national congress 2013 - National Domestic Workers Alliance

Comentarios

Transcripción

national congress 2013 - National Domestic Workers Alliance
NATIONAL CONGRESS 2013
July 20-23, 2013
Hyatt Regency at Capitol Hill
400 New Jersey Avenue Northwest
Washington DC
National Domestic Workers Alliance
NATIONAL CONGRESS 2013
July 20-23, 2013
Hyatt Regency at Capitol Hill
400 New Jersey Avenue Northwest
Washington DC
In this program book you will find:
Congress Program Logistical Information
Updated National Domestic Workers Alliance Member Map
2013-2014 Goals
2012-2013 Accomplishments
Speaker Bios
4
8
9
11
12
14
National Domestic Workers Alliance
NATIONAL CONGRESS 2013
The 2013 National Congress
brings together
2-3
delegates from each
of our member organizations to learn, reflect and strategize the future
of our movement together.
We
plan to deepen our understanding of
the current context and strengthen our vision for the future of
domestic work, while clarifying our role in the broader movement for a
just, sustainable economy and democracy that works for everyone.
We
will also have time for exchange, celebration of our victories, mutual
support, training and demonstrating our power together.
National Congress 2012
3
PROGRAM
NATIONAL CONGRESS 2013
SATURDAY, JULY 21
6:30pm
WELCOME DINNER
Juana Flores, Mujeres Unidas y Activas and NDWA Board President
Gilda Blanco, Casa Latina, NDWA Board Member
Patricia Francois, Domestic Workers United
Ai-jen Poo, NDWA Director
TALENT NIGHT
SUNDAY, JULY 22 – NDWA PRIORITIES & WORK
8:00am – 9:00am
BREAKFAST
9:00am – 9:30am
OPENING OF NATIONAL CONGRESS
Welcome:Linda Oalican, Damayan Migrant Workers Association, NDWA
Board Member
Morning Prayer
Morning Practice
9:30am – 10:45am
Presentation and Discussion: ECONOMY & LABOR MOVEMENT David Rolf, President, SEIU Healthcare 775 NW
10:45am – 11:00am
BREAK
11:00am - 12:45pm
Reflection: LESSONS, CHALLENGES & OPPORTUNITIES FOR THE DOMESTIC WORKER MOVEMENT
4
History of Domestic Work Industry & Movement – Jerret Johnson, Atlanta Chapter
Roundtable of reflections from the frontlines
12:45pm – 1:45pm
LUNCH (on your own)
1:30pm – 1:45pm
PRACTICE (Optional)
PROGRAM
NATIONAL CONGRESS 2013
SUNDAY, JULY 22 – NDWA PRIORITIES & WORK
1:45pm – 3:45pm
COHORT and CAMPAIGN MEETINGS
1. STATE STRATEGIES AND LABOR STANDARDS:
Strategies to win Domestic Workers Bills of Rights in states
2. WINNING IMMIGRATION REFORM
We Belong Together campaign to win a path to citizenship for the 11 million undocumented, highlighting what’s at stake for women and families
3. CARE SECTOR STRATEGY
Through Caring Across Generations, building a movement to transform long-term care choices for families and quality of jobs for care workers while building a caring, political majority.
4. ENDING TRAFFICKING IN DOMESTIC WORKERS
Beyond Survival campaign to elevate the leadership of domestic labor trafficking survivors in key policy debates
5. BRINGING OUR LOCAL ORGANIZING TO SCALE
Base-building Innovation Group
6. SOCIAL ENTERPRISE AND INNOVATION
Carewetrust.com, creating market-based solutions to improve working conditions for domestic workers
7. INTERNATIONAL & CROSS-SECTOR MOVEMENT BUILDING
News from our movement internationally, and developments in other low-wage worker organizing efforts.
3:45pm – 4:00pm
BREAK
4:00pm – 7:00pm
NDWA PRIORITIES AND WORK PLAN
Review of overall priorities
Reports from campaign and cohort meetings
NDWA Growth Strategy for 2013-2014
7:00pm 7:00pm DINNER (on your own)
National broadcast of National Congress via livestream
MONDAY, JULY 22 – 2050 VISION DEVELOPMENT
8:00am – 9:00am
BREAKFAST
9:00am – 9:45am
OPENING
Reflections on Previous Day
9:45am – 12:00pm
CONTEXT FOR OUR WORK
Domestic Work in the City–Guillemina Castellanos, La Colectiva de Mujeres
Domestic Work in the South–Lori Wallace, Atlanta Chapter
Changing World of Work–Saket Soni, National Guestworkers Alliance
Changing Demographics: Race, Gender & Age–Erin Johansson, Jobs with Justice and American Rights at Work
5
PROGRAM
NATIONAL CONGRESS 2013
MONDAY, JULY 22 – 2050 VISION DEVELOPMENT
12:00pm – 1:00pm
LUNCH (on your own)
1:00pm – 3:00pm
FUTURE TRAVEL—PROJECTIONS FOR 2050
Where do we go from here?
Moderator - Ai-jen Poo, NDWA Director
Racial Justice & Immigrant Rights Movement – Gabriela Pacheco, United We Dream
Community Organizing – Bree Carlson, National People’s Action
Domestic Workers Movement – Natalicia Tracy, Brazilian Immigrant Center, NDWA Board member
Group Visioning Exercise
3:00pm – 3:15pm
BREAK
3:15pm – 4:45pm
TRAININGS & ORGANIZING EXCHANGES
PREPARING FOR IMPLEMENTATION OF IMMIGRATION REFORM
Nisha Agarwal, Center for Popular Democracy, Lolita Lledo, Pilipino Workers Center, and Antonia Peña, Casa de Maryland
The legalization of millions presents unprecedented opportunities to both improve the lives of domestic workers and build our
movement for the long-term, provided organizations are able to develop the capacity to connect community education, service,
and organizing. We will share lessons from DACA and discuss plans being developed by NDWA and other local organizations.
NDWA CNX: TEXT TOOL FOR ORGANIZING
Jonathan Kissam, NDWA/Webskillet and Chris Huang, Center for Popular Democracy
Learn how to grow your organizing with this text message & hotline system that connects domestic workers with important
updates and actions for immigration reform and domestic worker rights.
THE POWER OF OUR STORIES MEDIA TRAINING
Barbara Young, NDWA National Organizer and Rosana Reyes, NDWA Communications Director
In this workshop we will practice telling our own stories and the story of our movement in a way that highlights the need for
policy change in the media. We will record short videos of our stories.
NDWA & ORGANIZATION UNITED FOR RESPECT AT WALMART (OUR WALMART)-NETWORK BUILDING EXCHANGE
Jill Shenker, NDWA Field Director with OURWalmart organizers and worker leaders
Both NDWA and OURWalmart are experimenting with how to build worker power at scale both locally and nationally.
OURWalmart is going up against the largest retail giant in the world with 4,000 stores and building online to field networks in
areas where there are no staff. NDWA is building power when there are as many employers as workers and workers are isolated
and dispersed. Join us for a rich exchange of ideas and strategy.
EMBODIED LEADERSHIP FOR TRANSFORMATIVE CHANGE
Staci Haines, generative somatics
Transformative leadership, campaigns and social change are at the core of NDWA’s vision. NDWA has been partnering with
generative somatics and Social Justice Leadership in our SOL (Solidarity, Organizing and Leadership) Program over the past 2
years. The embodied leadership workshop will introduce you to some of the core practices of transformative leadership that can
support your work. We’ll practice: “I,We, All”, centering and under pressure, understanding your triggers and how to keep moving
together toward your vision, and more! Embodied leadership invites you to be whole and powerful.
SELF-DEVELOPMENT OF PEOPLE (SDOP)
Cynthia White, Self-Development of People
SDOP is a ministry of compassion and justice. We enter into partnership with communities that have identified their needs and
have come up with a plan to address those needs. Come learn how we can partner together. Listen and learn from SDOP staff
and members of NDWA that have established partnership with our ministry.
6
PROGRAM
NATIONAL CONGRESS 2013
MONDAY, JULY 22 – 2050 VISION DEVELOPMENT
TRAININGS & ORGANIZING EXCHANGES continued
DISABILITY RIGHTS
Hand in Hand: The Domestic Employers Association
Hand in Hand will lead a discussion about the historical context of disability communities organizing for change, and current
intersections between disability and domestic worker movements. We will also dig into strategy around working with disability
communities in the context of current
NDWA
campaigns.
National
Congress
2012
DIRECTOR’S CIRCLE
Ai-jen Poo, NDWA Director
A session designed for Executive Directors of NDWA affiliates, we will discuss and strategize the particular challenges of running
an organization in this moment, and brainstorm ways to better support one another’s leadership as our movement grows.We will
also discuss NDWA’s priorities and focus for next year.
5:00pm – 5:30pm
OPPORTUNITIES & CHALLENGES AHEAD FOR WOMEN & WORKERS
Maya Harris,Vice-President, Ford Foundation
Mary Kay Henry, International President, SEIU
5:30pm – 7:30pm
HONORING OUR LEGACY RECEPTION
TUESDAY, JULY 23 – SEIZING THE MOMENT
7:00am – 8:30am BREAKFAST (& Check-out of hotel)
8:30am – 9:00am
OPENING
Reflections from the Previous Day
Morning practices: closure for the Congress
9:00am – 10:30am
PREP FOR HILL VISITS AND MEETINGS 11:00am
PRESS CONFERENCE
Capitol Hill, Washington DC
12:00pm – 4:00 pm
Legislative Visits on Immigration Reform
2:00pm
1. AFL-CIO – Listening Session
815 16th St NW, Washington DC
Meet with the AFL-CIO Community Partnerships Committee to share experiences of working with unions and hopes for future partnerships.
2. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR WOMEN’S BUREAU MEETING
200 Constitution Ave NW, Washington DC
Meet with representatives of the Department of Labor to share the findings from our national study on domestic work.
