Triad, etc.
Benzodiazepines
Ativan, Azene, Clonopin, Dalmane, Diazepam, Librium, Xanax, Serax, Tranxene, Valiumn Verstram,
Halcion, Paxipam, Restoril, Centrax.
Methadone
Dolophine, Methadose
Propoxypohene
Darvocet, Darvon N, Dolene, etc.
NOTES:
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Local Chambers
Local Chambers of Commerce & Development Authorities
Adel-Cook County Chamber of Commerce
Rhonda Geiger, President/CEO
Adel, GA - http://www.adel-cookchamber.org
Airport Area Chamber of Commerce
Mike Simpson, Executive Director
Atlanta, GA
Albany Area Chamber of Commerce
Tim Martin, President/CEO
Albany, GA
Alma-Bacon County Chamber of Commerce
Leslie Douglas, Interim Executive Director
Alma, GA
American-Israel Chamber of Commerce
Tom Glaser, President
Atlanta, GA
Americus-Sumter County Chamber
David L. Garriga, President
Americus, GA - http://www.americus-sumterchamber.com
Appling County Development Authority
Dale Atkins, Executive Director
Baxley, GA
Ashburn-Turner County Chamber
Shelley Zorn, President
Ashburn, GA - http://www.turnerchamber.com
Athens Area Chamber of Commerce
Larry McKinney, President
Athens, GA - http://www.athenschamber.net
Augusta Metro Chamber of Commerce
Ed Presnell, President & CEO
Augusta, GA - http://www.augustagausa.com
Bainbridge-Decatur County Chamber
Cile Warr, President
Bainbridge, GA
Banks County Chamber of Commerce
Richard M. Billingslea, Director
Homer, GA
Barnesville-Lamar County Chamber
Melissa Kinnard, Executive Director
Barnesville, GA
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The Georgia Chamber of
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Barrow County Chamber/Industrial Authority
Meredith Cartmill, President
Winder, GA
Baxley-Appling County Chamber of Commerce
Karen Glenn, Executive Vice President
Baxley, GA
Berrien County Chamber of Commerce
Mary Alice McGee, President
Nashville, GA - http://www.berrienchamber.com
Blairsville-Union County Chamber of Commerce
Renai M. Brock, Executive Director
Blairsville, GA
Blakely-Early County Chamber of Commerce
Wanda Hudson, President
Blakely, GA - http://www.blakelyearlychamber.com
Brunswick and Glynn Co. Dev. Authority
Phil Overton, Executive Director
Brunswick, GA
Brunswick-Golden Isles Chamber
M. H. Woodside, Jr., President
Brunswick, GA - http://www.brunswickgeorgia.com
Cairo-Grady Chamber of Commerce
Sandy Reagan, Executive Vice President
Cairo, GA
Camden-Kings Bay Area Chamber of Commerce
Carla Carper, Executive Director
Saint Marys, GA - http://www.camdenchamber.com
Camilla Chamber of Commerce
C. Eric Brooks, Executive Director
Camilla, GA
Carroll County Chamber of Commerce
Kenneth J. O'Neill, President and CEO
Carrollton, GA
Cartersville/Bartow County Chamber of Commerce
Molly Grover, President & CEO
Cartersville, GA
Catoosa County Chamber of Commerce
Katie Rennard, President
Ringgold, GA
Chatsworth-Murray County Chamber of Commerce
Dinah Rowe, President
Chatsworth, GA
Chattanooga Area Chamber of Commerce
Thomas E. Wilson, President & CEO
Chattanooga, TN
Chattooga Chamber of Commerce
Suzan B. Spivey, President
Summerville, GA
Cherokee County Chamber of Commerce
Pamela W. Carnes, President
Canton, GA
Clayton County Chamber of Commerce
Shane Moody, President & CEO
Hapeville, GA
Cobb Chamber of Commerce
William A. Cooper, President & CEO
Marietta, GA
Cochran-Bleckley Chamber of Commerce
