English Language - Pearson Schools and FE Colleges

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English Language - Pearson Schools and FE Colleges
New for 2015
Edexcel GCSE (9-1)
English Language
Resources Guide
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Why choose our Edexcel GCSE (9–1) English
Language teaching and learning service?
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Building confidence in English
Welcome to our brand new teaching and learning service, designed
specifically for the Edexcel GCSE (9-1) English Language specification.
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Brand new Revision Guide
and Workbook, written
specifically to support
your students with their
GCSE mocks and final
exam preparation.
See page 20.
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Resources
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Revision Guide and Workbook
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One annual subscription gives you full
access to our interactive front-of-class
teaching, planning and assessment service:
a wealth of resources to support every
extract in the Anthology. See pages 8–19.
Professional Development:
events and in-school
Gain a deeper understanding of the
Grammar for Writing and the Let’s Think
in English pedagogies and how best to
embed them into your teaching.
See page 21.
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ISBN: 9781447987895
Edexcel GCSE English Language Text Anthology-Cover.indd 1
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A LW AY S L E A R N I N G
www.pearsonschools.co.uk
[email protected]
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* These resources have now been endorsed by Edexcel. To find out more
about the new Edexcel GCSE (9–1) English Language specification, visit
www.edexcel.com/englishfor2015
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Next steps ....................................................................................... 24
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Summary grid matching resource
features to the new GCSE ...................................................22–23
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Series consultant: Debra Myhill
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Professional Development ......................................................... 21
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Revision Guide and Revision Workbook
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Revision ........................................................................................... 20
Text Anthology
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Text Anthology ActiveBook
An online version of this Text Anthology for students to access outside of lessons.
ISBN: 9781447994886
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d own b
Our online ActiveLearn Digital Service, powered by ActiveTeach provides a
wealth of teaching, planning and assessment support. This includes presentations,
worksheets, interactive activities and lesson plans to accompany the extracts in
this Text Anthology. ISBN: 9781447982029
ActiveLearn Digital Service
English Language
m
Also available
ActiveLearn Digital Service
t
ActiveLearn Digital Service ................................................... 8–19
Edexcel GCSE (9-1)
One student book packed
with texts – providing
the context for the
resources on the
ActiveLearn Digital Service.
Also available as an ActiveBook
See pages 6–7.
ISBN: 9781447988083
Text Anthology .............................................................................6–7
Series consultant: Debra Myhill
• Provides an extensive bank of engaging extracts, including many from 19th century fiction
and 20th/21st century non-fiction texts.
• Extensive support for all extracts provided by our online ActiveLearn Digital Service
(see below) – helping you to bring the Grammar for Writing and Let’s Think in English
approaches into your teaching.
• Assessment pages provide questions in the style of the new exams.
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English Language
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Edexcel GCSE (9-1)
Text Anthology
Inc
Let’s Think in English pedagogy ................................................... 5
FOR WRITING
Text Anthology
Grammar for Writing pedagogy .................................................. 4
Text Anthology
GRAMMAR
Edexcel GCSE (9-1) English Language
Contents
Our resources are organised into six differentiated tiers – complementing the Pearson
Progression Scale and helping you to match your teaching to suit the ability profile of your
classes. Exam-style assessment materials mapped to the progression scale are provided to
help you monitor that progress. See page 8.
in
• Learn how to use the Grammar for Writing and Let’s Think in
English pedagogies to full effect.
Supporting differentiation and progression for all your students
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an
• Develop student confidence and resilience when responding to
challenging unseen texts with the Let’s Think in English pedagogy.
Shares the
same Grammar
for Writing
methodology
used in our
KS3 Skills for
Writing course.
The Let’s Think in English pedagogy is underpinned by research and focuses on developing
inference, deduction and analysis skills to build students’ confidence when tackling unseen
texts in exam conditions. See page 5.
,
• Improve your students’ writing skills with an evidence-­based
approach so that they can write in a sustained, technically accurate
and effective way.
Building confidence with unseen texts through Let’s Think in English
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• Monitor your students’ progress and predict success simply and effectively
with our ActiveLearn Digital Service, so you can check they are on track.
Debra Myhill’s Grammar for Writing pedagogy has been trialled and shown to significantly
increase the rate of progress in reading and writing. Students explore and analyse the choices
writers make and then experiment with those choices in their own writing. See page 4.
as
• Fully prepare all of your students for the new style of assessments.
Improving writing through Grammar for Writing
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Our resources will help you and your students to get the very best
out of the new English curriculum, and help you to teach the new
specification* with confidence from September 2015.
Our new resources have been developed in exclusive partnership with experts from the
University of Exeter and King’s College London. The course components incorporate both
the Grammar for Writing and the Let’s Think in English pedagogies – specifically designed
to help with improving writing, and building confidence with unseen texts.
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Building confidence with unseen texts:
Let’s Think in English
Let’s Think in English is a teaching programme created by Laurie Smith and Michael
Walsh for King’s College London to help students develop the response and analysis skills
necessary for success in English. The programme has been trialled by 100+ schools over
five years and proven to work with students of all abilities.
A positive impact on reading and writing
More recently, Professor Myhill and her team carried out a new study at KS4 to see if it had
the same significant effect. Again, the intervention had a statistically significant positive
impact on students’ reading as well as writing, specifically with language analysis, sentence
structure, punctuation and spelling. Read more in the separate leaflet The Grammar for
Writing Pedagogy at KS4.
The seven Grammar for Writing pedagogical principles
1. Make a link between the grammar being introduced and how it works in the writing
being taught.
2. Explain the grammar through examples, not lengthy explanations.
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GCSE change for 2015 brings about a new set of expectations and challenges for students,
most notably with the emphasis on 100% examination, literary heritage texts, writing skills
and technical accuracy.
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Grammar for Writing at KS4
Our new teaching and learning service for Edexcel GCSE (9–1) English Language includes six
exclusive LTE lessons, with the planning, guidance and resources you need to teach them.
The Witch
the snow,
great while over
I have walked a
nor strong.
And I am not tall
h are set,
teet
my
and
My clothes are wet,
hard and long.
And the way was
h,
over the fruitful eart
I have wandered
here before.
the door!