5:00PMDEPART
7
LOGISTICAL INFORMATION
NATIONAL CONGRESS 2013
CONGRESS LOCATION
HYATT REGENCY AT CAPITOL HILL
400 New Jersey Avenue Northwest
Washington, DC 20001
202.737.1234
OTHER PERTINENT LOCATIONS
Press Conference
Capitol Hill
Washington DC
AFL-CIO Listening Session
815 16th St NW (at I Street)
Washington DC
Department of Labor
200 Constitution Ave NW
Washington DC
CHILDCARE
NDWA will provide childcare during the Congress starting on the morning of July 21st and end at 5:30pm on Monday, July
22nd. Children will be expected to stay with their parents during the press conference, legislative visits and other activities on
Tuesday. The childcare will be provided in a few of the breakout rooms in the Hyatt Regency. When you drop off your child
for care, you will complete a form with emergency and contact information. Please keep your cell phone with you in case
childcare needs to get in touch with you. Register your children for childcare between 8-9am on Sunday July 21st.
INTERPRETATION
NDWA will provide interpretation in three languages: Spanish, English, and Tagalog. The majority of the interpretation will
be simultaneous through interpretation equipment. Delegates will need to sign out the equipment and be responsible for
returning it. If the equipment is not returned, then each organization will be responsible for covering the cost to replace the
equipment. Interpretation equipment will be distributed at the registration table every morning.
8
MEMBERS
NATIONAL CONGRESS 2013
As of July 2013, NDWA has 41 organizational
members in 26 cities and 17 states.
Filipino Advocates for Justice
OAKLAND, California
www.filipinos4action.org
[email protected] • 510.465.9876
NDWA ORGANIZING MEMBERS
Organizing members are organizations that have a clear membership structure
and are actively growing their membership base of domestic workers.
All members pay dues, participate in decision-making through our programs,
National Campaigns, Congresses and Conferences. Adhikaar
WOODSIDE, New York
www.adhikaar.org
[email protected] • 718.937.1117
Centro Humanitario
DENVER, Colorado
www.centrohumanitario.org [email protected]
centrohumanitario.org • 303.292.4115
Brazilian Immigrant Center
ALLSTON, Massachusets
HARTFORD, Connecticut
www.braziliancenter.org
[email protected] • 617.783. 8001
Cidadao Global
LONG ISLAND CITY, New York
www.cidadaoglobal.org
[email protected] • 917.294.6087
Brazilian Women’s Group
ALLSTON, Massachusets
http://verdeamarelo.org/
[email protected] • 617.787.0557
Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights of
Los Angeles (CHIRLA)
LOS ANGELES, California
www.chirla.org
[email protected] • 213.353.1333
CASA de Maryland
SILVER SPRING, Maryland
www.casademaryland.org
[email protected] • 301.431.4185
Damayan Migrant Workers Association
NEW YORK, New York
www.damayanmigrants.org [email protected]
damayanmigrants.org • 212.564.6057
CASA Latina
SEATTLE, Washington
www.casa-latina.org
[email protected] • 206.956.0779
Domestic Workers United
NEW YORK, New York
www.domesticworkersunited.org
[email protected]
212.481.5747
Centro Laboral de Graton / Graton Day
Labor Center
GRATON, California
www.gratondaylabor.org
[email protected] • 707.829.1864
Fe y Justicia Worker Center
HOUSTON, Texas
www.houstonworkers.org
fjwchoustonworkers.org • 713.862.8222
IDEPSCA
LOS ANGELES, California
www.idepsca.org
[email protected] • 213.252.2952
La Colectiva de Mujeres
SAN FRANCISCO, California
lacolectivasf.org [email protected]
Latino Union of Chicago
CHICAGO, Illinois
www.latinounion.org
[email protected] • 773.588.2641
Matahari: Eye of the Day
BOSTON, Massachusetts
http://eyeoftheday.org/wp/
[email protected]
Mujeres Unidas y Activas
SAN FRANCISCO & OAKLAND, California
www.mujeresunidas.net
[email protected] • 415.621.8140
Ola de Mujeres, Miami Worker’s Center
MIAMI, Florida
www.miamiworkerscenter.org
[email protected]
305-759-8717
People Organized to Win Employment
Rights (POWER)
SAN FRANCISCO, California
www.peopleorganized.org/
[email protected] • 415.864.8372
Pilipino Workers’ Center of Southern
California
LOS ANGELES, California
www.pwcsc.org
[email protected] • 213.250.43
9
MEMBERS
NATIONAL CONGRESS 2013
NDWA Chapters
In 2012, NDWA launched its first local chapter in Atlanta, GA with the goals
of increasing our base in the South and the African-American community.
NDWA Atlanta Chapter
[email protected]
www.domesticworkers.org/atlanta
Tamieka Atkins • 646-334-9503
NDWA ORGANIZING
MEMBERS
—continued—
INTERESTED ORGANIZATIONS
PARTICIPATING AT THIS YEARS CONGRESS
San Diego Day Laborers and
Household Workers Association
SAN DIEGO, Californiawww.myajsd.org
[email protected] • 760.658.1985
CARE
SAN DIEGO, California
[email protected]
Southwest Workers’ Union
SAN ANTONIO, Texas
www.swunion.org
[email protected] • 210.299.2666
Unity Housecleaners Cooperative
HEMPSTEAD, New York
[email protected] • 516.565.5377
Casa Freehold
NEW JERSEY
El Centro de Igualdad y Derechos
ALBUQUERQUE, New Mexico
Workers Justice Project
JACKSON HEIGHTS, New York
[email protected]
Quetzal / CRISOL
STAMFORD, Connecticut
[email protected]
Legal Aid Justice Society
CHARLOTSVILLE, Virginia
[email protected]
NDWA ASSOCIATE MEMBERS
Associate Members are organizations that are very new to domestic worker organizing or work with domestic workers in some capacity
but do not have a membership of domestic workers. Every new affiliate begins as an Associate Member and after six months, another
organization or the Field Staff can petition the Board to re-classify their status as an Organizing Member.
ARISE Chicago
CHICAGO, Illinois
arisechicago.org
[email protected] • 773.937.1826
Break the Chain Campaign
WASHINGTON DC
http://www.ips-dc.org/BTCC
[email protected]
Dominican Development Center
BOSTON, Massachussetts
www.dominicancenter.net
[email protected]
857.719.9055
El Centro Laboral de Mujeres por un
Mundo Mejor
TUSCON, Arizona
[email protected]
Encuentro
ALBUQUERQUE, New Mexico
www.encuentronm.org
[email protected] •
505.247.2920
10
Filipino Community Center
SAN FRANCISCO, California
http://filipinocc.org
[email protected] • 415.333.6267
Filipino Migrant Center
LONG BEACH, California
http://fmcsc09.wordpress.com
[email protected] • 562.438.9515
Haitian Women for Haitian Refugees
BROOKLYN, New York
haitianwomen.wordpress.com
[email protected] • 718.735.4660
Hispanic Resource Center
WESTCHESTER, New York
www.hrclm.org
[email protected] • 914-630-7022
La Colectiva de Mujeres Tejiendo Sueños y
Luchando
CHICAGO, Illinois
[email protected] • 708.363.1247
Las Mujeres de Santa Maria
STATEN ISLAND, New York
[email protected] Labor
LAKEWOOD, New Jersey
[email protected]
www.newlabor.org
NY NICE (New Immigrant Community
Empowerment)
JACKSON HEIGHTS, New York
www.nynice.org
[email protected] • 718.205.8796
OLE
ALBUQUERQUE, New Mexico
www.olenm.org
[email protected]
Somos Tuskaloosa
TUSCALOOSA, Alabama
www.facebook.com/somostuskaloosa
Tenants and Workers United
VIRGINIA
www.tenantsandworkers.org •703.684.5697
National Domestic Workers Alliance
PRIORITIES AND GOALS FOR 2013-2014
A) Strengthen our current organizing model – continue building on our track record of deep
leadership development while expanding our membership base-building efforts with particular attention
to organizing in Black communities.
B) Innovate and experiment with new organizing and self-financing models - by engaging in
experiments that allow us to service our members, engage high-road employers, leverage technology,
“new economy” and market-based solutions towards a sustainable and scalable model for domestic
worker organizing.
C) Create the shifts in power and culture that will allow for large scale wins in the lives of
our members and in the country. By building out our campaigns, we will bring new communities,
organizations and people together to change the way we value and take care of one another across
communities and generations.
• Win labor protections for domestic workers through continuing to build state campaigns for
Domestic Workers Bills of Rights.
• Build the Beyond Survival campaign to elevate the leadership of domestic labor trafficking
survivors in key policy debates and end trafficking of domestic workers.
• Build Caring Across Generations, a national campaign to bring communities together across
communities and generation to expand care, supports and services for everyone.
• Build We Belong Together, a national effort to lift up the voices of women and children for a
path to citizenship for the undocumented and policies that support a healthy, multi-racial democracy.
D) Develop vision and strategic clarity as a movement – develop a strong long-term vision for
the country and the economy, and our movements for social change, that people can understand and
believe in. We don’t have that yet, and we need to start building it.
• The Next Generation Labor Movement & Stronger Field of Organizing
• Women’s Economic Opportunity Agenda & A Caring Economy
• Immigration Reform Implementation & A Vibrant Multi-racial Democracy
National Congress 2012
11
National Domestic Workers Alliance
ACCOMPLISHMENTS IN 2012-2013
DOMESTIC WORKERS BILL OF RIGHTS CAMPAIGNS:
• In 2012 California Domestic Workers Bill of Rights Campaign: after a powerful campaign led by the California
Domestic Workers Coalition, the bill passed the CA Congress to then be vetoed by the governor.
• In 2013 Illinois, Oregon, Texas, Hawaii, Massachusetts, and California all introduced state bills! While the bills in
Illinois, Oregon and Texas were not successful, Hawaii became the second state in the nation to pass a domestic
workers bill of rights!
• The Domestic Workers Coalition in Massachusetts hit the ground running and have secured 41 co-sponsors in the
House and 13 in the Senate. And in California, the bill has passed in the Assembly and continues to move through
the Senate toward Governor Brown’s desk.
