GRENADA Agricultural Information Systems

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GRENADA Agricultural Information Systems
GRENADA
Agricultural Information
Systems
MIOA Caribbean Regional Meeting
Kingston, Jamaica
March 13 & 14, 2008
by
Aaron Francois
Senior Planning Officer
MoA
Overview of the Agricultural Sector
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Grenada’s economy is relatively open with a
large rural economy, thus making agriculture a
very important economic activity.
Agriculture’s GDP contribution ranged from
6% to 9% between 1998 and 2006. In was
estimated to be just over 6% in 2007.
Direct employment in agriculture accounts for
11.5% of total employment. Unemployment
was estimated at 18% in 2005

Agricultural exports averaged 55% of total exports
between 2002 and 2005. It was 38.2% in 2006.

Nutmeg and mace averaged 37% of agriculture
exports between 2002 and 2005. It fell to 14.6% in
2006

Fishing contributed 52.8% to agricultural exports in
2006.

Food imports accounted for 14% to 19% of total
imports between 2002 and 2006.
Agricultural Sub-sectors (Exports EC$’000’)
Crop
2005
2006
Comments
Nutmeg
21,584.0
7,155.6
-
Cocoa
248.3
695.4
-
Banana
0.0
359.9
-
Fruits &
Vegetables
31.9
224.2
-
Fish
9,494.6
9,914.4
-Many young entrepreneurs are investing
in the sector
Other
54.3
56.7
-Growing demand for herbs.
Replanting has not been sufficiently
aggressive, so that low production will
continue a long time
-Effort on the way to reform the GCNA
and GCA
Many of the fields are in need of
rehabilitation.
Sector facing high incidence of diseases –
Moko, Black Sigatoka
Project now being developed to
significantly expand the acreage under
fruit production
MAJOR CONSTRAINTS FACING THE
AGRICULTURE SECTOR
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Limited financial resources for capital expenditure
(country’s heavily indebted)
Weak institutional framework
Weak infrastructural support (marketing, irrigation,
roads, processing)
Low level of private investment
Large number of small scale farmers
Aging farming population
Low level of technical skills including entrepreneurial
and marketing skills
High cost of labour and other inputs
High incidence of praedial larceny
Marketing Agricultural Produce
An Overview

In Grenada three main agricultural agricultural
marketing systems are employed:
1.Traditional exports
2. Non-traditional exports
3. Domestic fresh-produce
Traditional Export Commodities

Nutmegs and Mace and Cocoa beans
- The leading export crops
- Marketed by the Grenada Cooperative
Nutmeg Association (GCNA) and Grenada Cocoa Association.
Both has monopoly power to be sole purchaser and exporter
- All data on crop are captured through
a computerized buying and sales system
- Production estimates are based on quantity
purchased
- Passes records of purchases and sales to the Central Statistical
Office (CSO)
Bananas

Most of the bananas grown are absorbed in the
domestic market.

Small quantities are exported to the international and
regional market.

The Marketing and National Importing Board
(MNIB) markets both on the domestic and regional
market

WIBDECO exports to the European market

Export data provided by agencies, but there is no
organised data collection on production.
Nutmegs, Cocoa, Bananas

For nutmegs and mace the GCNA has marketing
agents in the export markets who provide market
information. Sales are also done directly with export
buyers

GCA sells its cocoa bean directly to buyers. Market
information is obtained on the world commodities
market

WIBDECO – the marketing agent for bananas is
present in Europe marketing bananas and provide
information to suppliers
Non-Traditional Export
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Commodities include tropical fruits such as mango,
golden apples, sour-sop, sugar apples, breadfruit,
avocadoes and fish
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In the 1980s and 1990s trade in the commodities with
the exception of fish was done by small private
exporters. Now it is done mainly by the MNIB
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Production is very scattered and no organised data
collection takes place

Production estimation is based on purchases by the
MNIB
Fish

Fresh fish export in the 1980s and early 1990s was
handled by Commercial Fisheries (Govt. owned
corporation).
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The Commercial Fisheries has since been privatized
and fish export is handled by a number of private
exporters.
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The Fisheries Division of the MOA collects all data
on fisheries industry including fish landings and
exports and submit to the CSO.
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Some fresh fish imports are also taking place.
Domestic Fresh Produce
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This category comprise vegetables, food crops, fresh
fruits, meats, etc.
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Trading of these commodities is done by the MNIB
and private persons and institutions including farmers
groups.
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It is estimated that the MNIB handles about 20% of
the fresh fruit produce
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Farmers, vendors and supermarkets handle the
remaining 80%.
Marketing Arrangements
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Farmers
Commodity Boards/Agencies
Export Traffickers
Market/Roadside Vendors
Supermarkets
Hotels
Consumers
Truckers/Airlines/Schooners
Marketing Information System
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No organised market information system exist
except for what the commodity boards operate.
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In the past some initiatives started but were not
sustained – CAMID, FAO Market Price
Information System, GAIS
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MoA is now undertaking the establishment of
an Agricultural Information System to include
a Marketing Information System
Proposed Agricultural Information
System
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Establishment of an AIS Unit
Recruiting of a Statistician, Marketing Officer
and AIS Officer
Establishing a Frame for conducting surveys
Funding provided under SFA 2006

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