But I never came
d, and let me in at
shol
thre
the
Oh, lift me over
is a cruel foe.
The cutting wind
in the blast.
I dare not stand
a groan,
e, and my voice
ston
are
ds
han
My
death is past.
And the worst of
en still,
I am but a little maid
are sore.
r!
My little white feet
me in at the doo
threshold, and let
Oh, lift me over the
3. Build in high-quality discussion about grammar and its effects.
4. Use ‘creative imitation’ to offer model patterns for students to play with and then use in
their own writing.
5. Use authentic examples from authentic texts to link writers to the broader community
of writers.
6. Select activities which support students in making choices and being designers of writing.
7. Include language play, experimentation, risk-taking and games.
4
We strongly believe the Grammar for Writing pedagogy provides an exciting, evidencebased approach to improving writing and reading progress at KS3 and KS4 through
contextualised grammar teaching – that’s why it underpins our brand-new teaching and
learning service to help you tackle this critical need.
Texts studied are in
the Text Anthology
and supported by
LTE worksheets, and
powerpoints on our
ActiveLearn Digital
Service. These guide
you through the
structure of the LTE
lessons.
© Pearson Educa
tion Ltd 2015. Copyi
ng permitted for
purchasing institu
tion only. This mater
ial is not copyright
free.
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In 2012, Professor Myhill and her team at the University of Exeter published the findings
of a three-year study into the impact of contextualised grammar teaching – a pedagogy
developed at the University of Exeter and now called Grammar for Writing. In the study,
KS3 students exposed to this pedagogy made almost double the rate of progress in writing.
Let’s Think in English (LTE) consists of lessons designed to be used fortnightly, all using
high-interest texts. The lessons are largely oral, based on reading, open-ended questioning
and structured group discussion. They systematically develop students’ skills of inference,
deduction and analysis, increasing their confidence, understanding and ability to express
their ideas. This can lead to higher results in written examinations as well as in speaking and
listening. Read more in the separate leaflet The Let’s Think in English Pedagogy.
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“These resources draw on research conducted in the Centre for Research
in Writing at the University of Exeter over many years and set out to
de-mystify the writing process through being explicit about how writing
is shaped and crafted.” Professor Debra Myhill, Exeter University
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Research strongly suggests that poor writing skills are one of the fundamental reasons why
more learners do not go on to realise their potential.
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Improving writing through
Grammar for Writing
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The Text Anthology is available as a printed book.
It is included on the ActiveLearn Digital Service for
front-of-class use, complete with annotation tools.
It is also available as an ActiveBook (via ActiveLearn)
for indpendent student access anywhere, anytime.
This course is organised into 42 Topics. Each Topic offers a set of resources based on a pair of extracts
in the Text Anthology. Each extract pairing centres around a particular theme (e.g. Animal Welfare in
this sample topic, 2.1).
a
This extract is from an article published in The Guardian newspaper the day before
the 2014 Grand National steeplechase1 at Liverpool’s Aintree racecourse, one of the
toughest horse races in the world because of the very high fences.
If you saw your neighbour whipping a dog, you’d
be on the phone to the police immediately, right? Of
course, anyone with a shred of decency condemns
hurting animals. Yet, inexplicably, some still turn a
blind eye to the cruelty to horses during the Grand
National, in which riders are required to carry a
whip. Nearly every year, racehorses sustain injuries.
Many have paid with their lives.
When 40 skittish horses are jammed onto a
treacherous obstacle course, viciously whipped, and
forced into jumping, breakdowns are inevitable. Last
year, only 17 – fewer than half – finished the Grand
National, and while the race organisers were quick
to highlight an absence of fatalities after last year’s
main event, they conveniently failed to mention
that two horses died at the same course earlier in
the week. According to research by Animal Aid in
2012, Aintree was the most lethal of all of Britain’s
racecourses, claiming the lives of six horses in just
eight days of racing.
Treated like wind-up toys – their fragile limbs
pushed to and sometimes beyond breaking point
– many horses sustain fractured legs or necks or
severed tendons, while others have heart attacks.
Every year, hundreds of horses die on British
racetracks. More are turned into dog food when they
stop winning.
f
o
Perhaps the most exciting discovery I made in this multicoloured Lilliput1 to which I had access was an
earwig’s nest. I had long wanted to find one and had searched everywhere without success, so the joy of
stumbling upon one unexpectedly was overwhelming, like suddenly being given a wonderful present. I moved
a piece of bark and there beneath it was the nursery, a small hollow in the earth that the insect must have
burrowed out for herself. She squatted in the middle of it, shielding underneath her a few white eggs. She
crouched over them like a hen, and did not move when the flood of sunlight struck her as I lifted the bark. I
could not count the eggs, but there did not seem to be many, so I presumed that she had not yet laid her full
complement. Tenderly I replaced her lid of bark.
From that moment I guarded the nest jealously. I erected a protecting wall of rocks round it, and as an
additional precaution I wrote out a notice in red ink and stuck it on a pole nearby as a warning to the family.
The notice read: ‘BEWAR – EARWIG NEST – QUIAT PLESE.’ It was only remarkable in that the two
correctly spelt words were biological ones. Every hour or so I would subject the mother earwig to ten minutes’
close scrutiny. I did not dare examine her more often for fear she might desert her nest. Eventually the pile of
eggs beneath her grew, and she seemed to have become accustomed to my lifting off her bark roof. I even
decided that she had begun to recognise me, from the friendly way she waggled her antennae.
To my acute disappointment, after all my efforts and constant sentry duty, the babies hatched out during
the night. I felt that, after all I had done, the female might have held up the hatching until I was there to
witness it. However, there they were, a fine brood of young earwigs, minute, frail, looking as though they had
been carved out of ivory. They moved gently under their mother’s body, walking between her legs, the more
venturesome even climbing on to her pincers. It was a heart-warming sight. The next day the nursery was
empty: my wonderful family had scattered over the garden.
I saw one of the babies some time later: he was bigger, of course, browner and stronger, but I recognized him
immediately. He was curled up in a maze of rose-petals, having a
sleep, and when I disturbed him he merely raised his pincers
irritably over his back. I would have liked to think that it was
a salute, a cheerful greeting, but honesty compelled me to
admit that it was nothing more than an earwig’s warning
to a potential enemy. Still, I excused him. After all, he had
been very young when I last saw him.
