spain

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spain
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Although this brochure has been elaborated with the utmost care, the National Public Employment
Service - INEM (EURES) will not accept any responsibility derived from the use of this information.
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Esta publicación ha sido realizada con ayuda de los Fondos de la Comisión Europea,
edición realizada por el Servicio Público de Empleo Estatal (INEM).
Condesa de Venadito, 9
Edición: 5.000 ejemplares
NIPO: 215-05-086-0
Depósito Legal: M-5156-2006
Elaboración: Red EURES - ESPAÑA
Diseño: PRINTERALIA
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CONTENTS
TABLE OF CONTENTS
1. Introduction .................................................................................................. 5
2. Free movement of workers .................................................................... 8
3. Labour market ........................................................................................... 10
4. Finding work in Spain ........................................................................... 12
5. Social security, health and unemployment benefits .............. 17
6. Taxes .............................................................................................................. 22
7. Employment ............................................................................................... 26
8. Accommodation ....................................................................................... 30
9. The spanish education system .......................................................... 33
10. Certificate and diploma equivalence in the european
economic space ........................................................................................ 38
11. Culture .......................................................................................................... 40
12. Legal assistance ....................................................................................... 42
13. Useful telephones & addresses ......................................................... 43
14. Do not forget ............................................................................................. 53
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1. INTRODUCTION
Official name Kingdom of Spain, common local name Spain.
Spain is located in the south-west of Europe, on the Iberian Peninsula. Its total
surface area is 504,750 km_, and it shares the peninsula with Portugal. Apart
from mainland Spain, the national territory also includes the Balearic Islands in
the Mediterranean Sea, the Canary Islands in the Atlantic Ocean, and, in North
Africa, the cities of Ceuta and Melilla. It is the third-largest European country in
land mass and the fifth-largest in population.
Spain’s climate is temperate, with abundant sunshine, but there is also a great
diversity in its weather. The first climate zone is the northern strip, which includes the regions of Galicia, Asturias, Cantabria and the Basque Country, where
rain is abundant and constant, summers are mild and winters are quite cold. To
the south of this strip, the interior zone enjoys a continental climate. Finally, in
the rest of the coastal zones, especially Andalusia and the Levant region, winters tend to be milder and summers are warm.
According to the latest official number published 1 January 2005, the population is 44,000,000. There are currently more than 2.6 million foreigners registered in Spain, representing over 6.2% of the total population. The arrival and
regularisation of foreigners in recent years has been very intense. It is calculated that the number of residents has quadrupled since 1998.
Nearly 60% of these foreigners reside in the regions of Madrid, Catalonia and
Valencia. This shows foreigners prefer large cities, such as Madrid, Barcelona
or Valencia, to live and work. Some 22.1% of all foreigners reside in
Andalusia, the Balearic Islands and the Canary Islands. The regions in the
north and west of the peninsula are the ones with the lowest numbers of
registered foreigners.
The Spanish State is a parliamentary monarchy. The Legislative branch is based
on a bicameral Parliament (“las Cortes”): Congress of the Deputies and Senate.
Spain has a President of the Government, and a Head of State, which is the King.
Spain is further configured as a State of autonomous regions, comprising 17
Autonomous Communities: Andalusia, Aragon, Asturias, Balearic Islands, the
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Basque Country, Canary Islands, Cantabria, Castilla - La Mancha, Castilla - Leon,
Catalonia, Extremadura, Galicia, La Rioja, Madrid, Murcia, Navarre and Valencia,
each of which has its own parliament and president. In other words, political
power in Spain is decentralised.
LANGUAGE
Spain is highly diversified culturally, which is reflected in the variety of languages spoken in the country. The official language throughout the country is
Spanish. However, in many Autonomous Communities, this language shares official status with languages such as Basque, Catalan, Galician or Valencian, in
their respective geographic areas. Although unofficial, there are other vernacular, minority languages used. These include Bable or Asturian, Leonese,
Aragonese and Aranese.
Speaking English, German or French only will make it very difficult to find work
in Spain, with the exception of occasional jobs in tourist areas on the islands or
on the coast.
CURRENCY
The legal monetary unit is the euro.
Importing and exporting local currency is subject to declaration requirements
when in excess of 6,000 (the amount exported may not exceed the amount
declared upon arrival). Importing and exporting foreign currencies is unlimited,
but it should be declared when in excess of 6,000 per person and trip, to avoid
customs difficulties when leaving Spain.
TIME
Peninsula and Balearic Islands: GMT +1
Canary Islands: GMT.
INTERNATIONAL TELEPHONE CALLS
To place a call to Spain from abroad, you must dial the international access code
of the country from which calling, plus 34 (country code for Spain) and the 9digit telephone number.
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To call from Spain to another country, you must dial 00, followed by the country
code and the telephone number.
You may place calls from phone boxes. The boxes work with coins or with cards.
To place a call within Spain, dial the number without any prefixes. The number
will always consist of 9 digits, whether a landline or a mobile telephone. Mobile
telephone technology in Spain is GSM (incompatible with some countries, such
as the United States or Japan). If your technology is compatible with GSM, you
should contact your operator in your country to make sure that you can use your
mobile phone in Spain (some operators require activating international service).
Once you have completed the procedures in your country of origin, you should
only use the mobile phone in Spain as if it were a Spanish terminal. That is, you
must dial 00 + the country code to place international calls.
EMERGENCY SERVICES
1-1-2 is the Single Telephone Number for Emergencies of all type.
In some regions, calls are handled in more than one language. In any case, it is
an emergency service that functions 24 hours a day, 365 days a year.
Other telephones of interest:
National police:
Local police:
Ambulances:
Fire brigade:
091
092
061
080
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2. FREE MOVEMENT OF WORKERS
Citizens of the EES may travel, reside and work freely in any member
nation, enjoying the same rights as the citizens of the selected country. This
right to free movement is extended to their family members, whatever their
citizenship.
Therefore, as a citizen of an EES member nation, you can aspire to any type of
work in Spain, whether employed by someone else or self-employed, without
having to request a work permit. You will also have the same rights as Spanish
citizens as regards salary, working conditions, access to housing, vocational training, social security or trade union affiliation.
To enter Spain as an EU citizen, all you need is an ID card or a valid passport.
You may stay three months to look for employment or to establish yourself as a
self-employed worker.
If after the three months you have still not found a job, you have a right to
stay longer if you are still looking for work and you have real possibilities of
finding it.
Foreigners who, for economic, professional or social reasons, maintain links with
Spain will be provided with a personal, unique and exclusive number, for identification purposes, called NIE (“Número de identificación de Extranjeros,
Foreigners Identification Number”). Although the worker may take complete
employment related formalities without the need to hold a NIE (registration at
employment offices, affiliation with the Social Security), it is recommended that
it be obtained if the stay in Spain is going to be lengthy.
http://www.mir.es/sites/mir/extranje/regimen_comunitario/tarjeta_residencia.html
RESIDENT’S CARD
You may apply for a community resident’s card if you find employment or if you
are a student or retiree to confirm your rights. However, this is not essential, as
Spanish legislation does not include any resident’s card requirements (although
having one makes it easier to complete certain administrative procedures). The
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following people may reside in Spain without being required to hold a community resident’s card, as long as they possess a valid, non-expired ID card or passport:
a) Citizens of European Union Member States, or of other States included in the
European Economic Space Agreement (including Switzerland), who are:
a. self-employed or salaried workers,
b. students
c. beneficiaries of the right to reside permanently.
b) Family members of the people indicated in the previous paragraph, whatever their citizenship:
a. spouse, as long as they are not legally separated;
b. descendants, and those of the spouse when they are not legally separated, under the age of 21 or those over 21 if they are economically dependent;
c. parents, and those of the spouse when they are not legally separated,
who are economically dependent, except for the parents of students and
their spouses
c) Cross-border community (or EES) workers; that is, those who work in Spain
but keep their residence in another Member State, to which they return
every day, or at least once a week.
