Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations

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Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations
4 November 2013 - 8 November 2013
Book of Abstracts
66th Annual Gulf and Caribbean Fisheries Institute
Corpus Christi, Texas, USA
Hosted by :
The Harte Research Institute for Gulf of Mexico Studies
th
GCFI Gratefully Thanks the Following Sponsors of the 66 Institute
WHALE SHARKS
FLORIDA FISH AND WILDLIFE CONSERVATION COMMISSION
FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH INSTITUTE
HARTE RESEARCH INSTITUTE FOR GULF OF MEXICO STUDIES AT TEXAS
A&M UNIVERSITY CORPUS CHRISTI
NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION
NATIONAL OCEAN SERVICE
NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE
BLUE FIN TUNAS
TEXAS SEAGRANT AT TEXAS A&M
TEXAS STATE AQUARIUM
THE GOVERNMENT OF BERMUDA
PORT OF CORPUS CHRISTI
RED SNAPPERS
(c) Diane Rome Peebles
THE UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN MISSISSIPPI, CENTER FOR FISHERIES
AND DEVELOPMENT
UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS MARINE SCIENCE INSTITUTE
DAUPHIN ISLAND SEA LAB
INTERNATIONAL GAMEFISH ASSOCIATION
TAMUCC OFFICE OF RESEARCH, COMMERCIALIZATION AND OUTREACH
FLORIDA INSTITUTE OF OCEANOGRAPHY
MOTE MARINE LABORATORY
FOOD AND AGRICULTURE ORGANIZATION OF THE UNITED NATIONS
SEA GRANT COLLEGE PROGRAMS OF FLORIDA, PUERTO RICO AND THE
GULF OF MEXICO
CARIBBEAN ENVIRONMENT PROGRAMME
CARIBBEAN MARINE PROTECTED AREAS NETWORK AND FORUM
COASTAL BEND BAYS AND ESTUARIES PROGRAM
TAMUCC COLLEGE OF SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING
COASTAL CONSERVATION ASSOCIATION TEXAS
SALTWATER-FISHERIES ENHANCEMENT ASSOCIATION
TEXAS PARKS AND WILDLIFE DEPARTMENT
GULF OF MEXICO FOUNDATION
PROGRAM
TH
66 ANNUAL GULF AND CARIBBEAN FISHERIES INSTITUTE
CORPUS CHRISTI, TEXAS USA
4-8 NOVEMBER 2013
Monday, November 4
Opening Ceremony
8:30
Dr. Alejandro
Acosta
Program Chair
Dr. James Franks
Chair, GCFI Board of Directors
Honorary Guests
8:40
Nelda Martinez
Mayor, City of Corpus Christi
8:50
Dr. Luis Cifuentes,
Vice President for Research, Commercialization, and Outreach, Texas A&M
University-Corpus Christi
Dr. Larry D.
McKinney
Executive Director, Harte Research Institute for Gulf of Mexico Studies
9:00
10:00
Keynote Speaker
Dr. Larry D.
McKinney
The Balance of Nature – Steel Reefs and Coral Reefs:
Compatible or Contradictory
Leroy Creswell
GCFI Executive Secretary; Opening Bell
Coffee break
Natural and Artificial Reef Fisheries, Research and Conservation (Moderators:
Wes Tunnell and Greg Stunz, HRI) (Sponsored by HRI)
10:30
Wes Tunnell and Greg Stunz
Introduction and overview of natural and artificial reefs in the Gulf of Mexico
Special Session
*Student competing for Outstanding Student Award for Academic Achievement
i
10:45
Patterson III,
William
Ecological function of artificial versus natural reefs in the Northern Gulf of
Mexico
11:00
Stunz, Greg
Artificial reefs in the northwestern Gulf of Mexico as fisheries habitat
11:15
Puritz, Jonathan
Genomic tools for assessment of natural and artificial reefs and formation of a
joint HRI and TAMU-CC marine genomics core facility
11:30
Truchon, Stephen
An assessment of offshore platform decommissioning alternatives using
ecosystem services
11:45
Chávez, Ernesto A. Fisheries of the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean coral reefs
12:00
Powers, Sean
Preparing for ecosystem-based management: a fishery-independent
sampling program for reef fish in the Northern Gulf of Mexico
12:15
Lindberg, William
Comprehensive artificial reef program meets Florida stakeholder needs
12:30-14:00
Lunch
Concurrent Session: Lionfish in the Market - Challenges and Opportunities. Preregistration required (Contacts: Lad Akins, REEF and James Morris, NOAA)
Socio-Economics (Moderator: Patrick McConney, CERMES)
14:00
Gill, David *
The economic value of reef-associated fishing: case studies from three
countries in the wider Caribbean
14:10
Mikuni, Nariaki
Economic activities which strengthen the social cohesion among fishermen
and promote the co-management
14:20
Box, Stephen
Modeling the economic benefits of applying new spatial management and
traceability tools to a low governance fishery
14:30
Chollett, Iliana
Mapping the cost of an artisanal fishery
14:40
Salas, Silvia
Analysis of fishermen performance in small-scale fisheries of the Yucatan
Coast, Mexico
14:50
Keithly, Walter
The Gulf of Mexico shrimp processing sector and adaption to increasing
imports
15:00
Bretos, Fernando
Fishermen learning exchanges for conservation: an examination of lessons
learned
15:10
Burrows, Felicity
M.
Enhancing management of the Bahamas spiny lobster fishery for the future
15:20
Tizol, Rafael
Current state and management of fisheries resources in Cuba
15:30
Baldwin, Kimberly
Demonstrating the effectiveness of a Participatory Geographic Information
Systems (PGIS) approach in supporting ecosystem-based marine
management for fisheries
15:40
Bonilla, Sara
Artisanal Fisheries of the Bay Islands in Honduras: Socioeconomic
Importance and Community participation in Marine Resource Management
15:50
Blackman,
Katherine
Working towards a code for sustainable fisheries with the Conset Bay Fishing
Community in Barbados
16:00
Coffee break
*Student competing for Outstanding Student Award for Academic Achievement
ii
The GCFI Fisher Forum (Moderator: Patrick McConney, CERMES)
16:15
Will Heyman,
Session Chairman
Introduction to F4F and the 2013 Fishers Forum theme
16:20
Don de Maria,
Fisher, Florida
USA
The value of fishermen and scientists working together
16:40
Mitchell Lay,
Fisher, Antigua
and Barbuda
Collaborating on sharks in Antigua and Barbuda
16:50
Angelica Mendez,
Fisher, Guatemala
Collaboration in the Guatemala fishers network
17:00
Andres
Maldonado,
Fisher, Puerto
Rico
Together to the bottom of the ocean
17:10
Benny Gallaway,
Scientist, USA
Collaborative science supports shrimp industry management
17:20
Patrick McConney,
Moderator
Discussion and session close
17:45
Eddie Toomer,
winner; Mitchell
Lay, Committee
Chair
Gladding Memorial Award Presentation
18:00
Close
18:30
Informal Reception & Welcome Address: Robert Glazer, Executive Director, GCFI
20:00
Tri-national Marine Science Meeting
Tuesday, November 5
Concurrent
Activities:
Fisher Forum Field Trip (1300-1700). Contact persons: Will Heyman,
ERA Assoc. and Mitchell Lay, Caribbean Fisherfolks Association
Concurrent Break-Out Session: UNEP-CEP/SPAW RAC/NOAA/GCFI
Session of MPAs Listed Under SPAW Protocol. Contact person:
Alessandra Vanzella-Khouri (UNEP)
Evaluation and Applications of Data-Limited Stock Assessment
Methods (Moderators: Bill Michaels and Mandy Karnauskas, NOAA) (Sponsored by
NOAA)
8:00
Michaels, Bill
Building a collaborative strategy for the assessment of data deficient
fisheries in the Caribbean region
8:15
Babcock,
Elizabeth
The influence of uncertainty in life history parameters on the estimation of
status using low-data assessment methods
*Student competing for Outstanding Student Award for Academic Achievement
iii
8:30
Benson,
Kristopher
Evaluating approaches for improving data-limited stock assessments
across Caribbean jurisdictions
8:45
Fujita, Rod
A framework for applying data limited analytical methods to fishery
management
9:00
Karnauskas,
Mandy
Generating fisheries management advice in data-limited situations:
examples from the U.S. South Atlantic and Caribbean
9:15
Cooper, Wade
A modified catch survey analysis for assessing northern Gulf of Mexico
blue crabs
9:30
Keithly, Walter
Limitations associated with establishing a catch share program in a data
poor fishery: a case study of the Puerto Rican deep water snapper fishery
9:45
Nowlis, Josh
Casting deeper and more widely to perform stock-specific fisheries
assessments when data are sparse
10:00
Coffee Break
10:15
Richardson,
Laura
Cayman Islands Marine Protected Areas, enhancing a 27 year legacy
10:30
Heyman,
William
Let them come to you: Improving assessment and management of data
poor fisheries in the snapper-grouper complex
10:45
Pavlowich,
Tyler
Using present-day details of coral-reef fishers’ harvest, including
taxonomic and size-structure, to support ecosystem-based fisheries
management in Montecristi National Park, Dominican Republic
Governance- Recreational Fisheries (Moderator: Graciela Garcia-Moliner,
NOAA CFMC) (Sponsored by GCFI)
11:00
Mahon, Robin
Assessing Emerging Regional Ocean Governance Arrangements in the
Wider Caribbean Region
11:10
Selliah, Neetha
An institutional assessment and strengthening initiative for the Conset Bay
fishing community in Barbados
11:20
Maharaj, Ben
From open access fishery to territorial use rights in fisheries (TURF)
systems: a socio-economic perspective on the implications for the
artisanal fishing sector posed by the transition between systems of
governance
11:30
Sidman,
Charles
A participatory co-management strategy for the use of fish aggregation
devices in Dominica and St. Vincent to sustain the Caribbean pelagic
fishery and communities that depend on it
11:40
Lorenzen, Kai
Stakeholder perspectives on goliath grouper management in Florida
11:50
Garner, Steven
B.
Observer-based estimates of reef fish catch and discard rates during open
and closed recreational seasons for red snapper in the Northern Gulf of
Mexico
12:00
Lashley,
Derrick *
Monitoring and evaluation of small-scale fisheries management using
simple performance indicators
12:10
Wallen,
Kenneth
Response rate decline, survey methodology, and implications for Texas
fisheries management
12:3014:00
Lunch Break
*Student competing for Outstanding Student Award for Academic Achievement
iv
Lionfish Biology, Control, and Management
(Moderators: James Morris, NOAA
and Lad Akins, REEF)(Sponsored by NOAA)
14:00
Tester, Pat
Invasive lionfish and ciguatera fish poisoning in the Gulf and Caribbean: what
do we really know?
14:10
Wilcox,
Christie
Expression profile of venom proteins in Pterois volitans implications for
ciguatoxin detection
14:20
Castillo II,
Bernard
Preliminary results: screening of ciguatera toxins found in indo-pacific lionfish
(Pterois volitans) in St. Croix, US Virgin Islands
14:30
Diaz, Nicholas
Lionfish ciguatoxicity risk assessment in French Antilles
14:40
Chapman,
Jennifer
Obstacles and opportunities in developing commercial markets for invasive
lionfish - lessons learnt from Belize
14:50
Bolaños,
Nacor
Colombia's Contributions to regional efforts the countries wider Caribbean for
the lionfish control
15:00
Lozano,
Ricardo G
Regional strategy for invasive lionfish in the wider Caribbean region
15:10
McCreedy,
Cliff
Lionfish control in U.S. National Parks
15:20
Chevalier,
Pedro
Lionfish (Pterois volitans/miles: Scorpaenidae) in Cuba, abundance,
distribution and ecological relationships
15:30
Fernández,
Alexis
First parasitological records at Lionfish, Pterois volitans (Linnaeus, 1758) for
Cuban waters
15:40
Eddy, Corey *
Preliminary analysis of lionfish (Pterois volitans and P. miles) populations in
Bermuda
15:50
Dark, Emily *
Investigation of lionfish (P. volitans/miles) use of estuarine mangroves in the
Indian River Lagoon, Florida, USA
16:00
Coffee Break
16:20
Caballero,
Hansel
Comparative results of the feeding ecology of invasive lionfish (Pterois
volitans/miles: Scorpaenidae) in Cuba: 2009-2013
16:30
Curtis-Quick,
Jocelyn
Interactions between the Caribbean spiny lobster, Panulirus argus, and
invasive lionfish, Pterois volitans: who displaces whom?
16:40
Dahl, Kristen
Diet of the invasive Pacific lionfish, Pterois volitans, on natural and artificial
reefsin the Northern Gulf of Mexico
16:50
Sealy, Shekira
Mitochondrial DNA (Mtdna) haplotype diversity of the invasive lionfish in
Barbados
17:00
Fogg,
Alexander*
Northern Gulf of Mexico lionfish: distribution and reproductive life history
trajectories
17:10
Lazarre,
Dominique *
Lionfish bycatch in the Florida Keys commercial spiny lobster fishery
17:20
Ali, Fadilah
Does removal work? A one year comparison of lionfish removal efforts at Klein
Bonaire
17:30
Green,
Stephanie
Fishing derbies for invasive lionfish: a tool for public engagement and
population control
17:40
Selwyn, Jason
Decadal changes in reef fish recruitment at Turneffe Atoll, Belize: before and
after lionfish invasion
*Student competing for Outstanding Student Award for Academic Achievement
v
19:00-21:00
POSTER SESSION
Hosted by GCFI (Sponsored by GCFI, University of Texas
Marine Science Institute, and TAMUCC Department of Life Sciences/College of
Science and Engineering)
Poster Session Coordinator: Read Hendon USM
20:00-21:00
Café Socio-Económico
Posters
Abril-Howard, Omar
Design, development and manufacture of insulated boxes for improving postcapture management and cold chain, in fishery products in the archipelago of
san Andres, Providence and Santa Catalina
Adams, Chuck
The contribution of artificial reef use to the coastal economies of Florida
Aiken, Karl
First observation sea cucumbers on Jamaica's island shelf
Alcolado, Pedro
Resilience in reef crests of the east of the gulf of Batabanó, Cuba, and probable
determining factors
Ali, Fadilah
The Role of Education In Lionfish Control and Management In The Caribbean
Andrino, Sergio
The infestation and mitigate the impacts of lionfish in the Caribbean
Guatemalan
Annandale, Senifa
Tracking parrotfishes (Scarus rubroviolaceus and Scarus psittacus) using
acoustic telemetry on a Hawaiian coral reef system
Arney,
Rachel
Assessing the recruitment of juvenile fish through the use of standard
monitoring units (SMURFs) at the South Padre Island culvert reef
Artero,
Céline
Non-lethal aging of goliath grouper (Epinephelus itajara) in French Guiana
Baldwin, Kimberly
A Participatory Marine Resource & Space-use Information System for the
Grenadine Islands: The Sandy Island Oyster Bed Marine Protected Area
Ballesteros, Carlos
Study and conservation actions of key species in the San Andres, Old
Providence and Kethleena Archipelago, Seaflower Biosphere Reserve
Bayuelo, Verena
Ovarian histological development of spiny lobster, Panulirus argus (latreille,
1804), in the coastal zone of Atlantic department, Colombian Caribbean
Beaufort, Océane
A land based monitoring technique to study the abundance and the
distribution of lemon sharks juveniles (Negaprion brevirostris) in the Nature
Reserve of the islets of Petite Terre (Guadeloupe, Lesser Antilles)
Bertelsen, Rodney
An analysis of spiny lobster movement patterns: A comparison of two subpopulations residing north and south of the Florida Keys, Florida, USA
Box, Stephen
Lobster Artificial Shelters: Financial Alternatives for Responsible Managing of
Fishing Areas, Pilot Project in Punta Gorda and Guanaja, Bay Islands,
Honduras
Burton, Michael
Age and growth characteristics of lesser known species of reef fish from the
southeastern United States
Chalifour, Julien
The National Natural Reserve of Saint-Martin: a well-managed and recognized
marine, terrestrial and lake protected area
Chapman, Jennifer
All boom and no bust as the lionfish invasion progresses in Bacalar Chico
Marine Reserve, Belize
Chong Sánchez, Fabiola *
Conditioning of conch Strombus Pugilis Linnaeus,1758 with laboratory
formulated diets
*Student competing for Outstanding Student Award for Academic Achievement
vi
Coelho, Eleine
Biorock Production for Reef Restoration
Coxey, Mariana
Spatial fidelity of juvenile goliath groupers, Epinephelus itajara, in a mangrove
area - implications for conservation
De los Angeles, Maria
Sustainable fisheries in the western Cuban archipelago: the role of
environmental education
Delgado, Gabriel
Queen Conch demography influences reproductive behavior and fecundity:
Implications for fisheries management
Dimens, Pavel
Using a landing cradle to fill the data gap left by really big fish
Dolan, Tara
Effect of season and scale on power to detect change in mangrove fish
assemblages
Downey, Charles H.
Vertical longline gear performance on artificial reefs of the Texas Coastal Bend
Downey-Wall, Alan
Characterization of diet composition of the lionfish, Pterois volitans, at
Turneffe Atoll, Belize
Eck, Alicia
Glover's Reef Marine Reserve (GRMR) charting the way forward for improved
MPA management in Belize
Eckert, Ryan J.
Ciguatera Fish Poisoning in the Northwestern Gulf of Mexico
Embesi, John
Benthic community composition associated with a gas platform, High Island A389-A, located within the Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary
Eristhee, Newton
A preliminary analysis of community-based live fish monitoring in four fish
sanctuaries in Jamaica
Eristhee, Newton
A socioeconomic and livelihood assessment of fishers in communities adjacent
to Sandy Island Oyster bed MPA (SIOBMPA) in the Grenadine Island of
Carriacou
Faletti, Meaghan
Novel predator, novel habitat: A diet analysis and experimental test of the
ecological effects of invasive lionfish in Florida Bay
Figueredo Martín, Tamara
Recreational fisheries in jardines de la reina, Cuba. Characterization and
perception about the conservation status of the area
Figueredo Martín, Tamara
Methodology for the Monitoring of Public use in Marine Protected Areas
Forbes, Trisha
Translocation and restocking of the queen conch, Strombus gigas in the
central zone of marine protected area Seaflower, Colombia
Forde, Romel
Understanding aspects of the Barbados deep-water snapper fishery as a
social-ecological system
Froehlich, Catheline
Fish diversity differs among varying patchiness of culvert reefs in the South
Padre Island Reef, Texas
Garcia, Andres
A comparison of site fidelity and habitat use of red snapper on two South
Texas artificial reefs utilizing acoustic telemetry
Gervain, Paul
FADs use as a tool to observe marine currents
Giglio, Vinícius
Goliath grouper, Epinephelus itajara on Natural and Artificial reefs in Brazil: a
participative survey
González, Marian *
Composition and spatial variation in the diet of Lutjanus synagris (Lutjanidae:
Lutjaninae) on the north coast of Yucatan, Mexico
Gourdin, Franck
Eighteen Protected Areas from the Wider Caribbean listed by Parties under the
SPAW Protocol
Granados-Dieseldorff, Pablo
Beyond aggregated catch data: intra-annual dynamics of the data-poor
mutton snapper (Lutjanus analis) fishery at Gladden Spit, Belize
Gray, Jana
Abundance and distribution of the marsh clam Rangia cuneata in the MissionAransas National Estuarine Research Reserve
*Student competing for Outstanding Student Award for Academic Achievement
vii
Gundam, Madhuri
Automatic fish classification in underwater video
Harms, Chelsea
Digestion rate analysis of fish prey items in lionfish (Pterois volitans)
Hernández, Oscar
What is the role of diatoms in feeding of queen conch, Strombus gigas?
Hurtado, Julio *
Mitochondrial genome organization and phylogeographic analyses in Mithrax
spinosissimus (Crustacea: Brachyura), an important species for artisanal
fisheries in the Caribbean sea
Jacobo Cabral, Selene
Erantzcani
Implemented actions to control lionfish (Pterois sp.)in the "Parque Nacional
Arrecife de Puerto Morelos", Quintana Roo, México
Joginipelly, Arjun Kumar*
Species-specific fish feature extraction using Gabor filters
Johnston, Michelle
Indo-Pacific Lionfishes (Pterois volitans/miles) invade the Flower Garden
Banks National Marine Sanctuary in the Northwest Gulf of Mexico
Keithly, Walter
Gulf of Mexico Red Snapper IFQ Program Survey Assessment: Change in
Attitude of the Fishermen
Kelly,
Michael
Understanding the stakeholders in the Caribbean sportfishing community: The
potential for sportfishing devlopment in the Caribbean
Kitchens, Larissa
Discrimination of chemical signatures in otoliths of juvenile yellowfin tuna
(Thunnus albacares) from nursery areas in the Atlantic Ocean
Knowles, Lindy
Bonefish Pond National Park Restoration: Increased Management
Effectiveness through Community Restoration Projects
Kormanec, Marshall
Comparisons of age and growth parameters of red snapper (Lutjanus
campechanus) at an artificial reef and at a natural shelf-edge reef
Labban, Shamanti
The Reef Fishery in St.Vincent
Legare,
Bryan
Quantify oyster (Crassostrea virginica) habitat by coupling acoustic
technologies within Texas bays and estuaries
Lou Allen Hightower, Crystal
Examining Current Mercury Concentrations in northern Gulf of Mexico Red
Drum
Lozano-Beltrán, Germán
Population aspects of blunttooth swimcrab (Callinectes bocourti) and blue crab
(C. sapidus) from Cienaga Grande de Santa Marta northwest area, Colombian
Caribbean
Lundy, Agnessa
Establishing Acropora coral nurseries throughout the Bahamas
Madden, Hannah
Assessment of the Breeding Success of Red-billed Tropic birds on St Eustatius
Mahon,
Robin
Assessment of governance arrangements for Pedro Bank, Jamaica
Matos,
Daniel
Portrait of the Deep water snapper in Puerto Rico during 1988-2012
McCoy, Croy
Marine Protected Areas, Reef Resiliency and the prevalence of Coral Diseases
& compromised reef health in the Cayman Islands, North West Caribbean
McGlaun, Kimberly
Depredation of catch by bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) and
observation of Atlantic spotted dolphin (Stenella frontalis) in the Gulf of
Mexico commercial reef fish fishery
McNaught, Michelle
A mixed management approach - artificial reefs and fish sanctuaries - towards
fisheries enhancement
Mellinger, Julie
Preliminary study of Halophila stipulacea, an invasive species of marine
Magnoliophyta in Guadeloupe Island (Lesser Antilles)
Merten, Wessley *
Spatial differentiation of dolphinfish (Coryphaena hippurus) movements
relative to the Bahamian archipelago
Moncada, Felix
Effect of season closures on populations of sea turtles in Cuba. Case study:
south of Isla de la Juventud
*Student competing for Outstanding Student Award for Academic Achievement
viii
Monnereau, Iris
Are Small-Island Developing States fisheries’ really that vulnerable to climate
change
Moretzsohn, Fabio
GulfBase as a tool to foster research collaborations and better disaster
preparedness
Mulcahy, Lisa
Using volunteer educators to enhance MPA outreach: Lessons learned
Nuttall, Marissa F.
Fish Communities Associated with Benthic Biological Zones at the Flower
Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary and other Banks in the Northwestern
Gulf of Mexico
Olaya-Nieto, Charles W.
Trophic ecology of Guabino (Pisces: Eleotridae) in the Cordoba’s Caribbean
Sea, Colombia
Orozco Toro, Carlos Andres *
Isotopic Composition of 15N and 13C in sponge tissues as an Indicator of human
sewage impacts on reef systems at San Andres Island, Colombian Caribbean
Pattengill-Semmens, Christy
Patterns of rarity of reef fishes in the Caribbean Basin
Pelc, Robin
Successes and challenges in achieving sustainability in Gulf and Caribbean
Fisheries: A conservation perspective
Pena, Maria
Socio-economic assessments in the Caribbean: synthesis of CERMESimplemented SocMon projects
Peterson, Mark
Impacts of Oil Spill Disasters on Marine Fisheries and their Habitats in North
America - a new book of current Deepwater Horizon research including reviews
of the Exxon Valdez and Ixtoc I spills
Pilnick, Aaron
Visualizing hypoxia in the Northern Gulf of Mexico
Pitt, Joanna
Efforts to develop a lionfish-specific trap for use in Bermuda waters
Quinn, Norman
Coral bleaching in Arrecifes de Cozumel National Park Cozumel, Mexico, after
the passing of Tropical Storm Rina in October 2011
Randall, Landes *
Habitat characteristics of flyingfish (family Exocoetidae) larvae in the northern
Gulf of Mexico
Rangel Medrano, Jose David
Mitochondrial DNA variation in queen conch Strombus gigas from archipelago
of San Andres, Old Providence and Santa Catalina, Sea Flower Biosphere
Reserve
Renan, Ximena
Age and growth of Epinephelus morio from Southern Gulf of Mexico
Renchen, Gabrielle F.
Translating scientific data to knowledge: educating stakeholders on trap
impacts
Renoux, Romain
Inventory of crustaceans, molluscs and echinoderms in Guadeloupe and SaintMartin, French West Indies : an exceptional, underestimated biodiversity
Reynolds, Emily
Hydroacoustic and video surveys at toppled and standing petroleum platforms
in the northern Gulf of Mexico: community structure and implications for
fisheries management
Richardson, Laura
Impacts of recreational and artisanal fisheries, Cayman Islands, Caribbean
Richardson, Laura
Estimating marine reserve effects through quantification of macro-algal
biomass, Cayman Islands
Robertson, Morven
An analysis of the spatial distribution and impacts of recreational lobster diving
and spear fishing activities in Bermuda
Rodriguez Gil, Luis Alfonso
Management of the Fishery, Sea Cucumber with Ecosystem Approach to the
Coast of Yucatan, Mexico
Rodriguez Gil, Luis Alfonso
Drawbacks of the Conversion of Processed Weight to Live Weight in the
Tracking of Sea Cucumber Fishing Quotas, Isostichopus baniodotus, in the
State of Yucatan, Mexico
*Student competing for Outstanding Student Award for Academic Achievement
ix
Rojas, Anthony
Description of the Fishery, in the Archipelago of San Andres,Providencia and
Santa Catalina, Biosphere Reserve Seaflower
Rojas, Anthony
Implementation of a program of environmental and fisheries observers
"SEAWATCHER" in the SEAFLOWER Biosphere Reserve, Archipelago of San
Andrés, Providencia and Santa Catalina
Rojas, Anthony
Distribution and abundance of the spiny lobster Panulirus argus, in the
southern sector of the Marine Protected Area of the SEAFLOWER biosphere
reserve
Rose, Kathryn
Gulf of Mexico Data Atlas: Digital Data Discovery and Access
Rossard,
Thibaud
Trophic ethology of the lionfish Pterois volitans in Guadeloupe Island (Lesser
Antilles)
Rupe, Blake*
Quantification and classification of garbage presence and marine debris along
the coasts of the Veracruz, Veracruz, Mexico
Salas, Silvia
Pilot assessment of the spatial distribution of artisanal fishing vessels in the
Southeastern Mexico through VMS. Challenges and opportunties
Samuels, Coretta
Enhanching stewardship within Fisherfolk Organisation
Santos-Valencia, Josefina
Octopus (Octopus maya) biomass evaluation in the Yucatan peninsula during
2012
Schärer-Umpierre, Michelle
Management Applications of Black grouper (Mycteroperca bonaci) Sounds at
Spawning Aggregations
Schwartzkopf, Brittany
Seasonal relationships of caloric density and liver weight of red snapper on
natural hard-bottom banks and artificial reefs in the northwestern Gulf of
Mexico
Sedberry, George
Finfisheries associated with deep-sea sponge-coral ecosystems off the
southeastern U.S.
Segura-Guevara, Fredys F.
Reproductive biology of Parassi mullet Mugil incilis Hancock, 1830 in the
Cordoba´s Caribbean sea
Simpson, Nikola
Description of the spear fishing effort on the reefs of Barbados
Spear,Natalie
Age and growth validation of the common thresher shark (Alopias vulpinus) in
the northeastern Pacific Ocean
Streich, Matthew
Relative abundance and size structure of red snapper, Lutjanus campechanus,
across habitat types in the northwestern Gulf of Mexico
Swenarton, MaryKate
Population biology of Pterois volitans in the coastal waters of Northeast Florida
Trotta, Kristina*
Pelagic recreational fishing and economic growth in Colombia
Vallès, Henri
The utility of simple coral reef fish community metrics as indicators for
Ecosystem-Based Fisheries Management in the Caribbean
Vasquez, Diana
Designing an exclusive area for artisanal fisheries – a viable alternative for the
communities of the Moskitia, Honduras
Wang, Huabo *
Quality versus Quantity for Aggregate Household Seafood Consumption and
Relevant Southeast U.S. Species
Wilson, Rich
Launch of the UNEP-CEP/CaMPAM Mentorship Program:Using Caribbean MPA
management expertise to expedite the dissemination of best practices
Wood, Jehroum
Incorporating GIS into Socioeconomic Monitoring for Coastal Managers
(SocMon)
Zimmermann, Danielle
A Comparison of Trophic Structure Among Artificial Reefs of the Northwestern
Gulf of Mexico
*Student competing for Outstanding Student Award for Academic Achievement
x
Wednesday, November 6
MEETING OF THE GCFI MEMBERSHIP (Everyone is
welcome - Learn about GCFI)
7:00 - 8:15
Concurrent
Workshop
NOAA Workshop: Evaluate the current status of
and explore applications of data-limited stock
assessment methods in the larger Caribbean region
(Pre-registration required)
Demersal Fisheries (Moderator: Alfonso Aguilar-Perera, Universidad Autónoma de Yucatán)
(Sponsored by GCFI)
8:30
Brulé, Thierry
Reproductive strategy of some grouper species from the Gulf of
Mexico: implication for adequate management of the grouper fishery
from the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico
8:40
Ferreira, Beatrice
Age and growth of the goliath grouper Epinephelus itajara in Brazil
8:50
Bertoncini, Áthila
Projeto Meros do Brasil Photo-iD: First insights of goliath grouper
(Epinephelus itajara, Epinephelidae) population and movements at
Fernando de Noronha National Marine Park
9:00
Moulton, David*
Movement and habitat use of subadult red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus)
and spotted seatrout (Cynoscion nebulosus) in the Mission-Aransas
National Estuarine Research Reserve
9:10
Miller, Skylar *
Preliminary analysis of reef fish settlement patterns in Eleuthera,
Bahamas
9:20
Nunez, Enrique
Composition and trophic structure of the fish communities of the Bank
of Campeche reefs, Gulf of Mexico
9:30
Hicks, David
Assessing fish communities of six remnant coralgal reefs off the south
Texas coast
9:40
Quattrini, Andrea
Deep reef fish assemblages of the north central and northeastern Gulf
of Mexico
10:00
Donaldson, Terry
Location is everything: differential mating success of wrasses at a
mating site impacted by diver fish feeding
10:00
Coffee Break
(Moderator: Pablo Granados-Dieseldorff, Texas A&M)
10:30
Luckhurst, Brian E.
Biomass of parrotfishes (Scaridae) and surgeonfishes (Acanthuridae)
increased significantly following Bermuda’s fish pot ban
10:40
Bozec, Yves-Marie
Modelling population dynamics of Caribbean parrotfish
10:50
Dromard, Charlotte
Diversity of trophic niches among Scaridae (Guadeloupe, Lesser
Antilles)
*Student competing for Outstanding Student Award for Academic Achievement
xi
Natural and Artificial Reef Fisheries, Research, and Conservation
(continued) (Moderator: Matthew Ajemian, HRI) (Sponsored by HRI)
11:00
Ajemian, Matthew
Micro-ROV survey methodology for submerged oil and gas platform
artificial reefs
11:10
Jarrell Wetz, Jennifer
Fish community structure and abundance on Texas artificial reefs: a
preliminary assessment
11:20
Lindberg, William
Rationale and evaluation of an artificial reef system designed for
enhanced growth and survival of juvenile gag, Mycteroperca
microlepis
11:30
Kingon, Kelly*
Communities at nearby artificial and natural reefs, similar or not?
11:40
Benson, Kristopher
Gap analysis for the application of artificial reefs as habitat restoration
11:50
Barans, Charles
Long-term residency of benthic fishes at an artificial patch reef using
hourly ultra-short videos
12:00
Borges Souza, Jose
Manuel
Influence of structural complexity on the biomass of the fish
community in seven artificial reefs Campeche Bank, Mexico
12:10
Tarnecki, Joseph
Diet and trophic ecology of red snapper, Lutjanus campechanus, on
natural and artificial reefs in the Northern Gulf of Mexico
12:20-13:30
Lunch
Departing/ Returning Time
13:30 18:00
*13:00
- 18:00
13:30 18:00
13:30 18:00
Field Trips
Padre Island National Seashore Trip
*Whooping Crane Boat Trip
Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, Marine Development Center Tour
University of Texas, Marine Science Institute Tour
*This trip departs at 13:00 (1:00 PM)
Concurrent Activity: SCRFA Board meeting
19:30
CINEFISH: Moderator: Elena Kobrinski (HRI) (Sponsored by TAMUCC Office of
Research, Commercialization, and Outreach)
*Student competing for Outstanding Student Award for Academic Achievement
xii
Thursday, November 7
7:00-9:00
BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING
Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) (A CaMPAM Activity) (Moderator:
Georgina Bustamante, CaMPAM) (Sponsored by NOAA)
8:15
Castro
Gonzalez, Erick
Richard
Seaflower Marine Protected Area: Progress report on the
implementation and future challenges
8:30
Clark, Randy
Baseline ecological assessment of the Flower Garden Banks National
Marine Sanctuary: informing design of a research area
8:45
Harvey, Olando
Stakeholder led co-management governance regimes: the new
paradigm for marine protected areas in Grenada, West Indies
9:00
Fulton, Stuart
Coral reef monitoring with fishers participation in Quintana Roo,
Mexico: building social capital to preserve marine ecosystems
9:15
Márquez
Llauger, Lázaro
Coordinated management in a zone under special use and protection in
the marine area of the Guanahacabibes National Park, Cuba
9:30
Prada, Martha
Management and conservation of reef biodiversity and reef fisheries
pilot project: A successful CLME pilot project in the Seaflower MPA
9:45
Eck, Alicia
Glovers Reef Marine Reserves (GRMR) charting the way forward for
improved MPA management in Belize
10:00
Coffee Break
(Moderator: Erick Castro, CORALINA)
10:30
Wolfs, Esther
The total economic value of nature on Bonaire
10:45
Kyne, Fabian
Evaluating MPA success as a function of Management
11:00
Nash, Harriet
Mapping the South Texas Banks
11:15
Torres-Irineo,
Edgar
Protected areas and fishing activities in the Gulf of Mexico and the
Mexican Caribbean. What needs to be learned?