Anne B. Sinyard, President/CEO
Cochran, GA
Colquitt-Miller County Chamber of Commerce
Veryl Garland, President
Colquitt, GA
Conyers-Rockdale Chamber of Commerce
Fred Boscarino, President & CEO
Conyers, GA - http://www.conyers-rockdale.com
Cordele-Crisp Chamber of Commerce
Monica G. Simmons, President
Cordele, GA
Covington-Newton County Chamber of Commerce
Misti Whitfield Martin, President
Covington, GA
Cumming/Forsyth County Chamber of Commerce
Joni Owens, President & CEO
Cumming, GA
Dahlonega-Lumpkin County Chamber
Cynthia Baily, Director/President
Dahlonega, GA
Dalton-Whitfield Chamber of Commerce
George Woodward, President/CEO
Dalton, GA
Darien-McIntosh County Chamber of Commerce
Shelly Sancomb, Administrative Assistant
Darien, GA
Dawson County Chamber of Commerce
Linda D. Williams, President
Dawsonville, GA
DeKalb Chamber of Commerce
Dedra D. Autra, Senior Vice President
Decatur, GA
Development Authority of Bainbridge & Decatur County
Ron Iamon, Executive Director/President
Bainbridge, GA
Development Authority of Cherokee County
Sherian Wilburn, Executive Director
Canton, GA
Development Authority of Clayton County
Emory Brock, Dir. of Economic Development
Jonesboro, GA
Development Authority of Columbia County
Bryan J. Quinsey, Executive Director
Evans, GA
Development Authority of Floyd County
Sam Freeman, Chairman
Rome, GA
Development Authority of Fulton County
C. Clayton Powell, Chief Executive Officer
Atlanta, GA
Development Authority of LaGrange
Jane Fryer, Secretary
LaGrange, GA
Development Authority of Peach County
Charles Sims, Executive Director
Fort Valley, GA
Development Authority of Peachtree City
Virgil Christian, Executive Director
Peachtree City, GA
Development Authority of Richmond County
Laurie Davis
Augusta, GA
Development Authority of White County
Jeffrey Neal Ash, Board Member
Helen, GA
Donalsonville-Seminole County Chamber
Brenda H. Broome, President
Donalsonville, GA
Dooly County Chamber of Commerce
Judy Ledford, President & CEO
Vienna, GA
Douglas County Chamber of Commerce
Matt Carlson, President
Douglasville, GA
Douglas-Coffee County Chamber & Industrial Authority
Frank Thompson, President
Douglas, GA
Dublin-Laurens County Chamber & Development Authority
Willie Paulk, President
Dublin, GA - http://www.dublin-georgia.com
Eastman-Dodge County Chamber of Commerce
Linda Dunlap, President
Eastman, GA
Eatonton-Putnam Chamber of Commerce
Roddie Anne Blackwell, President
Eatonton, GA
Effingham County Chamber of Commerce and Industrial Development Authority
Herb Jones, Executive Director
Springfield, GA
Elbert County Chamber of Commerce
Phyllis Brooks, President
Elberton, GA
Ellaville-Schley County Chamber of Commerce
Tommy Barnes, Executive Director
Ellaville, GA
Fannin County Chamber of Commerce
Jan Hackett, Executive Director
Blue Ridge, GA
Fayette County Chamber of Commerce
Elissa Hall, President
Fayetteville, GA
Fayette County Development Authority
Chris Clark, President/CEO
Fayetteville, GA
Fitzgerald-Ben Hill Chamber of Commerce
Betsy W. Giddens, Executive Director
Fitzgerald, GA
Forsyth-Monroe Co. Chamber of Commerce
Pamela Christopher, President & CEO
Forsyth, GA
Georgia Chamber of Commerce
George Israel, President & CEO
Atlanta, GA
Georgia Hispanic Chamber of Commerce
Sara J. Gonzalez, President
Atlanta, GA
German American Chamber of the Southern United States, Inc.