Care about horses? Then you should boycott the Grand National
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Contextual
information is
provided to help
students access
each extract.
Author Gerald Durrell (1925–95) was one of the world’s most highly respected
naturalists and conservationists, founding the Durrell Wildlife Conservation Trust,
based at his zoo on Jersey in the Channel Islands, in 1963. This extract is taken from
Durrell’s first book, My Family and Other Animals, an autobiographical account of the
five years he spent living on the Greek island of Corfu between the ages of 10 and 15.
The mindset that horses are little more than tools
to be used, abused and discarded is entrenched1
in the racing industry. Ruby Walsh’s comment that
horses are ‘replaceable’ is deeply offensive. Horses
are not unfeeling – they experience joy, anxiety, fear
and affection. They are also clever and perceptive,
as anyone who has seen a horse figure out how
to open stable-door latches will tell you. However,
Walsh’s comments were prophetic2: the very next
day, two more horses died on the Cheltenham track.
Horses are sometimes drugged to mask pain
and keep them running when they should be
resting or receiving treatment. Raced too young
and too hard, when their bones are not up to
the pounding and stress, horses used in racing
endure injuries, lameness and exhaustion. Last
year, Godolphin trainer Mahmood al Zarooni was
banned from racing for eight years after being
found guilty of doping offences.
People who care about horses should turn their
backs on the Grand National and every other
race in which horses are being run to death. This
cruelty will end only when the public realises that
there is no such thing as a ‘harmless flutter3’ when
it comes to funding the cruel and exploitative
horse-racing industry.
Glossary
1
Lilliput: the fictional island inhabited by
tiny people in Jonathan Swift’s satirical novel
Gulliver’s Travels (1726)
inexplicably: for reasons difficult to explain
2
skittish: jumpy, moving unpredictably
3
entrenched: long-lasting and difficult to change
4
full complement: the final number expected
2
prophetic: an accurate prediction
5
sentry duty: keeping guard
3
exploitative: benefiting unjustly from an activity
6
venturesome: adventurous
4
Sample pages from the Text Anthology
6
Extracts are usually from texts typical of
those that students will encounter in their
GCSE English Language exams.
Challenging words
are supported by
definitions in the
glossary box.
steeplechase: horse race in which the horses
jump over fences
1
Glossary
18
21st century non-fiction
20th century non-fiction
My Family and Other Animals
Animal welfare
19
The Text Anthology also includes …
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Animal welfare
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2.1
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A fantastic bank of engaging fiction and non-fiction extracts.
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Text Anthology
• Assessment pages to give students experience of exam-style questions.
(More assessment resources are provided on our ActiveLearn Digital Service.)
• Extracts for the Let’s Think in English lessons (provided on our ActiveLearn Digital Service)
to build the confidence and resilience of students when responding to unseen texts.
7
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Introducing our ActiveLearn Digital Service – powered by ActiveTeach
1
4th-6th
1.1
1.2
1.3
1.4
1.5
1.6
1.7
5-6
2
5th-7th
2.1
2.2
2.3
2.4
2.5
2.6
2.7
6-7
3
6th-8th
3.1
3.2
3.3
3.4
3.5
3.6
3.7
6-8
4
7th-9th
4.1
4.2
4.3
4.4
4.5
4.6
4.7
7-8
5
8th-10th
5.1
5.2
5.3
5.4
5.5
5.6
5.7
N/A
6
9th-12th
6.1
6.2
6.3
6.4
6.5
6.6
6.7
N/A
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Tier of
resources
Steps on the
Progression Scale…
Indicative old
NC Levels…
Tier 1
4 –6
5–6
Tier 2
5 –7
6–7
Tier 3
th
6 –8
6–8
Tier 4
7th–9th
7–8
Tier 5
8th–10th
N/A
Tier 6
9th–12th
N/A
th
th
th
The structure supports a
cumulative approach to
developing skills. Start with
whichever Tier you think is most
appropriate for your students.
Subsequent Tiers will revisit
many of the skills but in a more
sophisticated manner – providing
consolidation and extension.
8
th
th
To find out more about the Pearson
Progression Scale for English, go to:
www.pearsonschools.co.uk/progression
See separate booklet for
Topic 3.4 samples, aimed at
the 6th to 8th steps of the
progression scale.
Whole text and
structure skills
Topic 1
Indicative
NC Level
Topics 1-7 for each Tier
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Steps on the
Progression Scale
Sentence level and
vocabulary skills
See separate booklet for
Topic 6.5 samples, aimed at
the 9th to 12th steps of the
progression scale.
Comparison skills
Topic 7
The Topics within each Tier work through
the reading and writing skills that
students will need for their GCSE.
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Our ActiveLearn Digital Service is organised into six Tiers based on those progression steps. The
table below indicates which ability profile (i.e. which ‘steps’) each tier is most appropriate for.
Tier
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That’s why we’ve developed a new progression scale for English. Our series of progression maps
represents our view of how learners progress in reading and writing. The progression maps are
divided into twelve ‘steps’ of increasing demand to create the Pearson Progression Scale. Expected
progress for a student is one step per year from 11-16.
Samples from Topic 2.1
are included on pages
12-17 of this booklet.
See separate booklet for
Topic 1.1 samples, aimed at
the 4th to 6th steps of the
progression scale.
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We know that it’s important for you to understand and monitor the progress of your students, so
you can make sure they are on track to achieve their potential in their GCSE. With the removal of
national curriculum levels, a new grading structure at GCSE (9-1 replacing A*-G) and the emphasis
on measuring progress from 11-16 through Progress 8, this has become even more critical.
Each tier consists of seven Topics – giving you a total of 42 to select from across the whole course.
Each Topic offers a range of activities, presentations and worksheets to help you get the best
from the extracts. You can explore sample Topics from across the tiers – see the separate sample
material booklets, or find them online.
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Our ActiveLearn Digital Service is structured to support
different abilities and to help you track progress.
See page 10 for more details about what each Topic offers.
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our ActiveLearn Digital Service – powered by
Introducing our
by ActiveTeach
ActiveTeach
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What’s in a Topic?
