THE SHRINE OF

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THE SHRINE OF
POPE FRANCIS
Jubilee Year
of Mercy
CATHOLIC
FOUNDATION
A Legacy of Giving
PROCLAIMING & SERVING
Bishop Ordains
12 Deacons
SAN AGUSTIN CATÓLICO
Ministerio de Trabajadores
Agrícolas Páginas 34-35
catholic
St. Augustine
NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2015
dosafl.com
THE SHRINE OF
OUR LADY OF
LA
LECHE
A holy place that brings spiritual comfort and renewal
With a simple planned gift, you can
provide strategic support to the
Diocese of St. Augustine that will endure
for another 450 years to come.
“What will your legacy be?
Join us as we build on the rock
of our Catholic Foundation.
Be a part of strengthening
our Church for
future generations.”
Most Reverend Felipe J. Estévez
Bishop of St. Augustine
Photo Credit: St. Augustine Catholic, Zach Thomas
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Contact Cliff Evans | 904.262.3200, ext. 139 | [email protected]
CatholiC
Continuum
catholic
VOLUME XXIV ISSUE 3 NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2015
14
contents
features
12
CAUSE OPENS FOR FLORIDA
MARTYRS
It was a beautiful autumn evening for the opening
ceremony of the cause for canonization of the
Florida Martyrs. Learn why so many people have
come together to tell their story.
BY PEGGY DEKEYSER
12
14
COVER STORY
NEW SHRINE DEDICATED TO
BLESSED MOTHER
Bishop Felipe Estévez dedicates a new Shrine
to Our Lady of La Leche at Mission Nombre de
Dios. It was a day of celebration and great joy for
all who participated.
SCOTT SMITH
“THE MARTYRDOM OF ANTONIO INIJA,” BY JACLYN W. MOSING
St. Augustine
BY KATHLEEN BAGG
18
16
A LEGACY OF GIVING
Founded nearly 30 years ago by Bishop John
Snyder, the Catholic Foundation has become a
way for Catholics to support their faith long after
they are gone.
BY MICHAEL CURET
18
THE ROLE OF THE DEACON
BY KATHLEEN BAGG
SCOTT SMITH
JEFFREY BRUNO-ALETEIA
26
On December 5, Bishop Estévez ordained 12 men
to the permanent diaconate. Discover the many
ways in which deacons serve and proclaim the
Word of God.
24
THE YEAR OF CONSECRATED LIFE
what else is inside
4 EDITOR'S NOTES l PROTECTING
CHILDREN BY KATHLEEN BAGG
5 SAINT l ST. MARIA GORETTI
BY LILLA ROSS
6 BISHOP’S MESSAGE l BLESSINGS FOR
CHRISTMAS BY BISHOP FELIPE J. ESTÉVEZ
8 WHY DO CATHOLICS? l GET ANSWERS
BY FATHER TERRY MORGAN
10 FAITH MATTERS
l INSPIRED BY
MICHELANGELO BY MICHAEL CURET
As part of the Year of Consecrated Life, read
the profiles of the Missionary Sisters of the Holy
Family and the Trinitarian Handmaids of the Divine
Word who serve in the diocese.
BY TRACY JONES
22 APPETITE FOR FAITH l HOLIDAY
26
MUFFINS BY KELLI BREW
31 AROUND THE DIOCESE l COMMUNITY
33 CALENDAR l WHAT’S HAPPENING
34 SAN AGUSTÍN CATÓLICO
THE JUBILEE YEAR OF MERCY
Seeing a great need for mercy and healing in the
world, Pope Francis has called for a special year
to help people grow spiritually, strengthen their
faith and encourage works of service.
BY PEGGY DEKEYSER
9 BIBLE QUIZ l SCRIPTURE IQ
28
COMPILED BY LILLA ROSS
Cover Image: The new Shrine of Our Lady of La Leche at Mission Nombre de Dios in
St. Augustine. Photo by Scott Smith.
THE SOLEMN PROCLAMATION
OPENING THE EXTRAORDINARY
JUBILEE YEAR OF MERCY
BY BISHOP FELIPE ESTÉVEZ
NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2015 ST. AUGUSTINE CATHOLIC
3
catholic
St. Augustine
The St. Augustine Catholic is the official magazine of the Diocese
of St. Augustine, which embraces 17 counties spanning
Northeast and North Central Florida from the Gulf of Mexico
to the Atlantic Ocean. The diocese covers 11,032 square miles
and serves more than 157,000 registered Catholics.
Most Rev. Felipe J. Estévez
editor’s notes l Rebuilding Trust
CREATING SAFE ENVIRONMENTS
Protecting God’s Children
PUBLISHER
Kathleen Bagg
EDITOR
Lorena Espinoza
SPANISH NEWS EDITOR/WRITER
Patrick McKinney
ART DIRECTOR/GRAPHIC DESIGNER
Kelli Brew
Michael Curet
Peggy DeKeyser
Joe DeSalvo
Tracy Jones
Father Terrence Morgan
Lilla Ross
CONTRIBUTING WRITERS
Brandon Duncan
Woody Huband
Larry Ossi
Scott Smith
Zach Thomas
CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS
Michael Curet
ADVERTISING SALES COORDINATOR
Cindy Barrier
PRINTING REPRESENTATIVE
Read us online at
WWW.DOSAFL.COM
St. Augustine Catholic (USPS 024-733) is a membership publication
of the Diocese of St. Augustine, 11625 Old St. Augustine Road,
Jacksonville, FL 32258-2060. Published six times a year; every other
month. Periodicals postage paid at Jacksonville, FL. POSTMASTER:
Send address changes to St. Augustine Catholic, c/o Office of
Communications, 11625 Old St. Augustine Road, Jacksonville, FL
32258-2060. PARISHIONERS: If you have a change of address, please
call (904) 262-3200, ext. 144 or email: [email protected]
©St. Augustine Catholic, Diocese of St. Augustine. No portion of the St.
Augustine Catholic may be published, broadcast, rewritten or otherwise
reproduced or distributed in whole or in part without prior written authority
of the Diocese of St. Augustine. For reprint information or other questions
regarding use of copyright material, contact the St. Augustine Catholic
editorial offices.
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(904) 262-3200, ext. 123
4
The Catholic Church in the United
States has made great strides in protecting
children from sexual abuse but until
sexual abuse is no longer a part of society,
the church will continue its efforts to
prevent it.
In 2002, the U.S. Bishops pledged to do
a better job at creating safe environments
and protecting young people. They
developed the Charter for the Protection
of Children and Young People. The Charter
is a comprehensive set of policies and
procedures that outline how the church
provides outreach to victims, reports abuse
to civil authorities and the public, as well
as trains clergy and personnel to create safe
environments.
Also mandated by the Charter is
demonstrating accountability. The USCCB
Child and Youth Protection Office oversee
the annual audits of dioceses and religious
institutes to determine their compliance
with the Charter. The audits are conducted
with the help of the independent firm,
StoneBridge Business Partners.
The Diocese of St. Augustine passed its
2014-2015 on-site audit that occurred the
week of Sept. 28. The diocese has been
found compliant every year since the audits
began in 2003.
“The Church has learned a painful
lesson and seeks forgiveness for its failure
to protect children in the past,” said
Bishop Felipe J. Estévez. “The sexual abuse
of children and young people by some
deacons, priests and bishops, and the
ST. AUGUSTINE CATHOLIC NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2015
ways in which these crimes and sins were
handled, have caused enormous pain,
anger and confusion,” he said.
“As bishops, we have acknowledged our
mistakes and our roles in that suffering,
and we apologize and take responsibility
again for too often failing victims and
the Catholic people in the past. From the
depths of our hearts, we bishops express
great sorrow and profound regret for
what the Catholic people have endured.”
– Charter for the Protection of Children and
Young People.
Did You Know…?
•More than 45,000 adults in the diocese
have been trained in the Protecting
God’s Children program.
•Since 2002, the diocese has screened
and conducted national and
international criminal background
checks on more than 31,600 clergy,
employees and volunteers with
renewal checks every five years.
•The diocese spends on average more
than $220,000 each year for its child
protection efforts.
•Children attending Catholic schools
and parish religious education
programs are taught to recognized
a predator’s grooming process, to
say “No,” and to tell their parents
and other trusted adults about such
behavior.
•Procedures are in place to respond
promptly with compassion to all
reports of misconduct – treating all
victims/survivors with dignity, respect,
privacy and confidentiality.
•Bishops are meeting with victims to
assist in their recovery.
•There is a Zero Tolerance for sexual
abusers.
To learn more about preventing child
sexual abuse and what the diocese is doing
to combat it, call Deacon Pat Goin at (904)
262-3200, ext. 125 or visit our online
resources at www.dosafl.com/policiesresources.
saint of the month l Saint Maria Goretti
is the church’s youngest saint and one of
the models for the Year of Mercy, beginning
Dec. 8.
You may have seen St. Maria’s body
in October at the Basilica of Immaculate
Conception in Jacksonville. The relic is on
a national tour to inspire Catholics to find
ways to incorporate mercy into their lives in
the coming year.
St. Maria’s example of forgiving her brutal
attacker poses a question to us: Could you
forgive an attacker? Hopefully none of us
will fall victim to such a brutal crime, but
we endure little attacks every day in the
form of rudeness, thoughtlessness and
angry words and actions from loved ones,
coworkers and strangers. Sometimes we are
the attacker.
So the next time you feel under attack
or want to go on the attack, think of the
example of St. Maria, a child saint.
CATHOLIC
CEMETERIES
SAINT MARIA GORETTI
Patroness
of Mercy
Pre-planning your final
arrangements will spare
your loved ones
unnecessary emotional
and financial burden.
BY LILLA ROSS
AN 11-YEAR-OLD GIRL DIED JULY 6,
of multiple stab wounds after fighting off a
neighbor who was trying to rape her, police
said. Alessandro Serenelli, 20, was arrested
and charged with murder. The victim,
Maria Goretti, was stabbed 14 times.
Sounds like a story you have heard on the
news. But you didn’t. Not unless you were
alive in 1902 in Italy.
If it happened today, the story would go
viral because of its brutality. And justice was
done. Serenelli was sentenced to 30 years in
prison.
But what makes this story important is
on a whole other level. Maria forgave her
killer. Serenelli said Maria’s forgiveness
saved him. And that is why Maria Goretti
For information contact
us at
904-824-6680
DIOCESE OF
ST. AUGUSTINE
SAINT MARIA GORETTI
Feast Day: July 6
Born: Oct. 16, 1890 in Corinaldo, Italy
Died: July 6, 1902
Canonized: 1950 by Pope Pius XII
San Lorenzo Cemetery
St. Augustine
St. Mary Cemetery
Korona
Patron: Forgiveness, chastity, rape
victims, purity, young women and
youth
NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2015 ST. AUGUSTINE CATHOLIC
5
bishop’s message l Merry Christmas
Renewing Our Baptismal
Promises at Christmas
BY BISHOP FELIPE J. ESTÉVEZ
The Infant of Bethlehem communicates to us none other than
the utterly reckless love of God for mankind. Radical in its depths,
limitless in its outpouring, His love reveals a beauty that is the
splendor of truth: “The Word became flesh and made His dwelling
among us, and we saw His glory, the glory as of the Father’s only
Son, full of grace and truth.” (Jn 1:14) The inexhaustible truth and
beauty of the Nativity of Our Lord has inspired Christians over
the centuries to put into words, music, and art something of the
mystery and reality of Christmas. In fact, our beloved Augustine
himself, the great theologian and philosopher whose writings so
heavily influenced the development of Western Christianity, chose
most often to quote Psalm 84 at Christmastime: “Truth is sprung
out of the earth, and justice has looked down from heaven.” As
comprehensive as this psalm may be in its perfection as an
expression of God’s love, Augustine goes beyond, trying time and
again to wrap his mind around this truly incredible event:
“He is the One through Whom all things have been made and,
on Christmas, Who has been made in the midst of all things...
Creator of the heavens and the earth, He is born on earth under
the heavens. Unspeakably wise, He is wisely speechless. Filling
the universe, He lies in a manger. Ruler of the stars, He nurses at
His mother’s bosom. He is both great in the nature of God and
small in the form of a servant, but His greatness is not diminished
by His smallness, nor His smallness overwhelmed by His
greatness.” (Sermo 191)
This should continue to amaze us, as Pope Benedict XVI said at
Midnight Mass three years ago, “that God makes himself a child
so that we may love him, so that we may dare to love him, and
as a child trustingly lets himself be taken into our arms. It is as if
God were saying: “I know that my glory frightens you, and that
you are trying to assert yourself in the face of my grandeur. So
now I am coming to you as a child, so that you can accept me and
love me.” In like manner, our diocese is exceptionally blessed to
have as patroness, Our Lady of La Leche y Buen Parto. When we
6
ST. AUGUSTINE CATHOLIC NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2015
gaze upon Our Lady, the ever-nurturing virgin Mother of God,
and the Divine Child she cradles in her arms, it is Christmas in
our hearts! The Word of God is made flesh in all simplicity, and
we cannot help but be amazed!
Since our God is love, (1Jn 4:8) and joy is a fruit of love, let us
recall then in joy this season the many occasions in which God
has become present in our lives and shown himself benevolent
in his blessings. In a particular way, our diocese brings to a close
the 450th anniversary of the founding of the city and of the faith
community of St. Augustine. It was a shared love of Christ that
served to inspire this year of commemorative celebrations, and our
collective joy in fellowship is precisely that of the Gospel which
our Holy Father, Francis, so often speaks of, a joy which fills us to
overflowing and enlivens us to a more active participation in Jesus’
mission of evangelization. Indeed, we inherit this call to share the
Good News with all in need (using words, if necessary) by virtue
of our one baptism in Christ.