11:30
Khan, Zaidy
Learning from Global MPA Networks: seeking greater involvement of
small-scale fishing communities in MPA design, implementation and
management
11:45
Brugneaux,
Sophie
The Regional Strategic Analysis: a tool for planning and zoning marine
protected areas for the French Territories of the Caribbean
12:00
Hurley,
Shannan*
The current status of Marine Protected Areas in the Western Central
Atlantic
12:10
Davila, Claudia*
Composition of the fisheries in the National Park Reef System in
Veracruz
12:30-14:00
Lunch
*Student competing for Outstanding Student Award for Academic Achievement
xiii
Fish Spawning Aggregations (Moderators: Martin Russell and Yvonne Sadovy;
SCRFA) (Sponsored by GCFI)
14:00
Russell, Martin
Want to know about fish aggregations globally? We have a web
database!
14:15
Appeldoorn,
Richard
Corroborating fishermen’s knowledge of red hind spawning
aggregation sites using passive acoustic mapping techniques
14:30
Heppell, Scott
Behavior, hyperstability, and population declines of an aggregating
marine fish
14:45
Canty, Steven
The last of the aggregations: validation of an extant grouper spawning
aggregation in Honduras
15:00
GranadosDieseldorff,
Pablo
Retrospective socio-ecological analysis of the mutton snapper
(Lutjanus analis) spawning aggregation fishery at Gladden Spit, Belize
15:15
Aguilar-Perera,
Alfonso
An obituary for a traditional aggregation site of Nassau grouper in the
Mexican Caribbean
15:25
Ruffo, Ashley#
Acoustic tracking of yellowtail parrotfish (Sparisoma rubripinne) at
spawning aggregations in Reef Bay, St. John USVI
15:35
Bueno,
Leonardo*
When do goliath grouper, Epinephelus itajara (Epinephelidae)
aggregate in South Brazil?
15:45
Ellis, Robert *
Spawning-related movement patterns of goliath grouper (Epinephelus
itajara) off the Atlantic coast of Florida
16:00
Coffee Break
16:20
Heyman,
William
Biogeography of transient reef fish spawning aggregations in the
Caribbean: a synthesis for future research and management
16:35
SchärerUmpierre,
Michelle
Nassau grouper (Epinephelus striatus) fish spawning aggregations in
the US Caribbean
16:50
Semmens, Brice
Linking recordings of fish vocalization with observations of spawning
behavior on a multi-species fish spawning aggregation
17:05
Taylor, Chris
Reef fish spawning aggregations (FSAs) in the Florida Keys: an update
17:20
Nemeth ,
Richard S.
Temporal patterns and behavioral characteristics of aggregation
formation and spawning in the Bermuda Chub (Kyphosus sectatrix)
17:35
Sadovy, Yvonne
Sad farewell to C. Lavett-Smith’s iconic Nassau spawning aggregation
site
17:50
Yvonne Sadovy
and Martin
Russell
Conclusion
# SCRFA Student Travel Award
18:30-19:30
19:30-20:30
Reception at Texas State Aquarium
Banquet at Texas State Aquarium (Sponsored by Texas
State Aquarium and TAMUCC/HRI)
*Student competing for Outstanding Student Award for Academic Achievement
xiv
Friday, November 8
Concurrent
Activity:
CaMPAM Mentorship MPA session (Moderators: Georgina
Bustamante, CaMPAM and Rich Wilson, SEATONE)
Invertebrate Science and Management (Moderator: Ronald Hill, NOAA)
(Sponsored by GCFI)
8:15
Rios, Veronica
Assessment of aggregation capacity of "casitas" (artificial shelters) for
lobster Panulirus argus in the coastal area of Celestun, Yucatan, Mexico
8:30
Horsford, Ian
Biology, status and current management of the Caribbean spiny lobster
(Panulirus argus) in Antigua and Barbuda
8:45
Shivlani,
Manoj
A social history of the Florida Keys commercial spiny lobster fishery and
management effects: Lessons for sustainable fishing communities
9:00
Olsen, David
A study of resource status of Virgin Islands spiny lobsters through a
collaboration between the Caribbean Council and Virgin Islands fishermen
9:15
Alegría,
Andrés
Use of artificial reefs in the Caribbean spiny lobster fishery: Review of key
biophysical requirements and best management practices for a successful
project and analysis of its potential development in Honduras
9:30
Truelove,
Nathan*
Genetic population structure of Caribbean spiny lobster between advective
and retentive oceanographic environments
9:40
Noguez
Núñez,
Mariana*
What does the queen conch behavior and how it uses its habitat?
9:50
Santana,
Pablo Alberto*
Effort and reproductive seasonality and spawning of the queen conch
Strombus gigas
10:00
Coffee Break
Moderator: Dalila Aldana, CINVESTAV
10:30
Nunez, Mayra
Market chain study for national consumption of queen conch (Strombus
gigas) in Honduras
10:45
Berry,
Charlotte A.
Queen conch aggregation demographics and habitat associations near Port
Everglades inlet, FL
11:00
Hill, Ronald
Using fishery-independent surveys to estimate densities of queen conch,
Strombus gigas, populations in St. Croix, U. S. Virgin Islands
11:15
Tewfik,
Alexander
Seagrass community responses to the decline in Queen conch (Strombus
gigas) populations
11:30
Rogers,
Arlenie
Assessment of the sea cucumber fishery in Belize
11:45
SantosValencia,
Josefina
Sexual maturity, reproductive seasonality and oviposition of the lightning
whelk Busycon perversum (Linneé, 1758) in the continental shelf of
Yucatan, Mexico
12:00
Japaud,
Aurélien*
Populations genetic study of the corals Acropora palmata and Acropora
cervicornis of Guadeloupe (French West Indies) in view of their
preservation
12:10
Melendez,
Laila*
Development of juvenile blue crab (Callinectes sapidus) growth models
*Student competing for Outstanding Student Award for Academic Achievement
xv
12:20
12:3014:00
Bravo-Reyes,
Mara*
Analysis of fishermen opinion on sea cucumber fishing regulations
established on the coast of Yucatan, Mexico
Lunch
Habitat and Ecosystems (Moderator: Tom Matthews, FL FWC) (Sponsored by GCFI)
14:10
Beltre, Marcia
Willingness to pay of Sanchez's fishermen for preserving mangroves in the Bajo
Yuna National Park, located in Samana bay, Dominican Republic
14:20
Tuz-Sulub,
Armin
A preliminary analysis of the populations of sea cucumber, Holothuria floridana
and H. Mexico, as the mark-recapture method in waters off the coast of
Campeche, Mexico
14:30
Guggenheim,
David
Advancing coastal community sustainability and restoring coral reefs and
eroded coastal areas in the Caribbean with small-scale wave energy buoys
14:40
Hill, Ronald
Linkages between habitats are essential for reef fishes
14:50
Glenn, Hilary
A comparison of reproductive potential of red snapper, Lutjanus campechanus:
natural and artificial habitats in the Northern Gulf of Mexico
15:00
Louon, Laura
Literature review and gap analysis on the sources and effects of non-extractive
stressors on coral reef ecosystems
Pelagic Fisheries/Aquaculture
(Moderator: Jim Franks, USM)
15:20
Brown-Peterson,
Nancy
Aspects of the reproductive biology of yellowfin tuna, Thunnus albacares, in the
northern Gulf of Mexico
15:30
Matheu, Heloïse
Does FAD deployment have a real effect on fishing redeployment towards
offshore resources?
15:40
Fässler, Sascha
A review of the small pelagics fishery resources of the Dutch Caribbean
* Student (10 minute presentation)
15:50
Coffee Break
Awards and Closing Ceremony
16:15
STUDENT AWARD PRESENTATIONS
GCFI Outstanding Student Achievement Awards
Ronald L. Schmied Scholarship
Student Travel Awards
17:00
King Fish Trio LIVE
17:30
Closing Bell
*Student competing for Outstanding Student Award for Academic Achievement
xvi
ABSTRACTS
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
DISEÑO, DESARROLLO Y FABRICACIÓN DE CAVAS ISOTÉRMICAS PARA EL
MEJORAMIENTO DE MANEJO POST-CAPTURA Y CADENA DE FRIO, EN PRODUCTOS
PESQUEROS EN EL ARCHIPIÉLAGO DE SAN ANDRÉS, PROVIDENCIA Y SANTA
CATALINA
DESIGN, DEVELOPMENT AND MANUFACTURE OF INSULATED BOXES FOR
IMPROVING POST-CAPTURE MANAGEMENT AND COLD CHAIN, IN FISHERY
PRODUCTS IN THE ARCHIPELAGO OF SAN ANDRES, PROVIDENCE AND SANTA
CATALINA
CONCEPTION, DÉVELOPPEMENT ET FABRICATION DE CONSERVATEURS
ISOTHERMES POUR L’AMÉLIORATION DE LA MANIPULATION POST-CAPTURE ET DE
LA CHAÎNE DU FROID, POUR LES PRODUITS DE LA PÈCHE DE L’ARCHIPEL DE SAN
ANDRÉS, PROVIDENCE ET SANTA CATALINA
OMAR ABRIL-HOWARD y HEINS BENT HOOKER
Secretaria de Agricultura y Pesca gobernacion departamental San Andres islas San Andres Islas,
Colombia,
[email protected]
RESUMEN
En el Archipiélago de San Andrés, Providencia y Santa Catalina (RB Seaflower), la pesca artesanal está
ligada fuertemente por tradición a la cultura de sus nativos, quienes han ejercido la pesca y agricultura
para su sustento diario. Principalmente se realiza sobre las plataformas adyacentes a las islas, se lleva a
cabo en embarcaciones de madera y/o fibra de vidrio, con tamaños desde los 12 hasta los 28 pies, con
autonomía de 50 millas aproximadamente. El aumento del esfuerzo pesquero sobre los ecosistemas que
soportan esta pesquería, ha generado que el pescador artesanal deba desplazarse a zonas de pesca más
distantes para garantizar una buena producción. Debido a esto, los pescadores artesanales han venido
desarrollando faenas de pesca con un tiempo promedio de 8 a 15 horas, con una captura entre 5 a 100 kg,
dejando el producto pesquero en la cubierta, expuesto al sol o en algunos casos cubiertos con una manta.
Este comportamiento se ha venido realizando porque los pescadores han considerado poco importante el
proceso de la cadena de frío, ya que culturalmente nunca se ha desarrollado esta práctica para estos
periodos de tiempo. El objetivo de este trabajo fue diseñar una cava que garantice la cadena de frio y
promueva las buenas prácticas para estas faenas. El material de fabricación fue la fibra de vidrio reforzada
con resina poliéster y espuma de poliuretano. En prueba realizada en campo se puedo determinar que la
perdida de temperatura de la cava en condiciones ambientales normales (20 a 29 grados Celsius), fue de
un grado por hora. La aplicación de cadena de frio mejoraría, las condiciones del producto pesquero.
PALABRAS CLAVES: R.B. Seaflower, cavas, cadena en frío, faena de pesca, producto pesquero
1
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
THE CONTRIBUTION OF ARTIFICIAL REEF USE TO THE COASTAL ECONOMIES OF
FLORIDA
LA CONTRIBUCION DEL USO DE ARRECIFES ARTIFICALES PARA LAS ECONOMIAS
COSTERAS DE FLORIDA
LA CONTRIBUTION DE L'UTILISATION DE RECIFS ARTIFICIELS POUR LES
ECONOMIES COTIERES DE LA FLORIDE
CHUCK ADAMS1, WILLIAM LINDBERG2, and JOHN STEVELY3
University of Florida Florida Sea Grant PO Box 110240 Gainesville, FL 32611 USA [email protected]
2
University of Florida PO Box 110600 Gainesville Florida 32611 USA
3
University of Florida 1303 17th St. West Palmetto Florida 34221 USA
1
2
ABSTRACT
Florida reportedly has more permitted artificial reefs that any other state in the US. Artificial reefs have
been deployed in state and federal waters all along the Gulf and South Atlantic Coast of Florida. A long
history of deployment programs has been met with strong support by local communities who derive
significant economic benefit from the use of the reefs by both commercial and recreational user groups.
Some reefs meet local demands, while other artificial reef deployments attract users from around the state
and the nation. Some recent large ship deployments are good examples of artificial reef programs that
have created a reputation for artificial reefs in Florida as premier dive destinations, while other reefs
continue to provide access to local anglers and divers. The users of the reefs create economic activity as
they purchase fuel, supplies, lodging and other items necessary for the utilization of the artificial reefs.
Many non-residents utilize the reefs, who bring in new dollars to the local economies. Key user groups
include both private boaters and the fore-hire sector. The economic contribution of these artificial reef
users can be significant to the local economies where the use occurs, as well as the overall economy of
Florida. This poster provides an overview of the studies that have been conducted with the goal of
quantifying the economic activity and impacts associated with artificial reef use in Florida.
KEYWORDS: Artificial reefs, economic, impact
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
AN OBITUARY FOR A TRADITIONAL AGGREGATION SITE OF NASSAU GROUPER IN
THE MEXICAN CARIBBEAN
UN OBITUARIO PARA EL SITIO TRADICIONAL DE AGRUPACIÓN DEL MERO EN EL
CARIBE MEXICANO
UNE NOTICE NÉCROLOGIQUE POUR UN SITE TRADITIONNELLE DE REGROUPEMENT
DE MEROU DES CARAÏBES MEXICAINES
ALFONSO AGUILAR-PERERA
Universidad Autónoma de Yucatán, Km. 15.5, carretera Mérida-Xmatkuil Mérida, Yucatán 97100 México
[email protected]
ABSTRACT
The Nassau grouper, Epinephelus striatus, is a commercially important fish classified by the IUCN´s red
list as endangered. The vulnerability of this grouper relates to its reproductive behavior and lifespan.
During winter full moon days, it migrates annually through the coral reefs of the Western Atlantic to
reach various traditional sites to spawn in aggregations of thousands of individuals. Such predictable
behavior -tracked down by local fishers for decades- has the persistence of its aggregations at risk due to
intense fishing pressure to levels of severe decline to extirpation. In Mexico, one of the oldest and
shallowest sites is located off the Mahahual coast, in the Mexican Caribbean. After more than 60 years of
timely arrivals, the grouper aggregation stopped arriving to the traditional site in 1996. Fishery authorities
established a temporary ban for protection in 1997, but the aggregation did not show up during the
following reproductive seasons. During January 2013, this work explored evidences of possible recovery
of the aggregation after more than 15 years of apparent protection. The survey included semi-structured
interviews to veteran fishermen and visual underwater inspections on site. The use of various fishing
gears (hook and line, spear gun, gill nets), uncontrolled fishing effort, and a lack of proper surveillance
and enforcement by authorities, and the influence of a cruise ship pier nearby severely affected the
aggregation persistence on site. This work certifies this aggregation site is no longer used by this grouper.
KEYWORDS: Nassau grouper, Reproduction, Mexico, Conservation, Management
3
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
FIRST OBSERVATION SEA CUCUMBERS ON JAMAICA'S ISLAND SHELF
PRIMERA OBSERVACIÓN DE PEPINOS DE MAR EN LA PLATAFORMA INSULAR DE
JAMAICA
PREMIÈRE OBSERVATION DE CONCOMBRES DE MER SUR LE PLATEAU DE L'ÎLE DE
LA JAMAÏQUE
DR. KARL AIKEN and KADEEN DOWE
University of the West Indies Dept. of Life Sciences Mona campus, Kingston, Kingston 7 Jamaica
[email protected]
4
ABSTRACT
Sea cucumbers have gained popularity as a fishery resource in the Caribbean in recent years. This is
largely as a consequence of their overfished status in parts of the Pacific where they are used for food and
traditional medicine purposes for centuries. In the Caribbean they are not consumed except by very small
oriental communities, for example in Jamaica. This study revealed that sea cucumbers have been quietly
fished in Jamaica and exported in small quantities to markets in Hong Kong and Singapore for a
significant period of time. However, there is no known body of information on the biology of sea
cucumbers in Jamaica‟s waters. This is an unsustainable situation, as no fishery can be sustainable if
biological information on the fished species is lacking. A small-scale study of the sea cucumbers was
done between 2012 and 2013. Visual survey techniques were used to assess the animals observed at
representative sites around Jamaica. Results strongly suggest that stocks existing in the areas investigated
were very small. The dominant species were Holothuria mexicana and Actinopyga agassizii. This study
suggests that Jamaican commercial buyers especially since 2010 have been purchasing both fresh and
dried sea cucumbers for exportation. Most nearshore shallow (<10m) areas examined had depauperate
populations possibly due to overfishing. The Fisheries Division of the Ministry of Agriculture and
Fisheries has moved to regulate this fishery and an indefinite ban on sea cucumber fishing and exportation
is in place from 01 September 2013.
KEYWORDS: Sea cucumbers, overfishing, Holothuria, management, Jamaica
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
MICRO-ROV SURVEY METHODOLOGY FOR SUBMERGED OIL AND GAS PLATFORM
ARTIFICIAL REEFS
METODOLOGÍA DE LA ENCUESTA DE MICRO-ROV PARA ARRECIFES ARTIFICIALES
PETRÓLEO Y GAS PLATAFORMA SUMERGIDOS
MICRO-ROV MÉTHODOLOGIE DE L'ENQUÊTE POUR HUILE SUBMERGÉ ET PLATEFORME GAZ RÉCIFS ARTIFICIELS
MATTHEW AJEMIAN, JENNIFER JARRELL WETZ, and GREGORY STUNZ
Harte Research Institute Texas A&M University - Corpus Christi Harte Research Institute 314 6300
Ocean Drive Corpus Christi, Texas 78412-5869 USA [email protected]
ABSTRACT
A major impediment to understanding the function of offshore benthic marine habitats to fish production
has been the ability of researchers to study assemblages situated in these generally inaccessible
environments. In general, fish associate with complex benthic environments, however these habitats range
in size (m2 – 100‟s of km2), and are often located in offshore waters at depths beyond most recreational
and scientific diving limits (30 m) or at depths where bottom time is extremely limited. These
characteristics have limited the ability of fisheries researchers to effectively sample these regions.
Louisiana and Texas artificial reef programs have reefing sites dominated by toppled or cut-off oil and
gas platforms, which are several orders of magnitude larger than artificial reefs in the eastern GOM (e.g.,
pyramids). In this study, we describe a ROV-based visual assessment protocol for estimating reef fish
abundance and diversity over a myriad of artificial reef types along the Texas coastal bend. Given the
deeper habitat and high relief (some 40-50 m from bottom to top) of these structures, we integrated
sampling methodologies previously used for both large and small habitats. We discuss some of the
challenges and constraints associated with using micro ROVs as well as potential future avenues of
research.
KEYWORDS: artificial reef, remotely operated vehicle, reef fishes, Red Snapper
5
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
RESILIENCE IN REEF CRESTS OF THE EAST OF THE GULF OF BATABANÓ, CUBA, AND
PROBABLE DETERMINING FACTORS
RESILIENCIA EN CRESTAS ARRECIFALES DEL ESTE DEL GOLFO DE BATABANÓ,
CUBA, Y SUS FACTORES DETERMINANTES PROBABLES
RÉSILIENCE EN CRÊTÉS ARRECIFALES DU L´EST DU GOLFE DE BATABANÓ, CUBA, ET
SES FACTEURS DÉTERMINANTES PROBABLES
PEDRO M. ALCOLADO1, HANSEL CABALLERO2, ARIAGNA LARA1, NÉSTOR REY-VILLIERS1,
LILIAM ARRIAZA1, GLADYS M. LUGIOYO1, PEDRO ALCOLADO-PRIETO1, SUSEL
CASTELLANOS1, SUSANA PERERA3 and ALAIN RODRÍGUEZ-GARCÍA1
1
Instituto de Oceanología, 1a, No. 18406, Rpto. Flores, Playa, La Habana, Cuba. [email protected]
2
Acuario Nacional de Cuba, Avenida 1a esquina a 60, No. # 6002, Playa, Ciudad Habana.
3
Centro Nacional de Áreas Protegidas, Calle 18ª, No. 4114, Playa, La Habana, Cuba.
6
ABSTRACT
The degree of resilience of six reef crest sites was compared at the east of the gulf of Batabanó, Cuba.
Three of them were located at the north of the gulf of Cazones (Northern Stretch), while the remaining
ones at west of Cayo Largo (Southern Stretch). Those of the Northern Stretch were Cazones beacon, north
of the crest of Diego Pérez key and Diego Pérez beacon. The remaining sites were those of the Rico key,
Los Ballenatos reefs, and Hijos de Los Ballenatos reefs. The AGRRA biological indicators were applied.
The Northern Stretch presented the most resilient crests, mainly that of Cazones beacon. Those of the
Southern Stretch did not reveal signs of resilience. Several interrelated factors were apparently more
linked to resilience. Four of them were considered as driving forces: shelter from waves, usual cyclonic
revolving water circulation in the Cazones cove, nutrient input from the great Zapata swamp and deep
water, and the abundance of the herbivore sea urchin Diadema antillarum. Triggered by these driving
forces, the remaining factors apparently were: less effect of waves and sediments; stabilization of live
coral fragments; favorable benthic macro-algae indices; some retention of nutrient and plankton;
increased coral heterotrophic feeding; better conditions for recruit settlement and viability, and for coral
re-sheeting; faster coral growth and recuperation; and better thermal conditions against coral bleaching.
Unexpectedly, in these specific conditions, herbivore and carnivore fish average biomass and density did
not reveal to exert a clear influence in inferred higher resilience at Cazones beacon reef crest.
KEYWORDS: coral reef, resilience, driving factors, Cuba
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
INFLUENCIA DE LOS ARRECIFES ARTIFICIALES SOBRE LA ESTRUCTURA
COMUNITARIA DE PECES EN EL PARQUE ECOTURÍSTICO XEL-HÁ, QUINTANA ROO,
MÉXICO
INFLUENCE OF ARTIFICIAL REEFS ON FISH COMMUNITY STRUCTURE IN XEL HA
ECOLOGICAL PARK, QUINTANA ROO, MEXICO
INFLUENCE DE RÉCIFS ARTIFICIELS SUR LES POISSONS STRUCTURE
COMMUNAUTAIRE XEL-HA PARC ÉCOLOGIQUE, QUINTANA ROO, MEXIQUE
ALEJANDRO ALDANA MORENO
CINVESTAV-IPN Km. 6 Carretera Progreso, Mérida, Yucatán, México. Merida, Yucatan 97310 Mexico
[email protected]
RESUMEN
Xel-Há es un parque marino privado localizado en el Caribe mexicano, que se encuentra protegido de la
extracción pesquera furtiva, alberga cerca del 20% de la ictiofauna arrecifal de la región. En el 2009,
fueron colocados 105 refugios arrecifales de piedra, observando un aumento en el la riqueza de especies y
número total de organismos, sin embargo se desconoce si la causa de este incremento se debió a los
arrecifes artificiales o a otros factores. En este estudio se evaluó el efecto de los arrecifes artificiales sobre
la estructura comunitaria de peces en el parque Xel-Há. Se realizaron censos visuales por la técnica de
transectos fijos con una envergadura de 100x5, distribuidos en 17 transectos a los largo de la caleta. Se
estimaron los descriptores ecológicos de riqueza, abundancia, y diversidad (H‟). Se categorizaron las
especies de la comunidad en: Dominantes, Frecuentes, Comunes y Raras de acuerdo a su abundancia y
frecuencia de ocurrencia. De las 63 especies censadas, Haemulon sciurus, H. flavolineatum, Lutjanus
griseus, Acanthurus coeruleus y Abudefduf saxoatilis fueron las mejor representadas con base a su
abundancia y frecuencia de ocurrencia. Los descriptores ecológicos mostraron variaciones entre
transectos con refugios arrecifales y transectos con sustrato arenoso. Los arrecifes artificiales, suplen la
escasa complejidad coralina que existe en la caleta de Xel-Há, propiciando una gran abundancia de peces
en estadio joven principalmente de las familias de Scaridae, Haemulidae, Labridae y Lutjanidae que
utilizan este sitio como área de crianza, alimentación y protección contra depredadores.
PALABRAS CLAVES: artificial reef, ichtyofaune, xel-ha, management, conservation
7
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
USE OF ARTIFICIAL REEFS IN THE CARIBBEAN SPINY LOBSTER FISHERY: REVIEW
OF KEY BIOPHYSICAL REQUIREMENTS AND BEST MANAGEMENT PRACTICES FOR A
SUCCESSFUL PROJECT AND ANALYSIS OF ITS POTENTIAL DEVELOPMENT IN
HONDURAS
USO DE ARRECIFES ARTIFICIALES EN LA PESQUERÍA DE LANGOSTA ESPINOSA DEL
CARIBE: REVISIÓN DE LOS REQUISITOS BIOFÍSICOS CLAVE Y DE LAS MEJORES
PRÁCTICAS DE MANEJO PARA UN PROYECTO EXITOSO Y ANÁLISIS DE SU
POTENCIAL DE DESARROLLO EN HONDURAS
L'UTILISATION DE RÉCIFS ARTIFICIELS DANS LA PÊCHE À LA LANGOUSTE DES
CARAÏBES: RÉVISION DES CONDITIONS BIOPHYSIQUES ET CLÉS ET LES MEILLEURES
PRATIQUES EN MATIÈRE DE GESTION DE PROJET RÉUSSIE, ET UNE ANALYSE DE SON
POTENTIEL DE DÉVELOPPEMENT AU HONDURAS
ANDRÉS ALEGRÍA1 and STEPHEN BOX2
Centro de Estudios Marinos (CEM) www.utilaecology.org , Honduras [email protected]
2
Smithsonian InstitutionSmithsonian Marine Station Fort Pierce Florida USA
1
8
ABSTRACT
In Honduras, a usual method for fishing the Caribbean spiny lobster consist of fishers free-diving or with
SCUBA, and using either gaffs or harpoons to spear lobsters upon sight, killing or injuring them before
they can be checked for eggs or assessed as legally sized. While these counterproductive method is
widespread across the Caribbean, the use of artificial reefs known as casitas has proven to be a
sustainable harvesting alternative through out the region, particularly in Mexico. However, whether a
planned project will actually enhance the production of biomass through its use, or simply act as another
fishing device, will depend on the specific set of biophysical conditions present, as well on the efficacy of
chosen management practices. Based on a systematic literature review, we synthesized a series of key
features that have been proven to be or identified as requirements for a successful casita project,
accounting on the biophysical context as well as the corresponding management practices. Surrounding
habitats, depth ranges, benthos composition, and population connectivity constitute basic biophysical
parameters upon which criteria for casitas dimensions and deployment design respond to. Also, a desired
set of management practices should target the respect for minimum size and closed seasons, the protection
of ovigerous females, the definition of clear property rights over the casitas, and a pertinent monitoring
program. We further identified a short list of communities in the Honduran Caribbean with high potential
to enhance this crustacean‟s productivity in benefit of their local fishermen, and initiated one small-scale
pilot project.
KEYWORDS: Lobster, Panulirus argus, artificial reefs, Honduras
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
THE ROLE OF EDUCATION IN LIONFISH CONTROL AND MANAGEMENT IN THE
CARIBBEAN
EL PAPEL DE LA EDUCACIÓN EN EL CONTROL Y GESTIÓN DEL PEZ LEÓN EN EL
CARIBE
LE RÔLE DE L'ÉDUCATION DANS LE CONTRÔLE ET LA GESTION DES POISSONSPAPILLONS DANS LES CARAÏBES
FADILAH ALI
University of Southampton 927 Pelican Road, Lange Park Chaguanas, Trinidad and Tobago
[email protected]
ABSTRACT
The invasive lionfish is a venomous, voracious predator currently causing ecological and economic harm
throughout the Caribbean. Since their confirmation in the Caribbean region over two decades ago, a
variety of management schemes have been established to quell their future spread. Education is a key
aspect which governs the success of any invasive species management program. In the Caribbean, lionfish
education schemes range from simple, local means via posters, brochures and newspapers to television
and radio announcements to more regional and international means via social media and the internet. In
the Caribbean, lionfish education schemes have had varying success rates. The type of media utilised, the
target audience and their literacy levels and reinforcement are instrumental factors which are often
overlooked. Trinidad and Tobago, Anguilla and Bonaire represent islands which are all at different stages
of the lionfish invasion and the development of their education schemes. Trinidad and Tobago, newest to
the lionfish invasion, represents an island whereby literacy levels were not taken into account which
affected their further control. Anguilla, an island represents an island where the education scheme
backfired and instilled a fear of lionfish, which meant that lionfish were not being removed and instead
were being set free. Bonaire represents the island with the most established education program in this
study which has built the foundation for its excellent lionfish management scheme. This study highlights
the important role education plays in lionfish management; good education fuels good management,
however when inadequately executed, management is severely hindered.
KEYWORDS: Lionfish, invasive species, control, management, education
9
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
DOES REMOVAL WORK? A ONE YEAR COMPARISON OF LIONFISH REMOVAL
EFFORTS AT KLEIN BONAIRE.;FUNCIONA EL CESE?
A UNA COMPARACIÓN INTERANUAL DE LOS ESFUERZOS DE ELIMINACIÓN DE PEZ
LEÓN EN KLEIN BONAIRE
EST-CE QUE LES TRAVAUX D'ENLÈVEMENT? A UNE COMPARAISON DES EFFORTS
D'ÉLIMINATION LIONFISH À KLEIN BONAIRE ANS.
FADILAH ALI
University of Southampton 927 Pelican Road, Lange Park Chaguanas, Trinidad and Tobago
[email protected]
10
ABSTRACT
The Indo-Pacific lionfish (Pterois volitans) is an invasive, marine predator, now confirmed in all islands
throughout the Caribbean region. Their generalist diet coupled with their high growth, reproductive and
feeding rates make them one of the worst marine invaders of all time. Lionfish were first confirmed in
Bonaire on October 26th, 2009. Since then an extensive removal program has been established and is
especially successful due to the ease of accessibility via shore diving in Bonaire. However Klein Bonaire,
which is only accessible via boat, receives a significantly lower hunting pressure. A study was conducted
in 2012 whereby the entire coastline of Klein Bonaire was surveyed and data was collected on lionfish
density, behaviour and ecology (general, feeding and reproductive). In 2012 a total of 2240 lionfish were
seen with 893 actually being caught. A year later, this study was repeated to determine the effectiveness
of removal efforts, and whether they were actually making a difference in the lionfish population. In
2013, there was a massive reduction in the number of lionfish seen (854) and caught (542). What is also
commendable is that these removal efforts were conducted by only volunteer divers and that there was an
increase in the efficiency of hunting from a successful capture rate of 40% in 2012 to 65% in 2013. This
study revealed that continuous removal of lionfish is key to their control and shows that lionfish
removals, even by volunteers, can make a difference.
KEYWORDS: Lionfish, invasive species, control, management, success
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
LA INFESTACIÓN Y MITIGACIÓN DE LOS IMPACTOS DEL PEZ LEÓN EN EL CARIBE
GUATEMALTECO
THE INFESTATION AND MITIGATE THE IMPACTS OF LIONFISH IN THE CARIBBEAN
GUATEMALAN
L'INFESTATION ET ATTÉNUER LES IMPACTS DU POISSON-LION DANS LA CARAÏBES
GUATÉMALTÈQUES
SERGIO ANDRINO
Centro de Estudios del Mar y Acuicultura DIPESCA Edificio T 14 Campus Centras USAC Km 22
Carretera al Pacifico Guatemala, Guatemala 0112 Guatemala [email protected]
RESUMEN
El pez león (Pterois volitans y P. miles) ha estado presente durante los últimos 20 años en las aguas del
Atlántico Occidental, sin embargo su presencia en el Caribe guatemalteco fue reportado hasta en el año
2007, constituyéndose una amenaza para el ecosistema de arrecifes, la pesca comercial y de subsistencia
por lo que desde 2012 se han realizado trabajos de investigación y de mitigación de los impactos de esta
especie. Las densidades de pez león, reportadas para el Caribe guatemalteco por Andrino (2012) oscilan
entre 0.20 y 0.10 Organismos/m2. Esta información sirvió de evidencia del potencial peligro e incentivo a
las organizaciones estales, privadas y académicas para promover la investigación e implementar acciones
para la reducción de los impactos causados por el pez león. Como estrategia de manejo se ha promovido
la utilización de dicho pez capacitando a los pescadores nuevas técnicas de pesca, manipulación y
preparación del pez león. Como parte de las capacitaciones se les ha enseñado a realizar buceos de cacería
del pez león a pescadores y personas interesadas en el tema. Estas actividades han ayudado a promover el
buceo en el Caribe guatemalteco y apoyar la economía en las poblaciones pesqueras locales. Uno de los
retos a seguir es promover que los pescadores alcancen darle un uso alimenticio, económico y ecológico
ya que ello colaborará directamente a la mitigación de este pez en los arrecifes del Caribe guatemalteco.