Two extracts, linked by a theme, are provided for every Topic – see pages 6-7 for example. These
extracts are in the Text Anthology and on printable worksheets on the ActiveLearn Digital
Service. For each of the 42 Topics there is then a wealth of resources to support the extracts:
Reading for meaning
Writer’s Workshops
Worksheets rehearsing a range of reading
skills are provided for every extract.
Each extract has a Writer’s Workshop
presentation exploring how language and
structure choices can influence a reader’s
response.
One annual subscription gives you full access to a wealth
of resources to support every extract in the Text Anthology.
What’s included in our ActiveLearn Digital Service?
•The Text Anthology on screen for front of class use, with annotation tools to support discussion.
•The Teacher Guide to explain the resources provided for each Topic and to help you plan and
deliver engaging lessons.
• Twelve assessment papers in the style of the new exams, and accompanying mark schemes to
help you to monitor the progress your students are making.
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• Six exclusive Let’s Think in English lessons that will help you build the confidence and
resilience of students when responding to unseen texts.
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• Full support including FREE initial training.
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Students apply skills learned from the
Workshops in an extended piece of writing,
thematically linked to the extracts in that
Topic.
The diagram below illustrates how the elements of each Topic slot together. You can either work
through all the elements provided for a Topic or just dip in and use those resources that best match
your needs and the time available. The diagram also shows where the new Assessment Objectives are
most often tackled.
2.1
Animal welfare
My Family and Other Animals
(lesson 1)
Second
extract
(lesson 2)
Independent
Writing
(lesson 3)
10
AO1
Reading for
meaning 1
prepares
students
for...
e.g. comprehend,
infer, summarise
reinforced and
developed
with....
Reading for
meaning 2
AO1
e.g comprehend,
infer, summarise
Writer’s
Workshop 1
Teacher
Guide
e.g. analyse and
experiment with the
writer’s choices
reinforced and
developed
with....
prepares
students
for...
AO2
AO5
Writer’s
Workshop 2
AO2
AO5
e.g. analyse and
experiment with
the writer’s choices
feeds into
students’ own
writing
Writing task
AO5
AO6
Planning and
writing a text of
their own
explored and
expressed
in....
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How do these elements link together?
First
extract
Grammar for
Writing workshops
and worksheets
Reading for meaning
worksheets
Critical writing
Animal welfare
Care about horses? Then you should boycott the Grand National
This extract is taken from Gerald Durrell’s autobiographical account of the five years he
spent living on the Greek island of Corfu, aged 10 to 15.
The article below was published in The Guardian newspaper the day before the 2014
Grand National horse race.
Perhaps the most exciting discovery I made in
this multicoloured Lilliput* to which I had access
was an earwig’s nest. I had long wanted to find one
and had searched everywhere without success, so
the joy of stumbling upon one unexpectedly was
overwhelming, like suddenly being given a wonderful
present. I moved a piece of bark and there beneath
it was the nursery, a small hollow in the earth that
the insect must have burrowed out for herself. She
squatted in the middle of it, shielding underneath her
a few white eggs. She crouched over them like a hen,
and did not move when the flood of sunlight struck
her as I lifted the bark. I could not count the eggs,
but there did not seem to be many, so I presumed
that she had not yet laid her full complement.
Tenderly I replaced her lid of bark.
From that moment I guarded the nest jealously.
I erected a protecting wall of rocks round it, and
as an additional precaution I wrote out a notice in
red ink and stuck it on a pole nearby as a warning
to the family. The notice read: ‘BEWAR – EARWIG
NEST – QUIAT PLESE.’ It was only remarkable in
that the two correctly spelt words were biological
If you saw your neighbour whipping a dog, you’d be on the phone to the police immediately, right? Of
course, anyone with a shred of decency condemns hurting animals. Yet, inexplicably, some still turn a blind
eye to the cruelty to horses during the Grand National, in which riders are required to carry a whip. Nearly
every year, racehorses sustain injuries. Many have paid with their lives.
When 40 skittish horses are jammed onto a treacherous obstacle course, viciously whipped, and forced
into jumping, breakdowns are inevitable. Last year, only 17 – fewer than half – finished the Grand National,
and while the race organisers were quick to highlight an absence of fatalities after last year’s main event, they
conveniently failed to mention that two horses died at the same course earlier in the week. According to
research by Animal Aid in 2012, Aintree was the most lethal of all of Britain’s racecourses, claiming the lives
of six horses in just eight days of racing.
Treated like wind-up toys – their fragile limbs pushed to and sometimes beyond breaking point – many
horses sustain fractured legs or necks or severed tendons, while others have heart attacks. Every year,
hundreds of horses die on British race tracks. More are turned into dog food when they stop winning.
The mindset that horses are little more than tools to be used, abused and discarded is entrenched* in
the racing industry. Ruby Walsh’s comment that horses are “replaceable” is deeply offensive. Horses are not
unfeeling – they experience joy, anxiety, fear and affection. They are also clever and perceptive, as anyone
who has seen a horse figure out how to open stable-door latches will tell you. However, Walsh’s comments
were prophetic*: the very next day, two more horses died on the Cheltenham track.
Horses are sometimes drugged to mask pain and keep them running when they should be resting or
receiving treatment. Raced too young and too hard, when their bones are not up to the pounding and stress,
horses used in racing endure injuries, lameness and exhaustion. Last year, Godolphin trainer Mahmood
al-Zarooni was banned from racing for eight years after being found guilty of doping offences.
People who care about horses should turn their backs on the Grand National and every other race in
which horses are being run to death. This cruelty will end only when the public realises that there is no such
thing as a “harmless flutter” when it comes to funding the cruel and exploitative horse-racing industry.
ones. Every hour or so I would subject the mother
earwig to ten minutes’ close scrutiny. I did not dare
examine her more often for fear she might desert her
nest. Eventually the pile of eggs beneath her grew,
and she seemed to have become accustomed to my
lifting off her bark roof. I even decided that she had
begun to recognise me, from the friendly way she
waggled her antennae.