The card is required when the European Economic Space Member State citizen
wishes to apply for residence for a family member who is not a citizen of a
Member State.
The Resident’s Card may be applied for at the Foreigners Office in the province
in which the interested party wishes to establish residence or, when there is
none, at the corresponding Provincial Police Headquarters. The card’s validity
period varies depending on group and period of residence.
http://www.mir.es/sites/mir/extranje/regimen_comunitario/tarjeta_residencia.html
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3. LABOUR MARKET
During the first quarter of 2005, according to a report by the Chambers of
Commerce, the Spanish economy maintained a growth rate similar to that of
2004, with a high employment creation rate. Construction and internal demand
continue to drive economic activity, whilst exports have decreased.
The productive sectors have shown stable growth in the services sector and
industry has become less dynamic, compared to growth in 2004, affected by the
poor export levels. Only construction continues to grow, making it the driving
force of the economy.
The sectors with both productive and employment growth are commerce and
services, which continue along the lines of recovery started last year. The recovery in 2004 in industry gave rise to increased job creation in the sector,
although in the first quarter of 2005 large commerce and services companies
were the ones that created the greatest number of jobs.
Data from the Labour Force Survey show a positive evolution during 2004, with
accelerated employment growth and a sharp drop in unemployment in the final
quarter. In the first quarter of 2005, the unemployment rate in Spain was around
10.2%. The distribution by group highlights a worrisome concentration of unemployment among young people (the unemployment rate for individuals under
the age of 25 is around 22%) and women (13.64% unemployed). Although these
numbers are quite high compared to neighbouring countries, they continue to
fall and therefore they are considered positive, especially taking into account
that the activity rate has grown to nearly 57%
In regional terms, the lowest unemployment rates are found in Aragon, Navarre
and Catalonia. The highest levels are in Ceuta, Melilla, Extremadura and
Andalusia. The highest activity levels were recorded in Madrid, Catalonia and the
Balearic Islands.
Employment Opportunities.
Opportunities may vary, depending on the sectorial specialisation of the regions.
Keep in mind also that the needs of the labour market change quickly.
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According to data from the INEM Monitoring Centre, the reasons for which
employers to have difficulty covering vacancies, which generates employment
opportunities, are diverse. Some are related to the lack of qualification and professional experience of the workers. In other cases, the opportunities arise due
to the dynamics of the economic activity itself or its seasonality.
There are employment opportunities for:
• Technical and commercial salespeople
• Cooks and waiters
• Construction professionals: bricklayers, cement operators and other qualified
workers
• Carpenters, electricians
• Mechanics, welders
• Lorry drivers
• Unskilled workers, such as cleaning personnel and farm labourers
Skilled employment:
The Infoempleo 2004 report includes the regional distribution of the skilled
labour offer. Of the total offer, the 42% is distributed between the Autonomous
Communities of Madrid and Catalonia. These are followed in order of importance by Andalusia, Valencia and the Basque Country. In any case, the report indicates that there has been a decline in the concentration in recent years. The
most relevant sectors are construction and public works, industry and consultancy, and by function, those of sales and customer support, production and
general services.
As regards offers that require qualifications, in Spain it is common for companies to request professionals with specific qualifications. The greatest demand
continues to be for technical qualifications (architects and technical and upperlevel engineers), followed by business administration and management and economics.
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4. FINDING WORK IN SPAIN
Despite the progressive drop in the unemployment rate in recent years in Spain,
finding work is not an easy task, so it is essential to use all available resources
(acquaintances, family members, press, information centres, professional associations...), as well as the EURES network and a healthy dose of imagination and
creativity.
Public Employment Services
The Spanish Public Employment Service (INEM) and the Autonomous
Community services (regional) have a network of offices with services available
to all workers.
Individuals over the age of 16 may register with the public employment services
by presenting a valid identification document or passport, as long as they have
a home address. To access professions that require qualifications, you must certify that you fulfil the requirements to work in that profession in Spain.
Services they provide: job offers, career guidance, vocational training, unemployment benefits processing, information on employment support measures.
Addresses may be found in the telephone book or on the INEM web site, which
has links to the Autonomous Community public employment services. Some of
them provide information on job offers through their web site. Many have information and useful addresses for finding work, as well as job searching guides.
To find the web sites for the Autonomous Community employment services, see
the useful addresses section in this guide.
www.inem.es
EURES (European Employment Services)
EURES (European Employment Services) is a network for co-operation established between the European Commission, the national employment services of
the Member States, Norway and Iceland and (in the case of the cross-border
regions) the organisations that represent the social partners.
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It may be useful to contact the EURES network in your country. Information is
available through the Public Employment Service. They will provide you with
information on job offers in Spain and other information of interest to help you
determine and/or develop your mobility project.
EURES has a web site that provides information related to mobility and a database with employment opportunities in the member countries, as well as an
application for inserting your CV online. This information is available at
http://europa.eu.int/eures
Private Placement Agencies and
Collaborating Entities
The current management model for some of the public employment services in Spain
includes entities (Universities, professional associations, etc.) that work with the
public employment service to provide the same services to workers free of charge.
These entities can provide their services to all types of workers or to specific groups
(university students, people with disabilities, workers in a particular activity sector).
There are also private placement agencies that operate in the Spanish labour
market, which are authorised by the Labour Administration.
The Autonomous Community employment service will provide you with information on these entities and the services that they offer.
Temporary Employment Agencies
Unlike other labour market intermediaries, these companies hire workers directly
and then loan them to the User Company by means of an availability contract,
delegating to these the management and control of the work to be carried out.
They are especially useful for finding temporary employment.
Press
All Spanish national, regional and provincial newspapers have a daily section
with job offers, although the Sunday editions publish the greatest number of
offers.
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National newspapers include EI País, ABC, EI Mundo, La Razón and EI Periódico,
and La Vanguardia in Barcelona. All of them have a special employment supplement in their Sunday edition.
The German, English or French language newspapers published in the major
Spanish tourist areas also include a job offer section in which knowledge of
foreign languages tends to be a prerequisite for the jobs.
The international press also usually publishes employment offers for Spain,
although they are generally aimed at executive, technical or professional staff.
Newspapers and professional journals available in the EES may also be a good
source of useful information on employment in Spain, especially if they include
a special Employment section. There are also Spanish publications that specialise in jobs and employment offers.
El Mundo
El País
ABC
La Razón
El Periódico
La Vanguardia
Busca medios
http://www.elmundo.es
http://www.elpais.es
http://www.abc.es
http://www.larazon.es
http://www.elperiodico.es
http://www.lavanguardia.es
http://www.buscamedios.com
Chambers of Commerce
The Chambers of Commerce, both in the country of origin and in Spain, are also
possible sources of information on the economy and on businesses. They are
especially useful for obtaining advice on establishing oneself as a self-employed
worker.
https://www.camaras.org
http://www.camerdata.es/ (companies file)
http://www.vue.es/ Single business window. Procedures for creating
companies
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Associations, Professional Bodies
and Trade Unions
Other sources of information include professional associations and trade unions.
Some professions in Spain have an Official Association that you must register
with to work in that profession.
Self-Proposal and Personal Contacts
Some companies offer an application form, but it is more common to provide a
CV with a cover letter. This may occur as a result of an offer or an ad in the press,
or by presenting a self-proposed application.
Cover letter. This is not a simple formality, it is your calling card and the first
impression that you make on the company. Unless otherwise indicated, the letter and the CV must be written in Spanish. They should by computer drafted in
A4 format, and on a single page. They should be concise, using formal language. The letter must be related directly to the job that you are applying for. Avoid
using a standard form letter.