PALABRAS CLAVES: Impactos, reduccion , mitigar, economia, alimenticio
11
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
TRACKING PARROTFISHES (SCARUS RUBROVIOLACEUS AND SCARUS PSITTACUS)
USING ACOUSTIC TELEMETRY ON A HAWAIIAN CORAL REEF SYSTEM
LORO SEGUIMIENTO (SCARUS RUBROVIOLACEUS Y SCARUS PSITTACUS) UTILIZANDO
TELEMETRÍA ACÚSTICA EN UN SISTEMA DE ARRECIFES DE CORAL DE HAWAI
SUIVI PERROQUETS (SCARUS RUBROVIOLACEUS ET SCARUS PSITTACUS) EN
UTILISANT LA TÉLÉMÉTRIE ACOUSTIQUE SUR UN SYSTÈME DE BARRIÈRE DE
CORAIL HAWAÏEN
SENIFA ANNANDALE1 and JASON TURNER2
Tropical Conservation Biology and Environmental 200 W. Kawili St. Hilo, HI 96720 United States
[email protected]
2Marine Science Department, University of Hawai‘i at HIlo 200 W. Kawili St. Hilo HI 96720 United
States
1
12
ABSTRACT
Parrotfishes (Scaridae) are important to coral reef ecosystems as bioeroders via production and
distribution of coral sand and as herbivores controlling algal overgrowth. In Hawaiʻi, Scarrids are highly
prized by both commercial and recreational fishermen leading to a decline in their populations and a need
for innovative management techniques. Here we used acoustic telemetry as a new method to monitor
parrotfish movements in a Hawaiian coral reef ecosystem. VEMCO acoustic receivers (VR2W) (n=14)
were deployed in a 1000m2 array at Puakō, Hawai„i to track fine-scale movements of two common
parrotfish species: Scarus rubroviolaceus (n=8) and Scarus psittacus (n=8). External VEMCO coded
acoustic transmitters (V8-4H) were mounted on each fish and tracked over a four-week period using a
VR2W Positioning System (VPS). Benthic habitats were mapped within the study area (<1-13m) using
scuba-based survey techniques including benthic percent cover and rugosity. Coral (40%) and algae
(25%) were the most dominant substrate types with Porites lobata and turf algae as the most commonly
observed species. Tracking data showed that nine of the sixteen tagged fish remained within the VPS
array after two weeks while the other seven fish transmitters were no longer detected after the first week.
These nine individual fish transmitters were detected between 394 and 10570 times. Multivariate spatial
models were used to determine habitat use patterns and the relative importance of different reef habitats.
This method of acoustically tracking movement of herbivorous fishes will provide managers a more
comprehensive understanding of the relationships between habitat value and use.
KEYWORDS: Parrotfish, Acoustic Telemetry, Puakō Hawai„i , VR2W Positioning System, SpeciesHabitat Relationship
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
CORROBORATING FISHERMEN’S KNOWLEDGE OF RED HIND SPAWNING
AGGREGATION SITES USING PASSIVE ACOUSTIC MAPPING TECHNIQUES
CORROBORACIÓN DEL CONOCIMIENTO DE PESCADORES SOBRE LUGARES DE
AGREGACIONES DE DESOVE DEL MERO CABRILLA USANDO TÉCNICAS ACÚSTICAS
PASIVAS DE MAPEO
CORROBORATION DE LA CONNAISSANCE DES PÊCHEURS AU SUJET DE PLACES DES
FRAI AGRÉGATIONS DE MÉROU COURONNÉ EN UTILISANT DES TECHNIQUES DE
CARTOGRAPHIE ACOUSTIQUES PASSIVES
RICHARD APPELDOORN, TIMOTHY ROWELL, MICHELLE SCHÄRER-UMPIERRE, and
MICHAEL NEMETH
Department of Marine Sciences University of Puerto Rico Mayaguez, PR 00680-9000 USA
[email protected]
ABSTRACT
The red hind, Epinephelus guttatus, is one of the most important commercial reef fish in Puerto Rico. Red
hind form spawning aggregations at predictable sites and times, and this behavior has led to marked
declines in its abundance as a consequence of directed fishing on spawning aggregations. However, this
trend can be reversed by targeting management and assessments toward these aggregations. This is
facilitated if the exact time and location of spawning aggregations are known. In this study we followedup a previous survey of patriarchal fishermen who identified past and present suspected spawning
aggregations sites, with field surveys to confirm their exact location and status. Passive acoustic
monitoring of red hind courtship sounds was made using a boat-based hydrophone and GPS. Plotting of
transect positions with the number and strength of red hind calls allowed the extent of aggregations to be
mapped. This study extended the known area of spawning for one west coast aggregation, confirmed the
presence of another west coast site, tentatively confirmed the predicted absence of aggregations off of
Guanica, and confirmed a new aggregation site (identified by a separate fisherman) off of Mayaguez. The
newly confirmed site off the west coast was subsequently monitored using passive hydroacoustics and
visited by divers. These baseline data will facilitate future surveys to assess spawning stocks with
minimal effort and track their recovery following the establishment of area and seasonal closures.
KEYWORDS: Red hind, Spawning aggregation, Passive acoustics, Mapping, Traditional ecological
knowledge
13
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
ASSESSING THE RECRUITMENT OF JUVENILE FISH THROUGH THE USE OF
STANDARD MONITORING UNITS (SMURFS) AT THE SOUTH PADRE ISLAND CULVERT
REEF.
EVALUANDO EL RECLUTAMIENTO DE PECES JUVENILES A TRAVÉS DEL USO DE LAS
UNIDADES DE CONTROL ESTÁNDAR (SMURFS) EN LA ISLA DEL PADRE SUR
ALCANTARILLA ARRECIFE.
ÉVALUÉ LE RECRUTEMENT DES JUVÉNILES DE POISSONS À TRAVERS L’USAGE
D’UNITÉS STANDARDS DE SURVEILLANCE (SMURFS) AU RÉCIF EN BUSES DE BÉTON
DE SOUTH PADRE ISLAND, TEXAS.
RACHEL ARNEY
University of Texas at Brownsville 375 Media Luna Rd #3407 Brownsville, TX 78521 USA
[email protected]
14
ABSTRACT
Artificial reefs along the Texas coast bring millions of dollars in revenue every year through sport fishing
and SCUBA diving, and they have been promoted as a means to enhance fish stocks. In 2011 the Texas
Parks and Wildlife Department deployed 4,000 concrete culverts seven miles off the coast of Port
Mansfield, TX. These concrete culverts can serve as habitat for highly desired sport fish species in the
Gulf of Mexico. Because the means of fish recruitment to artificial reefs is unclear and may be attributed
to direct settlement or movement of larger individuals to the reef sites, the aim of this study was to assess
juvenile fish recruitment at particular culvert reef configurations and compare them with observed adult
fish populations. Standard monitoring units for measuring the recruitment of fishes (SMURF) were used
in this study. Eighteen artificial coral SMURFs enclosed in anti-predator cages were deployed at nine
sites in the artificial reef grid. The structures were placed in discrete habitat types of clumped, patchy,
and bare areas. Because epi-faunal community development on an artificial reef varies seasonally, the
SMURFs were sampled bi-monthly. Analysis of fish recruitment differences at each site was conducted,
and juvenile recruits were quantified by size class to the lowest taxonomic level. The use of SMURFs to
characterize fish recruitment at the clumped, patchy, and bare areas at this artificial reef is useful to
determine its function as an attraction device for larger fish or as habitat for fish settlement.
KEYWORDS: artificial reef, juvenile, recruitment, management, fishing
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
NON LETHAL AGING OF GOLIATH GROUPER (EPINEPHELUS ITAJARA) IN FRENCH
GUIANA
DETERMINACIÓN NO LETAL DE LA EDAD DEL MERO GIGANTE (EPINEPHELUS
ITAJARA) DE LA GUAYANA FRANCESA
DÉTERMINATION NON LÉTALE DE L’ÂGE DES MÉROUS GÉANTS (EPINEPHELUS
ITAJARA) DE GUYANE FRANÇAISE
CÉLINE ARTERO1, DEBRA MURIE2, LUIS LAMPERT3, and CHRISTOPHER KOENIG4
ONCFS 23 rue des Amethistes BP 45 Kourou, 97310 Guyane Française [email protected]
2University of Florida 7922 NW 71st Street Gainesville Florida 32653 United States
3
Ifremer Domaine de Suzini BP 477 Cayenne 97300 Guyane Française
4
Florida State University 3618 coastal highway 98 St Teresa Beach Florida 32358 United States
1
ABSTRACT
Goliath grouper, Epinephelus itajara, live in tropical and subtropical waters of the Atlantic Ocean from
Florida to the south of Brazil. While their fishing is still allowed in French Guiana, this species is listed as
critically endangered on the IUCN red list and is protected in some countries. It is essential to know the
age structure of the goliath grouper population in French Guiana to be able to suggest appropriate
fisheries management. Groupers are usually aged using their otoliths, which is a lethal method. To avoid
this impact, a non-lethal methodology using dorsal finrays was modified for goliath grouper in French
Guiana. In a tropical environment such as French Guiana the contrast between seasons is not strong and
hence the visualization of the growth zones in the finrays was less than for fish from higher latitudes.
Finrays of French Guiana goliath grouper were therefore cut at various thicknesses to enhance the growth
rings. Although the reading of the finray sections was difficult due to the presence of false annuli or
“checks”, the annular pattern in the finrays was consistently discernible when finrays were sectioned at
thicknesses between 1.1 and 1.4 mm. Using this method, a total of 200 fish between 38 to 194 cm total
length were aged between 2010 and 2011. Goliath grouper in French Guiana were aged from 1 to 16
years old, with a mean of 4 years old. This highlighted the observation that French Guiana currently
houses mostly a juvenile population of goliath grouper.
KEYWORDS: Goliath grouper, French Guiana, age, finrays
15
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
THE INFLUENCE OF UNCERTAINTY IN LIFE HISTORY PARAMETERS ON THE
ESTIMATION OF STATUS USING LOW-DATA ASSESSMENT METHODS
LA INCERTIDUMBRE EN EL CÁLCULO DE LOS PARÁMETROS DEL CICLO DE VIDA
PARA LA ESTIMACIÓN DEL ESTADO DE LAS POBLACIONES CON MÉTODOS DE
EVALUACIÓN DE POCOS DATOS.
L'INFLUENCE DE L'INCERTITUDE SUR LES TRAITS D'HISTOIRE DE VIE DANS
L'ESTIMATION DU STATUT EN UTILISATION DES MÉTHODES D'ESTIMATION AVEC
PEU DE DONNÉES
ELIZABETH BABCOCK1, ROBIN COLEMAN2, and MANDY KARNAUSKAS3
1
University of Miami RSMAS 4600 Rickenbacker Cswy. Miami, FL 33133 USA
[email protected]
2
Wildlife Conservation Society P.O. Box 768, 1755 Coney Drive, 2nd Floor Belize City Belize
3
NOAA. National Marine Fisheries Service.Southeast Fisheries Science Center 75 Virginia Beach Drive
Miami FL 33149 USA
16
ABSTRACT
Many methods for low-data assessment of fishery status require information on life history parameters
such as longevity, size at maturity, asymptotic length and growth rate. For reef fish in the Caribbean,
these parameters may vary greatly between studies. Generally, when low-data methods are used, life
history parameters are taken from the literature, although the reported values may be from locations far
from the fishery being assessed, or in different habitat. Also, correlations between parameters, such as
growth rates and mortality rates, may not be considered. Uncertainty in life history parameters is therefore
a major source of uncertainty in low-data assessment. We used a Monte Carlo method to evaluate the
implications of parameter uncertainty and correlation between parameter values, when using length-based
methods to infer status for the spear gun fishery at Glover‟s Reef, Belize. Despite a large range of
parameter uncertainty, the length-based methods were able to infer that black grouper Mycteroperca
bonaci was overfished, Nassau grouper Epinephelus striatus, schoolmaster snapper Lutjanus apodus and
mutton snapper Lutjanus analis were probably overfished, and hogfish Lachnolaimus maximus, stoplight
parrotfish Sparisoma viride, French angelfish Pomacanthus paru and gray angelfish Pomacanthus arcuatus
were probably not overfished. All species except French angelfish were experiencing overfishing across a
range of life history parameters. Incorporating parameter uncertainty through Monte Carlo simulation
allowed us to quantify the uncertainty in the inferred status of the species, and also to identify which
species should be the highest priority for life history studies in Belize.
KEYWORDS: Length-based assessment, Low-data assessment, Monte Carlo simulation, Belize
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
DEMONSTRATING THE EFFECTIVENESS OF A PARTICIPATORY GEOGRAPHIC
INFORMATION SYSTEMS (PGIS) APPROACH IN SUPPORTING ECOSYSTEM-BASED
MARINE MANAGEMENT FOR FISHERIES
DEMOSTRAR LA EFICACIA DE UN SISTEMA DE INFORMACIÓN GEOGRAFICA
PARTICIPATIVOS (SIGP) ENFOQUE EN EL APOYO A LA GESTIÓN BASADA EN LOS
ECOSISTEMAS MARINOS DE LA PESCADO
MONSTRATION DE L'EFFICACIT D'UNE PARTICIPATION SYSTEMES D'INFORMATION
GÉOGRAPHIQUE (SIGP) D'APPROCHE POUR SOUTENIR LA GESTION
ÉCOSYSTEMIQUE DU MILIEU MARIN DE LA PÊCHE
KIMBERLY BALDWIN, HAZEL OXENFORD, and ROBIN MAHON
CERMES University of the West Indies Cave Hill Campus Bridgetown, St Michael BB 11000 Barbados
[email protected]
ABSTRACT
Increasing interest in implementing ecosystem-based management approaches has made stakeholder
involvement vital and has highlighted the need for an effective participatory framework. In this case study
of the transboundary Grenadine Islands, we illustrate how the application of a participatory geographic
information systems (PGIS) approach was successful in developing user-centred, demand-driven
information that could be easily accessed and understood by resource users, whilst also serving the needs
of decision makers. PGIS provided a platform for transparent multi-level and multi-scale communication,
information exchange and problem-solving, allowing for collective agreement on: an appropriate mapping
scale, a locally-relevant habitat classification scheme, resource use profiles and a number of fishingrelated attributes. The high level of stakeholder engagement necessary for successful PGIS not only
provided uniquely useful information, but also created a strong sense of ownership in information
produced, increased inter- and intra-stakeholder understanding, and validated the critical role of
stakeholder participation in research and governance. Furthermore, the GIS framework and its integration
with other freely available easy-to-use information technology applications has provided access to
information for all stakeholders that will allow continued engagement, update and use of information for
multiple purposes in support of an ecosystem-based approach to marine governance.
KEYWORDS: ecosystem-based management, Participatory Geographical Information S, Grenadine
Islands, marine governance
17
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
A PARTICIPATORY MARINE RESOURCE & SPACE-USE INFORMATION SYSTEM FOR
THE GRENADINE ISLANDS: THE SANDY ISLAND OYSTER BED MARINE PROTECTED
AREA
A PARTICIPATIVA DE RECURSOS MARINOS Y EL USO DEL ESPACIO-SISTEMA DE
INFORMACIÓN PARA LA GRANADINA ISLAS: LA ISLA DE SANDY OYSTER BED
MARINE PROTECTED AREA
UN MARINE PARTICIPATIVE DES RESSOURCES ET SYSTÈME D'INFORMATION
D'ORIGINE SPATIALE UTILISATION POUR LES ÎLES GRENADINE: LE SANDY ISLAND
OYSTER BED AIRES MARINES PROTÉGÉES
KIMBERLY BALDWIN
CERMES University of the West Indies PO Box 64 Bridgetown, St Michael BB 11000 Barbados
[email protected]
18
ABSTRACT
Ecosystem-based management recognises the variety of spatial interactions within an area, including
humans, rather than considering single issues, species, or ecosystem services in isolation. To implement
such an approach, a diversity of social, economic and environmental information from all existing sources
is needed in a format that is both appropriate and accessible to all stakeholders. A participatory
geographical information system (PGIS) approach was employed in the transboundary Grenadine Islands
as a conceptual framework to integrate, analyse and share multi-disciplinary and multi-knowledge
information to assist ecosystem-based management. The resulting Grenadines Marine Resource and
Space-use Information System (MarSIS) brings together a variety of information and can be used to
uniquely identify areas important for conservation and livelihood, ultimately assisting ecosystem-based
management and transboundary marine spatial planning. Here the potential of the MarSIS is showcased
using the newly established Sandy Island Oyster Bed Marine Protected Area (SIOBMPA) in Carriacou,
Grenada as a case study. The utility of PGIS specifically the ways in which information can be brought
together, visualised and analysed to create practical baseline inventories on marine habitats, resources and
associated human activity of the SIOBMPA is illustrated.
KEYWORDS: ecosystem-based management, Participatory GIS (PGIS), Grenadine Islands, Marine
Resource and Space-use Informatio, Sandy Island Oyster Bed Marine Protected
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
ACTIVIDADES DE ESTUDIO Y CONSERVACIÓN DE ESPECIES CLAVES EN EL
ARCHIPIÉLAGO DE SAN ANDRÉS, PROVIDENCIA Y SANTA CATALINA, RESERVA DE
BIOSFERA SEAFLOWER
STUDY AND CONSERVATION ACTIONS OF KEY SPECIES IN THE SAN ANDRES, OLD
PROVIDENCE AND KETHLEENA ARCHIPELAGO, SEAFLOWER BIOSPHERE RESERVE
LES ACTIVITÉS D'ÉTUDE ET DE CONSERVATION DES ESPÈCES CLÉS DANS
L'ARCHIPEL DE SAN ANDRÉS, PROVIDENCIA ET SANTA CATALINA, RÉSERVE DE LA
BIOSPHÈRE DE SEAFLOWER
CARLOS BALLESTEROS1, ERICK CASTRO1, y HEINS BENT2
CORALINA Km 26 Vía San Luis San Andres, SAI Colombia [email protected]
2
Secretaría de Agricultura y Pesca Ed. Coral Palace San Andrés Colombia
1
RESUMEN
La Corporación para el Desarrollo Sostenible CORALINA en busca de continuar las acciones de
protección, conservación y uso sostenible de los ecosistemas estratégicos y los recursos naturales de la
Reserva de Biosfera Seaflower -RBS-, aunó esfuerzos con la Gobernación del Departamento de San
Andrés, Providencia y Santa Catalina para aumentar el conocimiento y mejorar la gestión frente a la
conservación y manejo de especies amenazadas y su ecosistema, así como para el mejoramiento del
control de especies invasoras en la RBS. Las acciones a realizar comprenden actividades de estudio y
conservación de varias especies claves en el Archipiélago que incluyen: educación y sensibilización a
través de jóvenes sobre las tortugas marinas; monitoreo de distribución y abundancia, estudio de aspectos
reproductivos del whelks Cittarium pica; implementación de un protocolo de monitoreo de peces
arrecifales con énfasis en peces loro (Scarus spp, Sparisoma spp); monitoreo de abundancia de puérulos
(postlarvas) de la langosta espinosa Panulirus argus; diseño de estrategias de conservación y manejo de
tiburones; implementación un programa de monitoreo de abundancia y generación de acciones de control
del pez león, así como diseñar estrategias de estímulo para su consumo. A través de estas actividades se le
da continuidad a la implementación de las Áreas Marinas Protegidas Seaflower y para que se puedan
aprovechar sosteniblemente los recursos naturales y el medio ambiente, a través de prácticas (culturales,
sociales y económicas) sensatas con el medio ambiente en la Reserva de Biosfera Seaflower.
PALABRAS CLAVES: Archipiélago de San Andrés , Providencia, Reserva de Biosfera Seaflower, Areas
Marinas Protegidas, Especies clave
19
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
LONG-TERM RESIDENCY OF BENTHIC FISHES AT AN ARTIFICIAL PATCH REEF USING
HOURLY ULTRA-SHORT VIDEOS
VIDEOS ULTRA CORTOS, POR HORA, PARA ESTABLECER RESIDENCIA A LARGO
PLAZO DE PECES DE PROFUNDIDAD (BENTICOS) EN UN ÁREA DE ARRECIFE
ARTIFICIAL
RÉSIDENCE À LONG TERME DES POISSONS BENTHIQUES DANS UN PETIT RÉCIF
ARTIFICIEL EN UTILISANT DES VIDÉOS ULTRA-COURTS UNE FOIS PAR HEURE.
CHARLES BARANS1, MICHAEL ARENDT2, and JEFFREY SCHWENTER2
SCDNR Retired 644 Clearview Dr. Charleston, SC 29412 USA [email protected]
2
South Carolina Department of Natural ResourcesMarine Resources Division 217 Fort Johnson Rd.
Charleston South Carolina 29412 USA
1
20
ABSTRACT
Few artificial reefs (ARs) have received intensive, long-term study. In 1999, a small “patch” (94 m2) AR
was created in an undisclosed location 72 km off the coast of Georgia, United States, in 26 m of water.
Ten-sec videos (77,593) were recorded hourly by up to six diurnally operated cameras viewing ~ 360o.
Through September 2008, 106 taxonomic identifications included 40 benthic resident species, 34 midwater visitors, 12 benthic cryptic species, and 12 supra-benthic nomads. Although the numbers of new
species of each group increased with total number of video observations, the six benthic "resident"
fishes/groups (Haemulon aurolineatum, Rhomboplites aurorubens, Balistes capriscus, Chaetodipterus
faber, Centropristis sp. and Mycteroperca sp.) exhibited unexpectedly low presence (range: 4-50%). A
Generalized Additive Model explained more deviation in residents‟ presence (26.4 ±2.4%; mean ±SE)
than a Generalized Linear Model (18.9 ±2.7%), among 13 covariate terms across species. Year, the
interaction between temperature and salinity and season each explained more variance than water
temperature or salinity, suggesting that yearly and seasonal conditions may have contained multiple
factors not among those measured. Of the six species, only the occurrence of Atlantic Spadefish,
Chaetodipterus faber, showed a significant inter-annual trend (downward) between 2000 (probability =
0.484) and 2008 (0.153) during the spring seasons. Despite their low short-term presence and high
variability, the frequency of observations of resident fishes of the patch reef remained relatively stable
over eight years. This study reinforced the utility of fixed remote video for assessment of long- and shortterm temporal trends.
KEYWORDS: Patch Reef, Fish residency, video monitoring
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
CHARACTERIZATION OF FISH COMMUNITIES, BENTHIC HABITATS, AND
CONTAMINANTS IN THE ST. THOMAS EAST END RESERVES
CARACTERIZACIÓN DE LAS COMUNIDADES DE PECES, LOS HÁBITATS BENTÓNICOS
Y CONTAMINANTES EN LAS RESERVAS DE ST. THOMAS EAST END
CARACTÉRISATION DES COMMUNAUTÉS DE POISSONS, LES HABITATS BENTHIQUES,
ET DES CONTAMINANTS DANS LES RÉSERVES DE L'EAST END SAINT-THOMAS
LAURIE BAUER, JENNY VANDER PLUYM, TONY PAIT, and IAN HARTWELL
NOAA National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science Consolidated Safety Services 1305 East-West
HIghway SSMC4 Silver Spring, MD 20902 USA [email protected]
ABSTRACT
Located at the southeastern end of St Thomas, US Virgin Islands (USVI), the St. Thomas East End
Reserves (STEER) is a marine protected area encompassing 9.6 square kilometers. The marine areas of
the STEER include a diverse array of habitats, including coral reefs, lagoons, seagrass beds, and
mangrove forests, which support numerous fish and shellfish species. In addition, STEER is an important
recreational and commercial resource for the island of St. Thomas. The adjacent watershed is considered
highly impacted and urbanized, with numerous sources of point and non-point pollution, leading to
concerns about potential contamination and its effects on the marine resources. To fill knowledge gaps
and inform management of STEER, several complimentary projects were developed in coordination with
STEER‟s Core Management Team, including an assessment of biological communities and chemical
contamination within the STEER. In support of this work, field surveys were conducted in June 2012
across coral reef, soft sediment and mangrove habitats to characterize the fish and benthic communities in
the STEER marine ecosystem. Additional field work was conducted to quantify levels of contamination
in sediments and coral tissues. Higher levels of both fish biomass/density and chemical contaminants
were found in Mangrove Lagoon.. The study provides the first spatially comprehensive characterization
of fish and associated benthic habitats in the STEER and will serve as a baseline from which to monitor
changes over time.
KEYWORDS: MPA, St. Thomas, coral reef, mangrove, pollution
21
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
DESARROLLO HISTOLÓGICO DE LOS OVARIOS DE LA LANGOSTA ESPINOSA,
PANULIRUS ARGUS (LATREILLE, 1804, EN LA ZONA COSTERA DEL DEPARTAMENTO
DEL ATLÁNTICO, CARIBE COLOMBIAN
OOVARIAN HISTOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENT OF SPINY LOBSTER, PANULIRUS ARGUS
(LATREILLE, 1804), IN THE COASTAL ZONE OF ATLANTIC DEPARTMENT,
COLOMBIAN CARIBBEAN
DÉVELOPPEMENT HISTOLOGIQUE DES OVAIRES LE LANGOUSTE BLANCHE,
PANULIRUS ARGUS (LATREILLE, 1804), DANS LA ZONE CÔTIÈRE DE L'ATLANTIQUE
DÉPARTEMENT, CARAÏBES COLOMBIENNES
VERENA BAYUELO1, GERMÁN LOZANO-BELTRÁN2, y ONEIDA GUARDIOLA3
Programa de Biología Universidad del Atlántico Km 7 Antigua vía Puerto Colombia Barranquilla,
Atlántico Colombia [email protected]
2
Centro de Investigaciones CientíficasUniversidad Simón Bolívar Carrera 54 N° 58-28 Barranquilla,
Colombia Atlántico Colombia
3
Autoridad Nacional de Acuicultura y Pesca Colombia
1
22
RESUMEN
En desarrollo del proyecto Validación de las nasas tipo hondureña para la captura de langosta espinosa,
Panulirus argus (Latreille, 1804), en la zona costera del Departamento del Atlántico, ejecutado por la
Universidad Simón Bolívar de Barranquilla, se colectaron 1353 ejemplares procedentes de faenas de
investigación con el objeto de determinar la evolución histológica de sus ovarios. A cada ejemplar se le
tomó información biométrica, peso de las gónadas y estado de desarrollo gonadal. Las muestras fueron
fijadas en formol al 5% y se realizaron cortes histológicos. El estudio permitió establecer que la langosta
espinosa presenta crecimiento y desarrollo de ovocitos dentro de sacos foliculares en los cuales se llevan a
cabo las etapas de desarrollo ovocitario: previtelogénesis y vitelogénesis. Los ovocitos vitelogénicos se
sitúan en la periferia de los sacos foliculares, en tanto que los previtelogénicos se localizan en el centro.
Se identificaron células en diferentes estados de desarrollo: ovogonias, ovocitos cromatina nucléolo,
ovocitos perinucleolares, alveolos corticales, en inicio de vitelogénesis, vitelogénicos y ovocitos maduros.
Estas observaciones indican que la langosta espinosa presenta un desarrollo gonadal de tipo asincrónico
en más de dos grupos, dado que se observó un lote de ovocitos próximo a la puesta y varios lotes más en
diferentes estado de desarrollo, incluyendo el lote de ovocitos de reserva, característico de las especies de
zonas tropicales que se reproducen durante todo el año.
PALABRAS CLAVES: Langosta espinosa, Panulirus argus, Desarrollo histológico, Caribe colombiano
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
A LAND BASED MONITORING TECHNIQUE TO STUDY THE ABUNDANCE AND THE
DISTRIBUTION OF LEMON SHARKS JUVENILES (NEGAPRION BREVIROSTRIS) IN THE
NATURE RESERVE OF THE ISLETS OF PETITE TERRE (GUADELOUPE, LESSER
ANTILLES)
UNA TÉCNICA DE OBSERVACIÓN DESDE EL LITORAL PARA EL ESTUDIO DE LA
ABUNDANCIA Y DE LA DISTRIBUCIÓN DE TIBURONES LIMÓN JUVENILES
(NEGAPRION BREVIROSTRIS) EN LA RESERVA NATURAL DE PETITE-TERRE
(GUADELOUPE, ANTILLAS MINORES)
TECHNIQUE DE SUIVI À PARTIR DU LITTORAL DE L’ABONDANCE ET DE LA
DISTRIBUTION DES JUVÉNILES DE REQUINS CITRON JUVÉNILES (NEGAPRION
BREVIROSTRIS) DANS LA RÉSERVE NATURELLE DES ILETS DE PETITE TERRE
(GUADELOUPE, PETITES ANTILLES)
OCÉANE BEAUFORT1, SOPHIE BEDEL2, FRANCK MAZÉAS3, and CLAUDE BOUCHON4
1
Universite des Antilles et de la Guyane Association Kap Natirel DYNECAR EA 926 BP 592 POINTE-aPitre cedex, Guadeloupe 97159 Guadeloupe (FRANCE) [email protected]
2
Kap Natirel Maison Marin, Section Soldat Trois Rivières Guadeloupe 97114 France
3
DÉAL Guadeloupe Direction des Ressources Naturelles,Rue Bougainvilliers Basse-Terre Guadeloupe
97100 France
4
Université Antilles-GuyaneLABEX Corail Equipe DYNECAR EA 926, BP 590 Pointe-à-Pitre
Guadeloupe 97159 France
ABSTRACT
Observations of lemon sharks are becoming nowadays more frequent in the Réserve Naturelle de Petite
Terre in Guadeloupe (Lesser Antilles). The purpose of this study was to set up a monitoring protocol to
answer the questions on the distribution and the abundance of juvenile lemon sharks, taking into account
the environmental characteristics of the studied site (no mangrove and presence of beach rock). The
tracking protocol developed is new for shark survey. The principle is to walk along the shore around the
islets (referred transect) and to record each observation of juvenile sharks. In addition, sharks were
captured to be marked with external tags able to be identified by visual information in the field.
Preliminary results showed the presence of 19 juvenile lemon sharks around the islet of Terre-de-Bas.
These individuals, from different age groups, were observed along the transect (except in one site).
However, the tagging of 15 individuals has revealed that each juvenile used specific home ranges that
vary in size and location. This protocol will soon be used in other sites such as the Island of Saint-Martin.
KEYWORDS: Lemon shark, Lesser Antilles, Transect technique, Tagging, Protected area
23
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
DISPONIBILIDAD A PAGAR DE LOS PESCADORES DE SÁNCHEZ PARA CONSERVAR
LOS MANGLARES DEL BAJO YUNA EN LA BAHÍA DE SAMANÁ, REPÚBLICA
DOMINICANA
WILLINGNESS TO PAY OF SANCHEZ'S FISHERMEN FOR PRESERVING MANGROVES IN
THE BAJO YUNA NATIONAL PARK, LOCATED IN SAMANA BAY, DOMINICAN
REPUBLIC
DISPONIBILITÉ DE PAYER POUR LES PÊCHEURS SANCHEZ POUR PRESERVER LA
BASSE MANGROVE BAY YUNA DANS SAMANA, REPUBLIQUE DOMINICAINE
MARCIA BELTRE
CODOPESCA Autopista Duarte Km 6 Santo Domingo Este, Santo Doming República Dominicana
[email protected]
24
RESUMEN
En este estudio se determinó la disponibilidad a pagar de los pescadores de Sánchez para conservar los
Manglares del Bajo Yuna, parque nacional ubicado en la Bahía de Samaná, República Dominicana. Se
realizaron siete (7) viajes de campo entre octubre 2008 y febrero 2010 para conducir entrevistas y aplicar
un cuestionario relativo al Método de Valoración Contingente. Los resultados reportaron que la DAP por
cada pescador es de RD$250.00, para un equivalente anual de RD$311,000.00, tomando en cuenta los
1,244 pescadores que faenan en la comunidad seleccionada. Adicionalmente, el nivel organizativo, la
familia, tenencia de vivienda, el conocimiento del ecosistema y el nivel de dependencia de servicios de
los pescadores entrevistados son variables importantes que afectan su DAP. El valor determinado
representa el 34% de RD$913,800.00, inversión gubernamental anual para manejar los recursos pesqueros
y los manglares en la Bahía de Samaná. Estos resultados validan la factibilidad de un mecanismo de
financiamiento compartido entre beneficiarios directos y las autoridades competentes, lo cual podría
ayudar a la eficacia de la administración del parque nacional del Bajo Yuna.
PALABRAS CLAVES: Parque Nacional, Manglares, Pescadores, Disponibilidad a pagar, Financiamiento
Compartido
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
EVALUATING APPROACHES FOR IMPROVING DATA-LIMITED STOCK ASSESSMENTS
ACROSS CARIBBEAN
JURISDICTIONS EVALUACIÓN DE MÉTODOS PARA MEJORAR LA EVALUACIÓN DE
LAS POBLACIONES DE DATOS LIMITADOS EN TODAS
L’ JURISDICCIONES DEL CARIBE AUDIT DES MÉTHODES DE SUIVI DES POPULATIONS
DE LA RÉGION CARAÏBE, EN VUE DE LEUR OPTIMISATION
KRISTOPHER BENSON
NOAA Restoration Center 4700 Ave. U Bldg. 307 Galveston, TX 77551 USA
[email protected]
ABSTRACT
The Gulf and Caribbean basins are surrounded by 41 territories comprising 28 independent nations.
Variability in fishery management regimes across those jurisdictions suggests that recommended
strategies for improving data-poor stock assessments will meet with mixed success. Recommended
strategies are generally predicated on limited entry and rights-based management providing incentives for
fisher engagement in collaborative research (CFMC/Fisheries Forum, 2011). Such conditions do not exist
uniformly across the region. This analysis comparatively evaluates the following strategies given various
jurisdictional contexts within which they could be applied: maximizing the utility of existing information
for background on fisheries; evaluating current management actions; collecting, augmenting, and
leveraging ongoing fisheries dependent and fisheries independent sampling (e.g., size- and length-based
studies, accounting for 100% of mortality, collection of biological samples from as high a percentage of
the catch as possible, improvements to fisher reporting forms, and incorporation of fisher sampling into
fishery independent data sets); localized development and application of management tools to determine
appropriate harvest control and sustainability targets (e.g., iterative annual catch limits that develop from
precautionary levels to science-based levels as better or more data is collected over time, the spawning
potential ratio approach, decision trees to determine sustainable yields, surplus production models, and
Ecological Risk Assessments for the Effects of Fishing). Finally, new technologies have been
recommended to enhance stock assessments in the context of the relatively data-rich Gulf region, and the
potential of these technologies to allow assessments of data-poor stocks across the Caribbean to
“leapfrog” to “data-rich” conditions is also examined.