To my acute disappointment, after all my efforts
and constant sentry duty, the babies hatched out
during the night. I felt that, after all I had done, the
female might have held up the hatching until I was
there to witness it. However, there they were, a
fine brood of young earwigs, minute, frail, looking
as though they had been carved out of ivory. They
moved gently under their mother’s body, walking
between her legs, the more venturesome even
climbing on to her pincers. It was a heart-warming
sight. The next day the nursery was empty: my
wonderful family had scattered over the garden.
I saw one of the babies some time later: he
was bigger, of course, browner and stronger, but I
recognized him immediately. He was curled up in
a maze of rose-petals, having a sleep, and when I
disturbed him he merely raised his pincers irritably
over his back. I would have liked to think that
it was a salute, a cheerful greeting, but honesty
compelled me to admit that it was nothing more
than an earwig’s warning to a potential enemy. Still, I
excused him. After all, he had been very young when
I last saw him.
AO2
AO3
AO4
Critical Writing
e.g. analyse or
evaluate the text,
or compare two
texts
Glossary
Lilliput: A reference to the fictional island from
the novel Gulliver’s Travels, which is inhabited by
tiny people.
Glossary
Let’s Think
in English
lessons
Writing
tasks
entrenched: long-lasting and difficult to change
prophetic: an accurate prediction
2
3
Progress
Checks
Sample from the ActiveLearn Digital Service showing the Text Anthology on screen
,
t
h
e
y
Worksheets to develop skills writing about
the texts. These may focus on analysis,
evaluation or comparison.
• Differentiated resources for each of the 42 Topics, to support students across the
ability spectrum and to consolidate skills as they move to the next Tier. Includes workshops,
presentations, worksheets and interactive activities.
w
e
r
e
Writing task
th
e
Critical writing
Assessment papers
and mark schemes
See pages 12-18 for sample material from Topic 2.1
Animal Welfare on our ActiveLearn Digital Service
11
u
o
h
Non-fiction
•
Written by Gerald Durrell
•
An extract from Durrell’s autobiographical account of his family’s life on the Greek
island of Corfu from 1935–1939, written in 1956.
Text 2
•
Newspaper article – writing to argue
21st Century
•
Care about horses? Then you should boycott the Grand National
Non-fiction
•
Written by Mimi Bekhechi
•
An article appearing in The Guardian, 4th April 2014, the day before the Grand
National was run, encouraging readers to consider the treatment of race horses.
Summary of lessons and coverage – see full plans for details
Lesson Learning objectives
1
Be able to identify key ideas
and events in an
autobiography extract and how
they support the writer’s
intention
Understand how the selection
of key ideas and events
supports the writer’s intention
2
Be able to identify key
arguments in a persuasive
article and how they support
the writer’s intention
Understand how the selection
of key ideas and events
supports the writer’s argument
Be able to comment on the
writer’s possible intention and
develop a personal response
to it
3
Understand how the selection
of key ideas supports the
writer’s argument
Be able to sequence ideas
logically when writing a
persuasive article
Understand the importance of
reviewing tense, viewpoint and
register decisions when writing
a persuasive article
●
Use Hook presentation to introduce the topic.
●
Students read Text 1 (from My Family and Other Animals) in
the Anthology or 2.1 Text 1.
●
Complete reading for meaning activities on Reading for
meaning worksheet 1. A Reading for meaning 1
interactive provides extra optional support if time allows.
●
Work through Writer’s Workshop 1 presentation to explore
how the writer has selected ideas and events to support his
intention. This is also supported by an optional Writer’s
workshop 1 progress check presentation and Short
writing task worksheet if time allows.
●
Use video links in Introduction presentation to start lesson.
●
Students read Text 2 (Care about horses?) in the Anthology
or 2.1 Text 2.
●
Complete the reading for meaning activities on the Reading
for meaning worksheet 2. A Reading for meaning 2
interactive is also available to support this.
●
Work through Writer’s workshop 2 presentation to explore
how the writer uses key ideas to support her argument. This
is also supported by a Writer’s workshop 2 progress check
presentation and a Sequencing paragraphs worksheet.
●
The Critical writing worksheet provides an opportunity for
students to plan and write a response about the extract. The
Critical writing: evaluation presentation gives sample
answers and supports students in evaluating these.
●
Introduce the task on the Writing task worksheet.
●
Students complete the writing task. This task is also
supported by the Writing design presentation, a Writing
interactive and a Writing modelling presentation.
●
At some point (before, during or after students do their own
writing), the sample answer on the worksheet can be used.
●
The worksheet and presentations offer additional guidance to
help students consider tense, viewpoint and register
decisions.
© Pearson Education Ltd 2015. Copying permitted for purchasing institution only. This material is not copyright free.
12
Snappy Hook presentations at
the start of each new topic help
you to engage students with the
Topic theme.
Summary
The Teacher Guide
is included as part
of our ActiveLearn
Digital Service and
provides overviews
and plans to
accompany all the
resources.
s
t
n
i
r
My Family and Other Animals
f
o
Autobiography – writing to describe
•
a
•
20th Century
Reading for
meaning
Reading for meaning
worksheets deepen
understanding of each text and
rehearse a range of reading
strategies that students will
need for their assessments.
1
Includes six exclusive lesson plans to
support the Let’s Think in English
teaching resources on our ActiveLearn
Digital Service, to build the
confidence and resilience of students
when tackling unseen texts.
Printable versions of the
extracts are also provided so
students can annotate their own
versions of the text.
,
t
h
e
y
Text 1
w
e
r
e
The texts
th
e
2.1 Topic overview sheet: Animal Welfare
Hooks
fo
o
t
p
Teacher Guide
c
i
t
n
a
g
gi
ActiveLearn Digital Service – sample material from Topic 2.1 Animal Welfare
13
u
o
h
ActiveLearn Digital Service – sample material from Topic 2.1 Animal Welfare
f
o
a
s
t
n
i
r
Many of the
worksheets on
the ActiveLearn
Digital Service
can be used
for homework
activities.
Frequent Progress
Checks and
practice activities
help you to
monitor how well
students have
grasped each
particular teaching
point.
,
t
h
e
y
Progress
Checks
w
e
r
e
As well as tackling AO2 (analysis)
head on, the Workshops lay valuable
groundwork for AO4 (evaluation), e.g.
by asking students to evaluate how
different authoring choices could
have impacted on the text.