CARING ACROSS GENERATIONS:
• In 2012 - Our member anchor organizations organized Care Congresses in Seattle, Los Angeles, Boston, Chicago,
and New York. Campaign state partners reached over 500,000 senior voters in five key states. We gathered more
than 1000 letters of support participated in more than 40 events around the country toward finalizing regulatory
change that would bring caregivers and domestic workers under minimum wage and overtime protections.
• In 2013 - The Department of Labor Companionship Exemption Regulations were released to the Office of
Management, which will review them for 90 days before finalizing. We are continuing to push to ensure they are
finalized despite pressure from business interests.
• The campaign has launched an exciting online action site, and a comprehensive culture change effort to influence
the popular culture conversation on aging and caregiving to promote our values and create the context for bold policy
to address our nation’s long-term care needs.
• And, the campaign has made a significant impact in getting key states to adopt Medicaid expansion under the
Affordable Care Act, to support low-income communities to gain access to health care.
• Finally, the campaign is working to bring the voices and stories of older Americans, and care consumers to the table
in the push to win a path to citizenship for the undocumented.
WE BELONG TOGETHER:
• In 2012 - We held women’s delegations to Birmingham, Alabama; Knoxville, Tennessee; and Tijuana, Mexico to lift
up women’s stories on the impact of immigration enforcement. We collected children’s letters for our “Wish for the
Holidays” campaign, bringing 10,000 letters to Congress expressing one wish: stop deportations and keep families
together.
• In 2013 - The campaign expanded to mobilize women of all walks of life to join the campaign to win immigration
reform, particularly women voters who could be moved to see immigration reform as core to a women’s equality
agenda. As a result of these efforts, we’ve provided the opportunity for women in key geographies around the country,
women celebrities and women leaders to engage in this effort. And we’ve provided a platform for women members
of Congress to champion women, caregivers, domestic workers and families in the context of the immigration reform
debate, which has resulted in the inclusion of a number of provisions in the Senate bill that speak to the specific
concerns of women, such as the right to return for parents who’ve been deported and separated from their children.
12
STRATEGY ORGANIZING LEADERSHIP (SOL) PROGRAM:
• In 2012 - we held two leadership retreats for over 60 leaders from 25 organizations, building our capacity as
organizational and movement leaders.
• In 2013 – we completed our final of five retreats and graduated participants from the 2-year program, and began
to lay the groundwork for SOL II.
RESEARCH:
• In 2012 - Home Economics: The Invisible and Unregulated World of Domestic Work: we completed and released
the first national report about domestic work in the United States, from data collected from over 2,000 surveys by
domestic workers in 14 cities. Dozens of media outlets covered the report, including the New York Times, which also
published an editorial calling for policy change.
• In 2013 - Improving Career Opportunities for Immigrant Women In-Home Care Workers and Increasing Pathways
to Legal Status for Immigrant In-Home Care Workers: we co-released these two reports with the Institute for
Women’s Policy Research that have been useful in our work to push for our immigration priorities on caregivers and
domestic workers.
We continue to grow! From 2012 – 2013, we grew from 29 to 41 affiliate organizations, created a new NDWA chapter
in Atlanta, and now have representation in 26 cities and 17 states. Our 2012 National Congress was our largest to date,
with over 400 domestic workers engaging in assemblies and trainings, and actions together with National People’s Action,
highlighting the need for a new economic vision that puts people first. In the 2012 Congress, we elected our first Board of
Directors as an independent organization.
Congreso Nacional 2012
13
SPEAKER BIOS
GILDA BLANCO CASA LATINA
Originally from Livingston Izabal, Guatemala, Gilda Blanco has spent decades doing community organizing work & fighting for social
justice. At a young age, she began to organize with other African descendants, like herself, to struggle for increased opportunities &
human rights. She co-founded the Black Guatemalans Organization, the first of its kind in the country, to gain recognition of black
Guatemalans recognized as a people. In order to support her family, Gilda came to the United States in 2007 for a better economic
opportunity, and she worked at various housekeeping & janitorial jobs. In 2009, she found Casa Latina and quickly became a leader
and began to facilitate workshops and organize the workers. Due to her experience & commitment, In 2010, Gilda became a member
of the Coordinating Committee of NDWA and is now part of the NDWA Board of Directors.
BREE CARLSON STRUCTURAL RACISM PROGRAM DIRECTOR, NATIONAL PEOPLES ACTION
Bree Carlson has worked in the racial justice field for more than 15 years. Her experience includes community, labor, and electoral
organizing. Prior to joining NPA, Bree assisted in the creation and implementation of the “Dismantling Racism” curriculum, and has
trained hundreds of organizations to understand and proactively address race and racism. Bree spent four years at the Center for Third
World Organizing where she trained and supported organizers of color and worked with community based organizations across the
country. Bree Joined NPA in April of 2012 for the opportunity to expand NPA’s structural racism work and to lead NPA in elevating
racial justice as a central and necessary component of a just economy and true democracy.
GUILLEMINA CASTELLANOS LA COLECTIVA DE MUJERES
Guillermina Castellanos has been a leader of the domestic worker movement for over 20 years. Born in Jalisco, México, she began
working as a domestic worker as a child and continued after immigrating to the U.S. in 1985. In 2000, she co-founded the Women’s
Collective (La Colectiva de Mujeres). As an organizer with La Colectiva, Guille has developed the leadership of hundreds of women,
helping them organize for respect and dignity and always with the purpose of building and transforming their lives. In 2005, Guillermina joined the Board of Directors of the National Day Labor Organizing Network. She participated in the founding of the National
Domestic Workers Alliance in 2007, and then served on NDWA’s Coordinating Committee. She was also among the NDWA-coordinated US delegation to the International Labor Organization in Geneva for the Convention on Domestic Work.
JUANA FLORES CO-DIRECTOR, MUJERES UNIDAS Y ACTIVAS
An immigrant from Mexico, Juana joined Mujeres Unidas y Activas as a member in 1991, and as staff in 1994. During her tenure on
MUA’s staff, Juana has taken a leadership role in key local, statewide, and national immigrant rights campaigns, such as the campaigns
to defeat statewide propositions 187, 227, and 209 and local proposition 21 and efforts to protect statewide prenatal health care
programs. Juana represented U.S. domestic workers at the International Labor Organization’s First Convention on Decent Work for
Domestic Workers in Geneva, Switzerland. In her current role as Co-Director for Programs, Juana oversees MUA’s peer-led domestic
violence intervention services and community organizing programs, represents MUA in state, national, and international coalitions, and
develops the capacity of our member-led Board of Directors.
PATRICIA FRANCOIS DOMESTIC WORKERS UNITED
Patricia Francois is from Trinidad and Tobago, and has worked as a nanny and a housekeeper in New York City for over fifteen years. As
an undocumented domestic worker, Pat has endured long hours, heavy workloads, lack of overtime pay, verbal harassment and physical
abuse on the job. Despite her employer’s threats that he would report her to immigration, Pat intervened when she saw that her
employer was abusing his child. While she has made numerous sacrifices to provide care for other families, Pat has been separated from
her own family in Trinidad and Tobago as a result of her immigration status, and she yearns to be reunited with them. Pat is a member
of Domestic Workers United and an outspoken advocate for the rights and dignity of domestic workers. Alongside her sisters in DWU,
Pat organized tirelessly for the successful passage of the New York State Domestic Workers Bill of Rights.
14
SPEAKER BIOS
MAYA HARRIS VICE PRESIDENT, FORD FOUNDATION
Maya Harris is one of three program Vice Presidents at the Ford Foundation, the second largest philanthropy in the United States. Maya
leads the Democracy, Rights and Justice program, a global effort that invests over $180 million annually in grants to promote effective
governance in seven countries; increase democratic participation in the United States and abroad; and protect and advance human
rights worldwide. Previously, Maya was executive director of the American Civil Liberties Union of Northern California, where she
oversaw the affiliate’s litigation, public education, lobbying and grassroots organizing work on issues ranging from racial and criminal
justice to reproductive, immigrant and LGBT rights.
MARY KAY HENRY INTERNATIONAL PRESIDENT, SERVICE EMPLOYEES INTERNATIONAL UNION (SEIU)
In 2010, Mary Kay Henry was unanimously elected International President and became the first woman to lead SEIU, a 2.1 millionmember union. Under her leadership, SEIU members are linking arms and forming historic partnerships to confront income inequality,
to demand that the wealthy and corporations pay their fair share in taxes, to hold politicians accountable to working people and to
achieving justice for immigrants.
ERIN JOHANSSON DIRECTOR OF RESEARCH, JOBS WITH JUSTICE AND AMERICAN RIGHTS AT WORK
Erin Johansson has worked for Jobs With Justice/American Rights at Work since 2004. Her recent publications include “Checking Out:
The Rise of Wal-Mart and the Fall of Middle Class Retail Jobs” in the Connecticut Law Review, and two American Rights at Work
reports, Fed Up With FedEx: How FedEx Ground Tramples Workers’ Rights and Civil Rights, and Broken Promises: Verizon neglects
its commitment to provide good jobs and quality service. She holds a Master of Public Policy degree from the University of Maryland
College Park, and a Bachelor of Arts from Skidmore College, where she was elected to the Phi Beta Kappa Society. Erin is a member of
the Labor and Employment Relations Association and as serves as a Co-Chair of the Labor Studies Committee.
JERRET JOHNSON ORGANIZER, ATLANTA CHAPTER
Jerret Johnson currently lives in Atlanta, GA where she is in forming a new chapter of the National Domestic Workers Alliance
(NDWA). In the fall of 2011, Jerret was the lead surveyor in Atlanta of NDWA’s national domestic worker survey project. Prior to
this,Jerret worked in the house cleaning, janitorial and home health-aide industry for 10 years -- first in her hometown of Detroit,
Michigan and later in Atlanta. It is because of this experience that Jerret is committed to working to expand the rights of domestic
workers -- to bring dignity and respect to the industry. Jerret is also a Board member of the Atlanta chapter of 9to5 Working Women.