Curriculum Vitae: There are no strict rules for presenting your CV, but here are
some tips that may be helpful. It should be structured, clear and concise. It
should be computer drafted. It should be kept to a maximum of two pages in
DIN A4 format. A photo is not required, but it may be recommendable for some
jobs. Do not include qualifications and certificates. Unless otherwise requested,
they are submitted during the interview. Language: direct, using simple sentences. Avoid acronyms and abbreviations.
Structure:
• Personal Data: name, nationality, full address, telephone (including international prefix), e-mail etc...
• Training: Include academic education and complementary training. A separate section is usually included for language and computer skills. For the
academic education, indicate only the highest level attained, indicating the
centre where it was obtained, the location and the start and end dates of the
studies.
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• Experience: this may be structured in chronological or inverse chronological
order, and also by professional area. Indicate the company, profession, dates
and tasks performed.
• Additional information: This section is optional and open, and it is used to
indicate other information that may be useful for performing the job, such
as holding a driving license, willingness to travel... References are not normally included, although this section may be used to add a comment such
as “references available upon request”.
CV templates and advice for writing them may be found on most public employment service web sites in Spain.
Contacts and personal relationships are very useful for finding employment. If
you have friends or family in Spain, it is useful to tell them that you are looking
for work, since many vacancies are covered through this type of contacts and
references.
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5. SOCIAL SECURITY, HEALTH AND
UNEMPLOYMENT BENEFITS
Social Security
The Social Security Administration in Spain comprises a set of Administrative
bodies and Public Organisations with powers and authorities designed to provide Spanish citizens and, when appropriate, foreigners residing in our country,
with a collection of assistance, health and economic benefits.
The Social Security System is an indispensable element and an essential objective in modern society as a public protection system covering any situation of
need, for all citizens.
The Spanish Social Security System is managed, among others, by three public
entities that depend on the Ministry of Labour and Social Affairs: the National
Social Security Institute (INSS), the Treasury General of the Social Security
(TGSS) and the Social Marine Institute (ISM).
The Community Regulations for Social Security will be applied to the citizens of
a European Union or European Economic Space Member State who are selfemployed or employed by others and who are or have been subject to the legislation of one or more of those States, students, civil servants and stateless individuals or refugees residing in one of the Member States, as well as to their
family members and survivors. In accordance with the Agreement between the
European Union and Switzerland, they are also applied to Swiss Citizens.
These regulations apply to the following Social Security benefits: illness and
maternity (health care, temporary disability and maternity), permanent disability, including those established to maintain or improve the ability to make a
living, old age, survivors, work-related injury and professional disease, death
subsidies, unemployment and family member benefits.
Health Care
The quality of health care in Spain is quite good. There are both public hospitals
(belonging to the Social Security) and private ones. The basic Spanish Social
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Security health care network is structured around consulting centres, health
centres and hospitals. Spain has a reciprocal health care agreement with several countries (including all of the countries in the European Union). Citizens of
these countries must request the European Health Card from their medical
centre, which, since June 2004, replaces the E-111 document, to use the public
medical services in Spain.
The State, through the National Health System, guarantees the availability
and quality of the services anywhere in the country.
The Departments of Health and Regional Health Services in the Autonomous
Communities have assumed the corresponding responsibilities, functions and
financing. Lists of hospitals and health centres are available from the local
offices.
Treatment in the public social security system is free. If special care is required, the doctor refers the patient to a specialist with an official report.
Medicine is always prescribed by the doctor on an official prescription form,
and the patient has to pay 40% of the price. Some medicines are not covered
by the social security.
Treatment is free at hospitals in the social security system. Patients have a
right to certain services such as prosthetics, orthopaedics, transfusions, etc.
free of charge when needed.
All self-employed individuals and those employed by others must be affiliated
with the social security, paying the monthly contributions through their
employer. A social security card will be provided, which grants the right to free
hospital and medical care.
Private insurance may also be taken out through the many private medical
companies in Spain. They are listed in telephone books as “Sociedades
Médicas”. In this case, treatment expenses are not reimbursed, except in certain emergency situations.
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Addresses of Interest
Web Site: Ministry of Health and Consumer Affairs (“Ministerio de Sanidad y
Consumo”) http://www.msc.es
• Office of ADMINISTRATIVE INFORMATION AND CITIZEN SUPPORT (“Oficina
de INFORMACIÓN ADMINISTRATIVA Y ATENCIÓN AL CIUDADANO”). The
information may be requested in person, in writing or by telephone at: Pº
del Prado 18-20 (ground floor) 28014, Madrid. Telephones: 915961089 / 90
/ 91-Fax: 915964480.
Links to the Autonomous Community
Ministries of Health
Community/City/Department/Ministry.
• Basque Country Department of Health
http://www.euskadi.net/sanidad/indice_c.htm
• Catalonia Department of Health and Social Security
http://www.gencat.net/sanitat/portal/es/latest.html
• Galicia Ministry of Health http://www.xunta.es/conselle/csss/index.htm
• Andalusia Ministry of Health http://www.csalud.junta-andalucia.es/principal
• Asturias Ministry of Health and Medical Services http:// www.princast.es
• Cantabria Ministry of Health, Consumer Affairs and Social Welfare:
www.csanidadcantabria.com/sanidad2/index.html
• La Rioja Ministry of Health and Social Services: http://www.larioja.org/
• Murcia Ministry of Health and Consumer Affairs http://www.carm.es/csan/
• Valencia Ministry of Health http:///www.san.gva.es/
• Aragon Department of Health, Consumer Affairs and Social Welfare:
http://www.portal.aragob.es
• Castilla - La Mancha Ministry of Health:
http://www.jccm.es/sanidad/prog.htm
• Canary Islands Ministry of Health and Consumer Affairs:
http://www.gobcan.es/sanidad/
• Navarre Department of Health: http://www.cfnavarra.es/Salud/
• Extremadura Ministry of Health and Consumer Affairs: http://www.juntaex.es/consejerias/syc/home.html
• Balearic Islands Ministry of Health and Consumer Affairs:
http//:web2.caib.es
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• Madrid Ministry of Health: http://www.madrid.org/sanidad/home.htm
• Castilla - Leon Ministry of Health and Social Welfare: http://www.jcyl.es
• City of Ceuta Ministry of Health and Consumer Affairs:
http:// www.ciceuta.es/consejerias/marcosconsej.htm
Unemployment Benefits
Unemployment benefits are economic benefits available to salaried workers who,
having contributed to the General Social Security Scheme, lose their job, completely or partially, and are in a legally recognised situation of unemployment.
In Spain, workers who are employed by others (except civil servants and those
who do not make contributions for this concept, such as domestic employees)
are required to be insured, covering the loss of employment. Contributions for
this coverage are made by the employers, the workers and the State.
There are two levels of coverage for unemployment benefits under the Spanish
system:
Contributory Level Benefits
All workers employed by others who have contribution periods in the general
Social Security scheme of over 360 days have a right to receive contributorylevel unemployment benefits when they lose their job, completely or partially,
for reasons beyond their control.
Assistance Level Benefits
Workers who are legally unemployed and registered with the Public Employment
Services, who do not have a right to contributory-level benefits or whose benefits have expired, may apply for an assistance-level unemployment benefit if
they meet the conditions established for certain groups.
The Spanish unemployment benefits system is managed by the INEM-SPES. If
you lose your job while in Spain, contact the local SPES office, where you will
receive information on applying for unemployment benefits. If you want to
return to your country and apply for unemployment benefits there, you must
first request the E-301 form from the SPES to be able to count the period worked in Spain.