The workshops
help you to embed
the core principles
of Debra Myhill’s
Grammar for
Writing pedagogy
into your teaching
and encourage
students to explore
the choices writers
make.
14
Supporting worksheets
and other activities
allow students to try
out skills from the
Grammar for Writing
Workshops in their own
writing (AO5).
th
e
Each Topic has a particular skills focus. For
example, the first Topic of Tier 2 (Topic 2.1)
explores how the writers have selected and
sequenced ideas. There are then Topics in
higher tiers using different extracts with a
similar but more sophisticated focus.
Practice activities and
worksheets
fo
o
t
p
Developed in
partnership with the
University of Exeter,
Writer’s Workshop
presentations are
available for every
Topic extract in the
Text Anthology. These
dig deeper into the
text and explore how
the writer has used
particular structural,
literary or linguistic
features.
c
i
t
n
a
g
gi
Grammar for Writing workshops
15
u
o
h
16
s
t
n
i
r
f
o
a
,
t
h
e
y
Sample answers
are provided along
with presentations
which indicate
their strengths
and weaknesses
and help students
understand how
their own critical
responses could be
improved.
w
e
r
e
Three differentiated
versions of each worksheet
are provided, each with a
varying degree of
scaffolding.
Every Topic ends with
a writing task based on
the theme of the two
extracts, just like the
exam. Sample responses
encourage evaluation
and reflection about the
task.
th
e
Critical writing
worksheets enable
students to practice
responding to the
texts they have
read – developing
the analytical (AO2),
comparison (AO3)
and evaluative (AO4)
skills they will need
in their exams.
Writing tasks
fo
o
t
p
Critical Writing
c
i
t
n
a
g
gi
ActiveLearn Digital Service – sample material from Topic 2.1 Animal Welfare
Every writing task
is accompanied
by presentations
supporting and
modelling the
writing process.
17
u
o
h
ActiveLearn Digital Service
ur
to say what
a short story. Lord Arth
ne), but has refused
This is an extract from
hand (to tell his fortu
ed at Lord Arthur’s
Mr Podgers has look
Oscar Wilde
5
a
10
f
o
15
Paper 1: Fiction and
Imaginative Writ
Paper 1: Fic
(i)
tion andingIm
aginative Writin
20
g (i)
25
Section B: Imagin
ative Writing
Answer ONE que
stion. You should
spend about 45
minutes on this
EITHER
section.
*5
30
Write about a time
when you, or som
eone you know, met
was particularly inter
a person who
esting at a party or
social event.
Your response coul
d be real or imagined
.
*Your response will
be marked for the
accurate and appr
vocabulary, spelling,
opriate use of
punctuation and gram
mar.
(Total for Quest
ion
OR
*6
121
Look at the images
19/02/2015 13:08
2043_ASS.indd
M08_Engl_SB_GCSE_
s
t
n
i
r
Crime’:
Arthur he started,
. When he saw Lord
ers entered the room
colour. The two
Suddenly Mr Podg
of greenish–yellow
sort
a
me
beca
face
and his coarse, fat
e was silence.
for a moment ther
asked me
men’s eyes met, and
, Lord Arthur, and has
one of her gloves here
“The Duchess has left
ly.
final
ers
Podg
Mr
to bring it to her,” said
sofa! Good evening.”
d answer to a
“Ah, I see it on the
g me a straightforwar
t insist on your givin
“Mr Podgers, I mus
g to put to you.”
afraid I must go.”
am
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question I am goin
is
ess
Arthur, but the Duch
“Another time, Lord
y.”
Duchess is in no hurr
Mr. Podgers, with his
said
“You shall not go. The
ur,”
Arth
Lord
be kept waiting,
“Ladies should not
tient.”
sex is apt to be impa
The poor
sickly smile. “The fair
in petulant disdain.
He walked
chiselled lips curved
e at that moment.
Lord Arthur’s finely
of very little importanc
him
to
his hand out.
ed
held
seem
Duchess
was standing , and
ers
Podg
Mr.
re
whe
I must know it. I am
across the room to
“Tell me the truth.
saw there,” he said.
“Tell me what you
ed
tacles, and he mov
not a child.”
gold–rimmed spec
ously with a
blinked behind his
Mr Podgers’s eyes
his fingers played nerv
to the other, while
foot
one
from
uneasily
Lord Arthur, more
flash watch-chain.
hing in your hand,
think that I saw anyt
“What makes you
”
will pay you. I will
than I told you?
g me what it was. I
I insist on your tellin
“I know you did, and
hundred pounds.”
a
for
ue
again.
cheq
dull
a
give you
then became
ed for a moment, and
The green eyes flash
low voice.
Podgers at last, in a
?”
Mr
club
said
?”
your
is
t
neas
“Gui
orrow. Wha
you a cheque tom
is ___________, but
“Certainly. I will send
present. My address
is to say, not just at
edged pasteboard
giltof
bit
“I have no club. That
a
g
ucin
my card;” and prod
bow to Lord
allow me to give you
handed it, with a low
pocket, Mr Podgers
from his waistcoat
it,
on
read
who
S
ur,
GER
Arth
Mr. SEPTIMUS R. POD
ntist1
Professional Cheiroma
t
103a West Moon Stree
‘Lord Arthur Savile’s
Mark 0 1-­‐2 Level Level 1 5 = 40 marks)
provided.
Level 2 121
Level 3 Write about ‘one
day in the future’.
Your response coul
d be real or imagined
. You may wish to
response on one
base your
of the images.
*Your response will
be marked for the
accurate and appr
vocabulary, spelling,
opriate use of
punctuation and gram
mar.
The Text Anthology includes
exam-style extracts and
questions. These can be used
either for assessment or to
facilitate class discussion
about the new assessments.