LINDA OALICAN OVERALL COORDINATOR & COMMUNITY ORGANIZER, DAMAYAN MIGRANT WORKERS ASSOCIATION
Linda Oalican discovered her passion for serving the marginalized sectors as a student activist in the University of the Philippines at
the height of the Marcos dictatorship in the 1970s. She later became a community and labor organizer, but had to shelve her organizing
work to focus on supporting her children to go to college. She migrated to the US eighteen years ago to help ensure her family’s
economic survival and became a domestic worker in New York City. In 2002, Linda became one of the founding members of Damayan
and currently serves as its Overall Coordinator. Linda became a Union Square Awardee in 2004, and was awarded the Leading With
Love – Dedication Award by NDWA. She was elected to the first two Coordinating Committees of the NDWA, was instrumental in
the establishment of its infrastructure and democratic processes, and was elected to its first Board of Directors in 2012.
GABRIELA PACHECO UNITED WE DREAM
Gaby Pacheco, an undocumented American, is an immigrant rights leader from Miami, Florida and currently serves as the Director of the
Bridge Project. She has been speaking about her lack of papers since high school. At Miami Dade College, she was elected statewide
student body president, raising the issue of in-state tuition for undocumented students throughout Florida. In 2010, she and three friends
walked 1,500 miles from Miami to Washington, DC to bring to light the plight of immigrants in this country, and to urge President Obama
to stop the separations of families and deportations of DREAM Act–eligible youth.This walk was dubbed the Trail of DREAMs. As political
director for the national youth group United We Dream, she spearheaded efforts that led President Obama to announce the Deferred
Action for Childhood Arrivals program, one of the biggest changes in immigration since the 1986 Amnesty. Gaby has three college degrees
from Miami Dade College and is a special education teacher.
15
SPEAKER BIOS
DAVID ROLF SEIU HEALTHCARE 775NW PRESIDENT
Known nationally as an innovative labor leader, David Rolf is the President of SEIU Healthcare 775NW, the fastest growing union the
Northwest representing 43,000 home care and nursing home workers in Washington state and Montana. He also serves as an International Vice President of the Service Employees International Union, the international organization, which represents more than 2.1
million workers in the United States, Canada and Puerto Rico. Rolf, 43, has led some of the largest organizing efforts since the 1930s. He
helped organize 75,000 caregivers in Los Angles and started the homecare union in Washington. Rolf also helped to create the SEIU NW
Healthcare Training Partnership and Health Benefits Trust. He helped to spearhead inclusion of the State Balancing Incentive Program
(BIPP) into the 2010 Affordable Care Act. BIPP incentivizes states to establish long-term care systems.
SAKET SONI EXE. DIRECTOR, NATIONAL GUESTWORKERS ALLIANCE & NEW ORLEAS WORKERS CENTER FOR RACIAL JUSTICE
Saket Soni is the Director of the New Orleans Workers’ Center for Racial Justice and the National Guestworker Alliance, both of which
he co-founded. The New Orleans Workers’ Center is a multi-racial poor peoples’ organization created in the aftermath of Hurricane
Katrina. The National Guestworker Alliance is the first cross-industry membership organization of guestworkers in the United States.
Saket was born and raised in New Delhi, India. Saket worked as an organizer in Chicago at the Coalition of African, Asian, European, and
Latino Immigrants of Illinois, a city‐wide immigrant rights coalition, and at the Organization of the North East. Recently, Saket led the
Justice at Hershey’s campaign, which was featured in the New York Times six times over a span of ten weeks.
NATALICIA TRACY EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, BRAZILIAN IMMIGRANT CENTER
Natalicia Tracy has been the Executive Director of the Brazilian Immigrant Center in Boston, Massachusetts since spring 2010. Under
her leadership, the 18-year old organization has renewed itself and has extended its traditional mission as a workers’ center to
encompass a major new domestic worker organizing initiative, with the goal of winning a new Domestic Worker Bill of Rights for
Massachusetts. She was a domestic worker for over 20 years caring for children, the disabled, and elderly, and doing home-based hospice
work. In December 2010 she co-founded the Massachusetts Coalition for Domestic Workers. She is on the board of directors of
Jobs with Justice-Boston, the National Domestic Workers Alliance (NDWA), and the Women’s Institute for Leadership Development
(WILD).
LORI WALLACE ATLANTA CHAPTER
Lori Wallace is a baby nurse (newborn care specialist)/nanny with nearly 30 years experience in childcare, caring for single births,
multiples and babies with special needs. She specializes in caring for twin infants and she has postpartum doula and lactation
experience and training. In addition, Lori taught 10 years in the Dekalb County school system in Georgia. Lori is a graduate of
Oberlin College with a BA in Communications. Lori joined the Atlanta Chapter of the National Domestic Workers Alliance in order
to uphold rights for all domestic workers.
16
JOIN NDWA CNX (Connects)
NDWA CNX is a new text message and hotline tool to enable NDWA and our affiliates
to communicate quickly and easily with domestic workers with updates and actions for
immigration reform and domestic worker rights.
Text “NDWA” to 646-699-3833 to join
·
Get the latest information about immigration reform
·
·
Learn about your rights as a worker
Work together with other domestic workers for rights and respect
Our hope is that NDWA CNX will be a tool that can help local organizations with
your outreach and ongoing communication with your contacts. To learn more, come to
the NDWA CNX Workshop (Monday at 3:15), go to the CNX information table, visit
www.domesticworkers.org/CNX, or contact [email protected]
NOTE: By texting NDWA to.646-699-3833, you are allowing NDWA (and
it’s local affiliate near you) to call you, including by autodialer, and text you.
NDWA will never charge you for text message alerts, but carrier message
and data rates may apply. Text STOP to 646-699-3833 to unsubscribe and
HELP for more info. Periodic updates, up to 6 per month.
17
18
CONGRESO NACIONAL 2013
20-23 de Julio, 2013
Hyatt Regency at Capitol Hill
400 New Jersey Avenue Northwest
Washington DC
Alianza Nacional de Trabajadoras del hogar
CONGRESO NACIONAL 2013
20-23 de Julio, 2013
Hyatt Regency at Capitol Hill
400 New Jersey Avenue Northwest
Washington DC
Este libro de programa incluye:
Programa del congreso Informacion logistica
Mapa de miembros de ANTH
Metas de 2013-2014
Logros de 2012-2013
Biografías de los oradores
22
26
27
29
30
32
Alianza Nacional de Trabajadoras del hogar
CONGRESO NACIONAL 2013
El Congreso Nacional 2013 juntara 2-3 delegados de cada organización
miembro para aprender, reflexionar y desarrollar estrategia para el futuro
de nuestro movimiento. Planeamos a profundizar nuestro análisis del
contexto actual y fortalecer nuestra visión por el futuro del trabajo
del hogar mientras que clarificamos nuestro papel en el movimiento más
amplio por una economía justa y sostenible y por una democracia que es
para todos. También tendremos tiempo para tener intercambios, celebrar
nuestros victorias, darnos apoyo mutuo, capacitarnos y demostrar
nuestro poder colectivo.
Congreso Nacional 2012
21
PROGRAMA
CONGRESO NACIONAL 2013
SABADO, 21 DE JULIO
6:30pm
CENA DE BIENVENIDA
Juana Flores, Mujeres Unidas y Activas y Presidenta de la Mesa de ANTH
Gilda Blanco, Casa Latina, miembro de la Mesa de ANTH
Patricia Francois, Domestic Workers United
Ai-jen Poo, Directora de ANTH
NOCHE DE TALENTO
DOMINGO, 22 DE JULIO – PRIORIDADES Y TRABAJO
8:00am – 9:00am
DESAYUNO
9:00am – 9:30am
APERTURA DEL CONGRESO NACIONAL
Bienvenida: Linda Oalican, DAMAYAN Migrant Workers Association, miembro de la Mesa de ANTH
Oración de la mañana
Práctica de la mañana
9:30am – 10:45am
Presentación y discusión: LA ECONOMIA Y EL MOVIMIENTO SINDICAL David Rolf, Presidente, SEIU Healthcare 775 NW
10:45am – 11:00am
DESCANSO
11:00am - 12:45pm
Reflexión: LECCIONES, RETOS Y OPORTUNIDADES PARA EL MOVIMIENTO DE LAS TRABAJADORAS DEL HOGAR
Historia de la industria y el movimiento del trabajo del hogar – Jerret Johnson, Atlanta Chapter
22
Mesa redonda de reflexiones de la frente
12:45pm – 1:45pm
ALMUERZO (por su propia cuenta)
1:30pm – 1:45pm
PRACTICA (Opcional)
PROGRAMA
CONGRESO NACIONAL 2013
DOMINGO, 22 DE JULIO – PRIORIDADES Y TRABAJO
1:45pm – 3:45pm
REUNIONES DE COHORTES Y CAMPAÑAS
1. ESTRATEGIAS ESTATALES Y NORMAS LABORALES
Estrategias para ganar Cartas de derechos de la trabajadoras del hogar en estados.
2. GANAR LA REFORMA MIGRATORIA
La campaña Nos mantenemos unidos para ganar un camino hacia la ciudadanía por los 11 millones indocumentados con el enfoque para mujeres y familias.
3. ESTRATEGIA DEL SECTOR DE CUIDADO
Mediante Cuidado digno para todas las generaciones estamos desarrollando un movimiento para transformar las opciones para el cuidado de largo plazo para familias y calidad de trabajos para los cuidadores mientras que creamos una mayoría política cariñosa.
4. ACABAR CON LA TRATA DE TRABAJADORAS DEL HOGARS
Más allá de la sobrevivencia para elevar el liderazgo de los sobrevivientes de la trata de trabajadoras del hogar en los debates claves de políticas.
5. LLEVAR NUESTRA ORGANIZACIÓN LOCAL A OTRA ESCALA
Grupo de innovación para crecer nuestra base.