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Exporting the Unemployment Benefit
If you are receiving unemployment benefits or subsidies in your country or in
any other in the EES, you may export it to another Member State to look for
employment in the new country for a maximum of 3 months. To do so, you must
have been registered with the Public Employment Service in the country of origin for at least 4 weeks and you must notify that service of your actual date of
departure and register with the Spanish Public Employment Service (INEM)
within 7 days of departing from the former Member State. You must bring form
E-303, which will be issued to you by the Employment Service that granted you
the right. Keep in mind that the processing may take up to 2 months. Contact
your SPES Office for more information. (http://www.inem.es)
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6. TAXES
One of the most important questions to be resolved upon arrival in the country to
which you have moved, in this case Spain, is to register with that country’s tax
collecting institution. Remember to bring the required tax document from your
country of origin, as well as certification that you have processed all pending tax
issues prior to leaving. You will also need the documentation for the new job or
new source of income. When you arrive, do not forget that you may need to open
a bank account, and remember to set aside enough money to pay your taxes.
Spain collects the following taxes
Direct Taxes:
Personal Income Tax (IRPF):
Tax applied to the income earned by individuals during the calendar year; that
is, the earnings from work, professional activities or business activities, income
and those derived from property.
The amount is determined by the income earned (progressive rate: the higher
the income, the higher the tax percentage) and the discounts and deductions
that may apply in each particular case, and after deducting the withholdings
and fractional payments made during the calendar year. In general, you must
declare all of your income (earnings obtained anywhere in the world) in the
country in which you maintain your legal residence. The legal residence, as
concerns the IRPF is normally the regular place of work and residence; that is,
the country in which you have resided for 183 days or more during a particular tax year. However, the “legal” residence may be determined by other factors, such as residence of family members, close personal and economic ties,
location where registered, location where most work is conducted... so it is
advisable to seek information on your tax situation in Spain before deciding
whether or not to accept a job here.
The declaration of this tax is made during the months of May and June of the
year following the year declared. Failure to declare or declaring outside of the
established period will be sanctioned, as is the case with all other taxes.
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Living and working in
SPAIN
The European Union Member States have signed tax agreements (Double
Taxation Agreements, DTA) to prevent taxing the income of people who travel or
reside in different countries of the Union twice.
(http://www.minhac.es/tributos/cdipaises.htm)
(http://www.aeat.es/normlegi/cdi/home.html)
Business Tax:
In general terms, it is very similar to the IRPF, but it affects legal entities (companies, enterprises, associations...). The general tax rate is currently set at 35%,
although there are also other special rates applied to certain types of legal entities.
Estate Tax:
This is a progressive tax on private ownership of goods and economic rights,
whenever they exceed the minimum exemption. It is declared during the same
period as the IRPF.
Inheritance and Donation Tax:
This is a tax on goods and rights, whether acquired by any form of succession
(Inheritance) or by free “inter vivos” acquisition (Donations).
Indirect Taxes:
Value Added Tax (VAT):
This tax is applied to the delivery of goods and services provided by companies
and professionals and to the importation of goods, except for the legally established exemptions. The applicable tax rates vary between 4% for goods considered basic needs and the general 16%.
Estate Transfer Tax and Stamp Duty:
This tax is applied to the transfer of goods and economic rights “inter vivos” that are
burdensome, as well as the documentation of legal acts that are formalised or applicable in Spain. The applicable tax rate varies according to the type of property transfer or legal act (notary, mercantile, administrative or judicial) that is documented.
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Special Taxes and Excises:
Unlike the VAT, which taxes general consumption, these taxes apply to the consumption of certain goods. These taxes are currently levied on: hydrocarbons,
alcohol and distilled beverages, wine and fermented beverages, beer, tobacco...).
One tax that you must keep in mind if you have a car is the Special Tax on certain means of transport, which is applied to the registration of automobiles,
boats and aircraft. New and used means of transport to which the tax is applied
must be registered in Spain when they are to be used in Spain by people or entities residing in Spain.
There are also other national-level taxes, such as the Insurance Premiums Tax
and those related to importing and exporting goods (that is, taxes on foreign
trade) which are in accordance with European Union legislation.
Local Taxes:
Property Tax:
Applied to the ownership of real estate property.
Economic Activities Tax:
Applied to the exercise of any business, professional or artistic activity.
Motor Vehicle Tax:
Applied to ownership of motor vehicles authorised to travel on public roadways.
Construction, Installation and Works Tax:
Applied to any construction, installation or works activity that requires the corresponding urban development permit.
Capital Gain on Urban Land Tax:
applied to the increased value of urban land as a result of transferring ownership.
You should seek information on your tax situation at the Tax Administration in
your country of origin prior to departing for Spain, as well as at the Spanish
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Living and working in
SPAIN
Embassy or one of the Consulates in your country
(http://www.mae.es/mae/textos/embajadas/relalf.htm)
In Spain, you may obtain information at the Provincial Offices of the State Tax
Administration Agency and at the corresponding Administrations. You may consult the Tax Agency page on the internet at http://www.aeat.es, call on Tel.: 901
33 55 33 (basic tax information) or contact:
Tax Office in Madrid (“Delegación de Hacienda en Madrid”)
Exchequer (“Ministerio de Hacienda”)
Guzmán El Bueno 139, 3ª plta.
E - 28003 Madrid
Tel: (00 34) 91 582 67 67 (Ext. 6537)
Fax: (00 34)91 582 65 77
http://www.minhac.es
Tax Department (“Dirección General de Tributos”)
c/ Alcalá, nº 5
28014 MADRID
Tel.: 91 595 80 00 Extension: 8043
Fax: 91 595 84 54
State Tax Administration Agency
(“Agencia Estatal de la Administración Tributaria”)
San Enrique, 26
28071 Madrid
Tel.: 91 583 70 00 Extension: 8998
Fax: 91 583 70 05
http://www.aeat.es/
Customs and Excise Department (“Departamento de Aduanas e Impuestos
Especiales”) (Headquarters and Offices):
http://www.aeat.es/aduanas/donde/home.html
E-mail: [email protected]
Tel.: 91 728 96 08 / 05
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7. EMPLOYMENT
CONTRACTS
Any citizen of the countries in the European Economic Space have the same
rights as Spaniards as regards salaries, promotion, social security working conditions and other work-related rights.
The minimum working age is 16, although authorisation is required from parents
or guardians until the age of 18, unless the individual has been emancipated
legally.
Duration:
The contract may be indefinite (“fijo”) or for a specified period of time (“temporal”). Unless otherwise stated in the contract, it is presumed to be indefinite and
full-time.
Formalisation:
The employment contract may be established in writing or verbal, although the
vast majority of the contracts in Spain are in writing. Verbal contracts may be
formalised in writing at any time while the contract is in effect. The following
types of contracts must always be in writing:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
26
Apprenticeship
Training,
Contract for a specific job or service,
Part-time contract,
Permanent intermittent
Relief,
Home,
Workers hired in Spain to work for Spanish companies abroad,
Contracts for a set amount of time greater than four weeks.
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Living and working in
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Trial period:
A trial period may be established in the contract during which the parties may terminate the contract for no reason. Although it is not obligatory, when such a period
is established the maximum duration allowed is 6 months for qualified technicians
and 2 months for all other workers. In companies with fewer than 25 workers, the
trial period may not exceed three months, except for qualified technicians.
Workday, holidays and leave of absence:
The maximum duration of the ordinary workday is 40 hours per week, with no
more than 9 hours a day. Minors under the age of 18 may not work more than
8 hours a day, including, in the case of training contracts, the time dedicated to
that training.
Holiday may never be less than 30 days, including Saturdays and Sundays. There
are also 12 national and 2 local holidays per year.
Workers also have a right to 15 days leave for marriage and 16 weeks for maternity, which the father may take part of if both parents work.
Salary:
The following basic concepts are established by collective agreement or in the
individual contracts:
• Base salary
• Salary complements: seniority, extra pays, profit sharing, distance and transport allowances...