KEYWORDS: Data-poor, stock assessment, Caribbean, fishery management, Gulf of Mexico
25
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
GAP ANALYSIS FOR THE APPLICATION OF ARTIFICIAL REEFS AS HABITAT
RESTORATION
ANÁLISIS DE LAS DEFICIENCIAS DE LA APLICACIÓN DE LOS ARRECIFES
ARTIFICIALES COMO LA RESTAURACIÓN DEL HÁBITAT
L'ANALYSE DES ÉCARTS POUR L'APPLICATION DE RÉCIFS ARTIFICIELS COMME LA
RESTAURATION DE L'HABITAT
KRISTOPHER BENSON
NOAA Restoration Center 4700 Ave. U Bldg. 307 Galveston, TX 77551 USA
[email protected]
26
ABSTRACT
Artificial reef construction is frequently promoted as a habitat restoration technique to benefit reef
fisheries, despite limited scientific understanding of such activities value for fisheries production or in
achieving habitat functions. The present analysis reviews gaps in existing literature and ongoing research
programs that limit consideration for artificial reef construction as a habitat restoration technique to well
understood applications benefiting human uses (diving, recreational fishing) or epifaunal communities
and associated cryptic fish species (e.g., blennies, gobies) living in these communities. Critical questions
in this context include whether artificial reefs serve to enhance production of aquatic species or merely
aggregate individuals from surrounding areas (“attraction vs. production”), thus making them more
susceptible to fishing mortality; and unknown impacts to stocks of commercially and recreationally
significant species on artificial reefs that are not managed for over-exploitation, regardless of whether the
reefs increase fish production or simply attract fish from other areas. Study is also needed to optimize
artificial reef design for specific ecosystem management goals, compare ecosystem service values (ESV)
provided by artificial reefs to ESV of pre-existing habitats, analyze siting to determine if hard bottom or
vertical structure is a limiting factor for fish communities in certain areas where reefs may be placed, and
assess the functional development of artificial structures over time (or whether „full function‟ of an
artificial reef as a fair facsimile of a natural reef is ever achieved with certain construction materials and
designs).
KEYWORDS: Artificial reef, habitat, restoration, reef fish, productivity
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
QUEEN CONCH AGGREGATION DEMOGRAPHICS AND HABITAT ASSOCIATIONS NEAR
PORT EVERGLADES INLET, FL
QUEEN CONCH AGREGACIÓN DE DATOS DEMOGRÁFICOS Y LAS ASOCIACIONES DE
HÁBITAT CERCA DE PUERTO DE ENTRADA EVERGLADES, FL
LAMBIS AGRÉGATION DÉMOGRAPHIE ET LES ASSOCIATIONS D'HABITAT PRÈS DE
L'ENTRÉE DE PORT EVERGLADES, FLORIDE
CHARLOTTE A. BERRY1, BRIAN K. WALKER1, and RONALD L. HILL2
Nova Southeastern University Oceanographic Cente 8000 North Ocean Drive Dania Beach, Florida
33004 United States [email protected]
2
NOAA/NMFS Southeast Fisheries Science Center 4700 Avenue U Galveston Texas 77551 United States
1
ABSTRACT
The queen conch (Strombus gigas) is a large gastropod found throughout the Caribbean including Florida.
Overfishing and habitat loss have led to a Caribbean-wide decline resulting in regional protections. On
Florida‟s east coast aggregations of conch were previously reported just south of a major shipping port
near Ft. Lauderdale, an unusually high latitude for the species. This study was designed to investigate the
spatial extent and population demographics of the aggregation. In summer 2012, broad scale population
surveys were conducted to document benthic cover and conch distribution and size data along 72 random
transects stratified across four habitats within 2 km north and south of the inlet. Younger conch were
found throughout the study area, but mostly in the colonized pavement west (CPW) while old conch were
exclusively at one CPW site south of the inlet. Significantly more conch were found on the CPW south
habitat than any other. Benthic cover data analyses suggests that CPW south may have a unique
community composition dominated by macroalgae and sand. In summer 2013, the CPW south habitat was
surveyed using cross-shelf transects measuring conch extent and demographics. Five hundred and twenty
five conch were found resulting in a density of 495 per hectare. Confirmed mating sightings, females with
eggs, and solitary egg masses were found indicating mating in this nearshore habitat is successful. Future
research should include expanded broader-scale surveys to determine if other aggregations exist and
monitoring to examine the effects of environmental change on this vulnerable species.
KEYWORDS: conch, queen, demographics, Florida, habitat
27
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
AN ANALYSIS OF SPINY LOBSTER MOVEMENT PATTERNS: A COMPARISON OF TWO
SUB-POPULATIONS RESIDING NORTH AND SOUTH OF THE FLORIDA KEYS, FLORIDA,
USA
UN ANÁLISIS DE LOS PATRONES DE MOVIMIENTO DE LA LANGOSTA ESPINOSA: UNA
COMPARACIÓN DE DOS SUBPOBLACIONES QUE RESIDEN AL NORTE Y AL SUR DE
LOS CAYOS DE FLORIDA, FLORIDA, USA
UNE ANALYSE DES HABITUDES DE DÉPLACEMENT DE LA LANGOUSTE: UNE
COMPARAISON DES DEUX SOUS-POPULATIONS RÉSIDANT AU NORD ET AU SUD DE LA
FLORIDA KEYS, EN FLORIDE, USA
RODNEY BERTELSEN and TOM MATTHEWS
Florida Fish and Wildlife Consev Comm 2796 Overseas Hwy Suite 119 Marathon, FL 33050 USA
[email protected]
28
ABSTRACT
Using acoustic monitoring technology, we tracked the movements of adult and sub-adult lobsters in two
distinct habitats. The first area is the Western Sambo Ecological Reserve (WSER) south of the Florida
Keys which contains numerous coral and rocky outcrops providing numerous natural shelters. Tagging
studies occurred during the summer between 2003 and 2007 using a total of 143 tags. The second area is
in the Gulf of Mexico north of the Florida Keys. The tagging study occurred during the summer of 2011
using a total of 31 tags. This area is relatively shelter poor but also contains numerous artificial shelters
(casitas) used to concentrate lobsters for fishing. In both areas we deployed arrays of acoustic receivers to
track lobsters fitted with acoustic transmitters. Although technical difficulties reduced the effectiveness of
the tracking array in the Gulf of Mexico, we found that some overall daily movement patterns were
similar in both areas. The daily probability of a spiny lobster shifting its location greater than 300 m was
9% in the Gulf and 10% for similar sized lobsters in WSER. Movement patterns were markedly different.
All Gulf of Mexico lobsters moved to the west (between 225 and 295 degrees) whereas in WSER,
movements could occur in any direction.
KEYWORDS: spiny, lobster, Florida, acoustic, movement
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
PROJETO MEROS DO BRASIL PHOTO-ID: FIRST INSIGHTS OF GOLIATH GROUPER
(EPINEPHELUS ITAJARA, EPINEPHELIDAE) POPULATION AND MOVEMENTS AT
FERNANDO DE NORONHA NATIONAL MARINE PARK.
PROJETO MEROS DO BRASIL FOTO-ID: PRIMERAS IDEAS DE POBLACIÓN Y
MOVIMIENTOS DEL MERO GUASA (EPINEPHELUS ITAJARA, EPINEPHELIDAE) EN EL
PARQUE NACIONAL MARINO FERNANDO DE NORONHA.
PROJETO MEROS DO BRASIL PHOTO-ID: LES PREMIERS APERÇUS DE POPULATION
ET DES MOUVEMENTS DU MÉROU (EPINEPHELUS ITAJARA, EPINEPHELIDAE) AU
PARC NATIONAL MARINE FERNANDO DE NORONHA
ÁTHILA BERTONCINI1, VINÍCIUS GIGLIO2, JOHNATAS ALVES2, and BEATRICE FERREIRA3
Universidade Federal Fluminense Instituto Meros do Brasil Travessa Santa Rosa do Viterbo, 32 apto.
602 Niterói, RJ 24241-030 Brazil [email protected]
2
Universidade Estadual de Santa CruzPrograma de Pós-Graduação em Ecologia e Conservação da
Biodiversi Ilhéus BA Brazil
3
Universidade Federal de PernambucoDepartamento de Oceanografia Recife PE Brazil
1
ABSTRACT
Photo-identification (photo-iD) is a widely utilized approach on a variety of marine species including
marine mammals, sea turtles and cartilaginous fish, providing a single non-invasive mark-recapture
technique, which is critical for threatened species such as the goliath grouper (GG), Epinephelus itajara.
Photographic records came from the Participative Survey Program of Projeto Meros do Brasil and from
photo/video companies. Recognition of individual animals, used natural marks, mainly spots over the
head of the GG. The free computer-aided photo-identification I3S was used, although some manual
inspection of the photo database was needed. The offshore archipelago of Fernando de Noronha (National
Marine Park), located 186nm off northeastern Brazil (03°50′ S, 32°25′ W), provided the most important
data that allowed long time analyses, betweenApril 2004 and May 2013, where six different GG were
registered in 84 different days. Results showed that GG were observed at 11 different dive sites. From
April 2004 to November 2006, four different GG were in the area, disappearing in the following years,
where the fifth specimen was observed from December 2007 to January 2012, being then replaced by the
sixth specimen in October 2012, registered for the last time in May 2013. Caverna da Sapata and Ilha do
Meio where the most visited places by the fifth specimen along 49 months, which also migrated distances
of 11km within at least 4 days, between these sites. The Project intends to start a telemetry tagging study
to refine the information on a well-known spawning area in south Brazil.
KEYWORDS: fish behavior, endangered species, mark-recapture, grouper, South Atlantic
29
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
WORKING TOWARDS A CODE FOR SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES WITH THE CONSET BAY
FISHING COMMUNITY IN BARBADOS
TRABAJANDO EN PRO DE UN CÓDIGO PARA LA PESCA RESPONSIBLE CON LA
COMUNIDAD PESQUERA DE CONSET BAY EN BARBADOS
VERS UN CODE POUR LA PÊCHERIE DURABLE AVEC LA COMMUNAUTÉ DE PÊCHE DE
CONSET BAY À LA BARBADE
KATHERINE BLACKMAN1, NEETHA SELLIAH1, TRAVIS SINCKLER2, PATRICK MCCONNEY1,
DONNA KING-BRATHWAITE2, and SHELLY-ANN COX1
1
Centre for Resource Management and Environmental The University of the West Indies, Cave Hill
Campus St. Michael , BB11000 Barbados [email protected]
2
Policy Research, Planning and Information Unit,Ministry of Environment and Drainage, 1st Floor S.P.
Musson Building Hinks Street Bridgetown BB11144 Barbados
30
ABSTRACT
Sustainable fisheries are fundamental to livelihoods in the coastal fishing community of Conset Bay.
Fishing is part of the cultural maritime heritage of the area. Acknowledging the importance of fisheries,
and the need for a collaborative approach in which fisheries stakeholders and the wider community play
active roles in sustainable fisheries management, a code for promoting sustainable fisheries at Conset Bay
was formulated. The local sustainable fisheries code was a component of the project “Up-scaling
Sustainable Resource Management in Coastal Watershed Communities of Barbados‟ National Park and
System of Open Spaces”. It was collaborative effort by the Government of Barbados, United Nations
Environment Programme and The University of the West Indies. The development of the Code was
participatory. The contents of the Code were developed through collectively reviewing the FAO Code of
Conduct for Responsible Fisheries (CCRF) and documents related to small-scale fisheries. A video was
produced in which fisherfolk inform the wider community of the importance of adhering to the CCRF.
Semi-structured interviews were done and discussions were held with the Conset Bay advocacy group, a
core group of interested fisherfolk, to decide upon the key principles of the Code. At the end of the
participatory process, nine principles emerged which were fully supported by fisheries stakeholders. A
poster was created and plans have been made for promoting uptake by the wider community. This
experience of learning-by-doing to build capacity and stewardship in a fishing community contains
lessons for future participatory processes and approaches to scaling up the Code.
KEYWORDS: Conset Bay, fisheries code, fisherfolk, sustainable, Barbados
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
APORTES DE COLOMBIA A LOS ESFUERZOS REGIONALES DE LOS PAÍSES DEL GRAN
CARIBE PARA EL CONTROL DEL PEZ LEÓN
COLOMBIA'S CONTRIBUTIONS TO REGIONAL EFFORTS THE COUNTRIES WIDER
CARIBBEAN FOR THE LION FISH CONTRO
CONTRIBUTIONS DE LA COLOMBIE AUX EFFORTS RÉGIONALE DES PAYS DES
CARAÏBES POUR LE CONTRÔLE DU POISSON-LION
NACOR BOLAÑOS1, ANA MARIA GONZALEZ2, DURCEY STEPHENS1, y ELIZABETH TAYLOR
JAY2
1
CORALINA Corporation for the Sustainable Develop San Luis km 26 Via San Luis San Andres Island,
Archipelago COLOMBIA [email protected]
2
Ministerio de Ambiente y Desarrollo Sostenible 3CORALINA Corporation for the Sustainable
Development of the Archipelago of San Andres, Providenc
RESUMEN
Desde la aparición del pez león en América y su rápida dispersión por el Caribe, varios países han
realizado esfuerzos por controlar esta especie invasora. En Colombia se observó por primera vez en
diciembre de 2008 y desde ese momento varias autoridades ambientales, e instituciones de control e
investigación lideradas por el Ministerio de Ambiente y Desarrollo Sostenible MADS, CORALINA,
INVEMAR, Parques Nacionales y la secretaria de Agricultura y Pesca del Departamento Archipiélago,
con portes de las Universidades, iniciaron acciones de educación, investigación, control y manejo. Los
aportes internacionales recibidos en el marco del primer “Taller de Estrategia Regional para la atención
del Pez león” llevado a cabo en Cancún, México en 2010 con representantes de 20 países y por el taller de
formación de formadores, en captura, manejo y disposición de pez león llevado a cabo en Bahamas 2012
con representantes de 9 países, brindaron información valiosa para la formulación de un plan nacional
denominado “PLAN PARA EL MANEJO Y CONTROL DEL PEZ LEÓN Pterois volitans EN EL
CARIBE COLOMBIANO” y posteriormente en la formulación del “PROTOCOLO PARA LA
CAPTURA, EXTRACCIÓN Y DISPOSICIÓN FINAL DEL PEZ LEÓN, EN COLOMBIA” que incluye
el tema del consumo como estrategia de control, algo que en el Colombia tiene el apoyo del Gobierno
Nacional y requirió soportes técnicos y legales para su adopción, la cual se llevó a cabo mediante la
Resolución No. 0675 de 20 de junio de 2013 del MADS. Hoy se continua trabajando con las autoridades
ambientales de todo el país en el control de esta especie y en la capacitación sobre los protocolos de
monitoreo que se vienen promoviendo en todo el Caribe
PALABRAS CLAVES: Pez leon, invasion, control, manejo, consumo
31
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
PESQUERÍAS ARTESANALES DEL PARQUE MARINO ISLAS DE LA BAHÍA EN
HONDURAS: IMPORTANCIA SOCIOECONÓMICA Y PARTICIPACIÓN COMUNITARIA EN
EL MANEJO DE LOS RECURSOS MARINOS
ARTISANAL FISHERIES OF THE BAY ISLANDS IN HONDURAS: SOCIOECONOMIC
IMPORTANCE AND COMMUNITY PARTICIPATION IN MARINE RESOURCE
MANAGEMENT
LES PÊCHERIES ARTISANALES DES ISLAS DE LA BAHÍA AU HONDURAS:
L'IMPORTANCE SOCIO-ÉCONOMIQUE ET LA PARTICIPATION COMMUNAUTAIRE À
LA GESTION DES RESSOURCES MARINES
SARA BONILLA1 y STEPHEN BOX2
1
Centro de Ecologia Marina Edificio Florencia Oficina 401-403 Tegucigalpa, FCO Honduras
[email protected]
2
Smithsonian Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce, 701 Seaway Drive, Fort Pierce, Florida 34949
Fort Pierce Florida USA
32
RESUMEN
El manejo del Parque Marino Islas de la Bahía en Honduras se caracteriza por la baja participación de los
grupos locales, principalmente de los pescadores. Con el fin de promover la participación de los
pescadores en la gestión de los recursos marinos y diseñar un programa de manejo que les facilite
conocimientos y herramientas para que sean capaces de liderar acciones de manejo en sus áreas, se realizó
una caracterización social y económica de los pescadores de tres comunidades del Parque. El propósito
del estudio fue comprender el contexto socioeconómico de los pescadores y entender como éste influye
en sus percepciones y preferencias de manejo. Para la caracterización se desarrolló una encuesta
socioeconómica, mediante la cual se recopiló información de 80 pescadores en total. Los resultados de las
encuestas reflejan que el aprovechamiento de los recursos marinos cambia dependiendo de la importancia
socioeconómica que tiene la pesca para cada hogar. En las comunidades en donde la mayoría de los
hogares dependen económicamente de la pesca (>75% del ingreso del hogar proviene de la pesca), los
pescadores se dedican a esta actividad a tiempo completo, tienen un fuerte vínculo con los ecosistemas
marinos y muestran una mejor actitud hacia el manejo y conservación de los mismos. Por otro lado, las
comunidades en las cuales los hogares tienen acceso a otras fuentes de ingreso, los pescadores solo
pescan algunos meses del año, utilizan artes de pesca más dañinas y no respetan las restricciones
establecidas. Los diferentes comportamientos de los pescadores de estas comunidades resaltan la
importancia de diseñar e implementar programas de manejo que reconozcan las condiciones
socioeconómicas de las comunidades, sus percepciones y preferencias de manejo.
PALABRAS CLAVES: Manejo costero, pesquerías artesanales, contexto socioeconómico, manejo
participativo, gobernanza marina
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
INFLUENCE OF STRUCTURAL COMPLEXITY ON THE BIOMASS OF THE FISH
COMMUNITY IN SEVEN ARTIFICIAL REEFS CAMPECHE BANK, MEXICO
INFLUENCIA DE LA COMPLEJIDAD ESTRUCTURAL SOBRE LA BIOMASA DE LA
COMUNIDAD ÍCTICA EN SIETE ARRECIFES ARTIFICIALES DEL BANCO DE
CAMPECHE, MÉXICO
INFLUENCE DE LA COMPLEXITÉ STRUCTURELLE DE LA BIOMASSE DE LA
COMMUNAUTÉ DE POISSONS DANS SEPT RÉCIFS ARTIFICIELS CAMPECHE BANK, AU
MEXIQUE
JOSE MANUEL BORGES SOUZA1, E ZAVALA2, JORGE BENITEZ3, ERNESTO CHAVEZ ORTIZ1
and ALEJANDRA CHAVEZ HIDALGO1
1
IPN-CICIMAR Av. Ipn S/N La Paz , BCS 23096 Mexico [email protected]
2Pemex Ciudad Del Carmen Campeche Mexico
3UNACAR Ciudad Del Carmen Campeche México
ABSTRACT
Artificial reefs are structures deposited on the seabed in order to create new habitat for flora and fauna,
the composition and structure of the fish community is positively influenced by the complexity of
artificial habitat. Structural complexity was determined seven artificial reefs and estimated biomass of
fish communities that inhabit them. Structures was observed that more structurally complex surface
showed better development of benthic flora and fauna (The Barcaza and The Huichol), the results indicate
that the structures capable of supporting a high biomass and are essentially different the Barcaza and the
Huichol. Biomass was estimate by the 23 most abundant species of fish in the 7 studied artificial reefs.
Site having the maximum value of biomass is the barge (285 g/m2). Santana I and biomass present the
Huichol intermediate (183 and 163 g/m2, respectively), the barge Santana III and V, II and III, exhibit
lower biomass (Figure 62). The species Lutjanus griseus, Megalops atlanticus, Selene vomer, Lutjanus
jocu and Chaetodipterus faber, is contributing 80% of total biomass. The fishery important species are
composed of the families Carangidae, Ephippidae and Haemulidae are the most important and abundant
in most of the reefs studied, the rest of the families are represented by 10 species in which stand out for
their market value appreciated Lutjanidae andCarangidae.
KEYWORDS: Artificial reef, Fish community, Biomass, Habitat Structure, Mexico
33
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
LOBSTER ARTIFICIAL SHELTERS: FINANCIAL ALTERNATIVES FOR RESPONSIBLE
MANAGING OF FISHING AREAS, PILOT PROJECT IN PUNTA GORDA AND GUANAJA,
BAY ISLANDS, HONDURAS
REFUGIOS ARTIFICIALES: ALTERNATIVAS ECONÓMICAS PARA MANEJAR ÁREAS DE
PESCA RESPONSABLE, PROYECTO PILOTO EN PUNTA GORDA Y GUANAJA, ISLAS DE
LA BAHÍA, HONDURAS
REFUGES ARTIFICIELS DE LANGOUSTE: ALTERNATIVES ÉCONOMIQUES POUR LA
GESTION RESPONSABLE DE ZONES DE PÊCHE, PROJET PILOTE À PUNTA GORDA ET
GUANAJA, ÎLES DE LA BAIE, HONDURAS
STEPHEN BOX1 and MARIELA OCHOA2
Program Coordinator Spatial Ecology of Marine Pr 701 Seaway Drive Fort Pierce Florida 34949 ,
[email protected]
2
Especialista en Pesquerias Comunitarias, Centro de Ecologia Marina Colonia el Naranjal, Edificio del
CREDIA. La Ceiba, Atlantida, Honduras
1
34
ABSTRACT
In 2010, the National Marine Park of the Bay Islands was created with an area of 16,000 hectares. This
park has extensive live corals coverage: a natural breeding area for a great variety of marine organisms. It
is an evidence for local fishermen, that there is a need in this park to create, define and delimit areas
which are essential for the protection and the conservation of fisheries resources. Artisanal fishermen of
Guanaja and Punta Gorda face different challenges in their livelihood, consequently they have expressed
interest in learning about the functioning of the Cuban Casitas (lobster shadows), which are artificial
shelters that enable sustainable fishing of spiny lobster and the improvement of their economy. According
to research already conducted in the region of the Mesoamerican Reef, this artificial shelter initiative
should consider three factors -biological, ecological and social- before its application. This knowledge
will ensure the success or failure of the project. The fishermen of Punta Gorda and Guanaja communities
consider that the first step is to be legally registered into an association of Artisanal Fishermen, in order to
participate in the management and get better benefits of productive projects. Another important factor that
fishermen consider essential is the declaration of a pilot area as an exclusive fishing area, managed by
members of Fishermen's Associations. Besides, they recognize the importance of establishing criteria to
make an equitable distribution of benefits within the association, developing regulations and marketing
the product under the guidance of responsible seafood consumption.
KEYWORDS: Management, Fishermen, Associations, economy, resources
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
MODELING THE ECONOMIC BENEFITS OF APPLYING NEW SPATIAL MANAGEMENT
AND TRACEABILITY TOOLS TO A LOW GOVERNANCE FISHERY
DESARROLLO DE MODELOS PARA CAPTAR BENEFICIOS ECONÓMICOS EN UNA
PESQUERÍA CON BAJA GOBERNABILIDAD, A TRAVÉS DEL USO DE NUEVAS
HERRAMIENTAS DE MANEJO ESPACIAL Y TRAZABILIDADLES
AVANTAGES ÉCONOMIQUES DE L'APPLICATION DE NOUVEAUX OUTILS POUR LA
GESTION DE L'ESPACE ET DE LA TRAÇABILITÉ DANS UNE PÊCHERIE DE
GOUVERNANCE FAIBLE
STEPHEN BOX1, PABLO CUARON DE GARAY2, and ILIANA CHOLLETT3
1Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History Smithsonian Marine Station 701 Seaway Drive Fort
Pierce, Fl 34949 USA [email protected]
2Haas School of BusinessUC Berkeley USA
3Marine Spatial Ecology LabsUniversity of Exeter Exeter UK
ABSTRACT
Ensuring the sustainable use of wild caught fisheries is a global priority in the 21st century. Effective
marine management however comes with an associated cost that many developing nations cannot afford
directly. Development banks and non-governmental organizations have frequently picked up the bill for
helping to improve fisheries management. These interventions are often framed in the context of
biodiversity conservation, such as protecting corals reefs in areas where fishing is a principal threat. This
approach however is vulnerable to cycles in conservation vogue and ultimately limited by the availability
of philanthropic funding. Here we use the Spiny Lobster fishery in Honduras as an example of how some
newly developed management tools, including real time analysis of vessel monitoring systems and the
implementation of traceability schemes, can have economic, social and ecological benefits for the fishery.
We then frame this in the context of an economic model that recasts the improvement of a struggling
fishery as a potential investment opportunity. Parameterized with historic catch data and fishing costs
collated from the existing fishery and using projections for changes in catches and costs, including those
of implementing the management toolbox, we show that restructuring the fishery and improving
compliance provides not only better returns for the members of the fishery, but also returns to external
investors who pay for the reform. This model can demonstrate to stakeholders the potential benefits of
change whilst at the same time showing impact investors that there is a viable investment opportunity to
improve struggling fisheries.
KEYWORDS: Panulirus argus, Spiny Lobster, Triple Bottom Line, Central America
35
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
MODELLING POPULATION DYNAMICS OF CARIBBEAN PARROTFISH
MODELAR LA DINAMICA DE POBLACIONES DE LOS PECES LORO EN EL CARIBE
MODÉLISER LA DYNAMIQUE DES POPULATIONS DES POISSONS PERROQUETS DANS
LES CARAÏBES
YVES-MARIE BOZEC1, CAROLINE BAILLE1, SHAY O'FARRELL2, JULES M. VAN ROOIJ3,
BRIAN E. LUCKHURST4, and PETER J. MUMBY1
1
School of Biological Sciences, University of Que College of Life Sciences, University of Exeter St. Lucia,
Qld 4072, Australia Exeter, EX4 4PS, UK , [email protected]
2
Global change Institute, University of Queensland St. Lucia Qld 4072, Australia
3
University of Groningen Groningen 9747 AA, The Netherlands
4
Marine Resources Division, Department of Environmental Protection P.O. Box CR 52, Crawl CRBX,
Bermuda
36
ABSTRACT
Parrotfish (family: Scaridae) are the dominant herbivores and a major source of ecological resilience on
today's Caribbean reefs. Parrotfish help maintain macroalgae at low levels, thus facilitating coral growth
and recruitment. Unfortunately, parrotfish populations have been depleted in some places by intense trap
fishing and the progressive shift of Caribbean fisheries towards low trophic level species. As a result,
there are growing concerns about the maintenance of functional levels of herbivory on Caribbean reefs
which are also facing a rapidly changing climate. This calls for increased knowledge for effective
management of parrotfish populations. Here we present a demographic model of the stoplight parrotfish
(Sparisoma viride) for exploring the effects of fishing and determining sustainable catch levels of the
species. The model is structured by size and habitat (shallow/deep) and was calibrated using life-history
data and time-series of fish abundances in Bonaire and Bermuda. Model performance and limitations are
presented as a first step towards the development of a robust modelling tool for user-specified
management strategies. In particular, the model was used to assess the response of the stoplight parrotfish
to different catches rate, with particular focus on population size distribution. The model can also be used
to explore the rate of recovery for different scenarios of reduced fishing mortality rates. Restoring and
protecting parrotfish population is likely to mitigate the negative effects of climate change-induced
disturbances on corals, therefore we stress that effective management for functional herbivory is key for
the maintenance of coral reef resilience in the Caribbean.
KEYWORDS: Sparisoma viride, demographic model, growth transition, density-dependence, fisheries
management
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
ANÁLISIS DE OPINIÓN DE PESCADORES DE PEPINO DE MAR SOBRE LAS
REGULACIONES DE PESCA ESTABLECIDAS EN LAS COSTAS DE YUCATÁN MÉXICO
ANALYSIS OF FISHERMEN OPINION ON SEA CUCUMBER FISHING REGULATIONS
ESTABLISHED ON THE COAST OF YUCATAN MEXICO
ANALYSE DE L'OPINION DES PÊCHEURS DE BECHE DE MER SUR LES REGULACION
DE PÊCHE ÉTABLIS SUR LA CÔTE DU YUCATAN AU MEXIQUE
MARA BRAVO-REYES, ARMIN TUZ-SULUB, y ALFONSO AGUILAR-PERERA
Universidad Autonoma de Yucatan Carretera Mérida - Xmatkuil Km. 15.5 Mérida , Yucatán 97315
México [email protected]
RESUMEN
Pese a la implementación de acciones para desarrollar en la Península de Yucatán una pesquería de
pepino de mar sustentable, a poco más de diez años de haber surgido el interés por la extracción y
comercialización de este recurso, la preocupación por el agotamiento de las poblaciones y los conflictos
sociales surgidos en torno a su pesca han ido en aumento. Este estudio registra a través de entrevistas
semi-estructuradas y cuestionarios, las perspectivas y actitudes de pescadores regularizados sobre las
estrategias de manejo establecidas en los primeros años de pesca. Se observa una inconformidad respecto
a la forma en que la autoridad ha aplicado las regulaciones y acciones de ordenamiento. En general se
percibe que las regulaciones y sanciones por su incumplimiento se aplican solo a pescadores con permiso
de pesca, limitado sus ganancias y favoreciendo a quienes pescan de manera ilegal. Esto y la percepción
de que la autoridad no sanciona a quienes pescan de manera ilegal, ha causado que tanto pescadores
ilegales como regularizados desarrollen en la práctica una pesca que asemeja más una pesca de acceso
abierto que una pesca de fomento. Se concluye que para que se pueda lograr una pesca comercial
sustentable es necesario mejorar el entendimiento entre las autoridades involucradas y pescadores, así
como incentivar adecuadamente las prácticas de pesca sostenible. Nota: se desea someter este trabajo al
concurso de GCFI Premio para Estudiante más Destacados por Logro Académico
PALABRAS CLAVES: pepino de mar, Pesquería, perspectivas , manejo, Yucatán
37
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
FISHERMEN LEARNING EXCHANGES FOR CONSERVATION: AN EXAMINATION OF
LESSONS LEARNED
INTERCAMBIOS DE PESCADORES PARA LA CONSERVACIÓN: UN ANÁLISIS DE
LECCIONES APRENDIDOS
ÉCHANGES D’APPRENTISSAGE DES PÊCHEURS POUR LA CONSERVATION: UNE
ANALYSE DES LEÇONS APPRISES
FERNANDO BRETOS1, WILLIAM HEYMAN2, LEKELIA JENKINS3, and SHERWOOD H.
PECKHAM4
1
The Ocean Foundation 311 NE 86th Street El Portal, FL 33138 USA [email protected]
2
Texas A&M University CSA 205D MS 3147 College Station TX 77843 USA
3
University of WashingtonSchool of Marine and Environmental Affairs 3707 Brooklyn Avenue, NE Seattle
WA 98105 USA
4
Smartfish Madero 2895 La Paz La Paz Baja California Sur Mexico
38
ABSTRACT
Fisher learning exchanges, in which representatives from different fisher communities are brought
together to share knowledge have emerged as a key tool for improving fisheries management globally.
Organized by fishermen, NGOs and governments to share fisheries challenges and solutions, they are
widely considered to be highly effective. Despite this perception and considerable investment in
producing fisher-learning exchanges, their effectiveness has not been assessed. In order to develop better
understanding of the values and effectiveness and a protocol do so, a National Science Foundation funded
workshop was held atthe National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center (SESYNC) entitled Fisher
Learning Exchanges for Conservation: An Examination of Lessons Learned (FLExCELL) in May 2014.
The workshop brought together fishers, NGOs, government managers, and academics in order to share
their lessons learned for how to best produce fisher learning exchanges, focusing on what has worked best
and what can be done to optimize future exchanges. It became the first ever large-scale analysis of how
best to design and produce fisher-learning exchanges in order to improve fisheries management. This
presentation will share the outcomes of this workshop and present the path forward to enhancing this
widely accepted tool for addressing overfishing and other conservation outcomes.
KEYWORDS: Fisher's exchange, FEK, Learning exchanges
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
ASPECTS OF THE REPRODUCTIVE BIOLOGY OF YELLOWFIN TUNA, THUNNUS
ALBACARES, IN THE NORTHERN GULF OF MEXICO
ASPECTOS DE LA BIOLOGÍA REPRODUCTIVA DEL ATÚN ALETA AMARILLA,
THUNNUS ALBACARES, EN EL GOLFO DE MÉXICO NORTE
ASPECTS DE LA BIOLOGIE DE LA REPRODUCTION DU ALBACORE À NAGEOIRES
JUANES, THUNNUS ALBACARES, DANS LE NORD DU GOLFE DU MEXIQUE
NANCY J. BROWN-PETERSON1, JAMES S. FRANKS2 and GIBSON DYAN2
University of Southern Mississippi Dept. Coastal Sciences 703 East Beach Dr Ocean Springs, MS 39564
USA [email protected]
2
Center for Research and Development Gulf Coast Research Laboratory University of Southern
Mississippis 703 East Beach Dr. Ocean Springs MS 39564 USA
1
ABSTRACT
Yellowfin Tuna, Thunnus albacares, support commercial and recreational fisheries in the northern Gulf of
Mexico (GOM). Recreational anglers and commercial longline fishers target Yellowfin Tuna year-round,
but primarily during summer months (May – September). Despite the abundance of the species in the
region, little is known regarding their reproductive biology in the northern GOM. Samples of opportunity
were collected from 2000 – 2011, predominately at summer fishing tournaments, while monthly sampling
began in summer 2012. Preliminary analysis of data from 100 females and 89 males suggests gonadal
recrudescence begins in some females as early as February, while active spermatogenesis occurred in all
males captured in February (n=12). Actively spawning females (containing hydrated oocytes or those
undergoing oocyte maturation) were found from May through September, although some females were no
longer spawning capable in August and September. All males captured were actively spawning
(spermatozoa in ducts) from May – September. Spawning frequency of females during the May –
September spawning season is estimated to be every 1.45 days. However, no actively spawning females
were found with 24 h postovulatory follicles, suggesting most Yellowfin Tuna do not spawn on a daily
basis.
KEYWORDS: Yellowfin Tuna, reproductive biology, Scombridae, Gulf of Mexico, spawning
39
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
THE REGIONAL STRATEGIC ANALYSIS: A TOOL FOR PLANNING AND ZONING
MARINE PROTECTED AREAS
EL ANÁLISIS ESTRATÉGICO REGIONAL: UNA HERRAMIENTA PARA FACILITAR LA
PLANIFICACIÓN DE LAS ÁREAS MARINAS PROTEGIDAS
L'ANALYSE STRATÉGIQUE RÉGIONALE, UN OUTIL D'AIDE À LA PLANIFICATION DES
AIRES MARINES PROTÉGÉES
SOPHIE BRUGNEAUX and NEIL ALLONCLE
Agence des Aires Marines protégées Quai des douanes Brest, 29200 France [email protected]
40
ABSTRACT
The French Marine protected Areas Agency has been undertaking for several years Regional Strategic
Analyses in each French marine region in order to propose strategies for the planning, zoning and
management of marine protected areas adapted to each territory. Recent analyses were carried out in
French territories in the Caribbean (Martinique, Guadeloupe, French Guyana). Regional Analyses proceed
in successive steps. The first stage consists in getting a comprehensive overview of existing knowledge
on the marine area that is spatially localized and of relevance for the study. All existing and available
information (data, expert opinions) is centralized and interpreted in order to identify key elements in
terms of ecological functionalities, remarkable ecological features and cultural heritage, human activities
and pressures that apply on the considered marine area. A GIS database is established that contains all the
gathered elements and synthetic maps are produced. The second stage involves crossing of synthetic
information in order to identify and spatially localize the different stakes observed. Areas concerned by
common stakes can be delineated and the stakes themselves can be ranked inside each homogeneous area.