6. EMPRESA SOCIAL E INNOVACIÓN
Carewetrust.com para crear soluciones basadas en el mercado para mejorar las condiciones de trabajo de las trabajadoras del hogar.
7. DESARROLLO DE MOVIMIENTO INTERNACIONAL E INTERSECTORIAL
Noticias de nuestro movimiento internacional y progreso de otros esfuerzos organizativos de trabajadores de bajos ingresos.
3:45pm – 4:00pm
DESCANSO
4:00pm – 7:00pm
PRIORIDADES Y PLAN DE TRABAJO DE ANTH
Repaso de las prioridades generales
Reportes de las reuniones de cohortes y campañas
Estrategia de crecimiento de 2013-2014 de ANTH
7:00pm CENA (por su propia cuenta)
7:00pm Transmisión nacional del Congreso Nacional por livestream
LUNES, 22 DE JULIO – DESARROLLO DE NUESTRA VISION PARA EL 2050
8:00am – 9:00am
DESAYUNO
9:00am – 9:45am
APERTURA
Reflexiones del día anterior
Practica de la mañana
9:45am – 12:00pm
CONTEXTO DE NUESTRO TRABAJO
Trabajo del hogar en la ciudad - Guillemina Castellanos, La Colectiva
Trabajo del hogar en el Sur – Lori Wallace, Capitulo de Atlanta
Cambio en el mundo del trabajo –Saket Soni, National Guestworkers Alliance
Cambio demográfico: Raza, genero y edad – Erin Johansson, Jobs with Justice y American Rights at Work
23
PROGRAMA
CONGRESO NACIONAL 2013
LUNES, 22 DE JULIO – DESARROLLO DE NUESTRA VISION PARA EL 2050
12:00pm – 1:00pm
ALMUERZO (por su propia cuenta)
1:00pm – 3:00pm
VIAJE FUTURO—PRONOSTICOS PARA EL 2050
¿A dónde vamos ahora?
Moderadora – Ai-jen Poo, Directora de ANTH
Justicia racial y movimiento pro-migrante – Gabriela Pacheco, United We Dream
Organización comunitaria – Bree Carlson, National People’s Action
Movimiento de trabajadoras del hogar – Natalicia Tracy, Brazilian Immigrant Center, miembro de la Mesa de ANTH
Actividad de crear visión en grupo
3:00pm – 3:15pm
DESCANSO
3:15pm – 4:45pm
TALLERES E INTERCAMBIOS SOBRE ORGANIZAR
PREPARACIÓN SOBRE LA IMPLEMENTACIÓN DE LA REFORMA MIGRATORIA
Nisha Agarwal, Center for Popular Democracy, Lolita Lledo, Pilipino Workers Center, y Antonia Peña, Casa de Maryland
La legalización de millones presenta oportunidades sin precedentes para mejorar las vidas de las trabajadoras del hogar y construir
nuestro movimiento por el largo plazo pero solo si organizaciones pueden capacitarse para conectar la educación comunitaria, los
servicios y el trabajo de organizar. Compartiremos lecciones de DACA y hablaremos de planes que ANTH y otras organizaciones
locales están desarrollando.
NDWA CNX: HERRAMIENTA DE TEXTO PARA ORGANIZAR
Jonathan Kissam, NDWA/Webskillet y Chris Huang, Center for Popular Democracy
Aprenda como crecer su organización con este sistema de mensaje de texto y línea caliente que conecta a las trabajadoras del
hogar con actualizaciones y acciones importantes por la reforma migratoria y los derechos de las trabajadoras del hogar.
TALLER DE MEDIOS SOBRE EL PODER DE NUESTRAS HISTORIA
Barbara Young, Organizadora Nacional de ANTH y Rosana Reyes, Directora de Comunicaciones de ANTH
En este taller practiquemos a contar nuestras historias y la historia de nuestro movimiento en una manera que enfoca la necesidad
por un cambio de política en los medios. Grabaremos videos cortos de nuestras historias.
ANTH Y OURWALMART (POR SUS SIGLAS EN INGLES) – INTERCAMBIO ENTRE REDES
Jill Shenker, Directora de campo de ANTH con organizadores y trabajadores lideres de OURWalmart
Ambos NDWA y la Organización unida por respeto en Walmart (OURWalmart) están experimentando con como crear poder de
los trabajadores a otra escala al nivel local y nacional. OURWalmart está enfrentando el comercio gigante más grande del mundo
con 4.000 negocios y está desarrollando redes en el internet y de base en áreas donde no hay personal. ANTH está creando
poder donde hay la misma cantidad de empleadores que trabajadoras y las trabajadoras están aisladas y dispersas. Participe en un
intercambio rico de ideas y estrategia.
LIDERAZGO PERSONIFICADO POR EL CAMBIO TRANFORMATIVO
Staci Haines, generative somatics
Liderazgo personificado, campañas y cambio social son centrales a la visión de ANTH.ANTH ha estado colaborando con generative
somatics y Social Justice Leadership en nuestro programa de SOL (Solidaridad, Organizar y Liderazgo) en los últimos 2 años. El
taller de liderazgo personificado introducirá algunas de las practicas centrales de liderazgo transformativa que puede apoyarte en
su trabajo. Practiquemos “Yo, Nosotros,Todos”, centrarnos y bajo presión, entender sus desencadenantes y saber como movernos
juntos hacia su visión y más! Liderazgo personificado le invita a ser entera y poderosa.
AUTO-DESARROLLO DE PERSONAS (SDOP POR SUS SIGLAS EN INGLES)
Cynthia White, Self-Development of People
SDOP es un ministerio de compasión y justicia. Entramos en colaboración con comunidades que han identificado sus necesidades
y han desarrollado un plan de cómo solucionar esas necesidades. Aprenda y escucha del personal de SDOP y miembros de ANTH
que han establecido colaboraciones con nuestro ministerio.
24
PROGRAMA
CONGRESO NACIONAL 2013
LUNES, 22 DE JULIO – DESARROLLO DE NUESTRA VISION PARA EL 2050
TALLERES E INTERCAMBIOS SOBRE ORGANIZAR continuan
DERECHOS DE LOS DISCAPACITADOS
Hand in Hand: The Domestic Employers Association
Hand in Hand dirigirá una discusión sobre el contexto histórico de las comunidades discapacitadas organizando por un cambio
y las intersecciones actuales entre los movimientos pro-discapacitados y de las trabajadoras del hogar. También hablaremos de
estrategias sobre como trabajar con las comunidades discapacitadas en el contexto de las campañas actuales de ANTH.
CIRCULO DE DIRECTORES
Ai-jen Poo, Directora de ANTH
Una sesión diseñada para Directores de los afiliados de ANTH. Hablaremos y desarrollaremos estrategias de cómo lidiar con
los retos particulares de dirigir una organización en este momento y haremos una lluvia de ideas de cómo mejor apoyar nuestro
liderazgo mientras que nuestro movimiento crece. Hablaremos de las prioridades y enfoque de ANTH para el próximo año.
5:00pm – 5:30pm
OPORTUNIDADES Y RETOS AHEAD PARA MUJERES Y TRABAJADORES
Maya Harris,Vicepresidenta, Ford Foundation
Mary Kay Henry, Presidenta Internacional, SEIU
5:30pm – 7:30pm
RECEPCION HONRANDO NUESTRO LEGADO
MARTES, 23 DE JULIO – APROVECHAR EL MOMENTO
7:00am – 8:30am DESAYUNO (y salir del hotel)
8:30am – 9:00am
APERTURA
Reflexiones del día anterior
Practica de la mañana: cierre del Congreso
9:00am – 10:30am
PPREPARACION PARA LAS VISITAS Y REUNIONES 11:00am
CONFERENCIA DE PRENSA
Capitol Hill, Washington DC
12:00pm – 4:00 pm
Visitas legislativas por la reforma migratoria
2:00pm
1. AFL-CIO – Sesión interactiva
815 16th St NW, Washington DC
Reunirse con el Comité de Colaboraciones Comunitarias para compartir como es trabajar con sindicatos y esperanzas por las colaboraciones futuras
2. LA AGENCIA DE MUJERES DEL DEPARTAMENTO DE TRABAJO
200 Constitution Ave NW, Washington DC
Reunirse con representantes del Departamento de Trabajo para compartir los resultados de nuestro estudio nacional sobre el trabajo del hogar.
5:00PMSALIDA
25
INFORMACION LOGISTICA
CONGRESO NACIONAL 2013
UBICACIÓN DEL CONGRESO
HYATT REGENCY AT CAPITOL HILL
400 New Jersey Avenue Northwest
Washington, DC 20001
202.737.1234
OTRAS UBICACIONES PERTINENTES
Conferencia de Prensa
Capitol Hill
Washington DC
AFL-CIO Sesión Interactiva
815 16th St NW (at I Street)
Washington DC
Departmento de Trabajo
200 Constitution Ave NW
Washington DC
CUIDADO DE NIÑOS
ANTH proveerá cuidado de niños durante el Congreso empezando en la mañana del 21 de julio hasta las 5:30pm el lunes,
22 de julio. Los niños tienen que pertenecer con sus padres durante la conferencia de prensa, visitas legislativas y otras
actividades del martes. El cuidado de niños se llevará acabo en algunos de los cuartos del hotel. Cuando deja su niño en
el cuidado, tendrá completar un formulario con la información de emergencia y contacto. Por favor mantenga su celular en
caso que el cuidado de niños necesita comunicarse con usted. Inscriba sus niños en el cuidado de niños entre las 8-9am el
domingo, 21 de julio.
INTERPRETACION
ANTH proveerá interpretación en tres idiomas: español, ingles, y tagalo. La mayoría de la interpretación será simultanea
usando equipo. Delegados tendrán que firmar por el uso del equipo y serán responsable en devolverlo. Si el equipo no regresa
entonces la organización tendrá que pagar el costo de remplazar el equipo. El equipo de interpretación se distribuirá en la
mesa de inscripción cada mañana.
26
MIEMBROS
CONGRESO NACIONAL 2013
Desde julio 2013, ANTH tiene 41 miembros
en 26 ciudades y 17 estados.