• Job complements: stress, toxic environments, danger, shifts, night work, etc.,
• Bonuses for production, per diem, accommodation, etc...
Payment must be made in periods of no greater than one month, and the employer is responsible for withholding the taxes and social security contributions
from the workers’ salaries.
One unique aspect of salaries in Spain is that workers have a right to at least
two extra pays per year; one is normally paid at Christmas and the other in summer. They may also be prorated if so established by agreement.
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The minimum professional wage (S.M.I.) is the minimum remuneration set
annually by the government. It is illegal to hire a worker for less than that
amount. In 2005, the minimum wage for any activity in agriculture, industry and
services, with no gender or age discrimination, has been set at € 17,10/day or
€ 513/month. The annual amount, including complements, may not be less than
€ 7,182 for a legal full-time workday. When the workday is less than full-time,
the salary is reduced in proportion to the time.
For domestic employees who provide their services by the hour, the minimum
wage is 4.01/hour worked, with the proportional part of the extra pays and
holidays included in that amount.
Updated information on the minimum professional wage is available at:
www.mtas.es/infpuntual/entrada.htm
For more information on salaries, see:
http://www.tusalario.es/
Terminating the working relationship:
the employment contract may be terminated by agreement between both parties, expiry of the employment contract, voluntary resignation of the worker,
force majeure or dismissal (collective dismissal for economic reasons, disciplinary dismissal, etc...). Cases of contract expiry or dismissal always require notification from the employer (notifying the worker of the contract expiry or dismissal) and, when appropriate, a pre-notification made from between 15 to 30
days beforehand, depending on the working relationship and its duration.
If the cause is a Dismissal by the employer, based on the worker’s failure to fulfil their duties, the worker must be notified in writing, indicating the reasons for
the dismissal and the date on which it becomes effective. If the worker disagrees with the decision, they must file a request for conciliation within 20 working
days before the Mediation, Arbitration and Conciliation unit in their
Autonomous Community, before they can lodge a complaint with the Social
Court.
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Living and working in
SPAIN
SELF-EMPLOYED INDIVIDUALS
If you wish to establish yourself as a self-employed worker in Spain, to carry out
an economic activity without being subject to an employment contract, you
must be 18 years of age or older and complete a series of formalities:
• Complete the Tax Declaration for initiating activity with the Tax Agency
(form 036) http://www.aeat.es - http://www.minhac.es/
• Register as a Social Security affiliate at the Social Security Offices
http://www.seg-social.es/
• Register with the corresponding professional association, when this is requisite to practise the profession.
If you wish to start a company, the procedures with the different administrations (national, regional and local) may be somewhat complex if you are not
familiar with the Spanish procedures and formalities. You may obtain advice and
information through the single business windows at the Chambers of
Commerce. They do not complete the administrative procedures, but the information they provide is excellent. See the following pages:
http://www.vue.es
http://www.camaras.org
Http://www.ventanillaempresarial.org
If you wish to seek the help of a private professional to complete all of the procedures, contact a “GESTORÍA” (office specialised in dealings with public bodies).
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8. ACCOMODATION
Rent:
If during your stay in Spain you wish to rent a flat, the best thing to do is to go
through an estate agent or check the rental property sections in newspapers.
Estate agents are listed in the yellow pages of the telephone book.
http://www.paginasamarillas.es
There are a number of web sites that can help you find accommodation, such as
http://www.vivendum.com
You must sign a rental contract with the owner. Rental contracts are valid, legal
and lawful in any form, including verbal. However, it is best to use written contracts. For this case, there is an “official contract form” on stamped paper that
may be purchased at “estancos” (tobacco shops).
The tenant is required to provide a cash deposit equal to one month’s rent. In
nearly all residential buildings community expenses and services are shared
(caretaker, cleaning, gardening, swimming pool...), so you must find out if these
expenses are included in the lease.
Seasonal accommodation:
Individuals interested in this type of accommodation may contact a Tourism
Office, which will provide a list of available seasonal accommodations.
The Youth Institute has partnership agreements with Town Halls to provide temporary rental housing to young people under the age of 30 with low incomes
when they are away from their habitual residence for reasons of work, studies
or to participate in cultural events and activities, sports, etc. These accommodations may be new construction or renovated homes located in the city’s historic
quarter.
http://www.injuve.mtas.es
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Living and working in
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Buying property:
There are currently many EES estate agencies dedicated to buying Spanish properties. In Spain, you may contact a local estate agency. Information on buying
property in Spain is also available from the Foundation Institute of Foreign
Owners.
For up-to-date information on market prices for new housing, the Valuation
Society conducts a massive market study that analyses the new free-market
housing promotions constructed in all provincial capitals.
Some Autonomous Communities have a service called the “Bolsa de Vivienda
Joven” (“Youth Housing Exchange”), where you may obtain general information
on renting and buying a home, specialised legal information and press reports
on housing rental and shared accommodation. This service maintains a bank of
rental flats for young people at below-market prices, through an agreement
with the owners. More information is available from the Youth services in each
of the Autonomous Communities.
Foundation Institute of Foreign Owners
Tel. 96 584 23 12 Fax: 96 584 15 89
E-mail:[email protected]
http://www.fipe.org
Valuation society
http.//www.st-tasacion.es/
yellow pages
http://www.paginasamarillas.es/
INJUVE. Sectorial Programmes Service.
Tel. 91 363 75 93 Fax: 91 402 21 94
E-mail: [email protected]
http://www.injuve.mtas.es
HOUSEHOLD GOODS
In theory, for moves within the Union, there are no restrictions on the right to
transport personal belongings. However, for reasons of general interest, Member
States may prohibit or condition the use of certain products, such as: firearms,
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tobacco, alcohol, medicines, drugs, products derived from protected species or
certain pornographic material. The Spanish consulate provides information on
exporting household goods and personal belongings.
SERVICES
Electricity:
Electricity is contracted with the electric company that is responsible for commercialising this service in each area (ENDESA, IBERDROLA, UNION FENOSA,
HIDROELÉCTRICA DEL CANTÁBRICO, BEGASA, etc.).
Gas:
Most Spanish cities have a centralised gas service that is paid according to
meter readings. Natural gas is currently used. Individual electric heating
systems are also quite common in Spain. However, bottled butane gas (“bombonas”), which is delivered to the home, is still used for cooking in many
homes.
Telephone:
There are several telephone companies. You should inform yourself well before
contracting services, since there are differences in rates and offers depending on
the time and the destination of the calls (TELEFÓNICA, AIRTEL, UNI 2, ALO, JAZZTEL, RETEVISION, etc.)
http://www.teltarifas.com
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Living and working in
SPAIN
9. SPANISH EDUCATION SYSTEM
Primary and secondary education in Spain are compulsory and free. This education covers ages 6 to 16 and it is given at public, subsidised or private education centres (the private centres are not free). Responsibility for education has
been transferred to the Autonomous Communities.
Pre-primary
Up to the age of 6, it consists of two cycles: the first cycle up to the age of 3,
and the second up to the age of 6. This education is not compulsory, but the
Administration must guarantee places for schooling the children for whom it is
so requested.
Primary Education
It is compulsory and free. It consists of six academic years for ages 6 to 12 and
it is organised into three 2-year cycles. Students enter Primary Education the
calendar year in which they turn six years old.
Compulsory Secondary Education
This is a compulsory, free education stage consisting of four academic years
between the ages of 12 and 16. It offers the education required to continue
studies in either Higher Secondary Education or midlevel Vocational Training.
The student and their parents may choose to conclude the compulsory schooling once the student turns 16, in which case they will be given the corresponding Compulsory Secondary Education Diploma.
Higher Secondary Education . It is voluntary and lasts for two school years,
normally between the ages of 16 and 18. These studies provide a general
education which favours greater intellectual and personal maturity, while
also preparing them for later studies, both at university and in vocational
training.