He who has revealed the Father to us also reveals the “face of
the Father’s mercy,” which Pope Francis calls us to contemplate
in the Extraordinary Jubilee Year of Mercy. With “sentiments
of gratitude for everything the Church has received, and with a
sense of responsibility for the task that lies ahead,” we remember
with the Holy Father that “mercy will always be greater than any
sin,” and we seek God’s forgiveness in our lives in order that a
“fresh undertaking for all Christians” will encourage us to “bear
witness to [our] faith with greater enthusiasm and conviction.”
(Misericordiae Vultus)
My Christmas wish for you, in the words of Augustine, is that
he who did not despise our lowly beginnings perfects his work in
us, and that he who wished on account of us to become the Son
of Man make us the sons and daughters of God. Let us offer the
renewal of our baptismal promises as a gift to Him this Christmas,
and may we ever say with Mary, “Be it done unto me according to
Your word.” (Lk 1:38)
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NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2015 ST. AUGUSTINE CATHOLIC
7
why do Catholics ...? l Get Answers
The challenge for us 21st century Bible-readers is that the
“magi” who visited the Newborn King in Matthew 2:1-12 were
more akin to astrologers than modern-day astronomers. In fact,
many Bible translations call these three visitors “astrologers”
instead of “wise men” or “kings.” A star for them meant so much
more than what it means to a sixth-grade science student (or to a
sophisticated Hubble telescope-viewer) today, since folks of yore
had no concept of the distance, size and makeup of what we in
our era call stars.
So what did these three sky-gazers see that enchanted them
and led them to the little insignificant town in Judah? The
early Church fathers, including St. Augustine and St. John
Chrysostom, were already beginning to make the astrology/
astronomy distinction and surmised that this “non-star” star was
not part of the heavenly system, but was rather quite possibly a
guiding angel under the form of a star. This is perfectly consistent
with the biblical picture of angels: they are brilliant (see Acts
6:15 and 2 Corinthians 11:14), they descend to Earth (see Daniel
8:10; Mark 13:25; and Revelation 1:20, 9:12, and 12-3-4), and
(everywhere in the Bible!) they reveal things to people.
If you absolutely have to preclude divine intervention into
the affairs of humans, then… the star is a nice romantic touch.
Maybe the Wise Men are too. But even sixth-grade sciencestudents aren’t so naïve as to think that the ultimate explanation
of the world is the last page of their science book.
Q. At Holy Communion in my parish, people do all sorts
of things. Some people bow before they receive the host.
Most people bow before receiving the host and the cup.
Some people genuflect. Some kneel down to receive. Are
there any rules? What are we supposed to do?
A. I receive this question so often I am almost embarrassed.
LEARNING MORE ABOUT YOUR FAITH
What was the star the
Wise Men followed?
BY FATHER TERRY MORGAN
Q. What was the “star” that guided the Wise Men to the infant Jesus
in Bethlehem?
A. Any sixth-grade science student knows that a real star would be far too
large to “move” and thus guide someone from Point A to Point B on Earth.
And even if it was small enough, for its movement to be noted, it would
have to be so close to the Earth that its immense heat would vaporize the
entire planet.
8
ST. AUGUSTINE CATHOLIC NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2015
My first answer is, with all due respect, stop looking around
and simply receive Our Lord reverently. My second answer
may seem a little contradictory: remember that receiving
the Eucharist at Mass is not simply a “me-and-Jesus” act of
individual piety, but rather the pinnacle act of unity, literally
communion of the Body of Christ, the Church. It is something
the members do as a body, together. Thus, this part of the Mass
is designated the Communion Procession.
Like the Entrance Procession, the procession with the
gifts, and the recessional Procession, it is a sign of the pilgrim
Church, on its way to the heavenly Jerusalem.
While joining into the Communion Procession does not
require Marine Corps-like regimentation, it is a sign first
and foremost of the unity of the Body. So some uniformity is
required for it to be a good sign. Our U.S. Catholic bishops
have asked that in our country, as in most countries,
communicants come forward in procession, bow slightly
(only) before receiving the Eucharist, and receive the Eucharist
standing as a continuation of participation in the Communion
Procession.
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1.What did God give Adam and
Eve in the Garden of Eden?
2.What did Jacob give to his son
Joseph?
3.What gifts did the Magi bring to
Jesus?
4.What gifts did the father give to
his prodigal son?
5.What did Paul say are the gifts
of ministry?
6.Name the gifts of the Spirit.
6. Wisdom, knowledge, faith, healing, miracles,
prophecy, discerning of spirits, speaking in tongues
and interpretation of tongues. (I Cor. 12)
5. Prophesying, serving, teaching, encouraging,
giving, leading and mercy. (Rom. 12:6-8)
4. A cloak, shoes, a ring, a feast and forgiveness.
(Lk 15:11-32)
3. Gold, incense, myrrh. (Matt. 2:11)
2. A cloak of many colors. (Gen. 37)
1. “Every seed-bearing plant on the face of the whole
earth and every tree that has fruit with seed for food.”
(Gen. 1:29)
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NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2015 ST. AUGUSTINE CATHOLIC
9
faith matters l Gift of Talent
JOE PUSKAS
Local Artist Inspired by Sistine Chapel
BY MICHAEL CURET
BRANDON DUNCAN
At the suggestion of his pastor, Father
Andy Blaszkowski, Joe Puskas happily
shared his time and talents by painting
the cupola of his parish church, St.
Luke. He said he was inspired by the
great Michelangelo!
“I’ve always wanted to give back
to God because I’ve had a lot of
blessings in my life. That’s why
I decided to do it.”
10
ST. AUGUSTINE CATHOLIC NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2015
When local artist Joe Puskas began painting murals for
the Firehouse Subs franchise a few years ago, it inspired him
to visit The Vatican’s Sistine Chapel and view the work of
Michelangelo. He never envisioned that a couple of years later
he would be painting his own masterpiece on the ceiling of
St. Luke Catholic Church in Middleburg.
It all started a little more than a year ago after becoming a
member of St. Luke Parish. Puskas asked his pastor, Father
Andy Blaszkowski to bless his home. “He came over for
dinner,” said Puskas, “and I showed him what I did for a
living. That’s when he brought up the fact that he wanted to
do something with the cupola in the church. He asked me to
come to a meeting where we exchanged some ideas and that’s
how it got started. I couldn’t pass the opportunity up.”
The mural, a seven-week project, is Puskas’ signature work.
With an illusion of looking into the open air, filled with blue
sky, Puskas incorporated the Holy Spirit, stained glass from
the church and sculptured angels to create a perception of
depth as if one is looking outside the church into the heavens.
“The impact and response has been unbelievable,” said
Puskas. “Father Andy even climbed up there with me and
couldn’t believe it.”
Puskas had great support from everyone involved –
including his wife, Father Andy, the parish and his employers
at Firehouse Subs.
Even Firehouse owners, Robin and Chris Sorenson,
took time to see the work of art too, and agreed it was Joe’s
signature piece.
With four days of scaffolding to set up, and seven weeks
under the dome at 65 feet in the air, for Puskas this project
is his Michelangelo. “I wish I had years and years to do
something like he did. I just had to see what he did in the
Sistine Chapel a couple of years ago. It was truly amazing and
inspiring.”
When he began the project, at age 53 with a bad shoulder
and a bad back, he knew it would be a challenge, but also one
of the greatest blessings of his life.
Everything is about his faith, according to Puskas. “The
inspiration is faith-based. The ability to do this and taking
on the challenge is faith-based. I’m not in the most fantastic
shape and I was about to climb up six stories for seven weeks
but nothing bothered me while I was doing this. Normally,
BRANDON DUNCAN
NOW AUDITIONING GRADES 1-6
we’re swamped at work at this time of the
year. We had a nice lull, where I didn’t have
to be at my other job 24-7. It was amazing
the way it all worked out. I’ve always wanted
to give back to God because I’ve had a lot of
blessings in my life. That’s why I decided to
do it.”
Puskas joked that he even bought a safety
harness to wear since there were a couple of
difficult spots he had to paint.
Puskas was also invited to speak at Mass
on three occasions about his contribution of
time and talents to the church. He revealed
that he never had a formal art lesson, despite
having a father who went to art school.
“He gave me drawing books as a kid about
how to draw shapes and animals because
he saw I had a passion for art,” said Puskas,
whose talent runs in the family, as his son
also has talent as an artist. I learned a lot
from my father and he supported his family
by being a truck driver for Pepsi. That’s how
we ended up in Florida.”
During the project, Puskas got great
support from his wife, who would bring
him dinner nightly. His schedule started
at Firehouse at 5 a.m. until noon, and then
he would work on the mural at St. Luke’s
sometimes from 1 p.m. until 9 p.m. until the
project was done. In the end, with a wedding
approaching, Puskas brought in another
artist, Anthony Rooney, to help him finish
the project.
Often bowing his head to reflect on his
many blessings, now Puskas may also find
himself looking up at Mass.
for our spring semester of the 2015-2016 season
Rehearsal sites in Mandarin, Southside, Westside,
Downtown, Orange Park and Arlington
To schedule an audition, visit JaxChildrensChorus.org or call 353-1636, ext. 1
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NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2015 ST. AUGUSTINE CATHOLIC
11
CAUSE OPENS FOR
FLORIDA
MARTYRS
BY PEGGY DEKEYSER
They proclaimed
their faith ‘at all cost’
“THE MARTYRDOM OF ANTONIO INIJA,” BY JACLYN W. MOSING
A slight breeze stirred the Spanish moss
of the ancient live oaks as the late October
afternoon sun slanted across the wide lawn of
the deserted mansion.
It was easy to imagine going back more
than 300 years to the dawn of the 18th
century, hearing the sounds of an Apalachee
village, and seeing the peaceful native people
with their families. It was difficult to imagine
the violence that would enter their world
as they were brutally murdered by a British
military force at war with their Spanish
missionary friends.
The outdoor Mass and opening of the
sainthood cause for 86 Florida martyrs –
known as Antonio Cuipa and Companions –
was celebrated Oct. 12, just east of Tallahassee,
the site of what will become the Shrine of
Mary, Queen of the Martyrs.
It’s just a short distance from U.S. Hwy. 90,
known during the Spanish exploration and
settlement of north Florida as El Camino Real,
the king’s highway. The road once strung
together the missions of Spanish Florida like
a “string of pearls” bringing the Catholic faith
to the indigenous people. Also along this
road, atrocities were committed by the forces
of a Protestant English king against these
same people, in the name of conquest and
colonization.
Bishop Gregory L. Parkes of PensacolaTallahassee was the main celebrant of the
Mass.
Bishop Felipe Estévez of St. Augustine,
retired Bishop J. Kevin Boland of Savannah,
and retired Bishop Sam G. Jacobs of HoumaThibodaux concelebrated the Mass, along with
priests from across Florida and Georgia.
In his homily, Bishop Parkes thanked all
who came from far and wide to participate,
saying that it was a “special, historic and
important day for the church in Florida, as
12
ST. AUGUSTINE CATHOLIC NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2015
WOODY HUBAND
the first shrine to Mary in the United States
– would conclude where the story ended
along El Camino Real with the deaths of the
martyrs.
Following Mass the first formal session of
the martyrs’ sainthood cause began with a
procession of Bishop Parkes, Bishop Estévez,
the members of the tribunal for the cause, and
the vice postulators of the cause.
The history of the cause was recounted,
as were the stories of the many martyrs who
have been identified. The letters exchanged
between Bishop Parkes and Cardinal Angelo
Amato of the Vatican Congregation for Saints’
Causes were read aloud, establishing that
Bishop Parkes, with consent from the other
Catholic bishops of Florida, is the competent
authority to investigate the cause.
Tribunal members are Father Joseph
Fowler, Diocese of Pensacola-Tallahassee,
episcopal delegate; Father Timothy
Lindenfelser, Diocese of St. Augustine,
promoter of justice; and Father Joseph Waters,
Diocese of St. Petersburg, notary.
Dr. Waldery Hilgeman of misio pastoralis
in Rome is the postulator for the cause. The
vice postulators are Mary Soha, Xaverian
Brother Reginald Cruz, Lynn Mangan, Father
Leonard Plazewski and Father Wayne Paysse,
a New Orleans priest who is former executive
director of the Black and Indian Mission
Office in Washington, D.C.
Interrogation of witnesses for the cause
– to be conducted by Father Fowler – will
begin immediately primarily in Tallahassee
at the Florida Conference of Catholic
Bishops. Bishop Estévez was the first to
testify on Nov. 4.
In his address at a dinner following
Mass, Bishop Estévez posed the questions:
Pensacol-Tallahassee Bishop, Gregory Parkes was the main celebrant at the Mass opening the
cause of canonization for the Florida Martyrs at the Shrine of Mary, Queen of the Martyrs outside
of Tallahassee on Oct. 12.
Mary Soha, M.D. of the Diocese of St. Augustine,
with Bishop Felipe Estévez at the opening
ceremony for the cause of canonization for the
Florida Martyrs. Dr. Soha has been appointed by
Rome to serve as a vice postulator for the cause.
“Because we care about the communion of
saints, we care about the Florida martyrs, for,
if we do not, who will? If we don’t care now,
when will we?