Filipino Advocates for Justice
OAKLAND, California
www.filipinos4action.org
[email protected] • 510.465.9876
MIEMBROS ORGANIZATIVOS DE ANTH
Miembros organizativos que tienen una estructura clara de membresía y están
creciendo su base de trabajadoras del hogar.
Todos los miembros pagan cuotas, participan en toma de decisión mediate
nuestros programas, campañas nacionales y conferencias.
Adhikaar
WOODSIDE, New York
www.adhikaar.org
[email protected] • 718.937.1117
Centro Humanitario
DENVER, Colorado
www.centrohumanitario.org [email protected]
centrohumanitario.org • 303.292.4115
Brazilian Immigrant Center
ALLSTON, Massachusets
HARTFORD, Connecticut
www.braziliancenter.org
[email protected] • 617.783. 8001
Cidadao Global
LONG ISLAND CITY, New York
www.cidadaoglobal.org
[email protected] • 917.294.6087
Brazilian Women’s Group
ALLSTON, Massachusets
http://verdeamarelo.org/
[email protected] • 617.787.0557
Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights of
Los Angeles (CHIRLA)
LOS ANGELES, California
www.chirla.org
[email protected] • 213.353.1333
CASA de Maryland
SILVER SPRING, Maryland
www.casademaryland.org
[email protected] • 301.431.4185
Damayan Migrant Workers Association
NEW YORK, New York
www.damayanmigrants.org [email protected]
damayanmigrants.org • 212.564.6057
CASA Latina
SEATTLE, Washington
www.casa-latina.org
[email protected] • 206.956.0779
Domestic Workers United
NEW YORK, New York
www.domesticworkersunited.org
[email protected]
212.481.5747
Centro Laboral de Graton / Graton Day
Labor Center
GRATON, California
www.gratondaylabor.org
[email protected] • 707.829.1864
Fe y Justicia Worker Center
HOUSTON, Texas
www.houstonworkers.org
fjwchoustonworkers.org • 713.862.8222
IDEPSCA
LOS ANGELES, California
www.idepsca.org
[email protected] • 213.252.2952
La Colectiva de Mujeres
SAN FRANCISCO, California
lacolectivasf.org [email protected]
Latino Union of Chicago
CHICAGO, Illinois
www.latinounion.org
[email protected] • 773.588.2641
Matahari: Eye of the Day
BOSTON, Massachusetts
http://eyeoftheday.org/wp/
[email protected]
Mujeres Unidas y Activas
SAN FRANCISCO & OAKLAND, California
www.mujeresunidas.net
[email protected] • 415.621.8140
Ola de Mujeres, Miami Worker’s Center
MIAMI, Florida
www.miamiworkerscenter.org
[email protected]
305-759-8717
People Organized to Win Employment
Rights (POWER)
SAN FRANCISCO, California
www.peopleorganized.org/
[email protected] • 415.864.8372
Pilipino Workers’ Center of Southern
California
LOS ANGELES, California
www.pwcsc.org
[email protected] • 213.250.43
27
MIEMBOS
CONGRESO NACIONAL 2013
Capitulos de ANTH
En 2012, ANTH lanzón su primer capitulo en Atlanta, GA con las metas de
aumentar nuestra base en el Sur y en la comunidad Afroamericana.
Capitulo de Atlanta de ANTH
[email protected]
www.domesticworkers.org/atlanta
Tamieka Atkins • 646-334-9503
MIEMBROS
ORGANIZATIVOS
—continuado—
ORGANIZACIONES INTERESADAS QUE ESTAN
PARTICIPANDO EN ESTE CONGRESO
San Diego Day Laborers and
Household Workers Association
SAN DIEGO, Californiawww.myajsd.org
[email protected] • 760.658.1985
Southwest Workers’ Union
SAN ANTONIO, Texas
www.swunion.org
[email protected] • 210.299.2666
Unity Housecleaners Cooperative
HEMPSTEAD, New York
[email protected] • 516.565.5377
CARE
SAN DIEGO, California
[email protected]
Workers Justice Project
JACKSON HEIGHTS, New York
[email protected]
Casa Freehold
NEW JERSEY
Quetzal / CRISOL
STAMFORD, Connecticut
[email protected]
El Centro de Igualdad y Derechos
ALBUQUERQUE, New Mexico
Legal Aid Justice Society
CHARLOTSVILLE, Virginia
[email protected]
MIEMBROS ASOCIADOS DE ANTH
Miembros Asociados son organizaciones que organizar trabajadoras del hogar es nuevo o que trabajan con trabajadoras del hogar en cierta
manera pero no tienen una membresía de trabajadoras del hogar. Todos los afiliados nuevos empiezan como Miembro Asociado y despues
de seis meses, otra organización o el personal de campo puede solicitar a la Mesa para cambiar su estado como Miembro Organizativo.
ARISE Chicago
CHICAGO, Illinois
arisechicago.org
[email protected] • 773.937.1826
Break the Chain Campaign
WASHINGTON DC
http://www.ips-dc.org/BTCC
[email protected]
Dominican Development Center
BOSTON, Massachussetts
www.dominicancenter.net
[email protected]
857.719.9055
El Centro Laboral de Mujeres por un
Mundo Mejor
TUSCON, Arizona
[email protected]
Encuentro
ALBUQUERQUE, New Mexico
www.encuentronm.org
[email protected] •
505.247.2920
28
Filipino Community Center
SAN FRANCISCO, California
http://filipinocc.org
[email protected] • 415.333.6267
Filipino Migrant Center
LONG BEACH, California
http://fmcsc09.wordpress.com
[email protected] • 562.438.9515
Haitian Women for Haitian Refugees
BROOKLYN, New York
haitianwomen.wordpress.com
[email protected] • 718.735.4660
Hispanic Resource Center
WESTCHESTER, New York
www.hrclm.org
[email protected] • 914-630-7022
La Colectiva de Mujeres Tejiendo Sueños y
Luchando
CHICAGO, Illinois
[email protected] • 708.363.1247
Las Mujeres de Santa Maria
STATEN ISLAND, New York
[email protected] Labor
LAKEWOOD, New Jersey
[email protected]
www.newlabor.org
NY NICE (New Immigrant Community
Empowerment)
JACKSON HEIGHTS, New York
www.nynice.org
[email protected] • 718.205.8796
OLE
ALBUQUERQUE, New Mexico
www.olenm.org
[email protected]
Somos Tuskaloosa
TUSCALOOSA, Alabama
www.facebook.com/somostuskaloosa
Tenants and Workers United
VIRGINIA
www.tenantsandworkers.org •703.684.5697
Alianza Nacional de Trabajadoras del Hogar
PRIORIDADES Y METAS PARA 2013-2014
A) Fortalecer nuestro modelo actual de organización – aprovechando nuestra trayectoria de
desarrollar liderazgo profundo, mientras que fortalecemos la formación de base con atención particular
a la organización de comunidades afro-descendentes.
B) Innovar y experimentar con nuevos modelos de organización y auto-financieras - a
través de experimentos que proveen servicios a nuestros miembros, involucran a empleadores buenos,
usan la tecnología y soluciones de la “nueva economía” hacia un modelo sostenible y de escala para la
organización de trabajadoras del hogar.
C) Crear cambios en poder y cultura que nos lleva a ganancias de alto impacto en las
vidas de nuestros miembros y en el país. Con el desarrollo de nuestras campañas vamos a juntar
nuevas comunidades, organizaciones y personas para cambiar como valoramos y cuidamos uno a otro
en diferentes comunidades y generaciones.
• Ganar protecciones laborales para las trabajadoras del hogar mediante las campañas estatales
para la Carta de Derechos de Trabajadoras del Hogar.
• Desarrollar la campaña Más Allá de la Sobrevivencia para levantar los sobrevivientes de la
trata de trabajo del hogar en debates claves de política y parar la trata de trabajadoras del hogar.
• Desarrollar la campaña Cuidado Digno para Todas las Generaciones, una campaña nacional
que une comunidades y generaciones para expandir el cuidado, apoyo y servicios para todos.
• Desarrollar Nos Mantenemos Unidos, un esfuerzo nacional para alzar las voces de mujeres y
niños por un camino hacia la ciudadanía y políticas que apoyan una democracia saludable y multirracial.
D) Desarrollar una visión y claridad estratégica como movimiento – desarrollar una visión
fuerte para el país y la economía y nuestros movimientos por el cambio social que la gente entienda y
en que cree. No lo tenemos todavía y necesitamos construirlo.
• La próxima generación del movimiento sindical y organización fuerte de base
• Agenda de oportunidad económica de mujeres y una economía de cuidado
• Implementación de la reforma migratoria y una democracia vibrante multirracial
Congreso Nacional 2012
29
Alianza Nacional de Trabajadoras del Hogar
LOGROS EN 2012-2013
CARTA DE DERECHOS DE TRABAJADORAS DEL HOGAR:
• En 2012 la campaña de la Carta de Derechos de trabajadoras del hogar en California: Después de una campaña
fuerte dirigida por la Coalición de Trabajadoras del Hogar de California, la propuesta de ley fue aprobada por el
Congreso de California pero vetada por el gobernador.
• ¡En 2013 Illinois, Oregón, Texas, Hawái, Massachusetts, y California todos introdujeron proyectos estatales de ley!
Mientras que los proyectos de ley en Illinois, Oregón y Texas no tuvieron éxito, ¡Hawái es el segundo estado a aprobar
la carta de derechos de las trabajadoras del hogar!
• La Coalición de las Trabajadoras del Hogar en Massachusetts han arrancado a toda marcha y han asegurado 41
co-patrocinadores en la Cámara y 13 en el Senado. Y en California, el proyecto de ley fue aprobado por la Asamblea
y sigue moviendo por el Senado hacia el Gobernador de Brown.