This step requires particular close consultation and collaboration with the decision-makers and all
stakeholders. Finally, strategic proposals with regard to the design or management of MPAs, management
and protection of marine environment in general and acquisition of knowledge, and tailored to the specific
needs of the territory concerned emerge collectively. We will aim to present the methodology used in
Strategic Regional Analyses and their results on the basis of examples of studies carried out at different
scales.
KEYWORDS: MPA, MPA design, stakes, consultation, planification
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
ESTRATEGIA REPRODUCTIVA DE ALGUNAS ESPECIES DE MEROS DEL GOLFO DE
MÉXICO: IMPLICACIÓN PARA UN MANEJO ADECUADO DE LA PESQUERÍA DE MERO
EN LA PENÍNSULA DE YUCATÁN, MÉXICO
REPRODUCTIVE STRATEGY OF SOME GROUPER SPECIES FROM THE GULF OF
MEXICO: IMPLICATION FOR ADEQUATE MANAGEMENT OF THE GROUPER FISHERY
FROM THE YUCATAN PENINSULA, MEXICO
STRATÉGIE DE REPRODUCTION DE QUELQUES MÉROUS DU GOLFE DU MEXIQUE :
IMPLICATION POUR UN AMÉNAGEMENT ADÉQUAT DE LA PÊCHERIE DE MÉROU DE
LA PÉNINSULE DU YUCATAN, MEXIQUE
THIERRY BRULÉ, DORALICE CABALLERO-ARANGO, ARMIN TUZ-SULUB, XIMENA RENÁN
y TERESA COLÁS-MARRUFO
CINVESTAV IPN Departamento de Recursos del Mar U Antigua carretera a Progreso KM.6, A.P. 73
Cordemex Mérida, Yucatán 97310 México [email protected]
RESUMEN
En el sureste del Golfo de México, 21 especies de mero constituyen uno de los principales recursos
pesqueros de la plataforma continental de la Península de Yucatán (Banco de Campeche). Debido a la
explotación excesiva de estas especies ocurrida durante las últimas décadas, fue necesario imponer a la
pesquería de mero de esta región una veda estacional permanente (15 de febrero-15 de marzo) a partir de
2007 y una talla mínima de captura (36.3 cm de longitud total) a partir de 2010. Sin embargo estas
medidas de manejo pesquero fueron establecidas únicamente con base a la biología reproductiva de la
especie más abundante en las capturas (Epinephelus morio), sin considerar el aspecto multiespecífico del
recurso. En el presente estudio se analiza la estrategia reproductiva (sexualidad, ciclo reproductivo, tallas
de primera madurez y de inversión sexual y comportamiento reproductivo) de las seis principales especies
de mero (Epinephelus guttatus, E. morio, Mycteroperca bonaci, M. microlepis, M. tigris y M. venenosa)
explotadas en el Banco de Campeche. Los resultados obtenidos ponen en evidencia similitudes, pero
también diferencias en la ecología y la biología reproductiva de estos meros. En particular, las variaciones
observadas se relacionan con: la época y zona de desove, talla de primera madurez y conducta
reproductiva de las especies, las cuales deberían ser consideradas para adecuar la legislación pesquera
vigente, con el fin de fomentar una pesca responsable del recurso mero del Banco de Campeche.
PALABRAS CLAVES: Biología reproductiva, Regulación pesquera, Epinephelidae, Banco de Campeche
41
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
WHEN DOES GOLIATH GROUPER, EPINEPHELUS ITAJARA (EPINEPHELIDAE)
AGGREGATES IN SOUTH BRAZIL?
CUÁNDO EL MERO GUASA, EPINEPHELUS ITAJARA (EPINEPHELIDAE) SE AGREGAN
EN EL SUR DE BRASIL?
QUAND EST-CE LE MÉROU, EPINEPHELUS ITAJARA (EPINEPHELIDAE) SE
RASSEMBLENT DANS LE SUD DU BRÉSIL?
LEONARDO BUENO1, ATHILA BERTONCINI1, CHRISTOPHER KOENIG2, FELICIA COLEMAN2,
JONAS LEITE1, MAURICIO HOSTIM-SILVA3 and MATHEUS FREITAS4
1
UFES Instituto Meros do Brasil 261, Sanito Rocha ap 1003 b Curitiba , PR 80050-380 Brazil
[email protected]
2
The Florida State University Coastal and Marine Laboratory 2The Florida State University Coastal and
Marine Laboratory Instituto Meros do Brasil 1Programa de Pós-Graduação em Oceanografia
Ambiental-UFES
3
Centro Universitário Norte do Espírito Santo-UFES Instituto Meros do Brasil Instituto Meros do Brasil,
4
Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ecologia-UFPR
42
ABSTRACT
Fishing for the critically endangered goliath grouper (GG) (Epinephelus itajara) has been prohibited in
Brazil since 2002. However, prohibition is likely to be lifted by 2015, despite efforts, information about
their distribution, abundance, or ecology is sparse and no data suggesting that populations have recovered
is available. In this study, we gather sightings-per-unit-effort (SPUE) data on three sites in southern
Brazil using scuba diving surveys and examine seasonal differences in size distribution and reproductive
condition of specimens collected by us or donated by law enforcement officers. Based on data were found
that the SPUE differed significantly with season (p < 0.05), increasing in late spring to become highest
during the summer months. All females sampled during the summer were considered reproductively
ready to spawn while all those sampled during other seasons were either regressing or dormant. What
these data strongly infer is that we have located goliath grouper spawning aggregation sites south the state
of Paraná and north of the state of Santa Catarina and identified summer as the most likely spawning
season. These data, together with size distribution, can help inform stock assessments and therefore the
management and conservation of this fish. Also the first step is to bring new questions and plan more
studies with GG in Brazil.
KEYWORDS: artificial reefs, spawning aggregations, reef fish, endangered species, South Atlantic
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
ENHANCING MANAGEMENT OF THE BAHAMAS SPINY LOBSTER FISHERY FOR THE
FUTURE
MEJORAR LA GESTIÓN DE LAS BAHAMAS LANGOSTA DE PESCA PARA EL FUTURO
AMÉLIORER LA GESTION DES BAHAMAS LANGOUSTE PÊCHES POUR L' AVENIR
FELICITY M. BURROWS1 and WENDY GOYERT2
The Nature Conservancy Northern Caribbean Program 6 Colonial Hill Plaza Thompson Boulevard
Nassau, CB11398 Bahamas [email protected]
2
Major Buyer InitiativeWorld Wildlife Fund 1250 24th Street NW Washington DC 20037 USA
1
ABSTRACT
The Bahamas has a productive spiny lobster (Panularis argus) fishery and is ranked the 5th largest
exporter of lobster tails globally. Though thefishery seems stable, sustainability concerns have been
ascertained, such as illegal harvesting of undersize lobsters and during the closed seasons. To improve
management and sustainability of the lobster fishery, The Bahamas Department of Marine Resources, The
Bahamas Marine Exporters Association, The Nature Conservancy, and conservation partners are working
with World Wildlife Fund (WWF) to implement a fishery improvement project (FIP) for the Bahamian
lobster fishery. The FIP aims to work with stakeholders to advance the fishery toward meeting the
Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) standard for sustainable fisheries while retaining a healthy
ecosystem. AnMSC pre-assessment was initially done that compared the current fishery status against the
MSC standard for sustainable fisheries and identified gaps where improvement is needed. FIP activities
include collecting fisheries dependent data; conducting outreach efforts; improving monitoring,
enforcement and management strategies and; performing a stock assessment. Currently, the Bahamas has
implemented a catch certificate program; a zero tolerance policy within the BMEA against the harvesting
and buying of illegal size lobsters; conducted both an Illegal, Unreported and Unregulated and lobster
stock assessments and; established a Government approved Spiny Lobster Working Group that will
advise the Government of effective strategies that can influence policy making and improved
management and governance. Results of the FIP will include improved documentation and management
of lobster stocks, sustained lobster populations and, good stewardship of the marine environment.
KEYWORDS: Management, fishery, FIP
43
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
AGE AND GROWTH CHARACTERISTICS OF LESSER KNOWN SPECIES OF REEF FISH
FROM THE SOUTHEASTERN UNITED STATES
CARACTERISTICAS DE LA EDAD Y EL CRECIMIENTO DE LAS ESPECIES MENOS
COMUNES DE PECES DE ARRECIFES DEL SURESTE DE ESTADOS UNIDOS
ÂGE ET LES CARACTÉRISTIQUES DE CROISSANCE DES ESPÈCES MOINS CONNU DE
POISSONS DE RÉCIF DU SUD-EST ÉTATS UNIS.
MICHAEL BURTON, DANIEL CARR, and JENNIFER POTTS
NOAA Fisheries SEFSC 101 Pivers Island Rd. Beaufort, NC 28516 USA [email protected]
44
ABSTRACT
Ageing studies of species that are abundant in recreational and commercial fisheries landings provide
valuable information about growth and age at maturity. In the southeastern U.S., the Southeast Data,
Assessment and Review (SEDAR) process is a driving mechanism behind which species are the subject
of ageing studies. Since SEDAR‟s inception in 2002, stock assessments have been completed or
scheduled for 20 reef fish species in the South Atlantic, 13 species in the Gulf of Mexico, and 11 species
in the U. S. Caribbean. Age-growth studies are time- and labor intensive, and stock assessment demands
limit the ability of staff to conduct studies on reef fishes that are less abundant in the landings. These
species may nonetheless be important for a variety of reasons (e.g., top predators in reef ecosystem,
indicators of ecosystem health, valuable trophy fish, and commercial value). Species which occur
infrequently in sampled catches require more time to accumulate sufficient biological samples to conduct
a proper ageing study. We attempt in this poster to offer a preliminary look at age-growth characteristics
of four less commonly occurring species of reef fishes: yellowmouth grouper (Mycteroperca
interstitialis), n=391; yellowfin grouper (Mycteroperca venenosa), n=277; warsaw grouper (Epinephelus
nigritus), n=188; and cubera snapper (Lutjanus cyanopterus), n=96. All fish were aged using sectioned
otoliths, and growth curves were generated using von Bertalanffy growth models. Information about
growth rates of less common species will be critical to the effective management of those species,
particularly as more common species come under increasing regulations and harvest restrictions.
KEYWORDS: Ageing, stock assessment, less common species
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
COMPARATIVE RESULTS OF THE FEEDING ECOLOGY OF INVASIVE LIONFISH
(PTEROIS VOLITANS/MILES: SCORPAENIDAE) IN CUBA: 2009-2013
RESULTADOS COMPARATIVOS DE LA ECOLOGÍA ALIMENTARIA DEL PEZ LEÓN
(PTEROIS VOLITANS/MILES: SCORPAENIDAE) EN CUBA: 2009-2013
RÉSULTATS COMPARATIVES DE LA ÉCOLOGIE ALIMENTAIRE DU POISSON LION
(PTEROIS VOLITANS/MILES: SCORPAENIDAE) À CUBA: 2009-2013
HANSEL CABALLERO
Acuario Nacional De Cuba 1ra y 60, Miramar Havana, Cuba [email protected]
ABSTRACT
In August 2007, the invasive lionfish (Pterois volitans and Pterois miles) was first sighted in Cuba, and in
less than two years was able to establish itself around the island. The invasive lionfish population in Cuba
was studied since its initial sightings, particularly their feeding ecology, which is the subject of this paper.
We present the results of 2117 stomach content analyses of lionfish captured in 5 different areas (48 sites
total) between the years 2009 and 2013. The captures were accomplished mostly in coral reef habitats,
with a minority in seagrass habitat. The stomach content of different size classes of fishes was identified
and quantified. Four analysis methods were used: frequency of occurrence, percent by volume, percent by
number and Index of Relative Importance (IRI). The results show the relation between sample sizes and
entities found. The 19,4% of the stomachs analyzed were empty. The specie did not show a preference
with respect to the feeding time, due to the high level of identifiable entities in the stomachs. We found
differences in stomach content among the different zones. The diet comprised, in order of preferred prey,
by: fish, crustaceans and mollusks. The most important fish families comprising the lionfish diet were
Pomacentridae, Labridae, Gobidae, Mullidae y Achanturidae. The most important crustaceans groups in
the lionfish diet were penneid shrimps and the order Mysidacea. Our results confirm that lionfish is a
generalist species.
KEYWORDS: lionfish, Cuba, invasive species
45
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
THE LAST OF THE AGGREGATIONS: VALIDATION OF AN EXTANT GROUPER
SPAWNING AGGREGATION IN HONDURAS
LA ÚLTIMA DE LAS AGREGACIONES: VALIDACIÓN DE UN MERO AGREGACIÓN
REPRODUCTIVA EXISTENTES EN HONDURAS
LE DERNIER DES AGRÉGATIONS: VALIDATION D'UN MÉROU AGRÉGATION DE FRAI
EXISTANT AU HONDURAS
STEVEN CANTY
Centro de Ecologia Marina Oficina 401-403 Edificio Florencia Bulevard S Tegucigalpa, M.D.C. Honduras [email protected]
46
ABSTRACT
Cordelia Bank on the south coast of the island of Roatan, Honduras, is a set of offshore banks which has
recently been designated as a site of special importance for wildlife. The 17 km2 area supports thickets of
Acropora cervicornis estimated to cover 60,000 m2, making it one of the largest documented expanses of
this species within the Caribbean. Within the limits of the protected area are grouper and snapper
spawning aggregation sites and aggregations of Caribbean reef sharks (Carcharhinus perezii). As part of
an ongoing study documenting the ecological importance of this area we evaluated the grouper spawning
aggregation during the reproductive season of 2012-2013. We determined that four species: tiger grouper
(Mycteroperca tigris), black grouper (M. bonaci), Nassau grouper (Epinephelus striatus), and yellowfin
grouper (M. venenosa) aggregated during the January full moon, however no spawning was observed.
The local fishery was assessed during this period to determine if large-bodied grouper were being targeted
and landed, none were found. Our results contrast with previous evaluations of other spawning sites in
Honduras which found few individuals aggregating, and suggested sustained overfishing of reproductive
areas by artisanal fishers. Fisheries regulations in Honduras protect Nassau grouper aggregation sites from
fishing between December and March, also protecting other species that share these sites. However
fisheries dependent and independent data show that grouper populations are low in the Honduran
Caribbean and restrictions on grouper fishing may need to be extended to allow for sufficient abundances
to migrate to spawning grounds and successfully reproduce.
KEYWORDS: Fisheries, Spawning aggregation, Grouper, Cordelia Bank, Honduras
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
PRELIMINARY RESULTS: SCREENING OF CIGUATERA TOXINS FOUND IN INDOPACIFIC LIONFISH (PTEROIS VOLITANS) IN ST. CROIX, US VIRGIN ISLANDS
RESULTADOS PRELIMINARES DE LA DETECCIÓN DE CIGUATOXINAS EN EL PEZ
LEÓN DEL INDOPACÍFICO (PTEROIS VOLITANS) QUE HABITA ST. CROIX (ISLAS
VÍRGENES ESTADOUNIDENSES).
RÉSULTATS PRÉLIMINAIRES : EXAMEN DES TOXINES CIGUATERIQUES TROUVÉES
DANS DES POISSON-LIONS DE L'INDO-PACIFIQUE (PTEROIS VOLITANTS) À SAINTECROIX, ILES VIERGES AMÉRICAINES
BERNARD CASTILLO1, KYNOCH REALE-MUNROE1, ALISON ROBERTSON2, and JOHN
RUBATTINO3
1University of the Virgin Islands RR1 Box 10000 Kingshill, VI 00850 US [email protected]
2
Dauphin Island Sea Laboratory Dauphin Island AL 36528 US
3
CORE Foundation Charlotte Amalie VI 00802 VI
ABSTRACT
Ciguatera fish poisoning (CFP) is a food borne illness caused by the consumption of fish that contain
ciguatera toxins (CTXs). Typically, ciguatera fish poisoning symptoms include gastrointestinal and
neurological effects. Ciguatera toxins are secondary metabolites that are produced by marine
dinoflagellates, more specifically, of the genus Gambierdiscus. Local government agencies and
environmental groups have encouraged the consumption of the invasive Indo-Pacific lionfish (Pterois
volitans) whose white flesh tastes similar to a snapper or grouper. Our preliminary results showed that
40% (N=20) of the lionfish tested from the west end of St. Croix indicated the presence of CTX in their
tissue. Results also showed that 15% of the tissue samples had levels above the 0.1 ppb FDA guidance for
consumption.
KEYWORDS: Lionfish, St. Croix, USVI, Ciguatera, Virgin Islands
47
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
SEAFLOWER MARINE PROTECTED AREA: PROGRESS REPORT ON THE
IMPLEMENTATION AND FUTURE CHALLENGES
ÁREA MARINA PROTEGIDA SEAFLWER: AVANCES EN LA IMPLEMENTACIÓN Y
DESAFÍOS HACIA EL FUTURO ZONE MARINE PROTEGÉE DE SEAFLOWER
PROGRÈS DANS LA MISE EN ŒUVRE D'UN PROGRAMME DE GESTION ET SES DÉFIS À
L'AVENIR
ERICK RICHARD CASTRO GONZALEZ, FANNY HOWARD, y DURCEY STEPHENS LEVER
CORALINA Via San Luis, Bight, Km 26 San Andrés Isla, San Andrés Colombia [email protected]
48
RESUMEN
El AMP Seaflower, Colombia, declarada en 2005 viene trabajando cuatro componentes: 1) Manejo
adaptativo; 2) Sostenibilidad financiera; 3) Alternativas de vida sostenible, y 4) Monitoreo y análisis. Hoy
cuenta con una delimitación interna, y una reglamentación de uso que incluye zonas de preservación,
conservación, uso especial, uso general y exclusivas de pesca artesanal. Se han fortalecido alianzas con
socios estratégicos para el control y vigilancia, involucrando a pescadores. Actualmente se trabaja en el
programa de voluntarios Team Seaflower como parte del plan de acción de entrenamiento, educación y
comunicación. Se cuenta con instancias de participación, a través de los comités: 1) Interinstitucional, 2)
Usuarios, y 3) Expertos internacionales. Además de un plan de resolución de conflictos. Se trabaja en la
implementación de instrumentos económicos para la sostenibilidad financiera, como: tarifas de ingreso,
pago por servicios ambientales y donaciones. Recientemente se vienen estructurando proyectos
productivos como alternativa de vida para los usuarios (pescadores, jóvenes y mujeres cabeza de familia).
Se ha realizado entrenamientos en emprendimiento y creación de microempresas, y se trabajan proyectos
asociados con pesca deportiva, turismo ambiental, cangrejo negro, zoocriadero de iguanas, procesamiento
del breadfruit y maricultura. Hay avances en el monitoreo y análisis, abarcando la calidad del agua, los
ecosistemas, las especies claves, socioeconómico y efectividad del AMP. Los principales desafíos están
relacionados con la sostenibilidad financiera y los impactos actuales y potenciales derivados del fallo de
la CIJ de la Haya sobre el diferendo limítrofe entre Colombia y Nicaragua, emitido en noviembre de
2012, y que afecta la extensión del AMP, el modelo de manejo, y presume amenazas como la explotación
de hidrocarburos y el incremento de la sobrepesca
PALABRAS CLAVES: MPA, Seaflower, San Andrés
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
THE NATIONAL NATURAL RESERVE OF SAINT-MARTIN: A WELL MANAGED AND
RECOGNIZED MARINE, TERRESTRIAL AND LAKE PROTECTED AREA
RESERVA NATURAL NACIONAL DE SAINT-MARTIN: UN ÁREA MARINA, TERRESTRES
Y LACUSTRES PROTEGIDA MANEJADA RECONOCIDO
LA RÉSERVE NATURELLE NATIONALE DE SAINT-MARTIN: UNE AIRE PROTÉGÉE
MARINE, TERRESTRE ET LACUSTRE GÉRÉE RECONNUE
JULIEN CHALIFOUR
Réserve Naturelle Nationale de Saint-Martin AGRNNSM Résidence les Acacias Anse Marcel, SaintMartin 97150 France [email protected]
ABSTRACT
The National Natural Reserve of Saint-Martin represents about 3 054 hectars of natural marin, terrestrial
and lake areas protected since september the 3rd of 1998. The managment of the areas was entrusted to
the Association de Gestion de la Réserve Naturelle Nationale de Saint-Martin, according to a Managment
Plan setting and prioritizing managing goals for 5 years. These managing goals are to promote the
improvment of knowledges on protected areas, to control the anthropological impacts, to extend the
managment to new areas, to restore degraded backgrounds and populations, to promote environmental
éducation, to optimize the use of ressources and to develop régional coopération.. The Conservatoire de
l‟Espace Littoral et des Rivages Lacustres owner of these protected areas has also entrusted the
managment of 14 ponds on the french part of the Island. Conservancy and management developed by
both entities in récent years has been recently recognized and rewarded by a double labelling from
RAMSAR (2011) and SPAW (2012) protocols. These dual certification is rewarding the work performed
the last 15 years and opens new opportunities to the manager, as well as for the MPA.
KEYWORDS: MPA, Saint-Martin, management, SPAW, RAMSAR
49
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
ALL BOOM AND NO BUST AS THE LIONFISH INVASION PROGRESSES IN BACALAR
CHICO MARINE RESERVE, BELIZE
LA INVASIÓN DEL PEZ LEÓN CRECE SIN CESAR EN LA RESERVA MARINA BACALAR
CHICO, BELICE
L'INVASION DES POISSONS LIONS S'AGRANDIT SANS FIN DANS LE RÉSERVE MARINE
BACALAR CHICO, BELIZE
JENNIFER CHAPMAN, CHARLOTTE GOUGH, JOANNA HUDSON, FRANCES HUMBER and
ALASDAIR HARRIS
Blue Ventures Level 2 Annex, Omnibus Business Centre, 39-41 North Road London, N7 9DP UK
[email protected]
50
ABSTRACT
Lionfish (Pterois volitans) were introduced to the Atlantic in the 1980s, with the first confirmed sighting
in Belize in 2008. The species is now well established throughout the country, promoting concerns for
threatened fish stocks and overall coral reef health. The mean frequency of lionfish sightings in Bacalar
Chico Marine Reserve, northern Belize, increased between 2011 (1.9 fish/hr ± 0.1 SEM) and 2012 (2.7
fish/hr ± 0.2 SEM), coupled with a significant upward shift in size class frequency distribution
(χ²=333.74, d.f.=4, P<0.01). The majority of sightings (89%) were made on the forereef. Culled lionfish
were dissected to record stomach contents, sex and maturity. A change in diet was observed between
years: in 2011, the majority of prey items were fish, including parrotfish, wrasse, damselfish and grouper.
However, in 2012 invertebrates, predominantly shrimp, comprised the majority of the diet. A similar
change in lionfish diet has been observed in Port Honduras Marine Reserve, southern Belize. Results also
confirm that lionfish in Belize reproduce throughout the year. With market development heralded as the
most feasible management solution to prevent lionfish population growth and spread, protected areas may
provide a refuge not only for native species, but also lionfish. Given that consistent removal of more than
one third of the population is required to prevent population growth and expansion, an open-minded
approach to developing alternative management solutions for the invasion within protected areas must be
applied.
KEYWORDS: Lionfish, status, management, protected area, Belize
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
ENSURING ENTHUSIASM EQUALS EFFECTIVENESS: FISHING TOURNAMENTS AS A
POPULATION CONTROL TOOL FOR INVASIVE LIONFISH IN BELIZE
ASEGURAR EL ENTUSIASMO EQUIVALE A EFICIENCIA: TORNEOS DE PESCA COMO
UNA HERRAMIENTA PARA CONTROLAR A LA POBLACIÓN DE PEZ LEÓN INVASIVO
EN BELICE
ASSURER L’ENTHOUSIASME ÉQUIVAUT À EFFICACITÉ: TOURNOIS DE PÊCHE
COMME OUTIL POUR CONTRÔLER LA POPULATION DU POISSON LION INVASIVE AU
BELIZE
JENNIFER CHAPMAN1, JAMES R. FOLEY2, CRISTÍN KEELIN FITZPATRICK2, CHARLOTTE
GOUGH1, and ISAIAS MAJIL3
1
Blue Ventures Level 2 Annex, Omnibus Business Centre, 39-41 North Road London, N7 9DP UK
[email protected]
2Toledo Institute for Development and Environment Punta Gorda Toledo District Belize
3
Fisheries Department Princess Margaret Drive Belize City Belize
ABSTRACT
Invasive lionfish (Pterois volitans) pose one of the greatest threats to the health of reefs and their
associated fisheries throughout the Tropical Atlantic and Caribbean. Although complete eradication of
this invasive species is no longer thought possible, stabilising or halting population growth and further
spread through targeted removal efforts is considered to be a viable management strategy. With no natural
predators, high fecundity and early maturity, removal efforts need to target all life stages of lionfish, and
at regular intervals. Developing a market for lionfish meat provides consistent removal effort, however,
effort is typically biased towards larger individuals. With enormous interest from the dive industry in
contributing to population control efforts, lionfish tournaments have risen in popularity. In Placencia,
Belize, a lionfish tournament has been held annually since 2011. However the impact of these events on
lionfish population density and structure remains unknown, and therefore the benefit of these tournaments
to lionfish management in Belize is yet to be determined. In 2013, lionfish population density assessments
were conducted at two dive sites before, directly after and one month following the tournament. The
results of this study examine the primary hypothesis that lionfish population density would be
significantly reduced by the tournament, but the population would be fully recovered within one month.
The study also discusses how the size distribution of the lionfish population is affected by the tournament
and presents recommendations for tournament management and further research.
KEYWORDS: lionfish, management, tournament, Belize
51
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
OBSTACLES AND OPPORTUNITIES IN DEVELOPING COMMERCIAL MARKETS FOR
INVASIVE LIONFISH - LESSONS LEARNT FROM BELIZE
OBSTÁCULOS Y OPORTUNIDADES EN EL DESARROLLO DE MERCADOS
COMERCIALES PARA EL PEZ LEÓN INVASIVO - LECCIONES APRENDIDAS EN BELICE
OBSTACLES ET OPPORTUNITÉS DANS LE DEVELOPMENT DES MARCHÉS
COMMERCIAUX POUR LE POISSON LION INVASIVE – LESSONS APPRIS EN BELIZE
JENNIFER CHAPMAN
Blue Ventures Level 2 Annex, Omnibus Business Centre, 39-41 North Road London, N7 9DP UK
[email protected]
52
ABSTRACT
First officially recorded in Belize in 2008, by 2010 invasive lionfish were well established countrywide.
In 2010, despite education campaigns and monthly lionfish tournaments, the lionfish population
continued to grow and expand. In 2011 and 2012, Blue Ventures carried out a study in coastal
communities in northern Belize that showed that although the general public liked the taste of lionfish
meat, there was limited willingness to consume lionfish at home. Demand for lionfish meat existed only
within the tourism sector, though this was low and seasonal. No restaurant served lionfish regularly, as
the disjunct existed where fishers required a guaranteed market, while potential buyers wanted a reliable,
continuous supply. It became clear that a central handling facility was required to provide support for
both suppliers and buyers. A critical step in the process was the identification of a buyer in the USA,
which provided the surety needed for a small fishing cooperative with a strong interest in conservation to
risk investment in the required facility upgrades for export. Significant media coverage following the first
export of lionfish to the USA had the desired effect, prompting the largest fishing cooperative in the
country to purchase and stockpile lionfish fillet for bulk export. While lionfish exports are an important
first step, this targets only the largest individuals. Growth in the fledgling domestic market for lionfish,
which utilises smaller lionfish and increases market access for fishers, will be essential in intensifying
lionfish removal efforts sufficiently to impact upon population growth and expansion.
KEYWORDS: lionfish, market development, management, Belize,
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
LAS PESQUERÍAS DE LOS ARRECIFES CORALINOS DEL GOLFO DE MÉXICO Y EL
CARIBE
FISHERIES OF THE GULF OF MEXICO AND CARIBBEAN CORAL REEFS
LA PÊCHE SUR LES RÉCIFS CORALLIENS DU GOLFE DU MEXIQUE ET DANS LES
CARAÏBES
ERNESTO A. CHÁVEZ
Centro Interdisciplinario de Ciencias Marinas, I Av. IPN s/n Col. Playa Palo de Sta Rita, El Conchalito
La Paz, BCS 23096 México [email protected]
RESUMEN
Las pesquerías se encuentran explotadas intensamente a nivel mundial y casi la mitad de los recursos
están sobre explotados. Mas de mil millones de personas dependen las pesquerías de los arrecifes
coralinos, cuyos beneficios netos en bienes y servicios, entre los que se incluyen las pesquerías, ascienden
a US$30 mil millones. Las capturas del Golfo de México y el Caribe, registran un poco mas de 60
especies, pero el número real de especies seguramente es mayor que 100. Infortunadamente la gran
mayoría de las especies explotadas no ha sido evaluada aún. El nivel de rendimiento máximo sostenible
de la región se estima en 2.65 millones de toneladas, con una biomasa de 5.3 millones; infortunadamente,
los rendimientos actuales y la biomasa sugieren una reducción del 30%. La tercera parte de estas cifras
corresponde al Golfo de México. Los principales indicadores de sobreexplotación son, una reducción en
el tamaño promedio de los peces capturados y una reducción gradual en la captura por unidad de esfuerzo,
asociadas a alta presión de pesca. Aparte de la intensidad de la pesca, el impacto del clima y la
contaminación sobre los arrecifes coralinos, contribuyen al agotamiento de los recursos pesqueros de los
arrecifes. Adicionalmente, las prácticas de pesca destructivas y otras actividades como el turismo,
contribuyen a reducir la productividad del ecosistema de arrecife coralino. Por lo tanto, la perspectiva de
las pesquerías de los arrecifes coralinos estará condicionada por las tendencias y actitudes políticas,
sociales y económicas.
PALABRAS CLAVES: Pesquerías, Rendimiento pesquero, Sobrepesca, Diversidad de las capturas,
Evaluacion
53
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
LIONFISH (PTEROIS VOLITANS/MILES: SCORPAENIDAE) IN CUBA, ABUNDANCE,
DISTRIBUTION AND ECOLOGICAL RELATIONSHIPS
DISTRIBUCIÓN, ABUNDANCIA Y RELACIONES ECOLÓGICAS DEL PEZ LEÓN (PTEROIS
VOLITANS/MILES: SCORPAENIDAE) EN CUBA
LE POISSON LION Á CUBA (PTEROIS VOLITANS∕MILES: SCORPAENIDAE),
DISTRIBUTION, ABONDANCE ET RELATIONS ÉCOLOGIQUE
PEDRO CHEVALIER
Acuario Nacional de Cuba Dpto. Acuariología 3ra y 62 Miramar, Playa Habana, Cuba
[email protected]
54
ABSTRACT
In Cuba, lionfish (Pterois volitans and Pterois miles) was sighted for the first time in 2007, and by 2009
its distribution range occupied the entire island coast. This species is considered a real threat to native fish
communities in the Caribbean. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the relationship between
density, biomass and average size of lionfish populations with similar variables of fish associations in 9
sites in Cuba. Sampling was conducted from 2010 to July 2013. Visual surveys were performed using
underwater visual belt transect survey methodology proposed by Brock (1954). Also explored were
correlations between the composition of the lionfish diet with the variables density, biomass and average
size of prey populations. In this case we used the Index of Relative Importance. The sites that have higher
lionfish density coincided with coral reefs located in protected areas, where reef complexity is high, as is
density of smaller fish, while fishing pressure is almost non-existent. In these areas, the native
carnivorous fish biomass was also relatively high. These results so far show no effective biotic control of
lionfish by large native predators. In places with intense fishing pressure, lower densities of the invasive
species are found. These results suggest that management actions must be implemented in protected areas
to cull lionfish and avoid the establishment of large reservoirs (hot spots) of the invasive species.
KEYWORDS: lionfish, invasive species, Cuba
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
MAPPING THE COST OF AN ARTISANAL FISHERY
MAPEANDO EL COSTO DE UNA PESQUERÍA ARTESANAL
CARTOGRAPHIER LES COÛTS D'UNE PÊCHERIE ARTISANALE
ILIANA CHOLLETT1, STEPHEN BOX2, and PETER J. MUMBY3
University of Exeter University of Queensland Geoffrey Pope Building, Stocker Road Goddard Building,
St. Lucia Exeter, UK [email protected]
2
Smithsonian Institution 420 Seaway Dr Fort Pierce Florida USA
3
University of QueenslandUniversity of Exeter Goddard Building, St Lucia Geoffrey Pope Building,
Stocker Road Brisbane QLD Australia
1
ABSTRACT
The mapping of costs is central to marine spatial planning, which is based on identifying trade-offs
between the achievement of conservation targets (e.g. protect certain amount of the available reef) while
minimising the costs to the users that dependend on the ecosystem (e.g. avoiding setting a no-take area in
the best fishing sites). Mapping costs is an easy task on land, where each property has a dollar value and
an associated land acquisition cost. In the sea, opportunity costs are commonly used, and areas where
more fishing effort occurs have a larger cost and should be avoided when setting a reserve. Spatial fishing
effort is largely available for industrial fisheries from logs or satellite tracks, but spatially explicit
information is generally not available for artisanal and small scale fisheries. Here we propose a method to
quantify the cost of an artisanal fishery based on biological (location of fishing grounds based on satellite
imagery), physical (wave exposure that restricts the access to rough locations) and economic (fuel
consumption from home port) constraints. Lower costs are associated to habitats not targeted by the
fishery, areas where the sea is generally rough, and regions far away from port and therefore expensive to
get to in terms of fuel. We demonstrate the method in the Honduran Miskito Cays, where a marine
protected area will be established and new artisanal fisheries are to be developed. By mapping the costs of
the fishery we minimize the socioeconomic impacts of conservation activities and avoid expensive
conservation mistakes.