“We want to promote the martyrs of
Florida because we want to know their stories
accurately, establish the historical facts, and
when approved by Holy Mother Church, we
want to seek their intercession. As they were
victims for their religious freedom – today we
need their courage to stand firm in the current
waves of secularism and subtle persecution.”
Recounting the earliest beginning of the
cause, when Pope Clement XI established
a commission in 1704 to document the
martyrdom of the Apalachee Christians,
Bishop Estévez traced the history of the
initiative to the present day.
“It is significant that the passage of time
has allowed us to discover that it was not only
foreign missionaries who laid down their
lives for Christ in La Florida. Rather, we now
know the incredible stories of so many Native
Americans who chose martyrdom rather than
renounce the faith they had accepted. It is a
meaningful sign that the faith was not simply
imposed upon them, but rather they freely
accepted the Catholic faith to the point that
they understood that it was worth dying for.”
Bishop Estévez continued, “The one faith is
expressed in different ways. There can be no
question of adulterating the Word of God or of
emptying the cross of its power, but rather of
Christ animating the very center of all culture.
Not only is Christianity relevant to these
Indian people, but Christ, in the members of
his body, is himself ‘Indian.’”
More information about the “Martyrs
of La Florida” and the canonization
cause can be found at www.
martyrsoflafloridamissions.org.
NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2015 ST. AUGUSTINE CATHOLIC
13
WOODY HUBAND
the 80 or more martyrs remembered lived
and died in what are now the dioceses of
Pensacola-Tallahassee, St. Augustine, St.
Petersburg, Orlando, Palm Beach and Venice.
“From Father Luis de Cancer near Tampa
Bay in 1549 to Antonio Cuipa and his
companions at Ayubale in 1704, they gave
their lives in witness to the faith,” Bishop
Parkes said. “We pray that through their
intercession, we may be empowered to imitate
their example. We pray that they might
inspire us to live more holy lives, always for
the glory of God.”
Cuipa was an Apalachee Indian from San
Luis Mission, in present-day Tallahassee, who
was converted by Franciscan missionaries.
His martyred companions included other
Native Americans and Franciscan friars as
well as Dominican and Jesuit missionaries.
Father Cancer was the first Dominican martyr
in the country.
At the conclusion of the Mass, Dr. Mary
Soha of Ponte Vedra Beach presented Lynn
Mangan of Tallahassee with a framed
rendering of the vision of Cuipa. While
hanging from the cross with fire at his feet, he
said Mary appeared to him. He said to those
who were being tortured with him, “Our
Lady is near. Be strong; be strong. Our Lady is
here with us.”
Cuipa was a leader among the Apalachee
people, a carpenter and a catechist for the
Franciscan friars. He was slain in 1704 at
the mission of La Concepcion de Ayubale by
the English and Creek forces of English Col.
James Moore.
Soha commented as she presented the art
that it was fitting that the story which began
with the Shrine of Our Lady of La Leche at
Mission Nombre de Dios in St. Augustine –
THE SHRINE OF
SCOTT SMITH
MARY WILL LEAD MANY TO THE KINGDOM OF JESUS CHRIST
14 ST. AUGUSTINE CATHOLIC NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2015
will provide liturgical services, conduct
retreats and pilgrimages, and provide a
pastoral identity for ongoing evangelization.
There are new confessionals, a new sacristy
and narthex (entrance area), a new sound
system, flooring and seating for 200 to 300
people. Total cost of construction was $1.5
million.
“This shrine has monumental importance
because of its historical and theological
significance,” said Bishop Estévez. “The
devotion to Our Lady of La Leche dates back
to 1565 – when evangelization was firmly
planted in this country and it is the oldest
devotion to Mary as the nursing Mother in the
United States,” he said.
Since the 17th century, the devotion to
Our Lady of La Leche has been kept alive
by countless people of faith who travel from
all over the world to the shrine seeking
our Blessed Mother’s intercession for a safe
pregnancy and delivery of their child, for the
gift of fertility, for families, for strengthening
their faith, for healing from breast cancer and
countless other reasons.
In 2012, the Vatican approved Bishop
Estévez’ request to celebrate Oct. 11 as an
annual diocesan feast-day to honor Our Lady
of La Leche, further elevating the shrine’s
status.
In his homily Oct. 11, Bishop Estévez
said, “Mission Nombre de Dios is the place
where the rustic altar evokes the First Mass
of the first city and the Cross stands out as
our glory and victory. The historic shrine and
the new shrine lead us to complete the story
of salvation, the child Jesus being nursed by
Mary – a magnificent mystery of beautiful
tenderness: indeed God is Love!”
To learn more about the beautification
of the Shrine of Our Lady of La Leche, visit
www.ourladyoflalecheshrine.org or call
Stanton Cadow at (904) 262-3200 or email
[email protected]
SCOTT SMITH
T
The celebration of the 450th anniversary of
St. Augustine and the founding of our faith in
“La Florida” didn’t end in September – Bishop
Felipe J. Estévez dedicated the new Shrine of
Our Lady of La Leche at Mission Nombre de
Dios on the feast day in her honor – Oct. 11.
The new shrine was filled to capacity with
lay Catholics, clergy and religious who came
to worship at Mass and see the renovations up
close. In February, work began on the Prince
of Peace Votive Church, which was originally
built and blessed by Archbishop Joseph P.
Hurley on April 17, 1966 to commemorate
the 400th anniversary. It served as a place
dedicated to prayers that God would spare the
world from atomic warfare.
An additional 2,500 square feet has been
added to the church, which now serves as the
new Shrine of Our Lady of La Leche. A chapel
was also added to the shrine and dedicated
to Jesus Christ, the Prince of Peace and the
intercession of Our Lady of Fatima.
A new altar configuration features a large
statue of Our Lady of La Leche and smaller
statues depicting St. Joseph, St. Francis
of Assisi, founder of the Franciscan order
whose missionaries evangelized the Native
Americans in Florida for two centuries; St.
Katherine Drexel, founder of the Sisters of the
Blessed Sacrament to serve Native Americans
and African Americans, and a major
benefactor of St. Benedict the Moor School
in St. Augustine; and St. Kateri Tekawitha,
the first Native American saint in the United
States and Canada.
Structural improvements include two
offices for priests assigned to the shrine who
SCHEDULE
Mass
Monday – Friday: 6 p.m.
Wednesdays: 11:30 a.m. (Historic Chapel)
Confession
Daily at 5 p.m. or by appointment
Vespers: 5 p.m. and Rosary 5:30 p.m.
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday
WOODY HUBAND
Adoration
Monday: 7:30 p.m.
Thursday: 5 p.m.
Bishop Felipe Estévez incenses the altar at the Mass of dedication for
the Shrine of Our Lady of La Leche, Oct. 11.
To schedule a retreat or pilgrimage or to
learn more, call Father Ivan Carrillo-Paris,
ICC (rector) or Father Carlos Sosa, ICC at
(904) 207-7117 or email [email protected]
gmail.com.
NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2015 ST. AUGUSTINE CATHOLIC
15
The Catholic Foundation
A WAY CATHOLICS CAN SUPPORT
THEIR FAITH FOR A LIFETIME
SCOTT SMITH
BY MICHAEL CURET
16
ST. AUGUSTINE CATHOLIC NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2015
W
hen the Catholic Foundation in the
Diocese of St. Augustine was created
nearly 30 years ago, there was one
certainty from the outset for lifetime
Catholic Robert Shircliff. He wanted to be
involved.
Having lived through the Great Depression
as a youth growing up in Indiana, Shircliff
learned the reward of giving at an early age,
and he has never wavered in his generosity
and philanthropic nature. From a teenager
at 14, he worked sweeping floors and sorting
bottles in his father’s Pepsi-Cola bottling plant
and he eventually became the president before
selling it in the late 1960s. But watching how
others who were less fortunate endure is what
resonated most in him.
“I was lucky to grow up in a generation that
looked after others,” said Shircliff. “Even when
times were tough, mother and father put the
church first. My parents not only fed people
who came to the doors looking for food but
provided clothing for kids and families. In our
family, we always sensed that my parents were
the first to stand up when somebody needed
something and I wanted to be the same way.”
The depression provided Shircliff a close-up
view of what it felt like to give. “I’ve talked to
BRANDON DUNCAN
Robert Shircliff
a lot of givers and I’ve never seen an unhappy
giver,” he said. “In my case, that’s true!
“Our faith tells us to care for others and look
after the least of God’s people. That’s what
pleases Jesus the most. What we do for the
least of our brothers and sisters, we do for him.
That’s a pretty nice thought to follow. Once you
give a little, you realize how important it is and
how much it means to you. We are happy that
we have been able to do what we’ve been able
to do. It’s not always easy to keep your giving at
a certain level, but it’s always rewarding.”
Shircliff, now 87, still works daily at his
office at the Shircliff Group, which he founded
in Jacksonville. Today, he reminds us that the
two specific needs that were defined for the
foundation in those first meetings back in 1982
haven’t changed. “We concluded that Catholics
needed to learn how to support their faith,”
he said. “We needed a stewardship program
that had worked well in other dioceses and we
wanted a foundation where people could leave
bequests and contributions to preserve them
for a long time as planned giving.”
The 19-person committee worked on
the idea for more than four years before the
Catholic Foundation was formed in 1987 with
the Bishop as President, the Vicar General and
Chancellor as ex-officio members, and 15 lay
members.
The expectation was for the foundation
to receive gifts from wills, larger gifts from
generous benefactors, gifts through insurance
plans and assigned memorials, which would
be invested and administered in a prudent
manner.
“What a beautiful thought that you can
leave a gift to the foundation and it will never
be reduced,” said Shirciff. “It will always earn
money and support the church in the future.
The important thing about planned giving and
how it differs from stewardship is that every
one of us has an estate whether we recognize it
or not. Where it goes will either be directed by
state law or by a will. We strongly recommend
that everybody have a will and direct where
their estate goes. Obviously, you want it to go
to your family and to those places that have
meant a lot to you during your lifetime.”
Shircliff called the Catholic Foundation
a perfect reservoir for funds. “It is a way to
provide the diocese with funds down the road
that can take care of unexpected needs.
When people give to the foundation, their
money will never be spent. It will be invested
in perpetuity. So a gift to the foundation is a gift
that will last forever and serve the diocese long
into the future.”
“These gifts have served the diocese
extremely well,” continued Shircliff. “We feel
that since the diocese and church has cared
for us and been interested in us from the time
we were baptized… Isn’t it reasonable that we
should leave the church a little something at
the time of our death?”
To learn more about The Catholic
Foundation and Planned Giving, call Cliff
Evans, OFS, at (904) 262-3200, ext. 139 or
email [email protected]
1. What is the purpose of the Catholic
Foundation?
As an independent not-for-profit 501c3
corporation, the foundation provides
assistance to parishes, schools and
ministries by creating perpetually
endowed funding. There are more than
120 endowment funds currently under
the stewardship of the Foundation. These
funds have grown to more than $25 million
in assets. Nearly every parish and school
has created a permanent endowment fund
to which their parishioners and student
families can contribute lasting gifts of
support.
2. What is planned giving and how does
it work?
Planned giving is essentially a donation
that is provided for in one’s estate plan.
In essence – it is making plans to keep
supporting something we care deeply
about once we are no longer here. A
donation to the Church of this type
becomes a “charitable contribution” and
may not only be tax-exempt but can lower
tax liabilities for one’s family.
3. Why is estate planning so important
for our family and church?
Estate planning is something everyone
needs to do. This is not something
reserved for the very wealthy. When we
pass away, all of us will have financial and
tangible assets. Do you want to decide
who receives your possessions and assets
or do you want the courts to decide? We all
need to make provisions for unanticipated
disasters to care for those whom we
provide care. At the same time, consider a
legacy gift to your church.
4. How can I learn more about providing
a legacy of faith?
We will begin offering regional estate
planning seminars in 2016. To learn more,
call (904) 262-3200, ext. 139 or email
[email protected]
NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2015 ST. AUGUSTINE CATHOLIC
17
Bishop Felipe J. Estévez
ordains 12 men to the
permanent diaconate
Bishop Felipe Estévez with Deacon David
Williams standing next to him, lays hands
on Michael Elison during the deacon
ordination Dec. 5 at St. Joseph Catholic
Church.
THE PERMANENT
SCOTT SMITH
DIACONATE
18 ST. AUGUSTINE CATHOLIC NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2015
The most recent class of deacons represents
the fifth class of men to be ordained deacons
in the diocese since the Permanent Deacon
Formation Program was established in the
diocese in 2005.
“The diocese will be enriched in a very
special way by these 12 men who have been
called to diaconal ministry,” said Father John
Tetlow, the vicar for deacons and diocesan
director of the Permanent Diaconate. “They
are truly filled with the spirit and humble in
their love for God,” he said.
Deacons (diakonos – Greek for servant)
played a great role in the early history of the
church, but gradually it disappeared in the
Middle Ages as the diaconate became more of
a transitional step to priestly ordination.
The Second Vatican Council reinstated the
diaconate in the Western Church as a “distinct
and permanent rank of the hierarchy” willed
by Jesus and the apostles.
The diaconate program was revived in the
United States in the late 1960s and it really
took off in the 1980s said Father Tetlow.
Many people have asked what the difference
is between the roles of priests and deacons.