CUIDADO DIGNO PARA TODAS LAS GENERACIONES:
• En 2012 - Nuestras organizaciones anclas organizaron Congresos de Cuidado en Seattle, Los Ángeles, Boston,
Chicago, y Nueva York. Colaboradores estatales contactaron más de 500,000 de votantes de tercer edad en cinco
estados claves, y organizaciones miembros juntamos más de 1000 cartas en apoyo y organizamos un exitoso Día
Nacional de Acción, donde 16 miembros de ANTH participaron en visitas legislativas en 20 estados, para presionar a
la administración para que finalicen las regulaciones del Departamento de Trabajo que extenderán el salario mínimo
y pago por horas extras a cuidadores a domicilio.
• En 2013 - Las regulaciones de exento de acompañantes del Departamento de Trabajo se introdujeron a la Oficina
de Manejo (Office of Management), que las van a revisar por 90 días antes de finalizarlas. Estamos montando presión
para asegurar que se finalicen en el medio de presión de la oposición.
• La campaña ha lanzado un sitio de acción en el internet y un esfuerzo de cambio comprensivo de cultura para
influir la conversación en la cultura popular acerca de envejecimiento y cuidado para promover nuestros valores y
crear el contexto para política ambiciosa que resuelve las necesidades de cuidado de largo plazo de este país
• Y, la campaña ha tenido impacto significativo en conseguir estados claves que adopten la expansión de Medicaid
bajo el Acto de Cuidado Accesible para apoyar a comunidades de bajos ingresos tener acceso a servicios de salud.
• Finalmente, la campaña está trabajando a traer las voces y historias de Americanos viejos y consumidores de
cuidado a la mesa en el empujo para ganar un camino hacia la ciudadanía para los indocumentados.
NOS MANTENEMOS UNIDOS:
• En 2012 - Organizamos delegaciones de mujeres a Birmingham, Alabama; Knoxville, Tennessee; y Tijuana, México
para levantar las historias del impacto de la inmigración sobre las mujeres. Recaudamos cartas de niños para nuestra
campaña “Un Deseo para las Fiestas” entregando 10.000 cartas al Congreso para expresar un deseo: alto a las
deportaciones y mantener a las familias juntas.
• En 2013 - La campaña expandió a movilizar a mujeres de todos tipos y unirse a la campaña para ganar reforma
migratoria con el enfoque de mujeres votantes que se podrán movilizar por ver reforma migratoria como central
a la agenda por la igualdad de las mujeres. Como resultado de estos esfuerzos, hemos dado la oportunidad para las
mujeres en localidades claves, mujeres famosas y mujeres lideres a participar en este esfuerzo.Y hemos proveído una
plataforma para mujeres en el Congreso a abogar por las mujeres, cuidadoras, trabajadoras del hogar y familias en el
contexto del debate de la reforma migratoria que ha resultado en la inclusión de varios provisiones en el proyecto
30
de ley del Senado que habla de las preocupaciones de mujeres como el derecho a regresar si los padres han sido
deportados y separados de sus niños.
ESTRATEGIA ORGANIZACIÓN LIDERAZGO (SOL POR SUS SIGLAS EN INGLES):
• En 2012 - tuvimos dos retiros de liderazgo con la participación de más de 60 lideres de 25 organizaciones, para
capacitarnos como lideres de organizaciones y movimiento.
• En 2013 – completamos nuestro ultimo retiro de los cinco y graduamos a los participantes del programa de dos
años y empezamos a planear SOL II.
INVESTIGACIÓN:
• En 2012 - Economía del Hogar: El mundo invisible y no regulado del Trabajo del Hogar: completamos y publicamos el
primer reporte nacional sobre el trabajo del hogar en los Estados Unidos que fue una compilación de los datos de
más de 2.000 encuestas coleccionadas por trabajadoras del hogar en 14 ciudades. Docenas de medios cubrieron el
reporte incluyendo el New York Times, que también publico un editorial llamando por un cambio político.
• En 2013 - Mejorando Oportunidades para Trabajadoras Inmigrantes de Cuidado al Domicilio y Aumentando los Caminos
al Estado Legal Trabajadoras Inmigrantes de Cuidado al Domicilio: co-publicamos estos dos reportes con el Institute for
Women’s Policy Research que han sido útiles en nuestro trabajo a empujar por nuestras prioridades de inmigración
para cuidadoras y trabajadoras del hogar.
¡Seguimos creciendo! De 2012 – 2013, crecimos de 29 a 41 organizaciones afiliadas, creamos un nuevo capitulo en Atlanta y
ahora tenemos representación en 26 ciudades y 17 estados. Nuestro Congreso Nacional en 2012 fue el más grande hasta la
fecha con más de 400 trabajadoras del hogar participando en asambleas y entrenamientos y acciones con National People’s
Action para exponer la necesidad por una visión de una economía nueva que pone al pueblo primero. En el Congreso de
2012, elegimos nuestra primera Mesa Directiva como organización independiente.
Congreso Nacional 2012
31
BIOGRAFIAS
GILDA BLANCO CASA LATINA
Originalmente de Livingston Izabal, Guatemala, Gilda Blanco ha realizado trabajo organizativo y luchando por la justicia social
por décadas. De joven ella empezó a organizar con otras personas de descendencia Africana como ella misma a luchar por más
oportunidades y derechos humanos. Ella co-fundó la Organización Afro-Guatemaltecos, la primera de su tipo en el país, para ganar
reconocimiento de Afro-guatemaltecos como personas. Para apoyar a su familia, Gilda llegó a los Estados Unidos en 2007 para una
mejor oportunidad económica y trabajo en limpieza de casa y de portero. En 2009, encontró a Casa Latina y se convirtió en un líder
y empezó a facilitar talleres y organizar a las trabajadoras. En 2010, Gilda fue un miembro del Comité Coordinador de ANTH y ahora
es parte de la Mesa Directiva de ANTH.
BREE CARLSON DIRECTORA DEL PROGRAMA DE RACISMO ESTRUCTURAL, NATIONAL PEOPLES ACTION
Bree Carlson he trabajado en el campo de justicia racial por más de 15 años. Su experiencia incluye la organización comunitaria, sindical
y electoral. Antes de ingresar a NPA, Bree ayudó con la creación e implementación del currículo “Desarmar el racismo”, y ha entrenado
cientos de organizaciones a entender y enfrentar proactivamente raza y el racismo. Bree trabajó cuatro años en el Center for Third
World Organizing donde entrenó y apoyó a organizadores de color y organizaciones de base por todo el país. Bree empezó a trabajar
en NPA en abril de 2012 por la oportunidad de expandir el trabajo de racismo estructural de NPA y dirigir a NPA en levantar la justicia
racial como componente central y necesario de una economía justa y una democracia verdadera.
GUILLEMINA CASTELLANOS LA COLECTIVA DE MUJERES
Guillermina Castellanos hGuillermina Castellanos ha sido una líder del movimiento de trabajadoras del hogar desde hace más de 20
años. Nacida en Jalisco, México, comenzó a trabajar como trabajadora del hogar cuando era niña y continuó después de emigrar a los
EE.UU. en 1985. En 2000, Guille fue co-fundadora de La Colectiva de Mujeres en San Francisco, CA. Guillermina ha desarrollado el
liderazgo de cientos de mujeres, ayudándoles a organizar para el respeto y la dignidad, y siempre con el objetivo de transformar sus
vidas. En 2005, Guillermina fue elegida a la Mesa Directiva de la Red Nacional de Jornaleros. Participó en la fundación de la Alianza
Nacional de Trabajadoras del Hogar en 2007, y luego se desempeñó en el Comité Coordinador de la ANTH. Ella estaba también en la
delegación a la Conferencia de la Organización Internacional del Trabajo (OIT) en Ginebra, que pasó la primera Convención Internacional sobre Trabajo del Hogar en el 2011.
JUANA FLORES CO-DIRECTORA, MUJERES UNIDAS Y ACTIVAS
Una inmigrante de México, Juana llego a Mujeres Unidas y Activas como miembro en 1991, y como personal en 1994. Durante su
tiempo en MUA, Juana ha tomado un papel de liderazgo en campañas por los derechos de inmigrantes al nivel local, estatal y nacional,
como las campañas a derrotar las proposiciones 187, 227, y 209 y la proposición local 21 y esfuerzos a proteger los programas de salud
prenatal. Juana representó trabajadoras del hogar de EEUU en el primer Convenio de Trabajo Decente de las Trabajadoras del Hogar
de la Organización Internacional de Trabajo en Ginebra, Suiza. En su papel de Co-directora de programas, Juana dirige los servicios de
base de intervención contra la violencia domestica, representa a MUA en coaliciones estatales, nacionales e internacionales, y desarrolla
la capacidad de nuestra Mesa Directiva que está dirigida por nuestros miembros.
PATRICIA FRANCOIS DOMESTIC WORKERS UNITED
Patricia Francois es de Trinidad y Tobago, y ha trabajado como cuidadora de niños y limpiadora de casa en la ciudad de Nueva York por
más de quince años. Como una trabajadora del hogar indocumentada, Pat ha soportado hoaras largas, mucha carga de trabajo sin recibir
pago por horas extra y recibir acoso verbal y abuso fisico en el trabajo. Aunque su empleador la amenazo que le iba a reportar a la
migra, Pat intervinio cuando vio que su empleador estaba abusando su niño. Mientras que ha tomado muchos sacrificios para proveer
el cuidado a otras familias, Pat ha sido separada de su propia familia en Trinidad y Tobago por su estado migratoria y tiene el deseo de
unificarse con ellos. Pat es un miembro de Domestic Workers United y un lider por los derechos y dignidad de las trabajadoras del
hogar. Con sus hermanas en DWU, Pat organizó sin parar por la aprobación exitosa de la Carta de Derechos de las Trabajadoras del
Hogar en el estado de Nueva York.