KEYWORDS: artisanal fisheries, wave exposure, fuel prices, habitat mapping, marine spatial planning
55
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
ACONDICIONAMIENTO DEL CARACOL STROMBUS PUGILIS, LINNAEUS, 1758 CON
DIETAS FORMULADAS EN LABORATORIO
CONDITIONING OF CONCH STROMBUS PUGILIS LINNAEUS, 1758 WITH LABORATORY
FORMULATED DIETS
MATURATION DU LAMBI STROMBUS PUGILIS, LINNAEUS, 1758 AVEC UN RÉGIME
ALIMENTAIRE SOUS CONDITIONS CONTRÔLÉES LABORATOIRE
FABIOLA CHONG SÁNCHEZ1, MARTHA ENRÍQUEZ DÍAZ2, y DALILA ALDANA ARANDA2
1 Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados Km6 Antigua Carretera a Progreso Mérida, Yucatan
97310 Mexico [email protected]
56
RESUMEN
El caracol Strombus pugilis se distribuye en el Golfo de México y Caribe, siendo una importante fuente
laboral y alimenticia para esta región. En el presente trabajo se evaluó el efecto de alimentos formulados
en la madurez gonádica de S. pugilis y su estadio nutricional utilizando la glándula digestiva. Se
colectaron 133 organismos, acondicionandose durante 104 días a 27.5ºC, con fotoperiodo de 12/12h. Se
alimentaron con dos dietas (D1 y D2) con la misma proporción de carbohidratos y proteínas. La D1
contiene cuatro veces más Halymenia floresia y Spirulina con respecto a la D2. Quincenalmente se
disectaron18 individuos, 6 caracoles por dieta y 6 silvestres, realizándose cortes histológicos del complejo
gónada-glándula digestiva y se utilizó la tinción de Tricromo de Mason modificada. Se determinaron
cinco estadios reproductivos: reposo, gametogénesis, madurez, desove, y postdesove. Se determinó el
estadio nutricional a través del feed index de Frenkiel y Aldana Aranda (2012). La madurez gonádica se
obtuvo con ambas dietas; D1 a los 41 días y D2 a los 40. Se consiguió la madurez gonádica, desove y
producción de masas ovígeras fecundadas; obteniéndose dos masas ovígeras con la D1 y siete con la D2;
la longitud de las masas ovígeras fue de 794±646cm, su peso 2.24±1.29g y su volumen2.67 ±2.5mm^3,
equivalente a 102646±75303 huevos. Los desoves se registraron por la mañana. La eclosión de larvas
viables se obtuvo a los 5 días, posterior al desove. Estos resultados permiten cerrar el cultivo de Strombus
spp, al conseguir la madurez gonadal y producción de masas de huevos viables en laboratorio.
PALABRAS CLAVES: Strombus pugilis, Reproducción, Nutrición, Desove, Cultivo
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
BASELINE ECOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT OF THE FLOWER GARDEN BANKS NATIONAL
MARINE SANCTUARY: INFORMING DESIGN OF A RESEARCH AREA
EVALUACIÓN ECOLÓGICA DE LÍNEA DE BASE DEL JARDÍN BANCOS SANTUARIO
MARINO NACIONAL DE LA FLOR: DISEÑO INFORMAR DE UN ÁREA DE
INVESTIGACIÓN
BASELINE ÉVALUATION ÉCOLOGIQUE DU FLOWER GARDEN BANKS NATIONAL
MARINE SANCTUARY: CONCEPTION INFORMANT D'UN DOMAINE DE RECHERCHE
RANDY CLARK1, CHRIS TAYLOR2, CHRISTINE BUCKEL2, L, LAURA KRACKER3, EMMA
HICKERSON4, G.P. SCHMAHL4 . and GREGORY PINIAK3
1
NOAA/NOS/NCCOS CCMA 1021 Balch Blvd, Suite 1003 Stennis Space Center, MS 28516 USA
[email protected]
2
NOAA/NOS/NCCOS CCFHR. 101 Pivers Island Road, Beaufort, NC 28516 USA
3
NOAA/NOS/NCCOS CCMA Silver SpringMD USA
4
Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary GalvestonTX USA
ABSTRACT
The 2012 Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary Management Plan called for a baseline
ecological assessment to characterize fish and benthic communities in order design and implement a
research area to investigate the impact of fishing and diving within the Sanctuary. We implemented a
three-year study of fish and benthic invertebrate communities on the East and West Flower Garden Banks
using three complementary techniques: 1) scuba and technical diving to characterize benthic and fish
communities on the coral reef at depths between 18-46m; 2) remotely operated vehicles (ROV) to survey
depths greater than 46 m (an area that represents 98% of the sanctuary); and 3) fishery acoustics (sonar) to
survey fish biomass in the water column across all habitat types and depth strata. This comprehensive
study revealed a coral reef community that is one of the least impacted coral reef ecosystems in the US
western Atlantic region. Diver surveys found significantly greater biomass of apex predators in highrelief, upper-mesophotic reefs >31m deep. The ROV surveys documented high abundance of snapper and
grouper species associated with structured habitats and provided density estimates of deep coral species in
the region. Fishery acoustic surveys identified consistent biomass hotspots within regions of the shallow
and upper mesophotic coral reef and over deep coral reefs. The study coincided with the arrival and
establishment of the invasive Indo-Pacific lionfish. Simulation studies using these baseline data and
further research on fishing effort are recommended to determine the most appropriate implementation of a
research area within the sanctuary.
KEYWORDS: Reef fish, benthic habitat, ROV, fish acoustics, reserve design
57
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
BIOROCK PRODUCTION FOR REEF RESTORATION
PRODUCCIÓN DE BIOROCK POR RESTAURACIÓN DE ARRECIFES
BIOROCK PRODUCTION POUR LA RESTAURATION DES RÉCIFS
ELIANE COELHO and PAUL ZIMBA
Texas A&M University - Corpus Christi 6300 Ocean Dr. Corpus Christi, TX 78412 United States
[email protected]
58
ABSTRACT
The use of electrified metals to aggregate carbonates has been shown to accelerate the growth of
calcareous organisms, such as corals and oysters. This method accelerates coral growth up to 3-5 times
relative to normal rates. The method includes installing a cathode and an anode in the electrolyte and
applying an electrical current at a low voltage across the cathode and the anode to induce electrolysis.
This method increases recruitment and enhances growth of calcareous organisms in the vicinity of the
cathode. Pieces of rebar ranging from one inch to six inches were preweighed, then exposed to
experimental conditions for 3-4 weeks. Final weights of rebar were collected, and SEM and
photomicrographs were taken of each sample of these replicated experiments weekly. We evaluated
voltage (intensity and type), and polarity to optimize conditions for carbonate accretion. Initial laboratory
experiments established that direct current resulted in maximal weight increase in carbonates. A second
laboratory experiment was used to determine optimal voltage. Through the analysis of the growth trends
and photographs of the lab structures, the best power source and voltage were chosen that result in 15mm
carbonate accretion over the study period. We built 3 - 4‟x1‟ reefs and deployed these in Packery
Channel, Corpus Christi Bay for 3 weeks to assess efficiency and growth rate in the field.
KEYWORDS: Biorock, electrolysis, oyster, calcium carbonate, restoration
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
A MODIFIED CATCH SURVEY ANALYSIS FOR ASSESSING NORTHERN GULF OF
MEXICO BLUE CRABS
ANALISIS DE UNA ENCUESTA DE CAPTURA MODIFICADA PARA LA EVALUACIÓN DE
CANGREJOS AZULES EN EL NORTE DEL GOLFO DE MÉJICO
UNE ANALYSE DE SONDAGE MIS À JOUR LE CATCH POUR ÉVALUER LES CRABES
BLEUS NORD DU GOLFE DU MEXIQUE
WADE COOPER1, GLEN SUTTON2, JOE WEST3, ROBERT LEAF4 and RALF REIDEL4
1
Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, Fish and Wildlife Research Institute , St.
Petersburg, FL USA [email protected]
2
Texas Parks and Wildlife Department
3
Louisiana Department Wildlife and Fisheries Baton Rouge, LA USA
4
Gulf Coast Research Lab Ocean Spring Gulf Coast Research Lab Ocean Spring, MS
ABSTRACT
Catch-Survey Analysis is a stage-based stock assessment method often used when age structure or catchat-length information are limited or unavailable. The method partitions the data into pre- and post-recruit
time series. Abundance and fishing mortality are estimated from observed time series fit. Miller et al.
2011 extended the method in including a stock recruitment (S/R) function for estimating management
reference points directly from the model. We further modified the method to include stage specific natural
mortality (M) and an option to force the S/R relationship and/or M using an environmental time series.
Results include 1) management reference points MSY, SPR, FMSY, UMSY for western and eastern Gulf of
Mexico blue crab stocks, and 2) a test for improved model fits when incorporating environmental forcing.
Neither stock was found to be “overfished” or undergoing “overfishing” and better model fits were
achieved using precipitation to force (reduce) M in the eastern stock.
KEYWORDS: blue crab, stock assessment
59
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
SPATIAL FIDELITY OF JUVENILE GOLIATH GROUPERS, EPINEPHELUS ITAJARA, IN A
MANGROVE AREA - IMPLICATIONS FOR CONSERVATION
FIDELIDAD ESPACIAL DE MEROS JUVENILES, EPINEPHELUS ITAJARA, EN ÁREAS
MANGLARES - IMPLICACIONES PARA SU CONSERVACIÓN
FIDÉLITÉ SPATIALE DES JUVÉNILES DU MÉROU GÉANT, EPINEPHELUS ITAJARA,
DANS UNE ZONE DE MANGROVE - IMPLICATIONS POUR LA CONSERVATION
MARIANA COXEY1, EDVALDO COSTA JR.1, ALBERTO SANTOS2, RODRIGO MORAES2,
SÉRGIO REZENDE3, MATHEUS FREITAS4 and BEATRICE FERREIRA3
1
IRCOS R. Samuel Hardman, s/n Tamandaré, PE 55578-000 Brazil [email protected]
2
Náutica Cooperativa Brazil 2Náutica Cooperativa Brazil
3
UFPE Brazil
4
Instituto Meros do Brasil Brazil [email protected] UFPE Brazil [email protected]
60
ABSTRACT
In northeastern Brazil, the estuarine complex of Rio Formoso (PE), formed by the Ariquindá, Formoso
and Passos Rivers, is enclosed in two Environmental Protection Area (EPA): the EPA of Guadalupe and
the federal EPA Costa dos Corais - the largest marine conservation unit with an extension of over 135 km
of coastline. This area is characterized by a large diversity of coastal ecosystems such as mangroves,
seagrass beds, sand banks and coral reefs that together form a complex network of energy transfer that
sustain shelter and food for several species throughout their life cycle. The federally protected goliath
grouper, Epinephelus itajara, is a mangrove-dependent species that show a remarkable ontogenetic shift
with juveniles being found in mangrove areas and adults on coral reefs, patch or rocky reefs and artificial
structures. To study the distribution and movement of juvenile groupers in different areas of the estuary,
using conventional tagging, we surveyed the artisanal camboa, performed by the fishing communities of
the surrounding area, and used traps manzuá to capture larger juveniles groupers. The results show a large
vulnerability of the goliath grouper with a capture of 0.04 individuals/100m of net by the camboa fishing
and 0.07 individuals/trap. Also, the high recapture rate, 20.4%, helps proving the high spatial fidelity of
the juveniles while in the estuary. This study aims to further define spatial fidelity and distribution
patterns of this species in the area, using acoustic telemetry, as well as to help designing and
implementing new management policies.
KEYWORDS: conventional tagging, recapture, marine protected area
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
INTERACTIONS BETWEEN THE CARIBBEAN SPINY LOBSTER, PANULIRUS ARGUS, AND
INVASIVE LIONFISH, PTEROIS VOLITANS: WHO DISPLACES WHOM?
INTERACCIONES ENTRE LA LANGOSTA CARIBE, PANULIRUS ARGUS, Y EL PEZ LEÓN
INVASOR, PTEROIS VOLITANS: QUIEN DESPLAZA QUIEN?
LES INTERACTIONS ENTRE LA LANGOUSTE BLANCHE DES CARAÏBES, PANULIRUS
ARGUS, ET LE RASCASSE VOLANTE INVASIVE, PTEROIS VOLITANS: QUI DÉPLACE
QUI?
JOCELYN CURTIS-QUICK1, ELIZABETH UNDERWOOD2, STEPHANIE GREEN3, LAD AKINS4
ALASTAIR HARBORNE5, and ISABELLE CÔTÉ6
1
Lionfish Research & Education Program, Cape Eleu Cape Eleuthera Institute Rock Sound, Eluethera
POBoxEL26029 The Bahamas [email protected]
2
Cape Eleuthera Institute Eleuthera The Bahamas
3
Zoology Department, Oregon State University 3029 Cordley Hall Oregon State University Dept. of
Zoology Corvallis OR 97331-2914 USA
4
Reef Environmental Education Foundation Key Largo Florida USA Marine
5
Spatial Ecology Lab, University of Queensland Brisbane Qld 4072
6
Department of Biological Sciences, Simon Fraser University Burnaby British Columbia Canada
ABSTRACT
The Caribbean spiny lobster fishery is the most valuable in the Caribbean. There are concerns that
invasive lionfish could affect the profitability of the industry, but ecological interactions between the two
species are not well understood. Previous work found an inverse relationship between the number of
lionfish and number of lobster in lobster traps (condos) but they could not assess whether this was caused
by lionfish displacing lobsters or vice-versa. We examined the behaviors of lionfish and lobster
competing for an artificial shelter. In experimental trials, lobsters were introduced to the arena 48 hours
before the introduction of either a lionfish or a trophically equivalent native fish, the graysby grouper
Cephalopholis cruentata. Reciprocal experiments (i.e., fish before lobster) and single-species control trials
were also conducted. Lobsters spent significantly more time outside of the shelters and more time
roaming when a lionfish was present, indicating the lobsters were displaced from the shelter. However,
shifts in lobster behavior were not observed in the presence of the native graysby. These findings suggest
that competition for shelter with invasive lionfish could negatively affect the abundance of lobsters found
in condos, resulting in negative socioeconomic impacts for countries with large lobster fisheries such as
The Bahamas.
KEYWORDS: lionfish, lobster, displacement, invasive, fishery
61
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
DIET OF THE INVASIVE PACIFIC LIONFISH, PTEROIS VOLITANS, ON NATURAL AND
ARTIFICIAL REEFS IN THE NORTHERN GULF OF MEXICO
DIETA DEL INVASIVO PACÍFICO PEZ LEÓN, PTEROIS VOLITANS, EN ARRECIFES
NATURALES Y ARTIFICIALES EN EL NORTE DEL GOLFO DE MÉXICO
DIÈTE DE LA PACIFIC INVASIVE POISSON-SCORPION, PTEROIS VOLITANS, SUR LES
RÉCIFS NATURELS ET ARTIFICIELS DANS LE NORD DU GOLFE DU MEXIQUE
KRISTEN DAHL1 and WILLIAM PATTERSON2
University of South Alabama Dauphin Island Sea L 101 Bienville Blvd Dauphin Island, AL 36528 USA
[email protected]
2
University of South Alabama
1
62
ABSTRACT
Invasive pacific lionfish, Pterois volitans/miles complex, were first reported in the Gulf of Mexico
(GOM) in 2009 and since then have quickly become established on GOM artificial and natural reefs.
Lionfish densities on northern GOM artificial reefs are currently among the highest reported in the
western Atlantic (~10 fish 100 m-2), while their densities on natural reefs are an order of magnitude
lower. As part of a broader study examining their impacts on native reef fishes, lionfish (n = 452) were
collected with spears by SCUBA divers from March to August 2013 to evaluate differences in their
feeding ecology at artificial versus natural reefs (depth range 20-40 m). Mean ± SE total length of lionfish
samples from artificial reefs was 231.9 ± 3.0 mm, and was 211.9 ± 5.8 mm from natural reefs. Diet
analysis revealed 83.6% of stomachs had prey present, with fifty-four percent of samples containing
identifiable prey that consisted primarily of fish (88.6% of total dry mass) from 13 families. Of
identifiable fish prey, 11.8% by mass consisted of juvenile vermilion snapper, an important fishery
species. Diet was significantly different between natural and artificial reefs (PERMANOVA, p < 0.001),
with lionfish captured at artificial reefs having higher percentages of non-reef associated benthic fishes
and decapod crustaceans in their stomachs. Ongoing diet work is focused on examining seasonal and
ontogenetic effects on lionfish diet, while changes in reef fish community structure and habitat utilization
in response to invasive lionfish are being examined in complimentary research.
KEYWORDS: invasive species, lionfish, Gulf of Mexico, diet, artificial versus natural reefs
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
INVESTIGATION OF LIONFISH (P. VOLITANS/MILES) USE OF ESTUARINE MANGROVES
IN THE INDIAN RIVER LAGOON, FLORIDA, USA
ESTUDIO DEL USO DE LOS MANGLARES ESTUARINOS DE LA LAGUNA INDIAN RIVER
DE LA FLORIDA (EE.UU.) POR EL PEZ LEÓN (P. VOLITANS Y P. MILES).
ETUDE DE L'UTILISATION PAR LE POISSON-LION (P. VOLITANS/MILES) DES
MANGROVES ESTUARIENNES DANS LA LAGUNE DE L'INDIAN RIVER, FLORIDE,
ETATS-UNIS
EMILY DARK1 and JEFFREY BEAL2
Antioch University New England Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission 40 Avon St
Harbor Branch Oceanographic Inst., Fort Pierce, Fl , USA Keene, NH [email protected]
2
Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservatino Commission US 1 Harbor Branch Oceanographic Inst. USA
Fort Pierce,
1
ABSTRACT
Since 2010 the invasive lionfish (Pterois volitans/miles) has been reported along man-made structures and
mangroves in Florida‟s Indian River Lagoon (IRL), one of the most biodiverse estuaries in the US.
Stressing the importance of mangroves as critical fish habitat, this study aims to examine the nature of
this veracious predator‟s use of mangroves in the IRL. The objectives of this study are to examine site
fidelity, micro-habitat characteristics, demographics and diet composition. This is done through a survey
and tagging effort in Fort Pierce Inlet area, as well as the collection of specimens in mangroves
throughout the IRL. Additionally, specimens are collected throughout the IRL in a variety of habitats and
offshore in order to compares size frequencies, diet and reproductive capacity. The purpose of this study
is two-fold: to provide valuable ecological data on lionfish in a recently invaded and biologically critical
estuary and to provide baseline data for local research and effective removal strategies.
KEYWORDS: Lionfish, mangroves, estuarine, biodiversity, invasive
63
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
COMPOSICIÓN DE LAS PESQUERÍAS DEL PARQUE NACIONAL SISTEMA ARRECIFAL
VERACRUZANO
COMPOSITION OF THE FISHERIES IN THE NATIONAL PARK REEF SYSTEM IN
VERACRUZ
COMPOSITION DE LA PÊCHE LE PARQUET NATIONAL SYSTÈM DE REEF EN
VERACRUZ
CLAUDIA DÁVILA PATRICIA ARCEO, CÉSAR MEINERS MANDUJANO, y ALEJANDRO
GRANADOS BARBA
Instituto de Ciencias Marinas y ¨Pesquerías Hidalgo 617 Col.río Jamapa Boca del Río , Veracruz 94290
México [email protected]
64
RESUMEN
En diversas investigaciones donde se evalúa el Índice Trófico Medio (ITM) de las capturas a nivel global
y regional, se ha reportado que el ITM de las capturas ha disminuido. Bajo este contexto, es necesario
esclarecer la situación en la que se encuentran las pesquerías del Parque Nacional Sistema Arrecifal
Veracruzano (PNSAV), localizado en la costa central mexicana del Golfo de México, donde se desarrolla
una pesquería artesanal multiespecífica, mediante la evaluación de la estructura trófica y contribución
relativa por grupos de especies. Para ello se construyó y analizó una base de datos de registros oficiales
mensuales de pesca comercial por especie de 1998 al 2012, estuvo compuesta por aproximadamente 100
especies. El ITM experimentó un incremento sostenido y se observó la disminución de la captura durante
el mismo período. En cuanto a la contribución relativa, el nivel trófico bajo (zooplanctófagos, detritívoros
y herbívoros) fue relevante al principio y disminuyó con el tiempo, su contribución fue del 12%, en tanto
que el nivel trófico medio (omnívoros) aumentó progresivamente y contribuyó con un total de 46%, por
último el nivel trófico alto (carnívoros) permaneció constante aportando el 42% del total de las capturas.
Se requiere de un estudio más detallado para discutir algunos de los resultados de esta investigación
PALABRAS CLAVES: PNSAV, Índice Trófico Medio (ITM), pesquerias artesanales
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
PESQUERÍAS SOSTENIBLES EN LA REGIÓN OCCIDENTAL DEL ARCHIPIÉLAGO
CUBANO: PAPEL DE LA EDUCACIÓN AMBIENTAL
SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES IN THE WESTERN CUBAN ARCHIPELAGO: THE ROLE OF
ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION
PÊCHERIES DURABLES DANS LA RÉGION OUEST DE L'ARCHIPEL CUBAIN: LE RÔLE
DE L'ÉDUCATION
MARIA DE LOS ANGELES
Acuario Nacional de Cuba Avenida 1ra calle 60 Miramar, Playa Havana, Cuba
[email protected]
RESUMEN
La educación ambientalbusca armonizar las relaciones que se establecen entre el hombre y el medio
ambiente, promoviendo acciones educativas para garantizar un mejor uso de los recursos naturales. La
experiencia en el campo de la Educación Ambiental alcanzada por Cuba es alta, existen un gran número
de organismos que contribuyen con sus acciones a eliminar o minimizar los problemas ambientales
existentes en las comunidades pesqueras así como la explotación sostenible de los recursos pesqueros. En
la actualidad es evidente que los problemas ambientales tienen su fundamento en fenómenos sociales y
por tanto los cambios en este sentido tienen que modificar radicalmente las formas de apropiación de la
naturaleza y sus transformaciones tecnológicas en comparación con las formas tradicionales, así como la
influencia social en la gestión de pesquerías sostenibles. El presente trabajo tiene como objetivo mostrar
los resultados obtenidos a partir de la aplicación de un programa de educación ambiental en comunidades
pesqueras de la región occidental del archipiélago cubano a partir de: aausencia de normas en su relación
con el medio ambiente, poco conocimiento de la vida en el mar y su relación con la costa, deterioro
ambiental y falta de conciencia y gestión propia ante los problemas de la comunidad. Se aplica una
metodología de investigación científica –acción –participación.
PALABRAS CLAVES: Environmental education, sustainable fisheries, fishing communities, Cuba
65
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
QUEEN CONCH DEMOGRAPHY INFLUENCES REPRODUCTIVE BEHAVIOR AND
FECUNDITY: IMPLICATIONS FOR FISHERIES MANAGEMENT
DEMOGRAFÍA INFLUENCIA EL COMPORTAMIENTO REPRODUCTIVO Y LA
FECUNDIDAD DEL CARACOL ROSADO: IMPLICACIONES PARA EL MANEJO DE LA
PESQUERÍA
INFLUENCES DE LA DÉMOGRAPHIE COMPORTEMENT EN MATIÈRE DE
PROCRÉATION ET DE LA FÉCONDITÉ: IMPLICATIONS POUR LA GESTION DE LA
PÊCHE
GABRIEL DELGADO, ROBERT GLAZER, and BRITTANI BURTON
Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, Fish and Wildlife Research Institute 2796 Overseas
Hwy, Suite 119 Marathon, FL 33050 USA [email protected]
66
ABSTRACT
Queen conch (Lobatus gigas) are harvested intensively throughout the Caribbean for their meat, shell, and
pearls. To ensure sustainability, fishery management strategies need to consider the distinctive biology of
the species (e.g. density-dependent reproduction, determinate growth). In this vein, it is unknown if
fecundity is influenced by size and age as in fish and lobster. Therefore, managers need to know if
fecundity declines with age (i.e. thicker lips), and if so, does compensation occur by increasing mating
and spawning frequency. We tracked 22 female conch at Looe Key, Florida and collected all egg masses
laid from June to August 2011. Conch were grouped into age classes based on lip thickness: young adult
11-15mm, adult 15-25mm, very old >25mm. Female fecundity (i.e. the estimated number of eggs in an
egg mass) showed no significant difference among age groups. However, transect surveys of spawning
aggregations throughout the Florida Keys from 2003-2011 showed that young adults did not mate or
spawn as frequently as adults and very old adults (P<0.001). So while age does not seem to affect an
individual‟s fecundity, young adults as a group have lower reproductive output because they do not
engage in reproductive activities as frequently as older individuals. As such, population demographics
play a crucial role in recovery and/or sustainable harvest. This argues for incorporating management
approaches that maximize reproductive output from mature aggregations whose densities exceed
minimum thresholds to avoid Allee effects.
KEYWORDS: queen conch, fecundity, reproduction, age, lip thickness
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
PREMIÈRE ÉVALUATION DU RISQUE DE CIGUATOXICITÉ DU POISSON LION DANS
LES ANTILLES FRANÇAISES
LIONFISH CIGUATOXICITY RISK ASSESSMENT IN FRENCH ANTILLES
PRIMERA EVALUACIÓN DEL RIESGO DE CIGUATOXICIDAD DEL PEZ LEON EN LAS
ANTILLAS FRANCESAS
NICOLAS DIAZ, WIDGY SAHA, et ANTHONY PAUTONNIER
CRPMEM Guadeloupe 2 bis rue Schoelcher Pointe-à-Pitre, Guadeloupe 97110 France
[email protected]
RÉSUMÉ
Arrivé dans les Antilles françaises en 2010 le poisson lion y est maintenant omniprésent. Sa prolifération
rapide en fait une menace pour l‟équilibre des écosystèmes marins récifaux et pour les rendements de la
pêche professionnelle. Considérant ces ravages potentiels, le Comité Régional des Pêches de Guadeloupe
à mis en place un programme de lutte afin d‟impliquer les marins professionnels dans la stratégie du
contrôle de la prolifération de cette espèce invasive à travers des pêches commerciales et la
consommation du poisson lion. En raison du positionnement trophique du poisson lion, il pourrait être
vecteur de la ciguatera. C‟est pour cela qu‟avant d‟encourager sa commercialisation, le risque de
ciguatoxicité a été évalué par des analyses sur la chair du poisson, doublées par une enquête
épidémiologique auprès des premiers consommateurs volontaires. Les analyses ont été réalisées sur des
échantillons de Guadeloupe, Saint-Martin et Saint-Barthélemy. Les résultats obtenus montrent une
absence totale de ciguatoxines en Guadeloupe. En revanche, à Saint-Barthélemy, un échantillon sur deux
a révélé la présence de ciguatoxines avec des concentrations comprises entre 0,01 et 0,413 ppb. En
conséquence, une réglementation différenciée doit être instaurée, autorisant la commercialisation dans
l‟archipel Guadeloupéen et interdisant la commercialisation dans îles de Saint-Martin et SaintBarthélemy. Ces premiers résultats ont été partagés avec des pêcheurs et gestionnaires des Petites Antilles
lors d‟un atelier régional organisé en Guadeloupe le 10 et 11 juillet 2013. Les résultats des premières
études et les échanges ont démontré la nécessité d‟étendre et d‟approfondir les dépistages dans les régions
à risque, de disposer de tests rapides et fiables et de mieux comprendre la corrélation entre concentration
de CCTX et l‟apparition de symptômes d‟intoxication.
MOTS CLÉS: Lionfish, ciguatera, Antilles
67
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
USING A LANDING CRADLE TO FILL THE DATA GAP LEFT BY REALLY BIG FISH
EL USO DE UN SOPORTE PARA LLENAR EL VACÍO DE INFORMACIÓN DADA POR LOS
PECES GRANDES
L'UTILISATION D'UN BERCEAU POUR COMBLER LE VIDE DE DONNÉES DONNÉE PAR
LES GROS POISSONS
PAVEL DIMENS, MARCUS DRYMON, and SEAN POWERS
Dauphin Island Sea Lab 101 Bienville Blvd. Dauphin Island, Alabama 36528 United States
[email protected]
68
ABSTRACT
In 2006, the Dauphin Island Sea Lab (DISL) began conducting bottom longline surveys along the north
central Gulf of Mexico. The data gathered from these surveys are used to make ecological connections
between organisms and their environment, as well as inform stock assessment models and the resulting
management decisions. While DISL has caught and gathered data on thousands of fish since beginning
the program, the gear available on the vessels did not allow for accurate measurements on large species
that could not be safely boated. While encounters with these large fish provide valuable catch and effort
data, our inability to boat them precludes precise measurements and maturity status determinations. To
address these limitations, in 2010 the DISL developed a low-cost landing cradle to safely lift large fishes
onto the deck of the boat. The implementation of this cradle has resulted in accurate length measurements
of an additional 74 large coastal sharks across 8 species. The addition of a spring scale in 2013 has
provided weight data for 14 large sharks that would otherwise have gone unweighed. Our preliminary
results demonstrate how the integration of a landing cradle into longline surveys provides researchers a
safe platform for accurately inserting intramuscular tags, getting precise (mm)length measurements,
taking blood and tissue samples, and getting proper sex and sexual maturity information. Given current
harvest restrictions (for example, closure of the commercial fishery for Sandbar shark Carcharhinus
plumbeus), the landing sling is an additional tool researchers can employ to gather increasingly important
life history data for shark populations recovering from overexploitation.
KEYWORDS: Fish, Methods, cradle, shark, sampling
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
EFFECT OF SEASON AND SCALE ON POWER TO DETECT CHANGE IN MANGROVE
FISH ASSEMBLAGES
EFECTOS TEMPORALES Y DE ESCALA COMO PODER PARA DETECTAR CAMBIOS EN
COMUNIDADES DE PECES DE MANGLE
L’EFFET DU SAISON ET DE L’ÉCHELLE SUR LA PROBABILITÉ DE DÉCOUVRIR DES
CHANGEMENTS DANS LES ASSEMBLAGES DES POISSONS DANS LES MANGROVES
TARA DOLAN1 and JOSEPH SERAFY2
National Marine Fisheries Service University of Miami 1239 Monroe St. NE Washington, DC20017 USA
[email protected],
2
National Marine Fisheries Service, Southeast Fisheries Science Center, 75 Virginia Beach Dr. Miami, FL
33149
1
ABSTRACT
An expansion is underway of a nuclear power plant on the shoreline of Biscayne Bay, Florida, USA; the
effects of its construction and operation on surrounding marine habitats and fishes are unknown. The
fringing intertidal mangrove stands that border the power plant property are critical habitat for a number
of fish species of ecological and commercial importance. The present study examined data gathered as
part of an ongoing monitoring survey of mangrove fish communities. Our objective was to determine the
adequacy of the survey to detect fish community changes, should they occur, at three spatial scales. Using
seasonally-resolved data recorded during 477 fish surveys over a 5-year period, power analyses were
performed for three metrics: fish diversity, fish density and the occurrence of two ecologically-important
fish species (Lutjanus griseus and Floridichthys carpio). Results indicated that the monitoring study at
current sampling intensity allows for detection of a < 30% change in fish density and diversity metrics in
both the wet and the dry season. However, sampling effort is insufficient in either season to detect a <
30% change in species-specific occurrence metrics for the two important fish species examined. More
effective monitoring strategies could be achieved by increasing sampling intensity within each season
until effort allocation is sufficient to detect 30% change for each metric after only one year of post-impact
sampling. Responsible monitoring practices are increasingly important in light of cumulative impacts to
the coastal zone resulting from hydrological alteration, coastal development and water quality
degradation, among others.
KEYWORDS: mangrove, assessment, fish assemblage, monitoring, power
69
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
LOCATION IS EVERYTHING: DIFFERENTIAL MATING SUCCESS OF WRASSES AT A
MATING SITE IMPACTED BY DIVER FISH FEEDING
LA UBICACIÓN LO ES TODO: VARIABILIDAD DEL ÉXITO DEL APAREAMIENTO DE
LOS PECES DONCELLA EN UN SITIO DE REPRODUCCIÓN AFECTADO POR
ACTIVIDADES DE BUCEO DONDE SE ALIMENTA A LOS PECES
LA LOCALISATION FAIT TOUT : DIFFÉRENCE DE SUCCÈS REPRODUCTEUR DES
LABRES DANS UN SITE DE REPRODUCTION IMPACTÉ PAR LE NOURRISSAGE DES
POISSONS PAR LES PLONGEURS
TERRY DONALDSON, MARYLOU HILDEBRAND STAMAN, and TARYN MESA
University of Guam Marine Laboratory UOG Station Mangilao, Guam 96923 USA
[email protected]
70
ABSTRACT
Twenty species of wrasses (Labridae) mate either in temporary resident spawning aggregations or in
small groups at Finger Reef, Guam. This site is popular also with groups of scuba divers and snorkelers
that frequently feed fishes. The influence of fish feeding increases the density of most wrasse species
compared to elsewhere. Thus, the mating system of species with increased local densities has changed as
well. Five of these species utilize a system that is lek-like with paired or group spawning within a resident
spawning aggregation. We measured courtship and spawning success rates for three of these species,
Cheilinus trilobatus, Epibulus insidiator and Gomphosus varius. Terminal-phase males of each species
utilize distinctive landmarks and establish temporary territories around them for courtship. They defend
these against rival males, and sneaker initial-phase males, while attempting to attract females that visit the
spawning aggregation site. Males holding temporary territories directly adjacent to the outer reef slope of
this site, where current exposure appears to be greatest, had significantly higher rates of mating success
compared to those males holding temporary territories away from the outer slope or in the interior of the
site. Our results suggest that dominant males within this resident spawning aggregation that defend these
outer reef slope sites successfully against rival males achieve greater mating success through increased
access to females, and that females may be selecting these males on the basis of the location of their
territories.