Father Tetlow explains there are three main
distinctions: Deacons cannot celebrate the
Mass or consecrate the Eucharist; they can’t
hear confession or administer the sacrament
of anointing. The permanent diaconate is
primarily a ministry of service.
Preparing for the Diaconate
Before beginning the three-year Permanent
Deacon Formation Program in the Diocese of
St. Augustine, men must complete a threeyear Ministry Formation Program (MFP) first.
They must also be accepted by the Deacon
Vocations Board, a nine-member board that
includes the wife of a deacon. And men must
be at least 32 years of age and no older than 60
when they are ordained.
In the first year, the prospective deacons
are called aspirants. Among other things,
there studies include liturgical practices,
homiletics, canon law and theology of holy
Continued on page 20.
BRANDON DUNCAN
On Dec. 5, Bishop Felipe J. Estévez
ordained 12 men to the permanent
diaconate to serve in parishes and
ministries of the Diocese of St.
Augustine. They join 70 men who
are already serving as permanent
deacons in the diocese.
The newly ordained Deacons and their assignments, effective Dec. 5: Front row, from left:
Deacons Mark Sciullo – Our Lady of Good Counsel, Milton Vega – Most Holy Redeemer, Michael
Federico – Prince of Peace, Santiago Rosado-Rodriguez – San Sebastian, Angel Sanchez – San
Jose and Campus Ministry at UNF, Deacon Patrick Goin. Back row, from left: Father John Tetlow,
Brian Hughes – Blessed Trinity and Campus Ministry at JU, Paul Testa – Mary, Queen of Heaven,
George Barletta – Christ the King, Edward Prisby – St. Paul, Jacksonville Beach; Robert Gardner
– St. Joseph and David Belanger – St. Patrick, Jacksonville.
WHO IS INVITED TO BE A DEACON?
• A devoted Roman Catholic man
• Can be married but wife must support decision or if single a vow of celibacy is
required
• Age – mature, between the ages of 32 and 60. Must be 35 to be ordained.
• Either employed or retired. Must be self-supporting. The church does not pay
deacons, although a parish or ministry may hire and pay a deacon. Most do not
earn a salary from diaconal ministry.
• Have gifts of a spiritual leader.
• Be stable in marriage and career.
• Be academically capable. Minimum of two years of college is preferred.
• Feel that God is calling them to ordained ministry.
WHAT STEPS LEAD TO THE PERMANENT DIACONATE?
• Acceptance in and completion of the Ministry Formation Program (MFP). Must
have leadership role in parish life to be considered for acceptance.
• An evaluation and screening is required – possibly in the third year of MFP –
before acceptance into the Permanent Deacon Formation Program.
• The Aspirancy Year – the first year after completion of the MFP – is a year of
focused discernment on the responsibilities of Holy Orders and instruction on the
diaconate class members are instituted* in the Ministry of Reader toward the end
of this year.
• The Candidacy Year – the sixth and final year of the program. It’s when the
decision to continue toward ordination is finalized. Class members will be
instituted in the Ministry of Acolyte and be admitted to Candidacy for Holy Orders.
• Once ordained, the deacon will be assigned by the bishop to a parish or diocesan
ministry.
DUTIES OF A DEACON
• Care and administration of the Eucharist (though he does not preside at Mass or
consecrate the elements of bread and wine). A deacon by virtue of his ordination
is an “ordinary” Minister of the Eucharist.
• Minister of baptism, witness’s marriages and presides at funerals when no Mass is
celebrated.
• Teacher, administrator, comforter of the sick and dying – and most importantly,
one who has special concern for the poor.
• Restricted only by his particular talents, the imagination of his supervisors and the
sacramental limits of his ordination.
• Always brings the graces of the sacrament of Holy Orders and a clergy presence
and representation to any ministry assignment.
*Instituted means to be permanently admitted to the ministries of reader/lector and acolyte. Eucharistic minister and lectors
who serve in parishes are installed or commissioned by their pastor for a certain period of time.
NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2015 ST. AUGUSTINE CATHOLIC
19
Deacons story continue from page 19.
orders and the diaconate.
In the second year, they are called candidates
and their studies focus on Scripture as well as
advanced studies in homiletics, canon law and
liturgical practices. A third year was added to
the formation program to include additional
courses and more intense training in homiletics
said Father Tetlow. “We did a lot of practicing
with 8-to-10-minute homilies,” he added.
Part of the training for the diaconate is to
Dr. David Heekin believes a person’s
meet monthly with a spiritual advisor and to
mobility is the key to happiness,
pray daily the morning and evening prayers
so he envisioned a world-class
of The Liturgy of the Hours.
orthopedic practice for the people of
Jacksonville.
Deacon Patrick Goin, director of the
Permanent
Deacon Formation Program,
The new Heekin Clinic focuses on
says
the
wives
of the perspective deacons are
restoring mobility to the hips and
knees of the over-40 crowd. Expect
invited and encouraged to participate in all
the highest level of care and a more
the classes and activities with their husbands.
personalized physician-patient
“A wife’s participation in the program allows
relationship from Florida’s most
experienced orthopedic surgeon.
her to grow spiritually with her husband and
to more fully understand the family’s call to
That’s
his mission.
So,believes
let’s get a person’s
Dr. David
Heekin
service through the diaconate,” he said.
moving Jacksonville!
mobility is the key to happiness,
Aspirants are often married and most of
so he envisioned a world-class
them
have children. Some are retired but
orthopedic practice for the people of
most
have
full-time careers and come to the
Jacksonville.
diaconate with diverse backgrounds.
The new Heekin Clinic focuses on
Once ordained, how can you tell if a man is
restoring mobility to the hips and a deacon?
knees of the over-40 crowd. Expect On the altar, it’s relatively easy. According
the highest level of care and a more
to “Liturgical Guidelines for Deacons,” the
personalized physician-patient
deacon ordinarily wears an alb, the same long
relationship from Florida’s most
experienced orthopedic surgeon. gown worn by a priest, and a stole, a long
narrow scarf draped from the left shoulder to
That’s his mission. So, let’s get
the right hip.
moving Jacksonville!
Outside of church, it’s not so easy. The
United States Conference of Catholic Bishops’
Standing Committee on the Permanent
Diaconate states that it “endorses the hope that
[permanent] deacons will resemble laypeople
in matters of dress and address.” However, in
2 Shircliff Way,
605 DePaul Building
callSte
904.328.5979
or visit HeekinClinic.com
some ministries, such as in a prison, hospital
Shircliff Way,
Suite 605
DePaul Building | Jacksonville, FL 32204
St. Vincent’s 2Medical
CenterRiverside
or when working in nursing homes – deacons
Jacksonville, FL 32204
may wear clerical attire with a Roman collar
for example, and a small “deacon cross.” This
is a cross with a deacon’s stole.
In an address to deacons, Pope John Paul
II said, “To think of oneself an act in practice
as a ‘part-time’ deacon would make no sense.
The deacon is not a part-time employee or
ecclesiastical official, but a minister of the
Church. His is not a profession, but a mission!”
For more information about the Permanent
Deacon Formation Program, call Deacon
Patrick Goin at (904) 262-3200 or email
call 904.328.5979 or visit HeekinClinic.com
[email protected]
MAN ON A
MISSION
MAN ON A
MISSION
Find Dr. Heekin at his new location!
2 Shircliff Way, Suite 605 DePaul Building | Jacksonville, FL 32204
20
ST. AUGUSTINE CATHOLIC NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2015
Advent istoa time
renew your heart
as we
await the coming of the LORD.
DECEMBER 1-
DECEMBER 22
Parishes in North Florida will offer the sacrament of reconciliation and
penance services. Contact your parish or visit dosafl.com/Advent for
information and tips for how to make a good confession.
December 1
7:00 p.m.
Holy Faith Parish
747 NW 43rd Street, Gainesville
December 16
7:00 p.m.
Santa Maria del Mar Parish
915 N. Central Avenue, Flagler Beach
December 4
5:30 p.m.
Holy Family Parish
Alternate 27 Highway, Williston
December 16
7:00 p.m.
Epiphany Catholic Church
254 SW Malone Street, Lake City
December 9
7:00 p.m.
Mary Queen of Heaven Parish
9401 Staples Mill Drive, Jacksonville
December 16
5:30 p.m.
St. Anastasia Catholic Church
5205 A1A South, St. Augustine
December 9
5:30 p.m.
St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Parish
4600 Belle Terre Parkway, Palm Coast
December 16
7:00 p.m.
St. Luke Parish
1606 Blanding Blvd., Middleburg
December 9
7:00 p.m.
St. William Parish
210 SW Peach Street, Keystone Heights
December 16
7:00 p.m.
St. Patrick Parish
500 NE 16th Avenue, Gainesville
December 10
6:30 p.m.
Resurrection Catholic Church
3383 University Blvd., N., Jacksonville
December 16
7:00 p.m.
San Sebastian Catholic Church
1112 State Road 16, St. Augustine
December 10
6:30 p.m.
St. John the Evangelist Parish
4050 NW Highway 27 Alt., Chiefland
December 17
7:00 p.m.
Holy Family Catholic Church
9800 Baymeadows Road, Jacksonville
December 10
4:00 p.m.
St. Patrick Parish
601 Airport Center Drive E., Jacksonville
December 17
7:00 p.m.
Holy Spirit Parish
11665 Fort Caroline Road, Jacksonville
December 10
7:00 p.m.
St. Paul Parish
2609 Park Street, Jacksonville
December 17
7:00 p.m.
Most Holy Redeemer Catholic Church
8523 Normandy Blvd., Jacksonville
December 10
7:00 p.m.
San Juan del Rio Parish
1718 State Road 13, St. Johns
December 17
7:00 p.m.
Our Lady of Good Counsel Parish
5950 State Road 16, Mill Creek
December 13
4:00 p.m.
St. Ambrose Parish
6070 Church Road, Elkton
December 17
7:00 p.m.
St. Francis Xavier Catholic Church
928 E. Howard Street, Live Oak
December 14
7:00 p.m.
St. Catherine of Siena
1649 Kingsley Avenue, Orange Park
December 17
7:00 p.m.
St. Joseph Catholic Church
11730 Old St. Augustine Road, Jacksonville
December 14
7:00 p.m.
St. Monica Parish
114 S. 4th Street, Palatka
December 17
7:00 p.m.
San Jose Catholic Church
3619 Toledo Road, Jacksonville
December 15
7:00 p.m.
Our Lady Star of the Sea Parish
545 A1A North, Ponte Vedra Beach
December 18
7:00 p.m.
St. Francis Xavier Parish
928 E. Howard Street, Live Oak
December 15
7:00 p.m.
Queen of Peace Parish
10900 SW 24rth Avenue, Gainesville
December 18
6:30 p.m.
Crucifixion, Holy Rosary and St. Pius V
4731 Norwood Avenue, Jacksonville
December 15
7:30 p.m.
St. Augustine Catholic Church
1738 W. University Avenue, Gainesville
December 20
6:00 p.m.
Sacred Heart Parish
5752 Blanding Blvd., Jacksonville
December 15
7:00 p.m.
St. Madeleine Catholic Church
17155 NW US Highway 441, High Springs
December 21
7:00 p.m.
Cathedral Basilica of St. Augustine
35 Treasury Street, St. Augustine
December 15
7:00 p.m.
St. Michael Catholic Church
505 Broome Street, Fernandina Beach
December 22
6:30 p.m.
Assumption Catholic Church
2430 Atlantic Blvd., Jacksonville
December 22
6:00 p.m.
St. Mary Parish
89 St. Mary’s Place, Bunnell
NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2015 ST. AUGUSTINE CATHOLIC
21
appetite for faith l Holiday Muffins
A LESSON IN PERSEVERANCE
Celebrate with the Florida
“Hanging Pumpkin”
BY KELLI BREW PHOTOS BY SCOTT SMITH
THE FIRST FLORIDA THANKSGIVING predated
the pilgrims by almost 50 years. Records show that the
feast consisted of ship stores of beans, olive oil, bread,
pork and wine, and that the native people contributed
oysters and clams. But it is easy to imagine the feast
featuring the native pumpkin as well, one of the few
cultivated crops that are harvested in late summer and
early fall.
Early Florida settlers have described what appeared
to be pumpkin trees growing in the wild. As it turned
out, these were the hardy vines of native Seminole
pumpkins, planted by the native people, and so
entangled in the branches of the trees that the trees
themselves seemed to be sprouting the large fruit.
In fact, the Creek Indian word for pumpkin is
chassahowtska, or “hanging pumpkin.”
EARLY FLORIDA SETTLERS
HAVE DESCRIBED WHAT
APPEARED TO BE PUMPKIN
TREES GROWING IN
THE WILD.
Savvy, modern-day Florida gardeners save the seeds
of these pumpkins from year to year and plant them
at the end of spring – when most things have been
harvested and few things can be anticipated to grow in
the coming summer heat. Seminole pumpkin vines will
grow many feet long – up and over landscape plants,
if not right up a tree. They are wonderfully resistant
to the pests and diseases that plague other squash
plants, especially during the heat. And they yield highly
nutritious and unusually sweet flesh.
You can find Seminole pumpkins at your local
farmers market. The pulp can substitute for any
pumpkin (even canned) in pumpkin pie, bread or
22
ST. AUGUSTINE CATHOLIC NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2015
muffins. It is also delicious layered in place of
tomato sauce in lasagnas or on pizza – and it
makes a fabulous puréed soup.