(Total for Quest
ion
6 = 40 marks)
124
M08_Engl_SB_GCSE
_2043_ASS.indd
Range of reference
is correct but not d. lope
deve
ed NB The mark award
d the cannot progress beyon
top of Level 1 if only ture has truc
s
R O
uage
lang
been considered. Step 3, 4, 5, 6 n of • Some explanatio
how both language and structure are used to achieve effects and influence readers, including use of vocabulary and . sentence structure
are • The quotations nd appropriate a
s supports the point
being made. Steps 7 -­‐ 12 nd a
uage
Lang
•
structure are analysed and candidates comment on how this has influenced
the reader. Their de nclu
i
ts men
com
use of vocabulary, sentence structure
and other language features. • The use of quotations are well selected and illustrate the point
being made. •
124
19/02/2015 13:08
3-­‐4 5-­‐6 Mark schemes will
help you to track your
students’ progress.
Marks will also map to steps
on the progression scale
to help you to see how to
intervene most effectively.
,
t
h
e
y
g
Section A: Readin
stions 1–4.
.
ow and answer Que
r, Mr Podgers, at a party
Read the text bel
has met a fortune telle
he can see.
Assessment papers
with questions
and tasks in the
style of the new
assessments, help to
prepare students for
their exams.
w
e
r
e
utes
Time: 1 hour 45 min
3. In lines 17 -­‐36, how does the write
r use language and both Mr Podgers’
structure to show
and Lord Arthur’s the change in moods? Support your view
s with reference to the text. (6) ………………………………
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of steps ………………………………
Indic
……ative
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(A02 descriptor) ……
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ed …………
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Nothing to be credit
Step 1 & 2 ………………………………………………
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on ………………………………
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• Some comment ……
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the ………………………………
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language/structure ………………
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used to achieve ………………
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effects and ………………………………
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influence readers, ………………………………
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f o
……
se u
…………
ding
al for Question 3 =
inclu
6 marks) vocabulary. th
e
g (i)
Imaginative Writin
fo
o
t
p
Paper 1: Fiction and
c
i
t
n
a
g
gi
Assessment and progression
tracking
Twelve practice papers and
mark schemes are included
on the service in total.
18
19
u
o
h
r first
Fo
2015
ea
t
E A R N I NG
A LW AY S L
g
F
l
ne
chin
A LW AY S L
E A R N I NG
Revision Guide
Revision Workbook
• Designed for hassle-free classroom and
independent study with one-topic-perpage format.
• Exam-style worked examples support
the new specification whilst practice
questions help students test their
understanding of a topic.
• Spelling and grammar support is
provided in a dedicated skills page and
integrated throughout the book.
• Level indicator shows students exactly
what level they are working at.
• One-to-one page match with the
Revision Guide enables students to find
the practice they need quickly and easily.
• Provides loads of practice questions in
the style of the new exams, with their
own set of accompanying texts.
• Guided support and hints provide
additional scaffolding to help students.
• Includes a full set of practice papers
written to support the new specification.
Texts
Reading
Statistics &
Probability
Problem-solv
ing
TEXT 3
This is an extract from a novel. It is the beginning of the second chapter of the novel. This is the first
time the reader encounters any of the characters in the novel.
TA R
G
ET
ET
G
pa
le
Dra
ft s
am
ple
p
mp
sa
Dr
aft
Had a look
Nearly there
Nailed it!
20
Look at the examstyle question below
25
and read the extrac
ts from two stude
nts’ answers.
TA R
This text is from
the opening of a
30
novel.
How has the writer
structured the text
to interest
you as a reader?
You could write about
:
• what the writer
focuses your attent
ion on at
the beginn
35
ing
• how and why the
writer changes this
focus
as the extract develo
ps
• any other structu
ral features that interes
t you.
(8 marks)
40
For a question like
this you should:
Spend about 15
minutes on your
answer.
Explain and analys
e the
writer’s use of struc effect of the
tural devices.
Use direct quote
s to support and
prove
your points.
Use subject termin
ology e.g., noun
phrase, present
partic
juxtaposition, narrat iple verb,
ive tension. Use
the
Glossary on p. xx
to help you with
these!
le
In the first parag
raph, an old man
is described in a lot of
detail, and really
close
up. We are told he
was once a naval
officer.
You wonder who
he is
along the road. The and why he is walking
second paragraph
more detail. He
gives
is in the middle of
nowhere,
on his own, with
a long way to go,
‘the long,
laborious road’. You
begin to wonder,
where
is he going to? It
is
a
xx bit mysterious
because it says that
he is on an empty
heath. This is descr
ibed as a ‘vast dark
surface’. This sound
s a bit scary.
✗ Largely describes structural
features.
✓ Includes two relevant quotations,
mp
sa
aft
At the start, the
reade
a carefully constructe r is presented with
d close up of an
man walking along
old
a path. The focus
includes his ‘silver
headed walking stick…
dotting the groun
.
d with its point at
every
few inches interv
al.’ The minutiae of
the
detail sets up intere
st in the reader.
Who
is the old man? Is
he going to be a
main
character? The secon
d
attention to his journe paragraph shifts
y. The fronted
adverbial phrase,
‘Before him’ emph
asizes
Dr
7
15
T
redding* - a dye made from red ochre used to mark livestock to show ownership
Acknowledgement:
Return of the Native, Thomas Hardy, Oxford World Classics, 2008
10
GE
Not long after this a faint cry sounded from the interior. The reddlemen hastened to the back,
looked in, and came away again.
‘You have a child there, my man?’
‘No, sir, I have a woman.’
ed
ve some sophisticat
Writers can achie
out for:
structure. Look
results through
or phrases
• a ‘field’ of words
same idea
emphasising the
or phrases
• repetition of words
n
ast and juxtapositio
• deliberate contr
s.
chain
nce
• refere
Scan this QR
code for a video
of this questio
being solved! n
R
T
‘Somebody who wants looking after?’
‘Yes.’
d
a faint cry sounde
Not long after this
from the interior.
TA
GE
and
ongoing problems
Writers will build
are sometimes very
dilemmas (these
on.
r wants to read
small) so the reade
be used.
tive hooks might
narra
erate
Delib
ally,
n can build up gradu
Narrative tensio
ate
ly, or even fluctu
happen unexpected
suspense.
between calm and
5
ET
The old officer, by degrees, came up alongside his fellow-wayfarer, and wished him good evening.