KEYWORDS: Courtship site, Lek-like behavior, reef fishes, spawning aggregation, Territoriality
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
VERTICAL LONGLINE GEAR PERFORMANCE ON ARTIFICIAL REEFS OF THE TEXAS
COASTAL BEND
RENDIMIENTO DE LOS PALANGRES VERTICALES EN LOS ARRECIFES ARTIFICIALES
DE TEXAS COASTAL BEND
LES PERFORMANCES DE LA PALANGRE VERTICALE SUR LES RÉCIFS ARTIFICIELS
DU TEXAS COASTAL BEND
CHARLES H. DOWNEY1, TORRI R. KLING2, MATT AJEMIAN1, JENNIFER WETZ1 and. GREG
STUNZ1
1
Harte Research Institute Texas A&M University - Corpus Christi 6300 Ocean Dr. Corpus Christi, Texas
78412 United States [email protected]
2
Colorado State University Colorado State University Fort Collins Colorado 80523 United States
ABSTRACT
Fishery-independent surveys provide a means to acquire standardized abundance and diversity data that
are adequately replicated over time and space. The standardization of these surveys control gear and/or
sample-related variability which allows researchers to assess the impact of seasonality, habitat, and a
variety of other factors that affect abundance fluctuations of fisheries species. Following the Southeastern
Area Monitoring and Assessment Program (SEAMAP) protocol we recently implemented a vertical
longline (VLL) survey for demersal fishes inhabiting artificial reefs of the Texas coast. These reefs are
dominated by cutoff and toppled oil and gas platforms which vary in complexity, size, water depth and
distance from shore. Three hook sizes (15/0, 11/0 and 8/0) were used to sample reefs varying between 30
and 60 m total depth. A subset of the deployments was accompanied by a GoPro© camera to supplement
catch data with visual estimates of abundance, depredation events, and escapes. Neither hook size nor
drop order affected the number of fish captured or seen, suggesting there was no enhanced baiting by
larger gear or prolonged deployment times. The abundance and diversity of catch per deployment was not
affected by the addition of the GoPro© camera. Preliminary results show a positive correlation between
fish size (total length and weight) and hook size while diversity decreases as hook size increases. Our
findings indicate that vertical longline surveys are a valid assessment tool for estimating fish abundance
on Texas artificial reefs. However, as has been demonstrated elsewhere, VLL gear tends to target Red
Snapper.
KEYWORDS: Artificial reef, vertical kongline, red snapper, Texas, demersal fish
71
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
CHARACTERIZATION OF DIET COMPOSITION OF THE LIONFISH, PTEROIS VOLITANS,
AT TURNEFFE ATOLL, BELIZE
CARACTERIZACIÓN DE LA DIETA COMPOSICIÓN DEL PEZ LEÓN, PTEROIS VOLITANS,
EN TURNEFFE ATOLL, BELICE
CARACTÉRISATION DE RÉGIME COMPOSITION DE LA RASCASSE VOLANTE, PTEROIS
VOLITANS, À TURNEFFE ATOLL, BELIZE
ALAN DOWNEY-WALL, DEREK HOGAN, JASON SELWYN, and PAOLO USSEGLIO
Department of Life Sciences, Texas A&M - Corpus , Department of Biology, University of Hawaii Manoa
72
ABSTRACT
Examining the feeding ecology and dietary composition of an invading species is critical for
understanding the impact of the invader on the indigenous populations and community structure. The
indo-pacific lionfish has emerged as the preeminent marine invasive species in the Caribbean. Here we
examined a Western Caribbean reef community at Turneffe atoll in Belize. We visually inspected the
stomach contents of 255 lionfish from 7 sites around the atoll. Sixty-five percent of the lionfish stomachs
contained identifiable individuals, while 19% were completely empty. Four different orders of
invertebrates were identified, and 15 species of teleosts from 11 families. The bluehead wrasse
(Labridae), Thalassoma bifasciatum, and the masked goby (Gobiidae), Coryphopterus personatus,
accounted for 59% of all identified teleost specimens. However, 43% were unidentifiable specimens due
to advanced digestion, DNA barcoding analysis may reveal the identity of these digested contents.
KEYWORDS: Lionfish, diet composition, feeding ecology, invasive species, stomach content
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
DIVERSITY OF TROPHIC NICHES AMONG SCARIDAE (GUADELOUPE, LESSER
ANTILLES)
DIVERSIDAD DE LOS NICHOS TRÓFICOS ENTRE LOS SCARIDAE (GUADELOUPE,
ANTILLAS MENORES)
DIVERSITÉ DES NICHES TROPHIQUES PARMI LES SCARIDAE (GUADELOUPE, LESSER
ANTILLES)
CHARLOTTE DROMARD1, YOLANDE BOUCHON-NAVARO1, MIREILLE HARMELIN-VIVIEN2,
and CLAUDE BOUCHON1
1
DYNECAR Université des Antilles et de la Guyane Laboratoire de Biologie Marine Campus de Fouillole
Pointe-à-Pitre, Guadeloupe 97159 France [email protected]
2
Mediterranean Institute of OceanographyAix-Marseille University Campus de Luminy Case 901
Marseille 13288 France
ABSTRACT
Scaridae (parrotfishes) represent a common family of herbivorous fishes on Caribbean reefs. They play a
major role in controlling the algal dynamics of the reef benthic communities and are widely exploited by
Caribbean fisheries. In this study, we stated the hypothesis that the coexistence of the different species of
Scaridae is allowed by the diversity of their trophic niche. To investigate this fact, a study was conducted
on seven species of Scarids, abundant on the reefs of Guadeloupe. Stomach content analyses were
coupled with stable isotope analyses (13C/12C and 15N/14N ratios) to determine their trophic niches.
Contributions of sources in the fish diet were estimated using a mixing model. These fishes presented
small δ15N differences whereas they showed more scattered δ13C values, which imply the use of
diversified sources of carbon. Among the seven studied species, three types of trophic niche were found.
A first group of fishes, constituted by Sparisoma chrysopterum, S. rubripinne and Scarus iseri, mostly
used macroalgae, especially algae at a juvenile stage present in the turf. Sparisoma viride, Scarus vetula
and S. taeniopterus were grouped together due to their common use of living coral as protein intake along
with macroalgae. Finally, Sparisoma aurofrenatum presented a specific diet, principally based on the
assimilation of algal turf. The seven scarid species ingested and assimilated differently the food items
present on the reef, presenting different trophic niches. This diversity could allow them to share food
resources without competitive interactions.
KEYWORDS: Scaridae, stomach content analysis, stable isotope analysis, trophic niches, Caribbean reefs
73
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
GLOVER'S REEF MARINE RESERVE (GRMR) CHARTING THE WAY FORWARD FOR
IMPROVED MPA MANAGEMENT IN BELIZE
RESERVA MARINA DE ARRECIFE DE GLOVERS (GRMR) TRAZA EL CAMINO A SEGUIR
PARA MEJORAR LA GESTION AMP EN BELICE
RESERVA MARINE DE GLOVER REEF (GRMR) TRACER LA ROUTE À SUIVRE POUR
AMÉLIORER MARIN PROTÉGÉ LA ZONE GESTION AU BELIZE
ALICIA ECK1, ROBIN COLEMAN2, and JULIO MAAZ2
Belize Fisheries Department Glover's Reef Marine Reserve 1st Floor Coastal Zone Multi plex Building,
Princess Margarite Drive Belize, Belize [email protected]
2
Wildlife Conservation Society 1755 Coney Drive Belize Belize Belize
1
74
ABSTRACT
Up to a couple of years ago, all the Belize fishing waters were managed under an open-access system.
Under this system, fishers are driven by a race to fish with little regard to regulations, as their primary
objective is to maximize profits in the shortest length of time. The number of licensed commercial fishers
in Belize has increased steadily, and fishers target two fully-exploited species, conch and lobster. The
increasing number of fishers translates to insecure livelihoods, unstable incomes, and diminishing local,
sustainable sources of protein. GRMR is one of two marine reserves in Belize managed under a rightsbased regime called managed access that was introduced in mid-2011. This program provides traditional
fishers a secure, dedicated share of a fishing area. It encourages fishers and local communities to become
stewards of the marine reserve, by ensuring that they benefit from conserving the resources – leading to
resource sustainability and secure livelihoods. Managed access strengthens the role of the fully-protected
replenishment zones by improving patrols through better planning and reporting, and increasing penalties
via a “three strike” rule. Preliminary results are very positive, showing an increase in catches and catchper-unit-effort (CPUE) of conch over the past three years. The number of infractions, as well as their
gravity, has also been reduced. These results are attributed to better enforcement and a more responsible
cohort of fishers using the atoll. Encouraged by these improvements, the GRMR staff continues to work
with its partners to seek innovative ways to strengthen management effectiveness of the reserve.
KEYWORDS: Rights-based management, Belize, open access, replenishment zones
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
CIGUATERA FISH POISONING IN THE NORTHWESTERN GULF OF MEXICO
INTOXICACIÓN POR CIGUATERA PECES EN EL NOROESTE DEL GOLFO DE MÉXICO
EMPOISONNEMENT DU CIGUATERA POISSON DANS LE NORD-OUEST DU GOLFE DU
MEXIQUE
RYAN J. ECKERT1, ALISON ROBERTSON2, CHRISTOPHER LOEFFLER2, EMMA L.
HICKERSON1 MICHELLE A. JOHNSTON1, and GEORGE P. SCHMAHL1
1
NOAA Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary 4700 Avenue U Bldg 216 Galveston, TX 77551
USA [email protected]
2
FDAGulf Coast Seafood Laboratory 1 AIberville Drive Dauphin Island AL 36528 USA
ABSTRACT
In 2007, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) confirmed a case of ciguatera fish poisoning (CFP)
from a Gag Grouper caught in the Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary (FGBNMS). As a
response, researchers from FGBNMS and University of Texas Marine Science Institute sampled 12
species of fish around the FGBNMS for ciguatoxins. The analysis by FDA resulted in high levels of
ciguatoxins in 13% of the sampled fish, leading FDA to issue a letter of guidance to seafood processors
recommending they avoid purchasing large carnivorous reef fish caught near FGBNMS. In 2011,
FGBNMS researchers were notified of another CFP case from the consumption of Grouper caught within
the sanctuary, which was confirmed by the FDA. This led FGBNMS and FDA to begin a collaborative
study to reexamine ciguatera in the Northwestern Gulf of Mexico. The study is examining the
concentrations of ciguatoxins in a variety of carnivorous reef fish species, as well as concentrations of
ciguatera causing dinoflagellates (Gambierdiscus spp.) found on algae. Ongoing opportunistic fish
sampling is currently underway, looking at various species of Snapper, Grouper, Jack, and Mackerel, and
invasive Pacific lionfish, as well as other commercially and recreationally important species. In order to
more fully understand the human health issues of consuming fish caught in the sanctuary, FGBNMS
researchers are also investigating mercury levels of sampled fish species.
KEYWORDS: Ciguatera, Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary, Gambierdiscus, Gulf of
Mexico, mercury
75
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
PRELIMINARY ANALYSIS OF LIONFISH (PTEROIS VOLITANS AND P. MILES)
POPULATIONS IN BERMUDA
EL ANÁLISIS PRELIMINAR DE LA POBLACIÓN DEL PEZ LEÓN (PTEROIS VOLITANS Y P.
MILES) EN LAS BERMUDAS
UNE ANALYSE PRÉLIMINAIRE DE LA POPULATION DE POISSON-LION (PTEROIS
VOLITANS ET P. MILES) AUX BERMUDES
COREY EDDY1, JOANNA PITT2, STRUAN SMITH3, GRETCHEN GOODBODY-GRINGLEY4 and
JAMES GLEASON5
1
University of Massacusetts Dartmouth 285 Old Westport Road Dartmouth, MA 02747 United States
[email protected]
2
Department of Environmental Protection Government of Bermuda PO Box CR52 Crawl CRBX Bermuda
3
Bermuda Natural History MuseumBermuda Aquarium Museum and Zoo PO Box FL 145 Flatts FL BX
Bermuda
4
Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences 17 Biological Lane Ferry Reach St. George GE01 Bermuda
5
Bermuda Lionfish Task Force Ocean Support Foundation Suite 1222 48 Par-la-Ville Road Hamilton
HM11 Bermuda [email protected]
76
ABSTRACT
Since the first official sighting of the invasive lionfish (Pterois volitans and P. miles) in Bermuda nearly
fifteen years ago, anecdotal evidence suggests their population is concentrated at depths greater than 60
feet (20 meters) and is expanding more slowly than in other parts of the northwestern Atlantic Ocean.
However, research into the distribution, population status and ecological impact of lionfish in Bermuda
has only recently begun. In 2013, approximately 60 sites in 5 depth bands were surveyed to determine
lionfish and prey fish abundance. In the same period, approximately 200 lionfish were captured by
surveyors, recreational spear fishers and SCUBA divers, and commercial fishermen. Captured fish were
weighed, measured, and dissected to provide otoliths for age and growth studies, and various tissue
samples for further analyses. Based on these efforts, we present a preliminary size distribution, age
structure and gender ratio, a length/weight relationship and a size-at-age based growth curve for the
invasive lionfish population in Bermuda. Preliminary results from stomach content analyses suggest,
among other things, that small crustaceans are the most common prey item. All reported sightings and
captures to date have been compiled to produce a preliminary distribution map. Lastly, one 60 meter site
was visited repeatedly to provide insights toward the rate at which lionfish re-colonize preferred habitat
types. Although still in the early stages, this research highlights some of the ways in which the invasive
lionfish population in Bermuda differs from others in the region.
KEYWORDS: Lionfish, Bermuda, population structure, feeding ecology, distribution
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
SPAWNING-RELATED MOVEMENT PATTERNS OF GOLIATH GROUPER (EPINEPHELUS
ITAJARA) OFF THE ATLANTIC COAST OF FLORIDA
PATRONES DE MOVIMIENTO RELACIONADOS AL DESOVE DEL MERO GUASA
(EPINEPHELUS ITAJARA) EN LAS AFUERAS DE LA COSTA ATLANTICA DE FLORIDA
MODÈLES DE MOUVEMENT LIÉS À LA REPRODUCTION DES MÉROUS GÉANT
(EPINEPHELUS ITAJARA) DE LA CÔTE ATLANTIQUE DE LA FLORIDE
ROBERT ELLIS1, CHRIS KOENIG2, and FELICIA COLEMAN2
1
Florida State University 1604 Branch St Tallahassee, FL 32303 USA [email protected]
2
Florida State University Coastal and Marine Laboratory 3618 Coastal Highway 98 St. Teresa FL
32358-2702 USA 2Fl
ABSTRACT
Goliath grouper (Epinephelus itajara), the largest reef fish in the western Atlantic, was once relatively
common throughout Florida and the Caribbean. Due to overfishing and loss of juvenile habitat, it is
considered critically endangered (IUCN). However, under total protection since 1990, population
recovery is occurring is the southeastern US. Spawning aggregations are now forming on the shelf off
southeast and southwest Florida. Aggregations of 20 to over 100 individuals occur on specific sites, both
artificial and natural sites, from late July through October. In an effort to determine the nature of
spawning migrations, we implanted 40 adult goliath grouper with ultrasonic transmitter tags (VEMCO 69
kHz V16-P coded transmitters) on known spawning sites in 2010 and 2012. Tagged fish were tracked as
they moved through the Florida Atlantic Coast Telemetry array of VEMCO VR2 and VR2W ultrasonic
receivers. Results indicate that adult goliath grouper are relatively sedentary during non-spawning months
(mean monthly distance moved = 1.98 km ± 0.6) but moved significantly more prior to aggregation
formation in July (18.5 km ± 8.56). Tagged fish moved more during spawning months compared to nonspawning months. Multiple individuals were tracked moving long distances (> 300-km) between
residence reefs and spawning sites. Site fidelity to aggregations was high: 84.2% of tagged fish returned
to the site of tagging after one year and 77.8% returned after two years. Our study utilizes long-term
tagging data of individual fish to aid in understanding the movement patterns of a large fish species of
special conservation concern.
KEYWORDS: grouper, spawning, movement, aggregation
77
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
BENTHIC COMMUNITY COMPOSITION ASSOCIATED WITH A GAS PLATFORM, HIGH
ISLAND A-389-A, LOCATED WITHIN THE FLOWER GARDEN BANKS NATIONAL
MARINE SANCTUARY
COMPOSICION DE LA COMUNIDAD BENTONICA ASOCIADA A UNA ESTRUCTURA DE
PETROLEO, HI-A-389-A, UBICADO DENTRO DE FLOWER GARDEN BANKS NATIONAL
MARINE SANCTUARY
COMPOSITION DE LA COMMUNAUTE BENTHIQUE ASSOCIEE A UNE STRUCTURE DE
PETROLE, HI-A-389-A, SITUE AU SEIN DE FLOWER GARDEN BANKS NATIONAL
MARINE SANCTUARY
JOHN EMBESI, RYAN ECKERT, EMMA HICKERSON, MICHELLE JOHNSTON MARISSA
NUTTALL, and GEORGE SCHMAHL
NOAA FGBNMS 4700 Ave U Galveston, TX 77550 USA [email protected]
78
ABSTRACT
The High Island A-389-A (HI-A-389-A) gas platform is located within the boundaries of the Flower
Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary (FGBNMS) in the Northwestern Gulf of Mexico. The platform
emerges from 124 meters water depth, 185 kilometers southeast of Galveston, Texas, and is 1.6 km from
the coral reef crest of the East Flower Garden Bank. HI-A-389-A was installed in 1981 and has developed
a complex benthic and fish community over the past thirty two years by providing hard substrate within
the water column. Much scientific debate has centered on what role oil and gas platforms and other
artificial reefs play in the larger Gulf of Mexico ecosystem and what their relationship and level of
similarity is to natural coral reefs. FGBNMS research team divers conducted benthic surveys of the
vertical and horizontal structures of the platform to document the biological components from forty
meters depth to the surface. The benthic community of the platform did not resemble the coral reefs of the
FGBNMS and was dominated by fouling organisms. The dominant coral species on the platform was an
invasive species of Tubastraea. Relatively few native hermatypic coral colonies were recorded.
KEYWORDS: platform, coral reef, artificial reef, Tubastraea, Flower Garden Banks
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
A PRELIMINARY ANALYSIS OF COMMUNITY-BASED LIVE FISH MONITORING IN
FOUR FISH SANCTUARIES IN JAMAICA
UN ANALISIS PRELINAR DE SEGUIMIENTO COMUNITARIO PECES VIVOS EN CUATRO
SANTUARIOS DE PESCADO EN JAMAICA
UNE ANALYSE PREMINIAIRE DE SUIVI COMMUNAUTAIRE DE POISSONS VIVENT
DANS QUATRE SANCTUAIRES DE POISSON EN JAMAÏQUE.
NEWTON ERISTHEE, OWEN DAY, MICHELLE MCNAUGHT, and SIMONE LEE
The CARIBSAVE Partnership Caribbean Regional Headquarters, Hastings House Balmoral Gap Christ
Church, Barbados [email protected]
ABSTRACT
Data collection within Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) and fish sanctuaries have traditionally been done
by teams of scientist with specialized skills. The Caribbean Fish Sanctuary Partnership (C-FISH)
Initiative has, so far, initiated the Community-based Live Fish (CLIF) methodology in five fish
sanctuaries or MPAs in Jamaica and one in the Eastern Caribbean. This methodology involves fishers,
wardens and community members, utilizing activities similar to fishing methods they already employ in
the trap fishery within their respective islands. CLIF involves catching fish using traditional fish traps
over a one month period, with two day soak times. Fish were anesthetised using a natural product (clove
oil), identified, weighed, and measured. After recovery from the anesthetic, fish were released using a
specially designed container to ensure safe transition to the reef without being predated on. Here we
present preliminary results from the first round of CLIF monitoring in fish sanctuaries in Jamaica
(Oracabessa, Bluefields, Salt Harbour and Galleaon). Mean fish biomass per trap inside the sanctuaries
ranged from 0.18  0.05kg – 0.46  0.08kg, Bluefields and Oracabessa respectively; While mean fish
biomass per trap outside the sanctuaries ranged from 0.09  0.04 kg – 0.42  0.17 kg, in Oracabessa and
Galleon respectively. All things being equal the value of fish catches to a fisher using ten traps (7 traps
inside the sanctuary and 3 traps outside) over a period of one month, based on current market prices,
ranges from US$ 140.40 – 269.76 in Bluefields and Galleon respectively.
KEYWORDS: Marine Protected Areas (MPAs), fish sanctuaries, community-based fish monitoring,
79
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
A SOCIOECONOMIC AND LIVELIHOOD ASSESSMENT OF FISHERS IN COMMUNITIES
ADJACENT TO SANDY ISLAND OYSTER BED MPA (SIOBMPA) IN THE GRENADINE
ISLAND OF CARRIACOU
UNA EVALUACIÓN SOCIOECONÓMICA Y EL SUSTENTO DE LOS PESCADORES EN
COMUNIDADES ADYACENTES A SANDY ISLAND OYSTER CAMA MPA ( SIOBMPA ) EN
LA ISLA DE GRANADINA DE CARRIACOU
A ÉVALUATIONS SOCIO-ÉCONOMIQUES ET LA SUBSISTANCE DES PÊCHEURS DE
COMMUNAUTÉS ADJACENTES SANDY ISLAND OYSTER BED MPA ( SIOBMPA ) DANS
L'ÎLE DE CARRIACOU GRENADINE
NEWTON ERISTHEE, ZAIDY KHAN, and OWEN DAY
The CARIBSAVE PARTNERSHIP Caribbean Regional Headquarters,Hastings House Balmoral Gap
Bridgetown, Barbados [email protected]
80
ABSTRACT
Artisanal fishing has always been an important source of employment for Caribbean coastal communities.
However, reduction in profitability of fishing due to pollution, over-fishing, as well as introduction of
Marine Protected Areas have forced many fishers out of the sector. Attempts to engage fishers in
alternative livelihoods are often unsucessful primarily because of a lack of understanding of
socioeconomic drivers as well as level of interest in a particular suite of supplementary livelihood
strategies. The Caribbean fish sanctuary partnership initiative (CFISH) currently supports several fish
sanctuaries or marine protected areas in the Caribbean Region. Here we present a possible model for
continued engagement of fishers of the Eastern Caribbean in MPA related governance as well as a better
understanding of alternative or supplementary livelihood opportunities of interest prior to interventions to
support these activities. Baseline data was collected through structured and open-ended interviews with
randomly selected fishers after an island wide census of fishers was done in Carriacou. This was followed
by a 1-day stakeholder consultation workshop. A total number of 68 full time and part time fishers were
identified. A total of 40 fishers were interviewed using the C-FISH socio-economic and preliminary
livelihood assessment survey forms. The survey results were validated during a one-day workshop. In
both processes fish aggregating devices (FADS) and fish marketing was rated as the first priority
alternative/ supplementary livelihood option for future funding considerations. Sea Moss farming was
rated as the second priority and eco–tourism tours as third priority alternative/ supplementary livelihood
option.
KEYWORDS: Marine Protected Areas (MPAs), alternative/ supplementary livelihoods, fishers
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
NOVEL PREDATOR, NOVEL HABITAT: A DIET ANALYSIS AND EXPERIMENTAL TEST
OF THE ECOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF INVASIVE LIONFISH IN FLORIDA BAY
UN DEPREDADOR SIN IGUAL ASECHANDO UN NUEVO HÁBITAT: ANÁLISIS
ALIMENTICIO Y PRUEBA EXPERIMENTAL DE LOS EFECTOS ECOLÓGICOS DEL
INVASOR PEZ LEÓN EN LA BAHÍA DE FLORIDA
NOUVEAU PRÉDATEUR, NOUVEL HABITAT: UNE ANALYSE DE LA NUTRITION ET UN
TEST EXPÉRIMENTAL SUR LES EFFETS ÉCOLOGIQUES DE L'INVASION DE LA BAIE
DE FLORIDE PAR LES RASCASSE VOLANTE
MEAGHAN FALETTI and ROBERT ELLIS
Florida State University Department of Biological Science 319 Stadium Dr Tallahassee, FL 32306-4295
USA [email protected]
ABSTRACT
Since its introduction to the western Atlantic and Caribbean the Indo-Pacific lionfish (Pterois volitans)
has undergone a population explosion which threatens the ecosystems it is invading. Determining the diet
of invading lionfish among the various habitats where they are found is critical for understanding the
ecological effects of the invasion. Our study combined a diet analysis and experimental transplant
experiment of lionfish found on the hardbottom habitats of Florida Bay. During June and July 2013 we
collected and analyzed the stomach contents of lionfish (n = 32) associated with limestone solution-holes
north of Marathon, FL. Prey found in collected stomachs was composed predominantly of teleost fishes,
although we also found a significant number of crustaceans in the diet (38% by number). Of the
identifiable teleost prey consumed, Gobiidae was the dominant prey item followed by Haemulon;
palaemonid shrimp were the most common crustacean in the diet. For the transplant experiment we
captured lionfish (n = 4) and released them at unoccupied solution holes. Prey communities were
monitored by divers on SCUBA for six weeks and compared to solution holes where lionfish were
already present (n = 5) and control holes without lionfish (n = 9). The presence of lionfish significantly
reduced the number of all juvenile fishes (< 5-cm) after just 3 weeks, while the addition of lionfish to
unoccupied holes reduced the number of palaemonids by 41%. Our study of lionfish in Florida Bay adds
to the mounting evidence on the ecological effects of this novel invasive predator.
KEYWORDS: lionfish, diet, invasion, ecology
81
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
FIRST PARASITOLOGICAL RECORDS AT LION FISH, PTEROIS VOLITANS (LINNAEUS,
1758) FOR CUBAN WATERS.
PRIMEROS REGISTROS PARASITOLÓGICOS EN PEZ LEÓN, PTEROIS VOLITANS
(LINNAEUS, 1758), PARA AGUAS CUBANAS.
LE PREMIER ENREGISTRE PARASITOLOGIQUE À POISSON LION, PTEROIS VOLITANS
(LINNAEUS, 1758), POUR LES EAUX CUBAINES.
RAMÓN ALEXIS FERNÁNDEZ OSORIO1, RAÚL IGOR CORRADA WONG1, PEDRO PABLO
CHEVALIER MONTEAGUDO1, HANSEL CABALLERO ARAGÓN1, ERLÁN CABRERA SANSON2
1
Acuario Nacional de Cuba, Ave. 1ra and 60, Playa, CP 11300, La Habana, Cuba.
[email protected]
82
ABSTRACT
The parasitic fauna of 1041 fishes of the invasive species Pterois volitans was studied, captured in
different locations in the Cuban archipelago. The parasites were observed in vivo or permanently fixed for
their description and identification. Prevalence (P), mean intensity (IM) and abundance (A) were
determined. A total of 6 species of parasites was identified: in gills and skin, the protozoan Cryptocaryon
irritans (P=0.19, IM=206, A=0.39), and the crustacean Anilocra haemuli (P=0.09, IM=1, A=0.001). In
intestine and pyloric ceca, the cestode larva Tetraphyllidea gen. sp. (P=0.38, IM=38, A=0.14) and
nematode larva Philometra sp. (P=0.38, IM=1.75, A=0.006); and the nematodes Hysterothylacium
reliquens (P=1.24, IM=4.7, A=0.05) and Spirocamallanus rebecae (P=0.7, IM=5.3, A=0.04). The
majority of the collected taxa has the strategy of a colonization generalist. The locations displaying the
largest infection parameters and composition of species were Guillermo Key and Coco Key (Archipelago
del Rey, on then Cuabn north shore), the area considered the primary point of the invasion. The infection
parameters of P. volitans showed depressed values, if they are compared with other native fish species.
The communities parasites are still far from constituting a control mechanism for P. volitans populations.
KEYWORDS: lionfish, parasitic fauna, Cuba
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
AGE AND GROWTH OF THE GOLIATH GROUPER EPINEPHELUS ITAJARA IN BRAZIL
EDAD Y CRESCIMENTO DEL MERO EPINEPHELUS ITAJARA EN BRAZIL
L'ÂGE ET LA CROISSANCE DU EPINEPHELUS ITAJARA AU BRÉSIL
BEATRICE FERREIRA1, MATHEUS FREITAS2, EDVALDO COSTA JUNIOR3, ALBERTO
SANTOS3, VINICIUS GIGLIO4, MAURICIO HOSTIM-SILVA5, and SERGIO REZENDE4
1
Universidade Federal de Pernambuco AV ARQUITETURA RECIFE, PE 54410010 BRAZIL
[email protected]
2
Universidade Federal do Parana 3Projeto Meros do Brasil
3
Projeto Meros do Brasil
4
Universidade Estadual de Santa Cruz
5
Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo
ABSTRACT
The goliath grouper Epinephelus itajara occurs along the Brazilian coast where intensive fishing has led
to its severe population reduction. The species is considered as critically endangered (CR A2bcd)
according to IUCN red list criteria and it is protected by federal law since 2002. Under the Projecto
Meros, a national effort funded by Petrobras Ambiental, biological samples were gathered along the coast
for over 10 years. Otoliths and spines were collected from individuals found dead or killed by ilegal
fishing (after environmental police interception) or during research tagging operations (non letal
collection of spines or rays). The sampling area ranges from 07° 54‟ to 29° 32‟, and ocurred in both
estuarines and reef or open sea areas. A total of 80 otoliths and 52 spines were read from individuals
measuring 19 to 220 cm TL. The minimum age observed was 0 and the maximum 25 years. Juvenile fish
up to 4-5 years remained in estuaries while older fish were found at sea. VBGF parameters were
L∞=295.26, K=0.06, t0=-1.0. The low K value reflects the low percentage of older individuals causing
less inflection of the curve. The projected age at weight curve indicates that fish could live up to 50 years
if allowed to attain the maximum weigth recorded in the past, which was almost twice as heavy and the
average maximum recorded in our sample.
KEYWORDS: goliath grouper, age, growth, spines, endangered
83
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
METODOLOGÍA PARA EL MONITOREO DE USO PÚBLICO EN ÁREAS MARINAS
PROTEGIDAS
METHODOLOGY FOR THE MONITORING OF PUBLIC USE IN MARINE PROTECTED
AREAS
MÉTHODOLOGIE POUR LA SURVEILLANCE DE L'USAGE PUBLIC DES SECTEURS
MARINS PROTÉGÉS.
TAMARA FIGUEREDO MARTÍN1, FABIAN PINA AMARGÓS1, LESLIE HERNÁNDEZ
FERNÁNDEZ1, ELENA DE LA GUARDIA LLANSÓ2, JORGE ANGULO VALDES2 , YANDY
RODRIGUEZ CUETO1, y ROBERTO GONZALEZ DE ZAYAS1
1
Centro de Investigaciones de Ecosistemas Costero Cayo Coco Moron Cayo Coco, C de Avila Cuba
[email protected]
2
Centro de Investigaciones Marinas Havana Cuba
84
RESUMEN
La sostenibilidad ambiental de las Áreas Marina Protegidas desde el punto de vista del uso turístico, ha
sido una preocupación del Centro Nacional de Áreas Protegidas, así como de diferentes instituciones
científicas en Cuba. Desde el 2006 se definieron una serie de indicadores y umbrales para el manejo del
uso público en nuestras áreas, siguiendo el enfoque basado en la Capacidad de Carga combinado con el
monitoreo y los cambios. Sin embargo, poco se ha llevado a vías de hecho. Uno de los aspectos que puede
atentar en contra de la realización continuada de los mismos, es la ausencia de protocolos para su
ejecución. Por ello el objetivo del presente trabajo, es proponer métodos que permitan medir y diferenciar,
con carácter comparativo y científico, los indicadores y umbrales que proponen Perera-Valderrama y
colectivo de autores.Se proporcionan diferentes métodos para evaluar los 26 indicadores propuestos. Se
recomienda precisar algunos umbrales para poderlos medir de una manera más certera y se añaden 4
indicadores socio – económicos con los umbrales correspondientes para su análisis. Se recomienda la
aplicación de este protocolo en las áreas marinas protegidas de Cuba, además del Parque Nacional
Jardines de la Reina, para evaluar su efectividad.
PALABRAS CLAVES: Sustainability, public use, marine protected areas
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
RECREATIONAL FISHERIES IN JARDINES DE LA REINA, CUBA: CHARACTERIZATION
AND PERCEPTION ABOUT THE CONSERVATION STATUS OF THE AREA
PESCA RECREATIVA EN JARDINES DE LA REINA, CUBA: CARACTERIZACIÓN Y
PERCEPCIÓN SOBRE EL ESTADO DE CONSERVACIÓN DEL AREA
PÊCHERIES DE LOISIR À JARDINES DE LA REINA, CUBA. CARACTÉRISATION ET
PERCEPTION DU STATUT DE CONSERVATION DE LA RÉGION
TAMARA FIGUEREDO MARTÍN1, FABIAN PINA AMARGÓS1, JORGE ANGULO VALDÉS1, and
RAÚL GÓMEZ FERNÁNDEZ2
1
Centro de Investigaciones de Ecosistemas Costero Cayo Coco Moron Cayo Coco, C de Avila Cuba
[email protected]
2
Centro de Investigaciones Marinas, Universidad de la Habana Calle 16 entre 3ra y 3ra Playa Miaramar
Havana Cuba
ABSTRACT
Recreational fisheries are very popular around the world, being catch and release increasingly preferred.
Few studies have been carried out concerning recreational fisheries in Cuba, and not one of them has
focused on the socio-economic characteristics of the activity. The aim of this research is (1) to
socioeconomically characterize recreational fisheries in Jardines de la Reina and (2) to evaluate visitor‟s
perception concerning natural resources conservation. 93 recreational fishermen from 13 countries were
interviewed, mainly from United Kingdom, Canada, Argentina and United States of America. The sample
was dominated by males, 41 to 50 years old, married and with university degrees. 37 % had visited
Jardines de la Reina before, 4 times average. These repeaters currently consider the area in better
environmental conditions than in previous visits. Recreational fishery is ranked good or excellent by
interviewees and 100 % of them would recommend Jardines de la Reina as a fishing destination. The
main attraction is the abundance of target species (first, tarpon (Megalops atlanticus); second, bonefish
(Albula vulpes) and third, permits (Trachinotus sp.). It could be concluded that Jardines de la Reina are in
a good environmental conservation status. Recreational fishery is compatible with the conservation status
of protected area and is ranked as excellent and with international recognition by visitors. Jardines de la
Reina exceed the expectation from recreational fishermen when visit the area.