To make the purée, wait for a cool day
when you don’t mind heating up your
kitchen. Cut the pumpkin(s) in half, remove
the seeds and fibrous material, and bake –
cut-side down – at 325 degrees for an hour to
an hour and a half. Let cool, then scrape out
the pulp and either mash or purée in a food
processor. You will get about 3/4 cup of puree
for each pound of pumpkin. Freeze any
excess for future use.
Here is a recipe for a nice, savory pumpkin
muffin – a relatively healthy bread for
breakfast, and a great addition to your own
Florida holiday meal.
Kelli Brew has been
active in farm and food
issues for two decades.
She is a retreat leader
and the current Farm to
School Coordinator for
Alachua County schools.
You can find more of her
recipes in her blog:
www.ourlocallife.com.
SAVORY PUMPKIN MUFFINS
Ingredients
2-cups white flour (or mix of white and
whole wheat)
1-½ teaspoons baking powder
1-½ teaspoons baking soda
½ teaspoon salt
2-tablespoons fresh, chopped
rosemary or sage
½-cup olive oil
2 eggs
1-½ cup pumpkin purée
¼ cup milk (or enough to make a lumpy
batter that can be spooned into a
muffin tin)
Preheat oven to 350°. Grease a 12-cup
muffin pan – or line with paper muffin cups.
Mix together flour, baking powder, salt and
herbs. In a separate bowl, whisk together
the oil, pumpkin, eggs and milk.
Pour the liquid ingredients into the dry,
stirring only until just mixed. Spoon about
¼ cup into each muffin cup. Bake for 2025 minutes. Enjoy!
NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2015 ST. AUGUSTINE CATHOLIC
23
consecrated life l wake up the world
Wake up the World is the theme for the yearlong focus
on consecrated life called on by Pope Francis. The
year, which began on Nov. 30, 2014 – the first Sunday
of Advent and closes on the World Day of Consecrated
Life on Feb. 2, 2016 – asks the church’s religious sisters,
brothers and priests to “wake up the world” with their
testimony of faith, holiness and hope.
The Year of Consecrated Life will provide great
opportunities for families and adults to look at the many
ways men and women serve Christ and the church while
answering the call to live in consecrated life.
During the yearlong celebration, the St. Augustine
Catholic magazine will feature profiles of religious orders,
congregations and societies for men and women
serving in the Diocese of St. Augustine.
Individual profiles of several consecrated women and
men serving in the diocese will be posted throughout the
year to the diocesan website, www.dosafl.com.
BRANDON DUNCAN
BY TR ACY JONES
The Missionary Sisters of the Holy Family from left, Maria
Iwona Serafin, Immaculee Nyirasuku, Kazimiera Noskoau and
Danuta Kujalowicz.
Missionary Sisters of the Holy Family
The Missionary Sisters of the Holy Family arrived in
Jacksonville, Fla. in 2011 to serve in the Diocese of St.
Augustine. Their congregation, however, can be traced
back to Poland when the country was in crisis and
under Russian rule.
The Missionary Sisters of the Holy Family were
founded by the Blessed Boleslawa Lament. Sister
Boleslawa, a devout Catholic, experienced
discrimination in her home country of Poland by the
Russian government for her religion and Polish ancestry.
She worked at different convents around Russia and
Poland teaching at several schools, oftentimes in secret.
She was distraught that the Polish people were not free
to practice their faith under Russian Rule.
In 1905, she started her own congregation to unite
Orthodox Christians with the Catholic Church and give
other women access to religious life. The order became
known as the Missionary Sisters of the Holy Family.
“The chrism of the order is unity among
Christians,” said Sister Immaculee Nyirasuku, one of
24
ST. AUGUSTINE CATHOLIC NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2015
Trinitarian Handmaids of the Divine Word
In a country ravished by poverty, one woman formed an order
to improve the lives of residents, particularly orphaned and
poor children while also spreading Christian values through
missionary work.
In the Philippines, about half its citizens live in rural areas,
where the majority is poor and living in poverty. Many rely on the
tempestuous farming or fishing industries to survive. According
to Catholic Relief Services, 25
percent of the country’s population
lives on $1.25 a day, and 40 percent
survive on $2 a day or less.
Recognizing the country’s
growing number of poor, especially
children who increasingly became
orphaned or destitute, Mother Elena
O. Suicio started the Trinitarian
Handmaids of the Divine World
hoping to uplift marginalized
families in the Philippines.
“Our work is not complicated,”
said Sister Patricia Tapales, a
Trinitarian Handmaid who lives in
Sister Patricia Tapales, THDW
Jacksonville. “We talk to families
and pray together with them – we
call our community more prayer than work.”
As the need in the Philippines increased, more sisters joined
the order, many just out of high school.
As the order grew, Mother Elena wanted to create a facility
that could better serve children in need. In 1993, the Trinitarian
Handmaids established The Holy Trinity Home for Children in
Quezon City, Philippines – beginning with just five children.
That number has since grown, and the sisters have aided
numerous children since its inception.
In 2001, the order embarked on a new endeavor – its
first foreign mission. After a failed attempt at establishing a
congregation in Canada, Bishop John J. Snyder invited the
sisters to the Diocese of St. Augustine. Five sisters came from the
Philippines, including Sister Patricia.
Over the years, three of the sisters were reassigned, but two
– Sister Patricia and Sister Maria Gracela Omamalin remains in
their Jacksonville home just blocks away from the beach. They’ve
worked in various capacities, including in an extended day care
program at a school and working with Navy families on base.
“We were easily accepted here,” said Sister Patricia.
The Jacksonville sisters’ work is often in counseling and
healing, and much of their day is spent in prayer – just like their
sisters in the Philippines. But the sisters here have a slightly
different approach to ministry than their sisters overseas.
The two sisters begin their morning prayer at 4:30 a.m.
Morning prayer is followed by meditation, then Mass. The two
sisters sing in the choir each day, with Sister Patricia playing the
guitar.
“We use [music] in our ministry,” said Sister Patricia.
Each Thursday, the sisters host a prayer group, which are
among many gatherings based in their home. After the groups
leave, their prayers begin again from 10 p.m. and can extend to as
late as 3 a.m., oftentimes the sisters sleep for only an hour or two
a night.
“We pray for those people who have no time to pray,” said
Sister Patricia.
NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2015 ST. AUGUSTINE CATHOLIC
25
BRANDON DUNCAN
the sisters in the congregation serving in the diocese.
Sister Boleslawa was especially interested in educating and
protecting youth. The first group of Missionary Sisters continued
to work underground in the teaching and healthcare fields.
During World War II, many sisters died or were relocated, and
a few were even placed in concentration camps. After the war,
when Communism took over Poland, more congregations and
schools closed and many of the Missionary Sisters were fired from
their nursing posts. But as conditions improved, the sisters were
able to travel to the United States, as well as Zambia and other
parts of Africa for missionary work.
The Missionary Sisters of the Holy Family first came to the
U.S. at the invitation of friends and family living here and Bishop
Felipe Estévez. He blessed their convent on Jan. 3, 2013.
There are four Missionary Sisters living in Middleburg near St.
Luke Parish: Sister Danuta Kujalowicz, Sister Kazimiera Noskoau,
Sister Immaculee Nyirasuku and Sister Iwona Maria Serafin.
A few began working as nurses at local hospitals, teaching in
schools and supporting missions. But now, three of them are
semi-retired and Sister Immaculee works as a nurse on the heart
ward at St. Vincent’s Hospital in Clay County.
The sisters adhere to their mission to unite the faithful, inspire
children and help the sick. Working with children is especially
important because, “through educating children, you reach
families,” said Sister Immaculee.
“We do the best we can with education and healthcare,” said
Sister Immaculee. “We evangelize to [non-Catholics through
nursing] – we are working for the same God.”
“You try to unite and show you love them,” said Sister Danuta.
The sisters start their day with Morning Prayer at 6:15 except
for Sister Immaculee, who works in the evenings. They attend an
8:30 a.m. Mass, complete chores and eat meals together.
Inside the home, there is a chapel with three stained-glass
windows blessed by Bishop Estévez. The rest of the home
resembles any other, with hardwood floors, a guest room and a
kitchen. Their bedrooms are cloistered in privacy, but the rest of
the home is open for guests and visitors. It beckons back to the
order’s charism of unity.
“The parish is outstanding,” said Sister Danuta. “The people
here are amazing and have been open and welcome.”
JEFFREY BRUNO-ALETEIA
of Mercy to begin Dec. 8 (the Solemnity of the
Immaculate Conception) for the Universal
Church and in local churches around the
world on the Third Sunday of Advent (Dec.
13). The conclusion of the Year of Mercy will
be Nov. 20, 2016 on the Solemnity of Christ
the King.
“I am convinced that the whole Church
will be able to find in this Jubilee the joy of
rediscovering and making fruitful the mercy
of God, with which we are all called to give
consolation to every man and every woman of
our time,” Pope Francis said, and entrusted the
Holy Year to Mary, Mother of Mercy.
Father John Phillips, pastor of Holy Faith
Parish in Gainesville and a member of the
diocesan planning committee for the jubilee,
explained further. “The Holy Father gives his
reasons in a Papal document announcing
the Jubilee of Mercy: The Face of Mercy
(Misericordiae Vultus). The Pope says the
Church is called to be a witness of God’s
incredible mercy shown to us in Christ Jesus.
Therefore he wants everyone in the Church to
reflect upon this mercy and to show it to others
so that our witness to mercy might be stronger
and more effective.”
A MOMENT OF GRACE TO FEEL GOD’S GREAT LOVE
BY PEGGY DEKEYSER
ON DEC. 8, POPE FRANCIS pushed open the Holy Door to St. Peter’s Basilica in
Rome, a symbol of God’s justice, which he said will always be exercised “in the light of
his mercy.” The Extraordinary Jubilee Year of Mercy has officially begun.
The rite of opening the Holy Door was preceded by a Mass with 70,000 pilgrims
packed in St. Peter’s Square. During his homily Pope Francis emphasized the “simple, yet
highly symbolic” act of opening the Holy Door, which “highlights the primacy of grace;”
the same grace that made Mary “worthy of becoming the mother of Christ.”
“The fullness of grace can transform the human heart and enable it to do something so
great as to change the course of human history,” he said.
Seeing the great need for mercy and healing in the world, Pope Francis called for a Year
26
ST. AUGUSTINE CATHOLIC NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2015
Pope Francis has asked individuals in
the Church “to be a witness of mercy”
by reflecting on and practicing the
spiritual and corporal works of mercy.
Here’s is a list compiled by Catholic
News Service:
The spiritual works of mercy: counsel
the doubtful; instruct the ignorant;
convert the sinner; comfort the
sorrowful; forgive offenses willingly;
bear wrongs patiently; and pray for the
living and the dead.
The corporal works of mercy: feed the
hungry; give drink to the thirsty; clothe
the naked; visit the imprisoned; shelter
the homeless; visit the sick; and bury
the dead.
What does this extraordinary jubilee mean to the ordinary
Catholic?
“The Jubilee can be a time that Catholics learn more about the
biblical and Church’s teachings on mercy. It also can be a time for
Catholics to reflect deeply about how they have experienced divine
and human mercy in their lives,” Father Phillips said. “Finally, it can
be a time when parishes and individuals explore ways to show the
mercy of God more generously in their particular circumstances.
Then we can ‘give thanks to the Lord for he is good: his mercy
endures forever!’” (Psalm 118:1)
Bishop Felipe Estévez, in his proclamation opening the Jubilee
Year of Mercy, has invited the laity and the clergy of the diocese
“to fully contemplate and embrace the message of biblical mercy.”
He also invites those who have been hurt and suffered pain by the
Church and its ministers to consider meeting with him.
“It is my sincere hope and prayer that all such conversations I may
have with you, the faithful of the Diocese of St. Augustine, will be a
step to sow the seeds of healing and reconciliation so that the peace
of Christ will come to your heart,” Bishop Estévez said.
The Year of Mercy, the pope stressed, is a gift of grace that allows
Christians to experience the joy of encountering the transforming
power of grace and rediscovering God’s infinite mercy toward
sinners.
“How much wrong we do to God and his grace when we speak of
sins being punished by his judgment before we speak of their being
forgiven by his mercy,” he said.
This story contains information from Catholic News Service.
Seven Churches and Shrines
Designated as Jubilee Churches
Bishop Felipe Estévez has
designated seven churches
and shrines in the Diocese
of St. Augustine as Jubilee
Churches. A plenary indulgence
for the Jubilee Year of Mercy
may be obtained, under the
usual conditions, for those who
participate in liturgies at these
churches. For more information
on obtaining indulgences, Year
of Mercy events planned in
the diocese, and resources
for individuals, families and
parishes, visit the Year of Mercy
website: www.dosayom.com.