Thomas Beck, President & CEO
Atlanta, GA
Gilmer County Chamber of Commerce
Brenda Johnson, Executive Director
Ellijay, GA
Gordon County Chamber of Commerce
Jimmy Phillips, President
Calhoun, GA
Greater Columbus Chamber of Commerce
F. Michael Gaymon, President/CEO
Columbus, GA
Greater Hall Chamber of Commerce
Kit Dunlap, President/CEO
Gainesville, GA
Greater Lithonia/Snapfinger Woods Chamber
Gerald D. Sanders
Lithonia, GA
Greater Macon Chamber of Commerce
Chip Cherry, President
Macon, GA
Greater North Fulton Chamber of Commerce
Robert Bowling
Roswell, GA
Greater Rome Chamber of Commerce
Albert M. Hodge, Jr., President
Rome, GA
Greene County Chamber of Commerce
Lynn L. Hudson, President
Greensboro, GA
Griffin-Spalding Chamber of Commerce
Bonita Pfrogner, Executive Director
Griffin, GA
Griffin-Spalding Development Authority
David M. Luckie, CEcD, Executive Director
Griffin, GA
Gwinnett Chamber of Commerce
Richard Tucker, President/CEO
Duluth, GA
Habersham County Chamber of Commerce
Ed Nichols, Executive Director
Cornelia, GA
Haralson County Chamber of Commerce
Jennie West, President
Waco, GA - http://www.haralson.org
Harris County Chamber of Commerce
Peggy Lyda, Executive Director
Hamilton, GA
Hart County Chamber of Commerce
Ginger Johnson, President
Hartwell, GA
Hawkinsville-Pulaski Chamber of Commerce
Laura Horne, Office Manager
Hawkinsville, GA
Hazlehurst-Jeff Davis Chamber of Commerce
Rebecca Burnette, Executive Director
Hazlehurst, GA
Heard County Chamber of Commerce
Donna Armstrong-Lackey, President/Director
Franklin, GA
Henry County Chamber of Commerce
Kay Pippin, Executive Director
McDonough, GA - http://www.henrycounty.com
Henry County Development Authority
Bob White, Executive Director
McDonough, GA
Houston County Development Authority
Morgan B. Law, Executive Director
Warner Robins, GA
Jackson County Chamber of Commerce
Pepe Cummings, President/CEO
Commerce, GA
Joint Development Authority Emanuel/Swainsboro
Charles Schwabe, Chairman
Swainsboro, GA
Jones County/Gray Chamber of Commerce
Sandra J. McKinney, Executive Director
Gray, GA
LaGrange Troup County Chamber of Commerce
Jane L. Fryer, President
LaGrange, GA
Lee County Chamber of Commerce
Brad Lofton, Executive Director
Leesburg, GA
Liberty County Chamber of Commerce
Ronald Tolley, President
Hinesville, GA
Lincolnton-Lincoln County Chamber of Commerce
Elizabeth P. Arthur, President
Lincolnton, GA - http://www.lincolncountyga.org
Loganville Chamber of Commerce
Betty McCullers, President
Loganville, GA
Long County Chamber of Commerce
Diane Middleton
Ludowici, GA
Macon County Chamber of Commerce
Bill Sawyer, President
Montezuma, GA
Macon-Bibb County Convention & Visitors Bureau
Janice Marshall
Macon, GA
Madison County Chamber of Commerce
Marvin L. White, President
Danielsville, GA
Madison-Morgan County Chamber
Marguerite Copelan, Executive Director
Madison, GA - http://www.madisonga.org
Meriwether County Chamber of Commerce
May McDaniel, Executive Director
Warm Springs, GA
Meriwether County Development Authority
Kip Purvis, President
Warm Springs, GA
Metro Atlanta Chamber of Commerce
Sam A. Williams, President
Atlanta, GA
Metter-Candler County Chamber of Commerce
Judd Drake, Chairman
Metter, GA
Milledgeville-Baldwin Chamber of Commerce
Tara Peters, President
Milledgeville, GA
Monticello-Jasper County Chamber of Commerce
Bill O'Keeffe, Exectuive Director
Monticello, GA
Moultrie-Colquitt Chamber of Commerce
Darrell Moore, President
Moultrie, GA
Newnan-Coweta Chamber of Commerce
Brenda Washington
Newnan, GA
Ocilla/Irwin Chamber of Commerce
Hazel McCranie, President
Ocilla, GA