32
BIOGRAFIAS
MAYA HARRIS VICEPRESIDENTA, FUNDACION FORD
Maya Harris es una de tres vicepresidentes de programa en la Fundación Ford, el segundo más grande instituto de filantropía en los
Estados Unidos. Maya dirige el programa de Democracia, derechos y justicia que es un esfuerzo global que invierta mas de $180 millón
por año en becas para promover gobierno efectivo en siete países, para aumentar la participación democrática en los Estados Unidos y
en el exterior y para proteger y avanzar derechos humanos por el mundo. Anteriormente, Maya fue la directora ejecutiva del American
Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) del Norte California donde dirigía su litigio, educación publica y trabajo de organización de base acerca
de asuntos de justicia racial y criminal a derechos reproductivos inmigrantes y de LGBT.
MARY KAY HENRY PRESIDENTA INTERNACIONAL, SINDICATO INTERNACIONAL DE EMPLEADOS DE SERVICIO (SEIU)
En 2010, Mary Kay Henry fue elegida por unanimidad como Presidenta Internacional y es la primera mujer a dirigir SEIU, un sindicato
de 2,1 millón de miembros. Bajo su dirección, miembros de SEIU uniéndose y formando colaboraciones históricas para enfrentar la
desigualdad en la distribución de ingresos, para exigir que los ricos y las corporaciones paguen lo que les pertenece en impuestos y que
los políticos representen a las personas trabajadoras, y para lograr justicia para los inmigrantes.
ERIN JOHANSSON DIRECTORA DE INVESTIGACION, JOBS WITH JUSTICE Y AMERICAN RIGHTS AT WORK
Erin Johansson ha trabajado por Jobs with Justice/American Rights at Work desde 2004. Sus publicaciones reciente incluyen “Checking
Out: The Rise of Wal-Mart and the Fall of Middle Class Retail Jobs” en el Connecticut Law Review, y dos reportes de American Rights
at Work, Fed Up With FedEx: How FedEx Ground Tramples Workers’ Rights and Civil Rights, y Broken Promises: Verizon neglects
its commitment to provide good jobs and quality service. Tiene una Maestria de Politica Publica de la Universidad de Maryland en
College Park, y una Licenciatura de Skidmore College, donde fue elegida a la Sociedad Phi Beta Kappa Society. Erin es un miembro de
la Associación de las Relaciones entre Trabajo y Empleo y sirve como Co-presidenta del Comité de estudios laborales.
JERRET JOHNSON ORGANIZADORA DE ATLANTA, CAPITULO DE ATLANTA
Jerret Johnson vive en Atlanta, GA donde está formando un nuevo capitulo de la Alianza Nacional de Trabajadoras del Hogar (ANTH).
En el otoño de 2011, Jerret fue la encuestadora principal en Atlanta como parte del proyecto de encuestas de trabajadoras del hogar de
ANTH. Anteriormente, Jerret trabajó en las industrias de limpieza de casas, limpieza de portería y asistencia de salud domiciliaria por
10 años primero en su ciudad natal de Detroit, Michigan y después en Atlanta. Es por esa experiencia que Jerret está comprometida a
trabajar para expandir los derechos de las trabajadoras del hogar, para traer dignidad y respeto a la industria. Jerret también es miembro
de la Mesa del capitulo de Atlanta de 9to5 Working Women.
LINDA OALICAN COORDINADORA GENERAL Y ORGANIZADORA COMUNITARIA, DAMAYAN MIGRANT WORKERS ASSOCIATION
Linda Oalican descubrió su pasión a servir a los sectores marginados como una activista estudiantil en la Universidad de las Filipinas
durante la dictadura de Marcos en los 70s. Después se convirtió en una organizadora comunitaria y sindical pero su salario no fue
suficiente para enviar a sus dos hijos a la Universidad. Emigró a los Estados Unidos hace 18 años para asegurar la sobrevivencia
económica de su familia y trabajó como trabajadora del hogar en la ciudad de Nueva York. En 2002, Linda co-fundó Damayan y
actualmente sirve como su Coordinadora general. Fue elegida a los primeros dos Comités de Coordinación de ANTH, fue clave en
establecer su infraestructura y procesos democráticos y fue elegida a su primera Mesa Directiva en 2012.
GABRIELA GABY PACHECO UNITED WE DREAM
Gaby Pacheco, una Americana indocumentada, es una líder de derechos inmigrantes de Miami, Florida y actualmente sirve como la
Directora del Bridge Project. Ella ha hablado de no tener papeles desde la secundaria. En la Universidad Miami Dade, fue elegida como la
presidenta del cuerpo estatal estudiantil donde levanto el asunto de matricula para residentes del estado para alumnos por todo Florida.
En 2010, ella y tres amigos caminaron 1500 millas de Miami a Washington DC para exponer la lucha de los inmigrantes en este país y exigir
al Presidente Obama que pare la separación de familias y deportaciones de jóvenes elegibles al Acto sueños. Esta caminata se llamaba el
Sendero de los sueños. Como directora política para el grupo nacional de jóvenes United We Dream, ella dirigió esfuerzos que llevó al
Presidente Obama a anunciar la Acción deferida para los que llegaron de niños, uno de los cambios más grandes en inmigración desde la
Amnistía de 1986. Gaby tiene tres títulos de Universidad de Miami Dade y es una maestro de educación especial.
33
BIOGRAFIAS
DAVID ROLF PRESIDENTE, SEIU HEALTHCARE 775NW
Conocido en el país como un líder sindical innovador, David Rolf es el Presidente de SEIU Healthcare 775NW, el sindicato de mayor
crecimiento en el noroeste representando 43.000 cuidadores al domicilio y trabajadores de residencias de ancianos en los estados de
Washington y Montana. También sirve como Vicepresidente del Sindicato Internacional de Empleados de Servicio, que representa más
de 2,1 millón de trabajadores en los Estados Unidos, Canadá y Puerto Rico. Rolf, que tiene 43 años, ha dirigido algunos de los esfuerzos
organizativos mas grandes desde los 30s. Ayudó a organizar 75.000 cuidadores al domicilio en Los Ángeles y empezó un sindicato de
cuidadores en Washington. También ayudó a crear la Colaboración de entrenamientos de salud de SEIU NW y el Fideicomiso de beneficios de salud. Ayudó a iniciar la inclusión del Programa de Balancear los Incentivos del Estado (BIPP por sus siglas en ingles) al Acto de
Cuidado Accesible de 2010. BIPP provee incentivos a estados a establecer sistemas de cuidado de largo plazo.
SAKET SONI DIRECTOR EJECUTIVO, ALIANZA NACIONAL DE TRABAJADORES HUÉSPEDES Y EL CENTRO DE TRABAJADORES
POR LA JUSTICIA RACIAL DE NUEVA ORLEANS
Saket Soni es el Director del Centro de Trabajadores por la Justicia Racial de Nueva Orleans y la Alianza Nacional de Trabajadores
Huéspedes, ambos que co-fundó. El Centro de Trabajadores de Nueva Orleans es una organización multirracial de personas pobres
que se creó después del Huracán Katrina. La Alianza Nacional de Trabajadores Huéspedes es la primera organización intersectorial de
base de trabajadores huéspedes en los Estados Unidos. Saket nació y se crio en New Delhi, India. Saket trabajó como organizador en
Chicago en la Coalición de inmigrantes Africanos, Asiáticos, Europeos y Latinos de Illinois, una coalición pro-derecho de inmigrantes y
en la Organización del Noreste. Recientemente, Saket dirigió la campaña Justicia en Hershey, que fue presentado en el New York Times
más de seis veces dentro de diez semanas.
NATALICIA TRACY DIRECTORA EJECUTIVA, BRAZILIAN IMMIGRANT CENTER
Natalicia Tracy has been the Executive Director of the Brazilian Immigrant Center in Boston, Massachusetts since spring 2010. Under
Natalicia Tracy ha sido la Directora Ejecutiva del Brazilian Immigrant Center en Boston, Massachusetts desde la primavera del 2010.
Bajo su dirección, la organización de 18 años se ha renovado y ha expandido su misión tradicional como un centro de trabajadores a
abarcar una iniciativa mayor de organizar a trabajadoras del hogar con la meta de ganar una Carta de Derechos de las trabajadoras del
hogar en Massachusetts. Fue una trabajadora por más de 20 años cuidando a niños, personas discapacitadas y ancianos y proveyendo
hospicio al domicilio. En diciembre del 2010 ella co-fundó la Coalición de trabajadoras del hogar de Massachusetts. Sirve en la Mesa
Directiva de Jobs with Justice-Boston, la Alianza Nacional de Trabajadoras del Hogar y el Instituto de Mujeres por el Desarrollo de
Liderazgo (WILD por sus siglas en ingles).
LORI WALLACE CAPITULO DE ATLANTA
Originalmente de Ohio, Lori Wallace ha sido una trabajadora del hogar por varias décadas. En los últimos años su amor para niños
le llevó a especializarse en amamantar. Lori cree que las trabajadoras del hogar pueden hacer un cambio real y so fuertes cuando
trabajan juntas. Lori es una miembro active del Capitulo de Atlanta de ANTH.
34
UNASE A CNX DE ANTH (Conexiones)
CNX de ANTH es una herramienta nueva de mensajes de texto
y línea caliente que ANTH usará para comunicar rapidamente y facilmente con
trabajadoras del hogar con actualizaciones y acciones por la reforma migratoria y
derechos de las trabajadoras del hogar.
Mande un texto “NDWA” al 646-699-3833
para ingresar
·
·
Reciba información sobre la reforma migratoria
·
Aprenda sobre sus derechos como trabajadora
Trabaje con otras trabajadoras por sus derechos y respeto
Nuestra esperanza es que CNX de ANTH será una herramienta que ayudará a
organizaciones locales con su alcance y comunicación regular con sus contactos. Para
aprender más, participe en el Taller de CNX (lunes a las 3:15), visite la mesa de CNX,
visite www.domesticworkers.org/CNX, o comuniquese con [email protected]
TOME NOTA: Cuando manda un texto “NDWA” al 646-699-3833, le
estas dando permiso a ANTH (y su miembro local cerca de ti) a llamarte
y mandarte textos. ANTH nunca te va a cobrar por las alertas de texto
pero su servicio quizas apliquen. Puede mandar un texto con STOP al 646699-3833 para salir y HELP para máa informacióno.
35
36