Cathedral Basilica
38 Cathedral Place,
St. Augustine
(904) 824-2806
Shrine of Our Lady of La
Leche Mission Nombre
34 Ocean Ave.,
St. Augustine
(904) 207-7117
St. Mary, Mother of Mercy
Catholic Church
1143 W. Macclenny Ave.,
Macclenny
(904) 259-2959
Basilica of Immaculate
Conception
121 E. Duval Street, Jacksonville
(904) 359-0331
St. Augustine Church &
Catholic Student Center
1738 W. University Ave.,
Gainesville
(352) 372-3533
Santa Fe Shrine of Our Lady
of La Leche at St. Madeleine
Sophie Catholic Church
17155 NW U.S. Highway 441,
High Springs
(386) 454-2358
St. Joseph Carmelite
Monastery Chapel
141 Carmelite Drive, Bunnell
(386) 437-2910
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NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2015 ST. AUGUSTINE CATHOLIC
27
1/17/14 4:01 PM
THE SOLEMN PROCLAMATION OPENING THE
Q
EXTRAORDINARY
Jubilee Year of Mercy
D I O C E S E O F S T. AU G U S T I N E
By the Bull of Indiction, Misericordiae Vultus (“The Face of Mercy”), promulgated on 11 April 2015 before
the Holy Door of the Papal Basilica of Saint Peter at the Vatican, our Holy Father, Pope Francis, declared
that an Extraordinary Jubilee Year of Mercy be observed in the Universal Church. The year will commence
for the Church on Solemnity of the Immaculate Conception (8 December 2015) and in the local churches
around the world on the Third Sunday of Advent (13 December 2015). The conclusion of the Year of Mercy
will be on the Solemnity of Christ our Lord, King of the Universe (20 November 2015).
Pope Francis has placed this initiative under the guidance of the Pontifical Council for the Promotion
of the New Evangelization. At the beginning of the Bull of Indiction, our Holy Father clearly stated that
“Jesus Christ is the face of the Father’s mercy…. Mercy has become living and visible in Jesus of Nazareth,
reaching its culmination in him.”1 This is the Good News that all peoples of the world need to hear and
experience! This is the Good News of the New Evangelization!
We have been invited in this Jubilee Year to live in the light of Jesus’ words, “Be merciful, just as your
Father is merciful.”2 Therefore, during the course of the Year of Mercy, I invite the faithful – the clergy
and the laity – of the Diocese of St. Augustine to fully contemplate and embrace the message of biblical
mercy. The Hebrew word from which we get the English word “mercy” is hesed. This mercy has to do with
showing loving kindness. In other words, there is an action that must occur when mercy is practiced and
manifested. This, of course, is best known by the manner in which God has dealt mercifully with sinners,
most especially in the Paschal Mystery of His Son’s death and resurrection. We are invited to reveal this
mercy, too, by our practice of the Corporal and Spiritual Works of Mercy. Rediscovering these works is a
“burning desire”3 of Pope Francis who reminded us: “Mercy is the very foundation of the Church’s life. All
her pastoral activity should be caught up in the tenderness she makes present to believers; nothing in her
preaching and in her witness to the world can be lacking in mercy.”4
Pope Francis, Bull of Indiction, Misericordiae Vultus, 11 April 2015, no. 1. (Hereafter MV.)
Cf. Luke 6:36.
3
MV, no. 15.
4
MV, no. 10.
1
2
28
ST. AUGUSTINE CATHOLIC NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2015
Through the years, so many have been hurt and alienated by the Church and her ministers. During
the Great Jubilee of 2000, Pope Saint John Paul II presided at a solemn liturgy in which he begged
forgiveness of God for the sins committed by the members of the Church, most especially those
committed in the name of the Church. During this Year of Mercy, locally I want to take this one step
closer to those who have experienced such pain by inviting you to have a conversation with me. Pope
Francis has encouraged the faithful to encuentro, that is, have a meaningful encounter in which we seek
and find the Lord. It is my sincere hope and prayer that all such conversations I may have with you, the
faithful of the Diocese of St. Augustine, will be a step to sow the seeds of healing and reconciliation so
that the peace of Christ will come to your heart.5
The observance of a Jubilee Year is marked by the solemn opening of a Jubilee Door, most especially in
the cathedrals of the world. Pope Francis, desiring to extend the graces of the Year of Mercy to as many
as possible, has provided for the Diocesan Bishop to designate other churches and shrines to serve as
Jubilee Churches and have a “Door of Mercy.” From the Judeo-Christian tradition, doors are symbolic
of conversion: a gesture of leaving the past behind, the crossing of a threshold from sin to grace. Even
the Psalmist proclaims: “This is the Lord’s own door; here the just shall enter through it!”6 And so, in
addition to the Cathedral Basilica of St. Augustine, the following have been declared Jubilee Churches for
the faithful of the diocese and all who visit them:
• The Shrine of Our Lady of La Leche at Mission Nombre de Dios (St. Augustine)
• The Basilica of the Immaculate Conception (Jacksonville)
• St. Augustine Church and Catholic Student Center (Gainesville)
• St. Mary, Mother of Mercy Church (Macclenny)
• St. Joseph Carmelite Monastery Chapel (Bunnell)
• Santa Fe Shrine of Our Lady of La Leche (High Springs)
Another significant aspect of a Jubilee Year is that of pilgrimage, a symbol of the ongoing journey of
faith which we embark on each day. The grace of continuing conversion is enhanced when we commit to
a pilgrimage. And so, I urge the faithful and their pastors to plan, during the course of the Year of Mercy,
a pilgrimage to one or more of the Jubilee Churches and their “Doors of Mercy.” Also, I want to encourage
those who are able to join one of the following pilgrimages that are being planned by the diocese as part
of the Year of Mercy: Rome and Italy (February 22-March 1); the National Shrine of Divine Mercy in
Stockbridge, Mass. (April 18-20), World Youth Days in Krakow, Poland (July 24-August 3); and the Holy
Land (October 17-28).
We know that “the favors of the Lord are not exhausted”7 and that “the mercy of the Lord endures
forever.”8 Thus, Pope Francis reminds us in the Bull of Indiction of the Church’s practice of granting
indulgences. “Reconciliation with God is made possible through the Paschal Mystery and the mediation
of the Church,”9 he writes. “Thus God is always ready to forgive, and he never tires of forgiving in ways
that are continually new and surprising.”10 God’s favor, through the ministry of his Church, to grant
indulgences is the path by which the Lord “reaches the pardoned sinner and frees him from every
residue left by the consequences of sin, enabling him to act in charity, to grow in love….”11 Therefore, I
invite every person to do whatever he or she can do to take advantage of these indulgences – the favors
that come from the Lord through his Church so that the Lord may “send out his spirit and renew the face
of the earth.”12
To set up an appointment with Bishop Estévez, contact your local pastor or the Bishop’s Office at 904-262-3200.
Psalm 118:20.
7
Lamentations 3:22.
8
Psalm 136:1.
9
MV, no. 22.
10
Ibid.
11
Ibid.
12
Psalm 104:30.
5
6
NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2015 ST. AUGUSTINE CATHOLIC
29
One way in which to do this is by coming to the sacrament of penance which is the sacrament of
mercy. Here, in the confession of our sins and the sacramental absolution given by the priest-confessor,
the mercy of God is revealed over and over again. The Parable of the Prodigal Son13 is a constant
reminder to us of how generous our heavenly Father is in granting the humble sinner forgiveness, peace
and mercy. God, who always welcomes the contrite of heart through his Church, so desires that we place
our complete trust in him so that his grace will be at work in us. As St. Paul so wonderfully writes, “We
implore you on behalf of Christ, be reconciled to God.”14 Therefore, I want to encourage those who have
been away from this sacrament to seek its grace once more, especially in this Jubilee of Mercy.
My dear people, we see and experience so many problems and crises facing the human family in our
time. Mercy is a powerful grace from the Most High God to not only temper the pains that afflict us, but
also to bring real healing and true life. This grace is Jesus. St. Teresa of Ávila (1515-1582) reminded us
that we must allow this grace to work through us.
“Christ has no body now but yours. No hands, no feet on earth but yours. Yours are the eyes through
which he looks compassion on this world. Yours are the feet with which he walks to do good. Yours are
the hands through which he blesses all the world. Yours are the hands, yours are the feet, yours are the
eyes, you are his body. Christ has no body now on earth but yours.”15
In the Mystery of the Incarnation, Christ shares fully in our humanity. This mystery came about
through the fiat of the Blessed Virgin Mary. In our own local Church, we turn to the Blessed Virgin Mary
under the title of Nuestra Señora de La Leche y Buen Parto (Our Lady of La Leche and a Happy Delivery).
Her image shows us the immediacy of a mother’s love as she nurses her new-born child, Jesus the Christ.
She stands as a constant reminder of the sacredness of life in all its forms – for just as she holds her infant
son at his birth, it anticipates that day when she will hold his lifeless body again after he is taken down
from the cross. And so we must show mercy in all the circumstances of life – from womb to tomb – to
the poorest and neediest among us, the unborn and the elderly, the sick and the dying, indeed, all who
are in need of God’s tender mercy.
Pope Francis has placed the Year of Mercy before our Lord and God through the intercession of Mary
under her title of “Mother of Mercy.” Just as Mary gave birth to Jesus, the visible manifestation of the
mercy of the invisible God, she is then the spiritual mother of the faithful who seek heavenly mercy. I
echo the sentiments of the Holy Father when he wrote: “Mary attests that the mercy of the Son of God
knows no bounds and extends to everyone, without exception.”16 Through Mary, may we not only
encounter Jesus; may we also help others to encounter Divine Mercy itself.
Most Rev. Felipe J. Estévez, S.T.D.
Bishop of St. Augustine
See Luke 15: 11-30.
2 Corinthians 5:20b.
15
Poem attributed to St. Teresa of Ávila (1515-1582)
16
MV, no. 24.
13
14
30
ST. AUGUSTINE CATHOLIC NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2015
around the diocese l community
YOUTH LEARN ABOUT RELIGIOUS LIFE AT FIAT FESTIVAL
The men religious and youth
played a tough game of basketball
at Fiat Festival.
EVENT RAISES $10,000
Barbecue with Bishop
Fiat. The word resonated through the halls
of Bishop Kenny High School on Nov. 21 as
more than 500 people attended the Fiat Festival.
The theme for the day was inspired by Mary’s
“yes” (fiat) to God in Luke 1:38 “Let it be done
unto me according to thy word.” It was held to
honor men and women religious for the Year of
Consecrated Life.
The festival was coordinated by the Servant
Sisters of the Home of the Mother in Jacksonville
and included Mass, breakout talks, Eucharistic
adoration, reconciliation and a popular “Boys vs.
Religious” basketball game.
Christina Roldan, a sophomore at
Jacksonville University, attended the day with
her friends and said “Just getting to know the
brothers and sisters” was her favorite part of
the event. “This is a one-time experience. It was
awesome,” she added.
Religious communities came from all over
the country to serve as witnesses to high school
and college students. Dominican Father Charles
Johnson said, “It was uplifting and powerful to
see so many young people come here, not only
to talk about religious life, but to participate in the
Eucharist and to adore Jesus.”
“A Barbecue with Bishop Snyder’’ had the perfect
recipe for success as $10,125 was raised at a sold-out
dinner and auction, on Sept. 18 at San Jose Parish
Hall, for the Bishop John J. Snyder Community Center
at nearby San Jose Apartments.
More than 180 guests enjoyed a catered dinner
from 4 Rivers Smokehouse and desserts from San
Jose Apartments residents. The dinner also served as
an early birthday celebration for Bishop Snyder, who
turned 90 on Oct. 25.
The dinner was sponsored by the board of San
Jose Apartments and Family Housing Management
Company staff. The event received generous
support from sponsors: Key Buick GMC Hyundai,
Tom and Ruby Peters, The Hartley Press and Kelley
Kronenberg Attorneys at Law.
The Diocese of St. Augustine formed Family
Housing Management Company in 1986 to manage
and maintain low-income, HUD-subsidized facilities
for the elderly and handicapped. Facilities for the
elderly include Hurley and San Jose Apartments in
Jacksonville and Barry Apartments in Palatka.
The Snyder Center does not receive any HUD
assistance and is a self-sustaining facility. Many of the
activities and services for the residents are held at the
center, located at 3622 Galicia Road.
FOUR SISTERS OF ST. JOSEPH CELEBRATE JUBILEES
LARRY OSSI
Honoring Milestones
Bishop Snyder enjoys taking a moment to help the 4
Rivers Smokehouse staff serve dinner to guests at the
San Jose Parish Hall on Sept. 18.
Father Jeff Johnson, left, joined Bishop Felipe Estévez in honoring the Sisters of
St. Joseph celebrating their Jubilees. From left, Sister Suzan Foster, Sister Mary
Immaculate Moraglia, Sister Marilyn Dingman and Sister Jane Stoecker, the general
superior of the congregation
Four Sisters of St. Joseph were honored at a Mass celebrated by Bishop
Felipe J. Estévez at the Cathedral Basilica of St. Augustine, Oct. 17. The sisters
celebrated a combined 230 years of faithful service to “their dear neighbor.”
Celebrating jubilees in 2015 are: Sisters Christopher Maria Burleson,
Marilyn Dingman and Mary Immaculate Moraglia (60 years). Celebrating her
Golden Jubilee (50 years) is Sister Suzan Foster.
In 2016, the Sisters of St. Joseph will celebrate 150 years of apostolic
ministry in the state of Florida. They have served continuously here since
1866. The St. Augustine Catholic will feature a cover story on their 150th
anniversary in the September/October edition.
LARRY OSSI
RENEE UNSWORTH
TONIA BORSELLINO
Consecrated Life Honored
Bishop Emeritus John J. Snyder is presented a birthday
cupcake by dinner committee member Jan Bebeau.
Bishop Snyder turned 90 on Oct. 25
NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2015 ST. AUGUSTINE CATHOLIC
31
December 2014_Layout 1 12/3/14 10:10 AM Page 1
A T T E N T I O N
The Diocese of St. Augustine
treats all allegations of
sexual misconduct seriously
and deals with the allegations
in a prompt, confidential and
thorough manner.