Oconee County Chamber of Commerce
Russell H. Lee, President
Watkinsville, GA
Okefenokee Area Development Authority
Regina Morgan, Executive Director
Waycross, GA
Okefenokee Chamber of Commerce
Doug Vaught, Executive Director
Folkston, GA
Paulding County Chamber of Commerce
Skip Teaster, President/CEO
Dallas, GA
Peach County Chamber of Commerce
Verna Borders, Executive Director
Fort Valley, GA
Pelham Chamber of Commerce
Danny Singleton, Executive Director
Pelham, GA
Perry Area Chamber of Commerce
Megan H. Smith, President/CEO
Perry, GA
Pickens County Chamber of Commerce
Kris Stancil, Executive Director
Jasper, GA
Polk County Chamber of Commerce/Development Authority
Karolyn Elders, President
Rockmart, GA
Quitman-Brooks County Chamber
Fred Lamb, President & Economic Developer
Quitman, GA
Rabun County Chamber of Commerce
Rhonda Lunsford, President
Clayton, GA
Richmond Hill-Bryan County Chamber of Commerce
Kimberly Nott, Director
Richmond Hill, GA
Roberta-Crawford County Chamber of Commerce
Elizabeth Scarborough, Executive Vice President
Roberta, GA
Savannah Area Chamber of Commerce
William Hubbard, President & CEO
Savannah, GA
Screven County Chamber of Commerce
Nancy Edenfield, Executive Director
Sylvania, GA
South Fulton Chamber of Commerce
John M. Boothby, President & CEO
Union City, GA
Southwest Georgia Chamber of Commerce
Beryl Rigsby
Cuthbert, GA
Statesboro-Bulloch Chamber of Commerce
Peggy Chapman, President
Statesboro, GA
Swainsboro Emanuel County Chamber
Helen S. Center, President
Swainsboro, GA
Tattnall County Development Authority
John M. Cheney, Executive Director
Reidsville, GA
Telfair County Chamber of Commerce
Carol Lavely, President
McRae, GA
Thomaston-Upson County Chamber/ GACCE
Betsy Hueber, President
Thomaston, GA - http://www.gacce.org
Thomaston-Upson County Chamber/ GACCE
Betsy Hueber, President
Thomaston, GA - http://www.gacce.org
Thomaston-Upson County Industrial Authority
Jim Edwards
Thomaston, GA
Thomasville-Thomas County Chamber
Donald P. Sims, President
Thomasville, GA
Thomson-McDuffie Chamber of Commerce
Winston A. Oxford, Executive Director & CEO
Thomson, GA
Tifton-Tift County Chamber of Commerce
James A. Chavez, President and CEO
Tifton, GA
Toccoa-Stephens County Chamber of Commerce
Cynthia Brown, President
Toccoa, GA
Toombs/Montgomery County Chamber of Commerce
Bill Mitchell, President
Vidalia, GA
Towns County Chamber of Commerce
Candace Lee, President
Young Harris, GA
U.S. Chamber of Commerce
Moore Hallmark, Southeastern Regional Director
Marietta, GA
Valdosta-Lowndes Co. Industrial Authority
Ken Garren, Executive Director
Valdosta, GA
Valdosta-Lowndes County Chamber of Commerce
Myrna Ballard, President
Valdosta, GA
Walker County Chamber of Commerce
Joanna King, Interim President
Rock Spring, GA
Walton County Chamber of Commerce
Teri H. Wommack, President
Monroe, GA
Warner Robins Area Chamber of Commerce
Michele Callahan, President
Warner Robins, GA
Warren County Chamber of Commerce
Ocie B. McCorkle, Executive Director
Warrenton, GA
Washington County Chamber of Commerce
Theo McDonald, President
Sandersville, GA
Waycross-Ware County Chamber of Commerce
Marshall Rainge, President
Waycross, GA
Wayne County Chamber of Commerce
Gary D. Browning, Executive Director
Jesup, GA
White County Chamber of Commerce
Judy Walker, President
Cleveland, GA
Wilkes County Chamber of Commerce
Sandy White, Executive Director
Washington, GA
Worth County Economic Development Authority
Bill Boone, Executive Director
Sylvester, GA
Worth County-Sylvester Chamber of Commerce
Lydia Harris, President
Sylvester, GA
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