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Vocational Training
The purpose of Vocational Training in the education system is to prepare students
for work in a professional field, providing them with multipurpose training that
allows them to adapt to the changes in the workplace that may arise throughout
their life. It includes both basic vocational training and specific midlevel and
upper-level vocational training. There are currently 142 official qualifications.
There are also Special Education Systems, such as the Artistic studies: Plastic
and design arts, Music, Dance and Art and Design, as well as Languages.
Registration Period:
In general the application submission period begins in April, with an extra period
in September for mid- and upper-level training cycles. Later, in June or July,
depending on the education level, the registration is formalised. In the case of
the extra applications in September, the registration is formalised in that month.
School Calendar:
There may be variations between the different Autonomous Communities.
However, it starts in mid-September and ends in the month of June, with holiday periods for Christmas, Holy Week and Summer.
UNIVERSITY
Access to university is made through an entrance examination. University education
currently includes: 3-year Diplomas (“Diplomatura”) and 4-, 5- or 6-year Degrees
(“Licenciatura”), depending on the selected course and the centre where the studies are
given. The Universities are autonomous entities with the ability to establish their own
educational offer. Students may study at any Public University they choose, regardless
of their place of origin (Open District). There are also private universities.
The university education structure is currently in the process of being modified
to adapt it to the “Bologna process”. Prior to October 2007 there will be new university qualifications structured into GRADUATE and POSTGRADUATE. Graduate
studies prepare students to work in a profession. POSTGRADUATE studies are
structured, in turn, into a second cycle, leading to a MASTER, and a third cycle,
which culminates in a DOCTORATE.
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Living and working in
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Spain has become the third most popular European country for foreign university students after England and Ireland.
http://wwwn.mec.es/univ/index.html
Masters, Doctorate and Postgraduate Studies
Nearly all Spanish Universities offer postgraduate, doctorate, masters and
degree studies.
FOREIGN CENTRES IN SPAIN
There are centres in Spain that offer non-university studies corresponding to
education systems in other countries. You may obtain more information from
the education bodies in your country or at the embassy.
It is also possible, at certain education centres, to take studies leading to dual qualifications (academic qualifications in both countries). This is the case of those participating in the partnership agreement between the Spanish Ministry of Education
and Science and The British Council (MCDE-British Council Agreement).
Useful addresses:
National Association of British Schools: information on these centres and their
location:
http://www.nabss.org/index.html
European School (Alicante): Follows the European Schools study plan. It covers
from pre-primary to secondary education.
http://www.eursc.org/SE/htmlEn/IndexEn_home.html
NON-FORMAL EDUCATION
Vocational Training
These are courses designed for unemployed individuals registered as job seekers
in the Public Employment Services. Information is available from the public
employment services. Training is free.
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Continuing Training
Courses for currently-employed workers organised by the companies, the workers, or trade union organisations, aimed both at improving skills and qualifications and at requalifying workers, making it possible to harmonise company
competitiveness with the individual training of the workers.
http://www.inem.es
SPANISH FOR FOREIGNERS:
Courses are provided by both private and public organisations. Find out more at
the Official Language School nearest you or through the Ministry of Education.
The Instituto Cervantes also offers Spanish language courses at its centres, organises examinations in Spain to obtain the DELE (Diploma for Spanish as a Foreign
Language, which is an official qualification that certifies the level of skill and
fluency in the Spanish language, awarded by the Ministry of Education and
Science) and provides information on over 1,300 courses in Spanish for foreigners
in Spain, nearly 300 education centres and close to 100 locations.
http://eee.cervantes.es
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Living and working in
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Spanish education system
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10. CERTIFICATE AND DIPLOMA
EQUIVALENCE IN THE EUROPEAN
ECONOMIC SPACE
RECOGNITION OF PROFESSIONAL
QUALIFICATIONS
This recognition is for professional qualifications only, not academic, and leads
to authorisation to practise a profession that is regulated in Spain. The primary
beneficiaries are professionals, not students.
The community Directives that regulate this matter are grouped into two categories: Sectorial Directives and Directives establishing a general recognition system.
The sectorial directives affect the following professions: Doctor, Specialist Doctor,
General Nurse, Midwife, Dentist, Veterinarian, Pharmacist and Architect.
This legislation for the recognition of qualifications applies exclusively to citizens of the 25 Member States of the European Union and the signatory States
of the Agreement for Non-Union Members of the European Economic Space.
The current list of professions that are regulated in Spain and require qualification recognition may be obtained from:
http://wwwn.mec.es/mecd/jsp/plantilla.jsp?id=111&area=titulos
Application and competent authorities:
The responsible authority is different for each profession, being the National or
Autonomous Community Ministerial Department related to the profession in
question.
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ACADEMIC RECOGNITION
(CERTIFICATION, RECOGNITION)
Certification
Certification gives the qualification from another country, from the date on
which it is granted and the corresponding credential is issued, the same value
as the Spanish academic qualification or level for which it is certified.
Recognition
The value of recognition of studies is, generally, academic only, as it allows individuals to continue studying in the Spanish education system. The studies may
lead, when appropriate, to obtaining the corresponding Spanish qualification.
The general information related to professional and academic recognition may
be obtained from:
Ministerio de Educación y Ciencia (“Ministry of Education and Science”)
Subdirección General de Títulos, Convalidaciones y Homologaciones
(“Subdirectorate General for Qualifications, Recognition and
Certification”)
Consejería técnica de Títulos de la Unión Europea (“Technical Office for
European Union Qualifications”)
Paseo del Prado, 28014- MADRID
Tel. 91 506 56 00 and 91 506 56 18 fax: 91 506 57 06
http://www.mec.es/mecd/jsp/plantilla.jsp?id=82&area=titulos
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11. CULTURE
Cultural and social life in Spain is the product of the multiple external influences that it received through the course of history, which explains its great
wealth and diversity. All cultural expressions receive the direct support of the
Government through the Ministry of Education and Science and the Ministry
of Foreign Affairs.
Great names in the Spanish arts have been, among others, in painting:
Velázquez, Goya, Murillo, Zurbarán, Sorolla, Picasso, Dalí or Miró; in classical
literature: Cervantes, Quevedo, Lope de Vega; in music, Manuel de Falla and
Albéniz.
Spain possesses an immense historic-artistic, bibliographic and documentary
heritage that holds the key to its national collective life. It is the third most
important country in the world in number of monuments declared to be of
world-wide historical value.
Madrid has, among others, three great museums with universal artistic masterpieces: the Prado Museum, the Thyssen-Bornemisza Museum and the Reina
Sofía National Art Centre Museum.
In recent years the Spanish literature industry has developed at a vertiginous
rate. Additionally, the literature industry is used to spread the Spanish language, which gains more and more ground every day throughout the world. The
Instituto Cervantes is very important in promoting and teaching Spanish and
in spreading Spanish and Latin American culture.
Spain celebrates Christmas, Holy Week and Carnival. All towns and cities also
have their own patron saints’ days whose festivities last several days. Some of
the best known festivals include Los Sanfermines in Pamplona, Las Fallas in
Valencia, the April Fair in Seville and the San Isidro Fair in Madrid.
Cities publish guides with information on all cultural activities (concerts, exhibitions, conferences, museums, painting, theatre, etc.). There are a numerous
festivals, leisure and recreation activities available. The municipal tourism
offices provide information on historical and cultural subjects.
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Living and working in
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Regarding sport, most Spanish cities have excellent sport facilities. For entertainment, football is most popular, but basketball, handball, cycling and athletics are
also popular. Other sports that are practised regularly include golf, tennis, skiing,
sport fishing, nautical sports such as sailing and, recently, adventure sports are
proliferating, such as free flight in ultralights, paragliding or canyoning.