To Report Abuse Call:
Diocesan Victim Assistance Coordinator
1-800-775-4659, ext.129
or
Department of Children and Families
1-800-96Abuse
1-800-962-2873
POU DENONSE ABI SEXYEL
ASSUMPTION Catholic School
Celebrating 90 years of providing children with a
challenging academic education where faith,
children and learning come first.
2431 Atlantic Boulevard ✟ Jacksonville, Florida 32207 ✟ 904-398-1774 ✟ www.assumptionjax.org
A Legacy of Catholic Education Since 1952
For more than six decades, Bishop Kenny High School has
been privileged to help young people explore their gifts,
expand their understanding, and grow in God’s love.
"Preparing young people for college and for life"
www.bishopkenny.org
Diocèz St. Augustine lan trete
tout plent kont inkondwit sexyel
seriezman e li agi nan yon
fason konfidensyel e rapid pou li
rezoud move rapò sa yo.
Pou pote plent pou abi sa yo: rele
“Diocesan Victim” Assistan Kòdinatè a nan
(904) 262-3200 eKstansyon 129
ou byen
Depatman Timoun ak Fanmi nan
(800) 962-2873.
A T E N C I Ó N
La Diócesis de San Agustín le da seria
consideración a toda acusación de mala
conducta sexual y dispone de todos dichos
casos de manera pronta, completa y
confidencial.
Para reportar tal abuso, llame a:
Coordinador Diocesano de Auxilio a Victimas
(904) 262-3200, ext. 129
o
Departamento de Niños y Familias
del Estado de la Florida
1-800-96Abuse
1-800-962-2873
LƯU Ý
Địa phận Thánh Augustine xử tất cả
những tố cáo về sự lạm dụng tình dục
một cách nghiêm trộng; và sẽ điều tra
- xét xử những điều tố cáo một cách
nhanh chóng, nghiêm mật, và cặn kẽ.
Để tố cáo, xin gọi: Diocesan Victim
Assistance Coordinator
1-800-775-4659, ext. 129.
Hay số:
Contact the office of Admissions for information or a campus tour: 904-398-7545
1055 Kingman Avenue • Jacksonville, FL 32207 • 904-398-7545 • www.bishopkenny.org
32
ST. AUGUSTINE CATHOLIC NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2015
Department of Children and Families
1-800-96Abuse (800) 962-2873.
calendar l what’s happening
DECEMBER 2015
LARGEST CATHOLIC STORE IN JACKSONVILLE
December 12
Catholic Outdoor Adventure Day
An annual Scout retreat for
the whole family.
8 a.m. to 6 p.m., Echockotee,
Orange Park. Call (904) 483-6113 or email
[email protected]
December 18
28th Annual Living Nativity
By Jacksonville’s L’Arche Community
6 to 8 p.m., Riverside Park United
Methodist Church
For details, email
[email protected]
December 12
Through Mary’s Eyes
Retelling of the story of Jesus’ birth
by Anne Coyle
2 to 4 p.m., Basilica of Immaculate
Conception, Jacksonville
Call (904) 359-0331
JANUARY 2016
December 12
Oh Come, Let Us Adore Him! –
Bethlehem Live
6 to 9 p.m., Holy Spirit Church,
Jacksonville. A Holy Spirit Christmas
tradition for whole family.
Call (904) 641-7244 for details
December 13
Feast Day Mass for Our Lady of
Guadalupe
12:30 p.m., San José Catholic Church,
Jacksonville
Celebrant: Bishop Felipe Estévez
Call (904) 353-3243 for details
December 13
Mass for Opening of
Jubilee Year of Mercy
5 p.m., Cathedral Basilica of St. Augustine
Main Celebrant: Bishop Felipe Estévez
Call (904) 824-2806 for details
December 15
Opening Mass for Simbang Gabi
A long-treasured Filipino tradition
preparing for Christmas. 7 p.m., Sacred
Heart Church, Jacksonville
Main Celebrant: Bishop Felipe Estévez
Call (904) 353-3243 for details
December 18-20
Mini-Camp I Am Special
A spiritual retreat for persons with
disabilities.
Camp St. John, St. Johns.
Cost: $190 for campers and
$10 for Buddies to apply.
For details, email Rebecca Aleman at
[email protected]
Queen of Angels
Catholic Book Store
Remember us for all
Sacramental gifts.
Shop in store or online!
Visit our website at
www.queenofangelsjax.com
11018 Old St. Augustine Rd. • Suite 125
Jacksonville, FL 32257
January 10
Interfaith Prayer Service
Bishop Estévez along with other faith
leaders will participate.
2:30 p.m. Edward Waters College Choir
3:00 p.m. Prayer Service, Holy Rosary
Church, Jacksonville
Email Ernie Favors at [email protected] for
information
January 16
Faith Formation Day West
10 a.m., Queen of Peace, Gainesville
For details, email Erin at
[email protected]
288-0062
SAVE THE DATE
JAN 30-31
Bishop’s Annual
Stewardship Appeal
“One Faith. One Family”
All parishes of the diocese.
To learn more, visit dosafl.com/
bishopsappeal
January 16
10th Annual March for Life
9 a.m. Mass at Shrine of
Our Lady of La Leche
10 a.m. March from Mission
Nombre de Dios, St. Augustine
Guest Speaker: Leah Darrow.
For details, visit
www.marchforlifestaugustine.com
MARCH 11-12
January 17
Dedication of Mary, Queen
of Heaven Church
9 a.m., 9401 Staples Mill Drive,
Jacksonville
Main Celebrant: Bishop Felipe Estévez
For details, call (904) 777-3168
Eucharistic Congress
Theme: “Renew Your Heart”
Friday Keynote: Archbishop Wilton
Gregory of Atlanta
Saturday Keynote: Cardinal
Óscar Rodríguez Maradiaga of
Tegucigalpa, Honduras
Prime Osborn Convention Center,
Jacksonville
For details, visit FloridaEucharist.org
January 24
Confirmation for Adults
Celebrant: Bishop Felipe Estévez
10:30 a.m., Epiphany Catholic Church,
Lake City
Call Erin at (904) 262-3200 for details
FOR MORE DIOCESAN, PARISH
AND ORGANIZATIONAL EVENTS,
visit www.dosafl.com/events
NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2015 ST. AUGUSTINE CATHOLIC
33
católico
San Agustín
Noviembre/Diciembre 2015
dosafl.com
Ministerio de
Trabajadores
Agrícolas
Una Oportunidad para Servir
POR LORENA ESPINOZA
WOODY HUBAND
Olga Lara-Moser
Directora de Farm Workers Ministry
34
ST. AUGUSTINE CATHOLIC NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2015
“Y el Rey les dirá: ‘En verdad les
digo que cuanto hicieron a uno
de estos hermanos míos más
pequeños, a mí me lo hicieron”
(Mt. 25, 40)
Como todos los años, el Ministerio de
Trabajadores Agrícolas de la Diócesis
de San Agustín (Farm Workers Ministry)
trabajan arduamente en sus dos programas,
“Canastas de Comida para Acción de
Gracias y “Toy for Joy” para la Navidad.
“Estos programas consisten en dar a
las familias y niños de Crescent City y
sus alrededores, canastas con productos
alimenticios que podrán ser utilizados para
preparar su cena de Acción de Gracias y
regalos de Navidad para los más pequeños.
Para ello, pedimos la colaboración de
iglesias hermanas, colegios u otras
organizaciones”, nos explica Olga Lara,
Directora del Farm Workers Ministy.
mensaje del obispo l Feliz Navidad
Renovación de las promesas
bautismales en Navidad
WOODY HUBAND
POR EL OBISPO MONS. FELIPE J. ESTÉVEZ
Sofia Chávez Martínez y su
hija Elizabeth Borja
Se prepara una lista con los productos
que las entidades y personas pueden
donar. Asimismo, se confecciona más de
600 ángeles para el árbol de navidad. Cada
angelito contiene el nombre de la familia,
el nombre del niño, género y edad. De esta
manera, las personas sabrán quién recibirá
sus regalos.
“Quiero dar las gracias por la canasta
de comida y los regalos de Navidad que
mi familia y yo recibimos el año pasado. Es
una verdadera bendición todo lo que este
ministerio hace por nosotros. No tengo
palabras para describir su generosidad.”,
comenta Sofía Chávez Martínez, de origen
mexicano, quien ayuda como voluntaria y
vive con su familia de cinco en Crescent
City.
El año pasado se repartieron cerca de
200 canastas el Día de Acción de Gracias y
entregaron regalos a más de 500 niños en
Navidad.
Este año, la entrega de juguetes se
realizará el 20 de diciembre en la Iglesia St.
Juan Bautista de Crescent City.
Pero el Ministerio de Trabajadores
Agrícolas no sólo se dedica a estos dos
programas. Su trabajo por los demás es
más complejo y durante todo el año.
Ellos se encargan de ayudar a las
familias de bajos recursos del sector, con el
pago de los servicios básicos como la luz,
agua, alcantarillado, gas, y renta. Además,
distribuyen comida todos los días lunes, y
pañales y comida para bebés.
Asimismo, cuenta con programas
especiales como el dental, visión,
referencias médicas, asistencia migratoria,
referidos de ayuda legal y servicio de
transportación en casos de emergencia.
“Me llena de satisfacción ver como
los hijos de estas familias han asistido a
escuela y han salido adelante. Ya tenemos
un asistente de dentista, un asistente de
El Niño de Belén
nos comunica nada
menos que el amor
totalmente impensable de Dios hacia el
hombre. Radical en
sus profundidades, sin límites en su despliegue,
su amor revela una belleza que es el esplendor de
la verdad: La Palabra se hizo carne y habitó entre nosotros, y vimos su gloria, gloria como del unigénito del
Padre, lleno de gracia y de verdad (Jn 1,14). La verdad inagotable y belleza de la Navidad de Nuestro
Señor ha inspirado a los cristianos a través de los
siglos a poner en palabras, música y arte algo del
misterio y la realidad de la Navidad. De hecho,
nuestro querido Agustín, el gran teólogo y filósofo,
cuyos escritos tan fuertemente han influido en
el desarrollo del cristianismo occidental, eligió el
Salmo 84 para citarlo en Navidad: La verdad ha
brotado de la tierra, y la justicia ha mirado desde los
cielos. Tan completo como este salmo puede ser
en su perfección como una expresión del amor
de Dios, Agustín va más allá, intentando una y
otra vez fijar su mente alrededor de este evento
verdaeramente increíble:
“Él es el Uno por quien han sido hechas todas
las cosas y, en Navidad, ¿Quién se ha hecho
en medio de todas las cosas?... Creador de los
cielos y la tierra, nacido en la tierra debajo de los
cielos. Indeciblemente sabio, Él es sabiamente sin
palabras. El que lleno el universo, Él ahora yace
en un pesebre. Gobernante de las estrellas, Él se
amamanta en el seno de su madre. Él es grande
en la naturaleza de Dios y pequeño en la forma de
un siervo, pero su grandeza no se ve disminuida
por su pequeñez, ni Su pequeñez abrumado por
su grandeza”. (Sermón 191).
Esto debería continuar sorprendiéndonos,
como dijo el Papa Benedicto XVI en la Misa de
Gallo hace tres años, “que Dios se hace un niño
para que lo amemos, para que nos atrevamos a
amarlo, y como un niño permite confiadamente
tenerlo en nuestros brazos. Es como si Dios
estuviera diciendo: Yo sé que mi gloria te asusta,
así que ahora voy a ti como un niño, de modo que
me puedas aceptar y amar”. De la misma manera,
nuestra Diócesis es excepcionalmente bendecida
por tener como patrona a la Virgen de la Leche
y del Buen Parto. Cuando miramos a la Virgen,
la siempre Madre virginal de Dios, y el Divino
Niño que ella acuna en sus brazos, es Navidad en
nuestros corazones. La Palabra de Dios se hizo
carne en toda sencillez, y no podemos dejar de
estar maravillados.
Dado que nuestro Dios es amor (1 Jn 4, 8), y la
alegría es un fruto del amor, recordemos entonces
con alegría esta temporada en la que Dios se ha
hecho presente en nuestras vidas y Él mismo
se muestra benevolente en sus bendiciones. De
manera particular, nuestra Diócesis pone fin a
los 450 años de la fundación de la ciudad y de
la comunidad de fe de San Agustín. Fue el amor
compartido de Cristo que sirvió de inspiración
a este año de celebraciones conmemorativas, y
nuestra alegría colectiva en comunión es precisamente la del Evangelio que nuestro Santo Padre,
Francisco, habla a menudo, una alegría que llena,
nos desborda y da vida por una participación
más activa en la misión evangelizadora de Jesús.
De hecho, heredamos este llamado a compartir la
Buena Nueva con todos los necesitados en virtud
de nuestro único bautismo en Cristo.
Aquel quien nos ha revelado al Padre, nos
revela también el “rostro de la misericordia
del Padre”, que el Papa Francisco nos invita a
contemplar en el próximo Jubileo extraordinario
de la Misericordia. Con “sentimientos de gratitud
por todo lo que la Iglesia ha recibido, y con un
sentido de responsabilidad por las tareas futuras”,
nos recuerda el Santo Padre que “la misericordia
siempre será mayor que cualquier pecado”, y
buscamos el perdón de Dios en nuestras vidas
con el fin de que esta “nueva iniciativa para todos
los cristianos” nos animará a “dar testimonio de
nuestra fe con mayor entusiasmo y convicción”.