The reddleman turned his head, and replied in sad and occupied tones. He was young, and his
face, if not exactly handsome, approached near to handsome. His eye, which glared so strangely
through his stain, was in itself attractive – keen as that of a bird of prey, and blue as autumn
mist. His lips were thin, and though, as it seemed, compressed by thought, there was a pleasant
twitch at their corners now and then. He was clothed throughout in a tight fitting suit of corduroy,
excellent in quality, not much worn, and well-chosen for its purpose; but deprived of its original
colour by his trade. A certain well to do air about the man suggested that he was not poor for his
degree. The natural query of an observer would have been, why should such a promising being as
this have hidden his prepossessing exterior by adopting that singular occupation?
After replying to the old man’s greeting he showed no inclination to continue in talk, although
they still walked side by side, for the elder traveller seemed to desire company. There were
no sounds but that of the booming wind, the crackling wheels, the tread of the men, and the
footsteps of the two shaggy ponies which drew the van.
Now, as they thus pursued their way, the reddleman occasionally left his companion’s side,
and stepping behind the van, looking into its interior through a small window. The look was
always anxious. When he returned from his fifth time of looking in the old man said, ‘ You have
something inside there besides your load?’
‘Yes.’
TA R
G
ET
ET
age
G
Words and
phrases
e. At length
he had yet to travers
over the tract that
proved
be a vehicle, and it
eyes ahead to gaze
ntly stretched his
which appeared to
of life that the scene
The old man freque
him, a moving spot,
was the single atom
and
distance in front of
f was journeying. It
advance was slow,
of
he discerned, a long
himsel
rate
he
Its
t.
which
in
way
ess more eviden
to be going the same
the general lonelin
render
to
served
only
contained, and it
upon it sensibly.
the old man gained
G
e in front of
ed, a long distanc
At length he discern
be a vehicle
which appeared to
him, a moving spot,
ET
nt images of
The writer will prese like shots in
g,
character and settin
le, the writer could
a film. For examp
in turn, use close
cter
show each chara
thing large to
some
ups, move from
or move from inside
something small,
de.
to outsi
TA R
R
Before him stretched the long, laborious road, dry, empty and white. It was quite open to the
heath on each side, and bisected that vast dark surface like the parting-line on a head of black
hair, diminishing and bending away on the furthest horizon.
The old man frequently stretched his eyes ahead to gaze over the tract that he had yet to traverse.
At length he discerned, a long distance in front of him, a moving spot, which appeared to be a
vehicle, and it proved to be going the same way in which he himself was journeying. It was the
single atom of life that the scene contained, and it only served to render the general loneliness
more evident. Its rate of advance was slow, and the old man gained upon it sensibly.
When he was nearer he perceived it to be a spring van, ordinary in shape, but singular in colour,
this being a lurid red. The driver walked beside it; and, like his van, he was completely red. One
dye of that tincture covered his clothes, the cap upon his head, his boots, his face, and his hands.
He not temporarily overlaid with the colour: it permeated him. The old man knew the meaning
of this. The traveller with the car was a reddleman – a person whose vocation it was to supply
farmers with redding* for their sheep.
ined
• Are ideas susta
nces
• How do sente
deliberate
Later ’. through
link? e.g. ‘This,
repetition of words
• Are connectives
or phrases?
uce
s
used to introd
• Do reference chain ?
n.
contrast / tensio
emphasise key ideas
e.g ‘But, Suddenly,
Without warning’.
nce
sente
• Does the
type or length
ture?
impact on the struc
Structural
features
G
es time can be a
How the writer manag
ture. Time can be:
key feature of struc
• slowed down
rd
• put on fast forwa
en the past,
• switched betwe
future.
present or even
ET
• How are ideas
from
carried through
one paragraph to
the next?
TA R
G
• What is each
?
paragraph about
oped
• How is it devel
and linked to the
previous paragraph?
ET
How does the text:
• move forward?
• build up narrative
tension?
• present character
and setting?
• manage shifts
between different
points of view?
G
Sentences
ET
ET
Paragraphs
G
G
about the
of a text tells you
ised. The structure
e how a text is organ , developed and built up.
You need to analys
is linked
text, and how it
ure to
sequence of the
struct
use
rs
Write
a journey
take the reader on
of the
from the beginning
text to the end.
The whole
text
TA R
Along the road walked an old man. He was white headed as a mountain, bowed in the shoulders,
and faded in general aspect. In his hand was a silver headed walking stick, perseveringly dotting
the ground with its point at every Tfew
A R inches interval. One would have said that he
had been, in
TA R
TA R
his day, a naval officer of some sort or other.
TA R
TA
pa
ge
TA R
ge
Return of the Native – Thomas Hardy
ET
Nearly there
G
Had a look
uses these to make
comments.
and
✗ The comment ‘This sounds a
•the pedagogies – Grammar for
Writing and Let’s Think in English
✓ Focuses on how the words on
the page
create a moving,
visual story.
✓ Analyses the effects of the
of structure.
writer’s use
✓ Has picked up well on narrat
ive hooks
and their key role
in sustaining reade
r
engagement and
interest.
✓ Selects a good range of quota
tions
and uses these as
a spring board for
comments and explan
ation.
ning and
9
View samples and find out more at www.pearsonschools.co.uk/edgcseenglang2015.
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bit scary’
is not precise.
✗ No specific subject terminology
used.
✓ Works through the text pickin
g up
on features of struc
ture, but this is
uneven, with some
aspects missed.
Complete the impro
ved
analysing how structu sample answer above. Write at least
two more paragraphs
re is used.
explai
20
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s
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i
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Writing
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The team at King’s College London will
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The assessment of the new
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• Cumulative approach to learning: consolidating and building on what has been previously taught.
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Features of the specification
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In the reading section of
the exams, students will be
required to analyse (AO2) and
evaluate (AO4) how the writer
creates effects, including
comparison of unseen
non-fiction extracts.
Students are required to write
creative and transactional
pieces in the exams, loosely
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Text Anthology
• Extracts: resources provided for all abilities that are mostly based on extracts from texts typical of
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a
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• Critical writing: differentiated worksheets focusing on the skill of writing critical responses to
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Text Anthology
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Professional
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opportunities to evaluate the extent to which students have mastered the skills being taught.
Teacher Guide
(on ActiveLearn
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