In the gastronomical section, one of Spain’s greatest attractions is the quality of
its food and the variety of products available. There is no real “national food”,
rather a variety of regional foods. Paella, Galician “empanada” and “caldo”,
“fabada” from Asturias, “callos” from Madrid and the Spanish omelette are some
of the most representative dishes.
Foreigners should keep in mind that eating habits may be very different from
their country of origin, especially regarding hours, since meals are generally
eaten later than normal. Most people work from 9:00 to 14:00 and from 16:00
to 19:00, so many people are forced to eat in restaurants.
Spain is still a country in which the family is fundamental. Although friendship and
work are very important, family takes precedence over all. This tradition is apparent
in many ways, and in this case it tends towards patriarchal organisation structures.
You can find more information on cultural subjects at:
Ministry of Culture (“Ministerio de Cultura”)
Secretariat of State for Culture (“Secretaría de Estado de Cultura”)
Telephone: 91-701 71 56 or 91-701 71 57
http://www.mcu.es/
The Youth Institute (INJUVE) collects and disseminates information of interest to
young people: youth cards, hostels, exchanges, co-operation, volunteering, associations, studies, employment, housing... It also collaborates with nearly 3,000
Youth Information Centres located around the country, which depend on the
Autonomous Communities, Town Halls and a variety of social initiatives.
http://www.injuve.mtas.es
It is a good idea to find out as much information as possible on a variety of
general subjects before arriving in Spain. For more information, contact the
Spanish Tourism Office or the Spanish Embassy or Consulate.
http://www.tourspain.es
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12. LEGAL ASSISTANCE
During your stay in Spain you are subject to Spanish law. If you have any legal problems, contact your country’s embassy. Also, if you feel your rights as a community
citizen are not being respected, you may contact the SOLVIT network, created by
the European Commission to ensure compliance with community legislation.
http://europa.eu.int/solvit
e-mail:[email protected]
The Spanish Constitution and its related laws establish a series of fundamental
rights that are fully guaranteed. When faced with any legal problem, contact a
lawyer. If you do not have one, request a legal aid lawyer from the Lawyers
Association. All detainees in any police and judicial proceedings have the right
to be assisted by a lawyer.
Any person who is detained must immediately be informed of their rights and
the reason for the arrest, and they may not be forced to make a declaration.
Preventive arrest may last only as long as strictly necessary to make the inquiries required to clarify the facts. In any case, after a maximum period of 72
hours, the detainee must be released or charged.
An additional legal guarantee to the right of personal freedom is the “habeas
corpus” procedure, which provides for the immediate release of all people detained, who must appear before the judge who will determine the legality or illegality of the arrest.
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Living and working in
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13. USEFUL TELEPHONE NUMBERS
AND ADDRESSES
Embassies in Madrid:
Germany:
http://www.embajada-alemania.es
Belgium :
Tel.91 577 63 00
http://www.embajada-online.com
Fax 91 431 81 66
Austria:
Tel.945565315
http://www.embajada-online.com
Fax 91 597 35 79
Denmark:
Tel.91 431 84 45
http://www.embajadadinamarca.es
Fax 91 431 91 68
Finland:
Tel.921 319 61 72
http://www.finlandia.org
Fax 91 308 39 01
France:
Tel.91 423 89 00
http://www.ambafrance-es.org
Fax 91 423 89 01
Greece:
Tel.91 564 46 53
http://www.embajada-online.com
Fax 91 564 46 68
Ireland
Tel.91 436 40 93
http://www.embajada-online.com
Fax 91 435 16 77
Island
Tel.91 373 15 06
Fax 91 373 92 65
Italy:
Tel.91 423 33 00
http://www.ambitaliamadrid.org
Fax 91 575 77 76
Luxembourg
Fax 91 577 48 26
Tel.91 435 91 64
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Norway
Tel.91 310 31 16
http://www.emb-noruega.es
Fax 91 310 43 26
Netherlands
Tel.91 359 09 14
http://www.embajada-online.com
Fax 91 359 21 50
Portugal
Tel.91 782 49 60
Fax 91 782 49 72
http://www.embajadaportugal-madrid.org
United Kingdom Tel.91 700 82 00
http://www.ukinspain.com
Fax 91 702 20 40
Sweden
Tel. 91 702 20 00
http://www.embajadasuecia.es
Fax 91 702 20 40
Euroinfo. European Commission. Representation in Spain
Tel.91 423 80 00
Fax 91 576 03 87
http://europa.eu.int/spain
General Central Government Information:
Tax Information: 901 33 55 33
Labour and Social Security Information: 900 16 65 65
Home Office (“Ministerio del Interior”) Citizen Information Office: 900 15 00 00
State Public Employment Service (INEM)
Condesa de Venadito, 9 28027-MADRID
Tel.: 91 585 98 88. Fax: 91 377 58 81/ 91 377 5887
http://www.inem.es
National Social Security Institute
Subdirectorate General for International Relations (International Agreements).
Padre Damián, 4-6 28036-MADRID
Tel.: 91 5688300
http://www.seg-social.es
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Living and working in
SPAIN
Internet Addresses:
Addresses related to each section have been indicated throughout the document. The following is a list of others that may also be of use:
Public Employment Services:
EURES:
http://europa.eu.int/eures
State Public Employment Service
http://www.inem.es
Autonomous Community employment services:
Andalucia
http://www.juntadeandalucia.es/servicioandaluzdeempleo
Aragón
http://www.portal.aragob.es
Asturias
http://www.princast.es/trabajastur
Canarias
http://www.gobiernodecanarias.org/empleo
Cantabria
http://www.empleacantabria.com
Castilla-La Mancha
http://www.sepecam.jccm.es/
Castilla y León
http://www.empleocastillayleon.com
Cataluña
http://www.gencat.net/treball
Comunidad de Madrid
http://www.madrid.org/servicio_regional_empleo/
Comunidad Valenciana http://www.servef.es
Extremadura
http://www.empleaextremadura.com
Galicia
http://www.xunta.es/emprego/portal.htm
Illes Balears
http://infosoib.caib.es
La Rioja
http://www.larioja.org
Navarra
http://www.cfnavarra.es/webgn/sou/instituc/cp/
areas/trabajo/snemp.htm
Región de Murcia
http://www.sefcarm.es
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Employment on the Internet:
http://www.monster.es
http://www.infojobs.net
http://www.trabajos.com
http://www.infoempleo.com
http://www.laboris.net
http://www.cybersearch.es
http://www.empleo.com
http://www.todotrabajo.com
http://www.trabajo.org
http://www.recursoshumanos.net/
http://www.acciontrabajo.com/
http://empleo.paginas-amarillas.es
http://www.oficinaempleo.com
http://intoko.es
http://www.lanbide.net
Specialised and/or sectorial Labour
Exchanges:
Executives and qualified professionals
http://www.canalcv.com
Hotel, Tourism and Leisure
http://www.bolsindetrabajo.com
http://www.turijobs.com
http://www.turiempleo.com
Teachers and Educators
http://www.internenes.com/empleo
http://www.educajob.com
Computers and Information Technology http://www.novanotio.es
Work for people with disabilities
http://www.mercadis.com/
University students and recent graduates http://www.empleo.universia.es
Secretaries
http://wwwsecretariaplus.com
Part-time employment
http://www.empleotiempoparcial.com/
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Living and working in
SPAIN
Temporary Employment Agencies (TEA)
ACCESS
ADECCO
ALTA GESTION
ATTEMPORA
CEPEDE
FASTER
RANDSTAD
TEMPORAL TRANSFER
http://www.accessett.com
http://www.adecco.es
http://www.altagestion.es
http://www.attempora.es
http://www.cepede.com
http://www.faster.es
http://randstad.es
http://www.temporaltransfer.com