(Misericordia Vultus).
Mi deseo de Navidad para todos ustedes, en
palabras de Agustín, es que Él que no desprecio
nuestros pobres inicios, perfeccione su obra en
nosotros, y Él que deseaba a causa de nosotros
convertirse en el Hijo del hombre, nos convierta en los hijos e hijas de Dios. Ofrezcamos la
renovación de las promesas bautismales como un
regalo a Él en esta Navidad, y podamos siempre
decir con María, hágase en mí según tu palabra
(Lc 1,38).
NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2015 ST. AUGUSTINE CATHOLIC
35
Nuestra Señora
enfermería y un maestro. Nos sentidos
tan bien que hemos podido ayudar a esas
familias”, detalla Olga Lara.
Otros de los servicios que ofrecen son:
las tutorías para los niños, clases de inglés
como segunda lengua, traducciones,
servicio de notaria, las canastas en Pascua
y la repartición de mochilas con útiles
escolares.
“Este año se repartieron más de 200
mochilas. Hay niños que realmente
las necesitan y se emocionan mucho
al recibirlas. Soy feliz de servir a esta
comunidad a la cual considero como mi
familia.”, comparte Rosa Gómez, quien
lleva trabajando para este ministerio por
ocho años, seis como voluntaria y dos
como empleada medio tiempo.
Además de las generosas donaciones,
este ministerio se ayuda con la venta de
mercadería en su tiendita. Los fondos
van destinados para solventar todos sus
programas.
Este ministerio es una organización sin
fines de lucro que fue establecido en 1992
por Caridades Católicas de la Diócesis de
San Agustín.
La misión principal es proveer asistencia,
soporte y guía a los trabajadores agrícolas
y migrantes que trabajan en las zonas
rurales de la diócesis.
CAPILLA SANTUARIO EN HONOR A
n la Misión de Nombre de Dios,
el pasado 11 de octubre, el Obispo Felipe
Estévez de la Diócesis de San Agustín,
dedicó una capilla Santuario a Nuestra
Señora de la Leche.
“Este santuario tiene un valor invaluable
debido a su importancia histórica y
teológica”, afirmó el Obispo Estévez.
Los trabajos de renovación en la Iglesia
Príncipe de Paz se iniciaron en febrero de
este año. Príncipe de Paz fue originalmente
construida y bendecida por el Arzobispo
Joseph P. Hurley, el 17 de abril de 1966.
El principal cambio fue la extensión de
unos 2.500 pies cuadrados a la Iglesia, y que
ahora son parte de la Capilla Santuario de
Nuestra Señora de La Leche.
Su altar cuenta con una nueva
configuración: una gran estatua de Nuestra
Señora de La Leche y estatuas más pequeñas
que representan a San José, custodio de
Jesucristo; San Francisco de Asís, fundador
de la orden franciscana cuyos misioneros
evangelizaron los nativos americanos en
la Florida durante dos siglos; St. Katherine
Drexel, fundadora de las Hermanas del
Santísimo Sacramento para servir a los
36
nativos americanos y los afro-americanos,
y Santa Kateri Tekawitha, el primer santo
nativo americano en los Estados Unidos y
Canadá.
A su vez, las mejoras estructurales
incluyen también dos oficinas para los
sacerdotes asignados a la ermita que
proporcionará los servicios litúrgicos,
peregrinaciones y una identidad pastoral
de evangelización en curso. Hay nuevos
confesionarios, una nueva sacristía y pórtico
de entrada, un nuevo sistema de sonido,
pisos y capacidad para 200 a 300 personas.
Desde el siglo 17, la devoción a la Virgen
de la Leche se ha mantenido viva por un
sinnúmero de personas de fe que viajan
de todas partes del mundo al santuario,
buscando la intercesión de nuestra Madre
Santísima para un embarazo y nacimiento
de su hijo seguros; para las familias, el
fortalecimiento de su fe, y la curación del
cáncer de mama y otras enfermedades.
En 2012, el Vaticano aprobó la solicitud
del Obispo Estévez para celebrar 11 de
octubre como día festivo diocesana anual en
honor a la Virgen de la Leche, elevando aún
más el estado del santuario.
ST. AUGUSTINE CATHOLIC NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2015
Rosa Gómez, trabaja en el Ministerio de
Trabajadores Agrícolas por 8 años
Si usted quiere ser parte de este
ministerio, puede comunicarse
con Olga Lara.
2725 B Highway 17 South,
Crescent City, FL 32043
Teléfono: (386) 698 4234
email: [email protected]
Horario de atención:
lunes, miércoles y jueves
WOODY HUBAND
E
SCOTT SMITH
de laLeche
el santo del mes l San Juan Diego
SAN JUAN DIEGO
El confidente de la dulce Señora del Tepeyac
San Juan Diego nació en 1474 en Cuauhtitlán,
México. Cuando nació recibió el nombre de
Cuauhtlatoatzin, que quiere decir “el que habla
como águila”.
Juan Diego perteneció a la más numerosa y
baja clase del Imperio Azteca, sin llegar a ser
esclavo. Se dedicó a trabajar la tierra y fabricar
matas, las que luego vendía.
Atraído por la doctrina de los Padres
Franciscanos llegados a México en 1524,
recibió el bautismo junto con su esposa
María Lucía. Una vez celebrado el matrimonio
cristiano, vivió castamente hasta la muerte de
su esposa, fallecida en 1529.
Hombre de fe, fue coherente con sus
obligaciones bautismales, nutriendo
regularmente su unión con Dios mediante la
eucaristía y el estudio del catecismo.
En el momento en que Juan Diego se queda
viudo, se va a vivir con su tío Juan Bernardino
en Tolpetlac, a sólo 14 kilómetros de la iglesia
de Tlatilolco, Tenochtitlán.
Durante una de sus caminatas camino
a Tenochtitlán, que solían durar tres horas
a través de montañas y poblados, ocurre
la primera aparición de Nuestra Señora de
Guadalupe, en el lugar ahora conocido como
“Capilla del Cerrito”, donde la Virgen María le
habló en su idioma, el náhuatl.
Luego del milagro de Guadalupe, Juan
Diego fue a vivir a un pequeño cuarto pegado
a la capilla que alojaba la santa imagen, tras
dejar todas sus pertenencias a su tío Juan
Bernardino.
Pasó el resto de su vida dedicado a la
difusión del relato de las apariciones entre la
gente de su pueblo.
Murió en 1548, a la edad de 74 años. Juan
Diego fue beatificado en abril de 1990 y
canonizado el 31 de julio de 2002 por el Papa
Juan Pablo II, quien viajó a Ciudad de México
para presidir la ceremonia.
En espíritu de pobreza y de vida humilde
Juan Diego recorrió el camino de la santidad,
dedicando mucho de su tiempo a la oración,
a la contemplación y a la penitencia. Dócil a la
autoridad eclesiástica, tres veces por semana
recibía la Santísima Eucaristía.
Festividad: 9 de diciembre
Fecha de nacimiento: En 1474 en
Cuauhtitlán, México
Fecha de defunción: En 1548
ENTENDIENDO
EL AÑO SANTO DE LA
MISERICORDIA
¿Cuando tendrá lugar el año santo?
Se inició este año con la apertura
de la Puerta Santa en el Vaticano
durante la solemnidad de la
Inmaculada Concepción, el 8 de
diciembre de 2015 y concluirá del
próximo El 20 de noviembre de
2016, domingo de nuestro Señor
Jesucristo Rey del universo y rostro
vivo de la misericordia del Padre.
¿Cómo propone el Papa Francisco
vivir este año santo?
El lema de este año santo es
Misericordiosos como el Padre.
“Es mi vivo deseo, dice el Papa,
que el pueblo de Dios reflexione
durante el Jubileo sobre obras
de misericordia corporales y
espirituales”. Redescubrir las
obras de misericordia corporales:
dar de comer al que pasa hambre,
acoger al forastero, asistir a los
enfermos y visitar a los presos. Y
obras de misericordia espirituales:
dar consejo a quien lo necesite,
consolar al afligido, corregir al que
se equivoca, perdonar ofensas, rezar
por los vivos y los difuntos ...
¿Qué dice la bula papal sobre el
sacramento del perdón?
Se pone otra vez el sacramento de
la confesión en el centro de la vida
cristiana. Acudir a la confesión será
fuente de verdadera paz interior. Se
prevée que la iniciativa “24 horas
con el Señor” se incremente cada
diócesis el próximo año.
¿El año santo habla de oración?
Para ser capaces de misericordia,
en primer lugar debemos colocarnos
a la escucha de la Palabra de Dios.
De este modo es posible contemplar
la misericordia de Dios y asumirla
como propio estilo de vida.
¿Quién llega a cruzar la Puerta
Santa de la misericordia?
La peregrinación es un signo peculiar
en el año santo, porque es imagen
del camino que cada persona realiza
en su existencia. También para llegar
a la Puerta Santa en Roma y en
cualquier otro lugar, cada uno deberá
realizar, de acuerdo con las propias
fuerzas, una peregrinación.
WOODY HUBAND
¿Por qué el Papa Francisco ha
convocado un Jubileo de la
Misericordia?
El Papa responde: “he anunciado
un Jubileo Extraordinario de la
Misericordia como tiempo propicio
para la Iglesia, para que haga más
fuerte y eficaz el testimonio de los
creyentes”.
Ordenados por el Obispo Estévez el pasado 5 de diciembre, desde la izqda. Diáconos
Santiago Rosado-Rodríguez, Milton Vega y Ángel Sánchez.
Tres Nuevos Diáconos Hispanos al Servicio de la Diócesis
El pasado 5 de diciembre, tres candidatos de origen hispano fueron ordenados
Diáconos por el Obispo de San Agustín, Felipe Estévez.
Ellos son el Dr. Santiago Rosado, de la Iglesia de San Sebastián; Milton Vega,
quien trabaja en el Apostolado del Mar de la Diócesis y Parroquia Blessed Trinity y
Ángel Sánchez, de la Parroquia Blessed Trinity.
La Misa de Ordenación se realizó en la Parroquia St. Joseph.
NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2015 ST. AUGUSTINE CATHOLIC
37
EL VERDADERO SENTIDO DEL
calendario
Adviento
POR P. WILLIAM VILLA
E
El Adviento es el comienzo del Año
Litúrgico, se inicia el primer domingo de
diciembre y culmina el 24 de diciembre.
La palabra latina “adventus” significa
“venida”. En el lenguaje cristiano se refiere a la
venida de Jesucristo.
La Liturgia de la Iglesia da el nombre de
adviento a las cuatro semanas que preceden
a la Navidad, y son una oportunidad para
prepararnos en la esperanza y la disposición
que debemos tener en este tiempo de espera a
la llegada del Señor.
El color utilizado en la liturgia de la Iglesia
durante esta época es el morado, el cual
significa penitencia. El tiempo de adviento es
un periodo privilegiado para los cristianos,
ya que nos invita a recordar el pasado, nos
impulsa a vivir el presente y preparar el futuro.
Es un período de preparación, esperanza
y arrepentimiento de nuestros pecados
38
16 al 23 de diciembre
Novena al Divino Niño en la Parroquia Queen
of Peace, Salón # 4, Walsh Hall.
Hora: 7:30 p.m.
15-23 de diciembre
Posadas de Navidad
Cada noche visitando diferentes hogares
Desde las 7:30-9:30 p.m. Más información,
contactar a Tingo Maldonado al (904) 699
9188
para la llegada del Señor. En el adviento nos
preparamos para la Navidad y la segunda
venida de Cristo al mundo, cuando volverá
como Rey de todo el universo.
Es un tiempo en el que podemos hacer
un plan de vida para mejorar como seres
humanos.
Esta es una época del año vamos a estar
‘bombardeados’ por la publicidad para comprar
todo tipo de regalos y vamos a estar invitados a
muchas fiestas. Todo esto puede llegar a hacer
que nos olvidemos del verdadero sentido del
Adviento.
Esforcémonos por vivir este tiempo litúrgico
con profundidad y sentido cristiano. De esta
manera, viviremos el verdadero sentido de la
Navidad, que es Jesús.
¡Que tengan un Feliz Navidad!
Sacerdote en las comunidades de Cross City,
Chiefland y Mayo.
ST. AUGUSTINE CATHOLIC NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2015
15 al 25 de diciembre
Posadas de Navidad en la Comunidad de
Mayo
Con oraciones, villancicos, y comida
Más información comunicarse con la Hermana
Lili al (386) 294 2126
24 de diciembre
Misa de Navidad en español en la Iglesia San
José a las 7:30 p.m.
17 de enero
Celebración Nuestra Señora de Altagracia
Iglesia San José a las 12:30 p.m.
Presidida por el Obispo Felipe Estévez
11-14 de febrero
Cursillo de Hombres
18-21 de febrero
Cursillo de Mujeres
11-12 de marzo
Congreso Eucarístico de la Florida
“Renueve su corazón”
Prime F. Osborn Convention Center
Más información al floridaeucharistic.org
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JACKSONVILLE
904.493.3333
FLEMING ISLAND
904.644.0092
ST. AUGUSTINE
904.436.6420
PALATKA
386.325.2836
MACCLENNY
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BUNNELL
386.445.2003
MIDDLEBURG
904.282.7271
NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2015 ST. AUGUSTINE CATHOLIC
39
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St. Augustine
The Magazine of the Catholic Diocese of Saint Augustine
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Jacksonville, FL 32258-2060
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