Media:
El Mundo
El País
Empleo
ABC Electrónico
Empleo
La Razón
El Periódico
La Vanguardia
Empleo
La Estrella Digital
“Sur in English”
Heraldo de Aragón
Empleo
Radio Televisión Española
TVE programme “Aquí hay trabajo”
Busca medios
Press Journal
http://www.elmundo.es/Empleo
http://www.elmundo.es/cobranded/empleo
http://www.elpais.es
http://www.excoge.com
http://www.abc.es
http://todotrabajo.abc.es/
http://www.larazon.es/
http://www.elperiodico.es/
http://www.lavanguardia.es
http://lavanguardia.servijob.com
http://www.estrelladigital.es/
http://www.surinenglish.com
http://www.heraldo.es
http://empleo.heraldo.es
http://www.rtve.es
http://www.rtve.es/tve/program/empleo/main.html
http://www.buscamedios.com
http://www.journalismnet.com
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Company Data
Company search engine
Export companies
Europages
Business creation
Chambers of Commerce
Your Europe - Business
Spanish SME Confederation
http://camerdata.es
http://directorio.camaras.org
http://www.europages.es
http://www.ventanillaempresarial.org/
http://www.vue.es
http://www.camaras.org
http://europa.eu.int/business/en/index.html
http://www.cepyme.es
Working conditions:
2004 Labour Guide
Salaries
http://www.mtas.es/Guia2004/portada.htm
http://www.tusalario.es
Central Government:
Administration Web Site:
http://www.administracion.es
Ministry of Labour and Social Affairs (“Ministerio de Trabajo y Asuntos Sociales”)
http://www.mtas.es
Ministry of the Public Authorities (“Ministerio de Administraciones Públicas”)
http://www.map.es
Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Co-operation (“Ministerio de Asuntos
Exteriores y Cooperación”)
http://www.maec.es
Ministry of Finance and Economy
(“Ministerio de Economía y Hacienda”): http://www.minhac.es
Ministry of Education and Science
(“Ministerio de Educación y Ciencia”):
http://www.mec.es
Ministry of Justice
(“Ministerio de Justicia”)
http://www.mju.es
Ministry of Health and Consumer Affairs
(“Ministerio de Sanidad y Consumo”) http://www.msc.es
Home Office (“Ministerio del Interior”): http://www.mir.es
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Living and working in
SPAIN
Ministry of Public Works (“Ministerio de Fomento)
:
http://www.mfom.es
Ministry of Culture
(“Ministerio de Cultura”):
http://www.mcu.es
Ministry of Agriculture, Fishing and Food (“Ministerio de Agricultura,
Pesca y Alimentación”):
http://www.mapya.es
Ministry of the Environment
(“Ministerio de Medio Ambiente”):
http://www.mma.es
Ministry of Housing
(“Ministerio de Vivienda”):
http://www.mviv.es
Ministry of Industry, Tourism and Trade (“Ministerio
de Industria, Turismo y Comercio”):
http://www.mityc.es
National Statistical Institute
http://ine.es
EU Qualifications Recognition
http://wwwn.mec.es/mecd/jsp/
plantilla.jsp?id=8&area=titulos
Community Status (Home Office)
h t t p : / / w w w. m i r. e s / e x t r a n j e /
extregcomunitario.htm
Taxes
http://www.aeat.es/
Youth Institute (“Instituto de la Juventud”) http://www.mtas.es/injuve/
Autonomous Administrations:
Junta de Andalucía
(gobierno de Andalucía):
http://www.juntadeandalucia.es
Comunidad autónoma de Aragón
(gobierno de Aragón):
http://www.aragob.es
Comunidad autónoma de Asturias
(Principado de Asturias) :
http://www.princast.es
Comunidad autónoma de Baleares:
http://www.caib.es
Comunidad autónoma de Canarias:
http://www.gobcan.es
Comunidad autónoma de Cantabria:
http://www.gobcantabria.es
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Comunidad autónoma
de Castilla-La Mancha:
http://www.jccm.es
Comunidad autónoma de Castilla y León: http://www.jcyl.es
Comunidad autónoma de Cataluña:
http://www.gencat.es
Comunidad autónoma de Extremadura: http://www.juntaex.es
Comunidad autónoma de Galicia:
http://www.xunta.es
Comunidad autónoma de Madrid:
http://www.madrid.org
Comunidad autónoma de Murcia:
http://www.carm.es
Comunidad autónoma de Navarra:
http://www.cfnavarra.es
Comunidad autónoma del País Vasco:
http://www.euskadi.net
Comunidad autónoma de La Rioja:
http://www.larioja.org
Comunidad autónoma de Valencia:
http://www.gva.es
Ciudad autónoma de Ceuta:
http://www.ciceuta.es
Ciudad autónoma de Melilla:
http://www.camelilla.es
Accommodation and Travel:
Finding a flat
http://www.vivendum.com
http://www.excoge.com
http://www.intoko.es
Youth hostels
http://www.reaj.com
Sleeping in Spain
http://www.sleepinspain.com/
Travel
http://www.viamichelin.com
Plans, maps
http://www.maporama.com
http://ismap.com
Air transport
http://www.iberia.com
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Living and working in
SPAIN
Rail
http://www.renfe.es
Tourism, Culture, Accommodation, Travel.
Official site
http://www.tourspain.es/
Others
http://www.sispain.org/
http://www.red2000.com/spain/1index.html
http://www.spaindata.com
Housing, Information on
Foundation Institute of Foreign Owners http://www.fipe.org/
Prices (Valuation Society)
http://www.st-tasacion.net/boletin.html
Education
Education
http://www.worldstudent.com/esp/exterior/espana/index.shtml
http://www.educaweb.com
http://www.eurydice.org
Universities
http://wwwuniversia.es
Learning Spanish (I. Cervantes)
http://eee.cervantes.es/
The Spanish language page
http://www.el-castellano.com/index.html
Postgraduate studies
http://navegadorcolon.org
Scholarships
http://estudiasotrabajas.com
Online Spanish courses
http://ave.cervantes.es/
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Other information sources:
EURES (Info. on living and working
conditions)
http://europa.eu.int/eures
Your Europe - Citizens
Street maps
http://citizens.eu.int
http://callejero.terra.es/
http://callejero.paginas-amarillas.es
Foreign embassies in Spain
http://www.maec.es/
Youth Institute (Eryica network)
http://www.mtas.es/injuve/
Yellow Pages
http://www.paginas-amarillas.es
Segunda Mano (job ads, property...)
http://www.segundamano.es
Anuntis (job ads, property)
http://www.anuntis.com
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Living and working in
SPAIN
14. DON’T FORGET...
Before travelling to Spain to look for work or for a recruitment interview, there are
some documents which you must not forget:
• Valid EU/EES passport or identification document.
• Translated Curriculum Vitae (several copies), cover letters and references from
previous employment, academic qualifications and courses.
• “E” forms or European Health Card issued by the Social Security in your country
• Forms E-301 and E-303, as appropriate.
• Photocopy of your birth certificate and family certificate
• Certified translation of qualifications, as appropriate.
• Other permits and licenses that may be appropriate, such as a driving license.
Before accepting a job, make sure you:
• Have a valid EU/EES passport or identification document.
• Understand the terms and conditions of the employment contract. It is important that you clearly understand who will be responsible for the travel and
accommodation expenses: you or the employer.
• Know the method of payment and the salary frequency.
• Have accommodation in Spain
• Have appropriate health coverage.
• Have sufficient funds until you receive your first salary or to return home if
necessary.
• Are affiliated with the social security.
Before returning, it is important that you:
• Request the E 301 document from your employment office, which certifies your
contributions in Spain for any future benefits that you may have a right to.
• Ensure that you still have all of the personal documentation that certifies your
working relation in Spain (employment contract, payslips, etc...).
• Settle your tax situation with the tax agency.
Remember that processing these documents may take time, so you should request
them as soon as possible.
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