KEYWORDS: recreational fisheries, catch and release, socio-economics, conservation, management
85
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
NORTHERN GULF OF MEXICO LIONFISH: DISTRIBUTION AND REPRODUCTIVE LIFE
HISTORY TRAJECTORIES
PEZ LEON EN EL GOLFO DE MÉXICO NORTE: DISTRIBUCIÓN Y TRAYECTORIAS DE
LA VIDA HISTORIA DE REPRODUCCIÓN
ETUDES DU POISSON-LION DANS LE NORD DU GOLFE DU MEXIQUE: DISTRIBUTION
GÉOGRAPHIQUE ET TRAJECTOIRES DE VIE REPRODUCTIVE
ALEXANDER FOGG, MARK PETERSON and NANCY BROWN-PETERSON
University of Southern Mississippi Department of Coastal Sciences 703 East Beach Dr Ocean Springs,
MS 39564 United States [email protected]
86
ABSTRACT
Since first reported in 2010, non-native lionfish (Pterois volitans, P. miles) invading the northern Gulf of
Mexico (GOM) have increased. Ongoing life history research in the northern GOM relies on the
participation of recreational divers from different regions. Since initiation, more than 2,000 lionfish have
been collected from five northern GOM regions, ranging from 44-419 mm total length (TL). These
regions are: southeast (Florida Keys to north 28°; 14.8%, mean=228.4 mm, range=90-409 mm); northeast
(north 28° to west 85°; 2.9%, 259.7, 94-409), east central (west 85° to west 88°; 65.7%, 202.2, 58-406);
west central (west 88° to west 94°; 15.4%, 258.0, 44-419); and west (west 94° to Mexico border; 1.2%,
228.4, 143-274). Aslionfish are collected from a large area and at times in large numbers, the
examination of fresh specimens is not always feasible. Therefore, some fish used in this study have been
frozen prior to data collection; however, freezing can negatively impact reproductive biology analyses.
As part of a life-history study, we evaluate the effects of freezing and formalin fixation on the wet weight
(g) of gonadal tissue of invasive lionfish. The right lobe fresh weight of 128 gonads, 56 males and 72
females (15 developing, 57 spawning capable), was compared to the preserved weight (after freezing).
There were no differences by gender or gonad developmental phase (paired t-test , all p > 0.700); thus, no
adjustments are required if processed within three weeks of collection. However, freezing can make
reproductive histological interpretations more difficult.
KEYWORDS: Invasive, Lionfish, Pterois, Scorpaenidae, Gulf of Mexico
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
UNDERSTANDING ASPECTS OF THE BARBADOS DEEP-WATER SNAPPER FISHERY AS A
SOCIAL-ECOLOGICAL SYSTEM
COMPRENSIÓN DE LOS ASPECTOS DE LA PESQUERÍA DE PARGO BARBADOS AGUAS
PROFUNDAS COMO UN SISTEMA SOCIO-ECOLÓGICO
COMPRENDRE LES ASPECTS DE LA PÊCHE AU VIVANEAU BARBADE EN EAU
PROFONDE COMME UN SYSTÈME SOCIO-ÉCOLOGIQUE
ROMEL FORDE and PATRICK MCCONNEY
CERMES, UWI Cave Hill Campus, St. Michael Bridgetown, 246 Barbados [email protected]
ABSTRACT
The Barbados deep-water snapper fishery peaks during July-October, the “off-season” when the major
migratory pelagic species are scarce. It is a multi-gear fishery, using traps and handlines. Three snappers
are most often caught: silk snapper (Lutjanus vivanus), vermilion snapper (Rhomboplites aurorubens) and
queen snapper (Etelis oculatus). However, little is known about many aspects of the Barbados snapper
fishery, including most ecological characteristics, location of the fishing grounds, current fishing
techniques and the socio-economic circumstances of active fisherfolk. Limited knowledge of the socialecological fishery system makes it difficult to monitor, thus having implications for adaptive management
by the state and stewardship by other stakeholders. This research aimed at understanding aspects of the
Barbados deep-water snapper fishery as a social-ecological system. It examined what ecological changes
such as in habitat or climate could have impacted, or may impact, the social system of the fishery. It also
investigated social changes and their ecological or fishery impacts such as due to fluctuating numbers of
fishers, shifts in harvest and post-harvest demographics and socio-economics, changing fishing and
marketing methods or technological innovations. External factors, such as energy costs and climate
change were also considered. A better understanding of social-ecological relationships within small-scale
fisheries should result in interventions and practices that contribute more to sustainable fisheries and
livelihoods. Well-managed small-scale fisheries are vital for small islands that depend heavily on the
ocean for resilience and their future.
KEYWORDS: Barbados, deep-water, fishery, snapper, social-ecological system
87
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
FISH DIVERSITY DIFFERS AMONG VARYING PATCHINESS OF CULVERT REEFS IN THE
SOUTH PADRE ISLAND REEF, TEXAS
LA DIVERSIDAD DE PECES DIFIERE ENTRE DENSIDADES VARIABLES DE TUBOS DE
CONCRETO EN EL ARRECIFE DE LA ISLA DE SOUTH PADRE, TEXAS
LA DIVERSITÉ DES POISSONS DIFFÈRE SELON LA DENSITÉ DES BUSES DE BÉTON AU
RÉCIF DE L'ÎLE DE SOUTH PADRE, TEXAS.
CATHELINE FROEHLICH and RICHARD KLINE
University of Texas at Brownsville 80 Fort Brown Brownsville, Texas 78520 USA
[email protected]
88
ABSTRACT
The western Gulf of Mexico (GOM) along the Texas coast is characterized by limited natural coral and
hard structure, where sand and mud bottom are prevalent. Due to the loss of numerous oil and gas
platforms from the “idle iron” policy, placement of hard substrate in the form of concrete and steel
structures has increased at a rapid pace. These artificial reef structures are predicted to increase available
habitat for economically important fishes, such as red snapper Lutjanus campechanus, and other reef
species. Monitoring the artificial reefs is an important step in determining the effectiveness of the
configurations and constructions of reefs, such as culvert reefs. Few studies have reported any
relationship between patchiness of culvert reefs and their assimilated reef fishes. To remedy this gap in
research, an 18 month study monitoring three structurally distinct habitat types is being conducted at the
South Padre Island culvert reef, TX. SCUBA divers are collecting data on species richness and abundance
in bare areas, loosely scattered patches, and dense patches of culverts. Alongside the visual surveys,
SCUBA divers are quantifying red snapper by size class to determine culvert patch size on snapper
populations. Current analysis has shown the highest species richness and abundance on dense patches, yet
the abundance of red snapper has been comparable in dense and loose patches, with hundreds of
individuals observed per patch. From these findings, future reef deployments can be altered to meet
specific structural guidelines determined through this research.
KEYWORDS: red snapper, artificial reef, culvert reef, artificial reef survey, fish survey
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
A FRAMEWORK FOR APPLYING DATA LIMITED ANALYTICAL METHODS TO FISHERY
MANAGEMENT
UN MARCO PARA LA APLICACIÓN DE MÉTODOS ANALÍTICOS CON DATOS
LIMITADOS EN LA GESTIÓN PESQUERA
UN CADRE POUR L'APPLICATION DES MÉTHODES ANALYTIQUES AVEC DONNÉES
LIMITÉES À LA GESTION DES PÊCHES
ROD FUJITA
Environmental Defense Fund 123 Mission Street San Francisco, Ca 94105 USA [email protected]
ABSTRACT
Many data-limited stock evaluation methods are now available, but they typically do not estimate current
stock abundance or biomass associated with the production of maximum sustainable yield. Instead, they
provide a variety of fishery performance indicators that can be used together to estimate stock status and
the sustainability of current levels of fishing. I will present a framework for using data-limited methods to
assess the status of coral reef ecosystems with respect to fishing, characterize stock vulnerability to
fishing, estimate stock status, and evaluate the sustainability of fishing in order to develop management
guidance. I will also present a case study from Belize of how this framework can be used to inform
adaptive management through a transparent and participatory process.
KEYWORDS: data limited, assessment, adaptive management
89
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
CORAL REEF MONITORING WITH FISHERS PARTICIPATION IN QUINTANA ROO,
MEXICO: BUILDING SOCIAL CAPITAL TO PRESERVE MARINE ECOSYSTEMS
MONITOREO DE ARRECIFES DE CORAL CON LA PARTICIPACIÓN DE PESCADORES EN
QUINTANA ROO, MÉXICO: CONSTRUYENDO CAPITAL SOCIAL PARA PRESERVAR LOS
ECOSISTEMAS MARINOS
LA SURVEILLANCE DES RÉCIFS CORALLIENS AVEC LA PARTICIPATION DES
PÊCHEURS EN QUINTANA ROO, MEXIQUE: CONSTRUCTION DU CAPITAL SOCIAL
POUR LA PRÉSERVATION DES ÉCOSYSTÈMES MARINS
STUART FULTON, JACOBO CAAMAL, CONSTANZA RIBOT, BEATRIZ LUCAS. CITLALI
GARCIA, and LUIS BOURILLÓN EGLÉ FLORES
Comunidad y Biodiversidad A.C. Calle Carey SM10 M24 L10 Puerto Morelos, Q.Roo 77580 Mexico
[email protected]
90
ABSTRACT
Since 2011 Comunidad y Biodiversidad has been working closely with fishing cooperatives in the central
portion of Quintana Roo, México to establish fully protected marine reserves to restore commercial
fisheries and conserve coral reefs and associated habitats. The general objective is to create a network of
marine reserves along the coast of the State, that are co-managed by fishers and authorities, that serve
multiple purposes, and eventually become essential tools in supporting ecosystem resilience and services.
The process to design, implement and monitor these reserves was developed in collaboration with the
fishers and a multitude of other stakeholders, working under the Kanan Kay Alliance. Although the
project is very ambitious, both in terms of geographic coverage and timing (20% of territorial waters by
2015) and its collaborative approach (the Kanan Kay Alliance is made of 40 institutions), it has been
discovered that the marine reserves are not only key to restoring the natural capital of the reefs, but also
generate social capital particularly regarding the fishing cooperatives' organization, administration,
leadership, marketing, law enforcement and governance skills. A package of incentives has also been
generated, including payment for ecosystem services, to compensate some of the opportunity costs of the
marine reserves. We conclude that this model of work can have dual results and that conservation projects
can benefit greatly by considering both approaches even with controversial tools like fully protected
zones.
KEYWORDS: Fully Protected Zones, co-management, fishers, Mexico, Payment for Ecosystem Services
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
A REVIEW OF THE SMALL PELAGICS FISHERY RESOURCES OF THE DUTCH
CARIBBEAN
UN RESUMEN DE LOS RECURSOS PESQUEROS DE PEQUEÑOS PELÁGICOS DEL
CARIBE HOLANDÉS
RÉVISION DES RESSOURCES HALIEUTIQUES DES PETITS POISSONS PÉLAGIQUES
DANS LES PAYS-BAS CARIBÉENS
SASCHA FÄSSLER, INGRID VAN BEEK, BRAM COUPERUS, DOLFI DEBROT and SVEN
GASTAUER
IMARES Haringkade 1 IJmuiden, 1976CP The Netherlands [email protected]
ABSTRACT
Small pelagic fish species have traditionally formed a critical part of annual fishery landings in many
areas of the Caribbean. These species continue to lead other species groups in the combined total landings
for the region, as well as in the Dutch Caribbean. They are not only of great importance as high quality
human food, but also as bait species for fishingThey further form a vital part of the marine food web, and
constitute a key food source for endangered species such as the whale shark and many cetacea. Even so,
their ecological and economic importance the species concerned have been relatively little studied. In this
study we compile and review the available information on small pelagic species for the Dutch Caribbean
EEZ. This work follows as a priority action point from the 2010 EEZ management plan adopted by the
Dutch Ministry of Economic Affairs. The Dutch waters of interest cover a combined area of more than
90.000 km2 and span a multitude of hydro- and oceanographic regimes and depths from the intertidal to
more than 4000 m. Because of the lack of information specific to the Dutch Caribbean, it was also
essential to compile information based on studies done elsewhere. Wide-ranging ecological connectivity
of these often trans-boundary migratory fish stocks, which represent a little-known and potentially
underutilized resource, as well as the narrow association of these species to broad regional oceanographic
features and phenomena, further dictated the need for an inclusive regional approach in this study.
KEYWORDS: Dutch Caribbean, pelagic fish, fisheries
91
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
A COMPARISON OF SITE FIDELITY AND HABITAT USE OF RED SNAPPER ON TWO
SOUTH TEXAS ARTIFICIAL REEFS UTILIZING ACOUSTIC TELEMETRY
UNA COMPARACIÓN DE FIDELIDAD AL SITIO Y EL USO DEL HÁBITAT DEL
HUACHINANGO EN DOS ARRECIFES ARTIFICIALES EN EL SUR DE TEXAS
UTILIZANDO TELEMETRÍA ACÚSTICA
COMPARAISON DE FIDELITÉ DE SITE ET USAGE D’HABITAT DU VIVANEAU
CAMPÈCHE SUR DEUX RÉCIFS ARTIFICIELS AU SUD DU TEXAS UTILISANT
TÉLÉMÉTRIE ACOUSTIQUE
ANDRES GARCIA1, RICHARD KLINE2, DAVID HICKS2, CARLOS CINTRA BUENROSTRO2, and
DALE SHIVELY3
1University of Texas at Brownsville 1135 Milam Ave. Brownsville, Texas 78521 United States
andres.[email protected]
2University of Texas Brownsville One West University Boulevard Brownsville Texas 78520 United States
3Texas Parks and Wildlife Artificial Reef Program 4200 Smith School Rd Austin Texas 784744 United
States
92
ABSTRACT
Evaluation of artificial reefs is becoming an increasingly important component of fisheries management.
This is particularly true for the southwestern Gulf of Mexico where natural hard substrate is limited and
359 petroleum platforms are scheduled for removal in 2013 due to the “idle iron” policy. This study
compared the performance of two artificial reef configurations off the South Texas coast, the Texas
Clipper and South Padre Island Reefs that differ in material, depth, and distance from shore, with respect
to behavior of red snapper, Lutjanus campechanus, an important recreational and commercial species.
Snapper were implanted with depth and identification tags. Receivers were moored at each site to record
presence and vertical movements of red snapper. In order to better understand the function of these two
artificial reefs, comparisons of behavior during day and night periods, as well as residency time were
performed to characterize red snapper-artificial reef interactions. In addition, a mark and recapture study
using external dart tags was also used to estimate fishing pressure at each site. Residency time was
significantly higher at the near-shore site as well as angler tag return rate, while the offshore site provided
more usable vertical habitat based on daily recorded depth profiles for each fish. This evaluation of which
reef configuration type provides the better usable habitat for red snapper may serve as a reference for
future artificial reef planning along the Texas coast.
KEYWORDS: Red snapper, artificial feef, acoustic telemetry, site fidelity, residency time
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
OBSERVER-BASED ESTIMATES OF REEF FISH CATCH AND DISCARD RATES DURING
OPEN AND CLOSED RECREATIONAL SEASONS FOR RED SNAPPER IN THE NORTHERN
GULF OF MEXICO
ESTIMACIONES DE LOS OBSERVADORES A BASE DE PESCADOS DEL FILÓN DE
CAPTURAS Y DE DESCARTES DURANTE ABIERTO Y CERRADO SEASONS
RECREATIVOS DE PARGO ROJO EN EL NORTE DEL GOLFO DE MÉXICOLES
ESTIMATIONS DE POISSONS DE RÉCIF OBSERVATEUR À BASE DE CAPTURES ET LES
TAUX DE REJETS COURS OUVERTS ET FERMÉS SEASONS DE LOISIRS POUR RED
SNAPPER DANS LE NORD DU GOLFE DU MEXIQUE
STEVEN B. GARNER1, WILLIAM F. PATTERSON1, and CLAY E. PORCH3
University of South Alabama, Dauphin Island Sea Lab, 101 Bienville Blvd, Dauphin Island, AL 36528
United States [email protected]
2
National Marine Fisheries Service, Southeast Fishery Science Center, 75 Virginia Beach Dr. Miami. FL
33149 United States
1
ABSTRACT
High discard rates combined with release mortality may impede stock recovery of red snapper. However,
discard estimates in the recreational fishery are based solely on self-reporting by fishermen. In this study,
we estimated reef fish catch and discard rates through direct observation of charterboat operations in the
for-hire recreational fishing sector during 2012-2013. Captured reef fish were identified, weighed, and
measured. Gear description, fishing coordinates, reef type, and fishing time also were recorded. Both the
retained and discarded red snapper catch were subsampled on each trip (n=54) for sex determination and
aging. Mean (± SE) discards per trip (21.1 ±2.1) and mean red snapper discards per trip (16.6 ±1.9)
declined significantly with depth (mean = 35.9m ±1.3) but were not significantly different between open
and closed seasons. During open seasons, smaller younger red snapper (mean TL = 474 mm, modal age =
3 yr) were discarded live in favor of larger older fish (mean TL = 645 mm, modal age = 7). Overall, red
snapper comprised nearly 80% of all reef fish discarded in the northern GOM, with 90% of total red
snapper discards occurring at depths <43m. Red snapper also constituted the largest percentage (65%) of
regulatory discards when targeting other species during red snapper closed seasons. Captains were able to
reduce red snapper catch rates (-22.2 fish trip-1) by changing gear types and locations but were not able to
significantly reduce total discard (+1.8 fish trip-1) or red snapper discard rates (-4.2 fish trip-1) during
closed seasons.
KEYWORDS: bycatch, discard, reef fish, red snapper
93
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
UTILISATION DES DCP COMME OUTIL D’OBSERVATION DES COURANTS MARINS
FADS USE AS A TOOL TO OBSERVE MARINE CURRENTS
LA UTILIZACIÓN DE LOS DCP COMO UN INSTRUMENTO PARA OBSERVAR LOS
CORRIENTES MARINO
PAUL GERVAIN1 et LIONEL REYNAL2
PLKmarine St Claude St Claude, Guadeloupe (FWI) [email protected]
2
Ifremer Pointe Fort Le Robert 97231 Martinique (FWI)
1
94
RÉSUMÉ
De façon à gérer le parc de DCP en Guadeloupe, les dispositifs ont été équipés d‟un GPS et d‟un système
de transmission des données. Celles-ci ont été traitées afin de disposer d‟informations sur la direction des
courants et d‟indications sur leur intensité autour de l‟île. La méthodologie utilisée est expliquée et
discutée. Un exemple de carte des courants autour de la Guadeloupe est présenté. L‟intérêt d‟équiper les
DCP de GPS et de traiter les données ainsi générées est illustré à partir d‟exemples. Il s‟agit non
seulement de limiter les débris en mer par perte de matériel, mais aussi de développer des connaissances
nouvelles sur la courantologie proche de la côte et de permettre d‟étudier ses effets sur la migration des
grands poissons pélagiques dans la zone exploitée à l‟aide de DCP.
MOTS CLÉS: DCP, FAD, Courants marins, Guadeloupe
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
GOLIATH GROUPER, EPINEPHELUS ITAJARA ON NATURAL AND ARTIFICIAL REEFS IN
BRAZIL: A PARTICIPATIVE SURVEY
MERO GUASA, EPINEPHELUS ITAJARA EN LOS ARRECIFES NATURALES Y
ARTIFICIALES EN BRASIL: UNA ENCUESTA PARTICIPATIVA
MÉROU, EPINEPHELUS ITAJARA SUR LES RÉCIFS NATURELS ET ARTIFICIELS AU
BRÉSIL: UNE ENQUÊTE PARTICIPATIVE
VINÍCIUS GIGLIO1, JOHNATAS ALVES1, LEOPOLDO GERHARDINGER2, FABIANO GRECCO3,
FELIPPE DAROS3, and ÁTHILA BERTONCINI4
1
Universidade Estadual de Santa Cruz Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ecologia e Conserva Ilhéus , BA
Brazil [email protected]
2
Universidade Estadual de Campinas Programa de Pós-Graduação Interdisciplinar Ambiente e
Sociedade Campinas SP Brazil
3
Universidade Federal do Paraná, Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ecologia e Conservação Curitiba
PR Brazil
4
Universidade Federal Fluminense Departamento de Biologia Marinha – ECOPESCA Niterói RJ Brazil
ABSTRACT
Developing survey strategies for rare and threatened species is often limited by access to sufficient
individuals to acquire information needed to design appropriate conservation measures. The goliath
grouper (Epinephelus itajara) is a globally threatened reef fish. In Brazil, fishing has been prohibited over
11 years and one of the policy prescriptions attached to the fishing ban has been the amalgamation of data
to subsidize species‟ recovery and management solutions. Herein we report habitat use and abundance of
E. itajara in Brazil drawn from a participatory survey proposed by Projeto Meros do Brasil, which
engaged volunteer divers in data-collection. A total of 188 sightings were recorded between 2005 to 2011,
reporting 306 individuals and three aggregations sites. Habitat type influenced the occurrence of E.
itajara regarding total length and depth. This study underscores the importance of developing
conservation measures addressing specific habitats and locations to enhance population recovery.
Artificial structures (shipwrecks and manmade reefs) are strategic habitats that must be considered as
highly sensitive areas to E. itajara conservation policies. We suggest the enforcement of surveillance, as
well as, creation and implementation of marine protected areas as a key strategy for the conservationof E.
itajara, especially high relief sites with relevant species aggregations.
KEYWORDS: volunteers survey, collaborative research, marine conservation, endangered species,
Epinephelidae
95
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
THE ECONOMIC VALUE OF REEF-ASSOCIATED FISHING: CASE STUDIES FROM THREE
COUNTRIES IN THE WIDER CARIBBEAN
EL VALOR ECONÓMICO DE LA PESCA ARRECIFE-ASOCIADO ESTUDIOS DE CASO
PAÍSES DEL CARIBE
LA VALEUR ÉCONOMIQUE DE LA PÊCHE ASSOCIÉES AUX RÉCIFS ÉTUDES DE CAS
DES TROIS PAYS DE LA RÉGION DES CARAÏBES
DAVID GILL1, HAZEL OXENFORD1, and PETER SCHUHMANN2
Centre for Resource Management and Environmental University of the West Indies, Cave Hill Campus
St. Michael , Barbados [email protected]
2
Department of Economics and Finance University of North Carolina Wilmington Wilmington, USA
1
96
ABSTRACT
Data on small-scale fisheries in the Caribbean are very limited. This is particularly true for reef-associated
fisheries where data are often unavailable or landings are aggregated with non-reef species. Nevertheless,
information on reef fisheries is necessary for management, where the level of exploitation and economic
gains must be determined to implement effective policy at the appropriate scale. This study investigated
the economic value of reef-associated fishing in three types of communities (fishing, tourism and a mixed
fishing/tourism community) within three countries (St. Kitts and Nevis, Honduras, Barbados) across the
Wider Caribbean. The results show the enormity of the value of reef-associated fishing to some Caribbean
communities as well as the diversity in the fisheries between sites. Communities with access to expansive
shallow shelves and those that exploit and export high valued species earned significant revenues from
the reef. Reef-associated fisheries also act as an important social safety net for many persons in the region
especially communities where few employment alternatives exist. The results highlight the need for
managers to recognise the importance of understanding the drivers of economic activity within reef
fisheries as these factors are also likely to affect fishers‟ response to management interventions.
KEYWORDS: Economic valuation, reef fisheries
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
A COMPARISON OF REPRODUCTIVE POTENTIAL OF RED SNAPPER, LUTJANUS
CAMPECHANUS: NATURAL AND ARTIFICIAL HABITATS IN THE NORTHERN GULF OF
MEXICOUNA
COMPARACIÓN DEL POTENCIAL REPRODUCTIVO DE PARGO ROJO, LUTJANUS
CAMPECHANUS: HÁBITATS NATURALES Y ARTIFICIALES EN EL NORTE DEL GOLFO
DE MÉXICOUNE
COMPARAISON DE POTENTIEL REPRODUCTEUR DE SNAPPER ROUGE, LUTJANUS
CAMPECHANUS: LES HABITATS NATURELS ET ARTIFICIELS DANS LE GOLFE DU
NORD DU MEXIQUE
HILARY GLENN, DANIELLE KULAW, and JIM COWAN
Louisiana State University 2231 Energy Coast and Environment Bldg Baton Rouge, LA 70803 USA
[email protected]
ABSTRACT
Few quantitative studies of red snapper (Lutjanus campechanus) reproduction have been conducted on
species from offshore natural hard bottom (NHB) banks in the northern Gulf of Mexico. Reproductive
potential is an important component of fisheries management and can help identify stock status. Data
from previous studies largely depended on specimens of red snapper from artificial habitats (AH). This
study compares reproductive potential of red snapper from AH and NHB habitats, as NHB habitats are
thought to be historical centers of abundance for this species. The gonadosomatic index (GSI) is
indicative of energy a fish invests in reproduction per body weight; thus larger GSI corresponds with a
greater reproductive effort. Red snapper reach peak fecundity at ages >10 yr, but mature as early as age 2.
Other studies found age 2-3 red snapper dominate AHs, whereas older individuals are normally found
inhabiting NHBs. Red snapper for this ongoing study were collected in 2009-2013 from three NHB sites
and two AH sites with vertical long lines and single hook lines. All female red snapper were measured for
total length, total weight, and eviscerated body weight. Ovaries were removed, weighed, and preserved
for preparation of histological slides. Mean GSIs were plotted against time to examine seasonal changes
in reproductive effort among sites. Results indicate that NHB sites exhibited higher mean GSI than AH
sites (ANOVA, p <0.0001) during peak spawning season. We hypothesize these differences are attributed
to older fish at NHB sites investing more energy toward reproduction and less energy toward growth.
KEYWORDS: Red snapper, reproduction, natural banks, artificial habitat, Gulf of Mexico
97
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
COMPOSICIÓN Y VARIACIÓN ESPACIAL DE LA DIETA DE LUTJANUS SYNAGRIS
(LUTJANIDAE: LUTJANINAE) DE LA COSTA NORTE DE YUCATÁN, MÉXICO
COMPOSITION AND SPATIAL VARIATION IN THE DIET OF LUTJANUS SYNAGRIS
(LUTJANIDAE: LUTJANINAE) ON THE NORTH COAST OF YUCATAN, MEXICO
COMPOSITION ET VARIATION SPATIAL DU RÉGIME ALIMENTAIRE DE LUTJANUS
SYNAGRIS (LUTJANIDAE: LUTJANINAE) DE LA CÔTE NORD DU YUCATAN, MEXIQUE
MARIAN GONZÁLEZ, THIERRY BRULÉ, JORGE MONTERO, ESPERANZA PÉREZ y TERE
COLAS
CINVESTAV-IPN Unidad Mérida Carretera antigua a Progreso Km 6 Mérida, Yucatán 97310 México
[email protected]
98
RESUMEN
Los hábitos alimenticios del pargo biajaiba Lutjanus synagris fueron estudiados en tres localidades de la
costa norte de Yucatán, entre febrero 2008 y enero 2009. Los análisis cualitativo y cuantitativo
(frecuencia de ocurrencia; porcentaje en número; porcentaje en peso y coeficiente alimentario) de la dieta
fueron realizados a partir de los contenidos estomacales de 220 individuos colectados en Celestún,
Dzilam de Bravo y Río Lagartos. El análisis comparativo de la composición de la dieta entre localidades
de estudio fue llevado a cabo mediante el cálculo de un índice de similitud y la aplicación de una prueba
de ANOVA multivariado permutado (PERMANOVA). Un total de 64 categorías de presa fueron
identificadas. La biajaiba es un pargo eurífago, carnívoro que se alimenta principalmente de organismos
bentónicos. Los crustáceos decápodos (Peneidea, Brachyura y Natantia indeterminados) representaron las
presas preferenciales mientras que los peces fueron consideradas como presas accidentales. No se observó
una variación espacial en la composición especifica de las presas consumidas pero si en la abundancia de
cada una de ellas en la dieta de la especie. Los individuos de biajaiba presentaron la tendencia a consumir
más camarones (Penaeidae) en la zona oriental (Río Lagartos) que en las zonas central (Dzilam de Bravo)
y occidental (Celestún) de la región de estudio. A lo largo de la costa norte de Yucatán, la biajaiba se
alimenta a partir de las mismas categorías de presa, las cuales son consumidas en proporciones diferentes
según la zona de distribución de la especie.
PALABRAS CLAVES: Régimen alimenticio, Pargo biajaiba, Península de Yucatán
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
EIGHTEEN PROTECTED AREAS FROM THE WIDER CARIBBEAN LISTED BY PARTIES
UNDER THE SPAW PROTOCOL
DIECIOCHO ÁREAS PROTEGIDAS DE LA REGIÓN DEL GRAN CARIBE LISTADOS POR
LAS PARTES BAJO EL PROTOCOLO SPAW
DIX-HUIT AIRES PROTÉGÉES DE LA GRANDE RÉGION CARAÏBE LISTÉES PAR LES
PARTIES AU TITRE DU PROTOCOLE SPAW
FRANCK GOURDIN
SPAW RAC PNG Monteran BP93 Saint Claude, FWI 97120 Guadeloupe
[email protected]
ABSTRACT
According to Article 7 of the SPAW Protocol (Cartagena Convention, UNEP Caribbean Environment
Programme), Contracting Parties shall establish a list of protected areas to create a regional network of
protected areas and develop cooperation programmes. The purpose of this List is to identify those areas
that are of particular importance to the Wider Caribbean region, that are to be accorded priority for
scientific and technical research pursuant to Article 17, and that are to be accorded priority for mutual
assistance pursuant to Article 18, as well as to protect the listed areas from activities that would
undermine the purposes for which they were listed. 18 Caribbean Protected Areas from six countries
fulfiling the common guidelines and criteria adopted by the Parties and established pursuant to Article 21,
are now listed under the SPAW Protocol. All significantly contribute to the conservation of marine and
coastal biodiversity in theCaribbean, while targeting various and complimentary features, habitats and
species. A specific database (http://www.spaw-palisting.org) has been developed and is managed by the
Regional Activity Center for the SPAW Protocol (SPAW-RAC)to compile data on the protected areas
listed and allow for specific statistics and analyses. A dedicated cooperation programme (2013-2014) is
currently being developed by the SPAW Secretariat with CaMPAM and the SPAW RAC, in consultation
with Parties and interested partners in order to support the 18 PAs and to promote the listing of other PAs
under SPAW. Contact: [email protected]
KEYWORDS: SPAW, Protected Area, cooperation programme, Caribbean, UNEP CEP
99
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
BEYOND AGGREGATED CATCH DATA: INTRA-ANNUAL DYNAMICS OF THE DATAPOOR MUTTON SNAPPER (LUTJANUS ANALIS) FISHERY AT GLADDEN SPIT, BELIZE
MÁS ALLÁ DE LAS DATOS AGREGADOS DE CAPTURA: DINÁMICAS ESTACIONALES DE
LA PESQUERÍA DEFICIENTE EN DATOS DE PARGO CRIOLLO (LUTJANUS ANALIS) DE
GLADDEN SPIT, BELICE
AU-DELÀ DES DONNÉES AGRÉGÉES DE CAPTURE: DYNAMIQUES INTRA-ANNUELLES
DE LA PÊCHERIE PAUVRE EN DONNÉES DE VIVANEAU SORBE (LUTJANUS ANALIS) DU
GLADDEN SPIT, BELIZE
PABLO GRANADOS-DIESELDORFF1, WILLIAM HEYMAN2, and BRENDAN ROARK3
Marine and Coastal Geography Applied Biodiversity Science NSF-IGERT Doctoral Texas A&M
University 810 Eller O&M Bldg. MS 3147 College Station, TX 77843 USA [email protected]
2
Ecological Research Associates, Inc. 4103 S Texas Ave # 211 Bryan Texas 77802 USA
3
Department of GeographyStable Isotopes Geosciences Facility 3147 TAMU College Station Texas
77843 USA
1
100
ABSTRACT
Since the 1950s, artisanal fishers have harvested mutton snapper (Lutjanus analis) at Gladden Spit,
southern Belize Barrier Reef. However, fishery data collections started until 1998 and analyses of fishery
statistics have been sparse. The fishery targets the peak of the species spawning aggregations, which
recurs annually in March-June, 10-12 days around the full moon days. In order to characterize for the first
time the size, age, and maturation structures of reproductive mutton snapper at Gladden Spit, we followed
a stratified balanced sampling design to survey the landings of the fishery between -2 and 7 days relative
to full moon (drfm) in March-June 2011. We measured, weighted, and macroscopically examined the
gonad state of 5,047 individuals and randomly collected 115 pair of sagittae for age determination.
Relative abundances of mutton snapper varied significantly in relation to drfm and among months.
Individual sizes ranged between 315-905 mm TL, weights 0.5-11.8 kg, otolith-based ages 2-16 years, and
von-Bertalanffy-growth-model projected ages 2-50 years. PERMANOVAs revealed significant monthly
variations in the size, age, and maturation structures of aggregating individuals. Older individuals
dominated in March-May, while younger individuals in June. Most males were mature throughout the
season, while most females were predominantly immature in June. Our results suggest that the
reproductive output from mutton snapper that aggregate to spawn at Gladden Spit is seasonally structured,
a life-history characteristic that must be considered in stock assessments and management strategies for
mutton snapper in Belize and elsewhere in the western Atlantic.
KEYWORDS: Data-poor fisheries, reef fish spawning aggregations, Lutjanidae, age and growth,
maturation
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
RETROSPECTIVE SOCIO-ECOLOGICAL ANALYSIS OF THE MUTTON SNAPPER
(LUTJANUS ANALIS) SPAWNING AGGREGATION FISHERY AT GLADDEN SPIT, BELIZE
ANÁLISIS RETROSPECTIVO SOCIO-ECOLÓGICO DE LA PESQUERÍA DE
AGREGACIONES DE DESOVE DE PARGO CRIOLLO (LUTJANUS ANALIS) EN GLADDEN
SPIT, BELICE
ANALYSE RÉTROSPECTIVE SOCIO-ÉCOLOGIQUE DE LA PÊCHERIE DES
AGRÉGATIONS DE FRAI DE VIVANEAU SORBE (LUTJANUS ANALIS) À GLADDEN SPIT,
BELIZE
PABLO GRANADOS-DIESELDORFF1, WILLIAM D. HEYMAN2, and JAMES AZUETA3
Department of Geography Applied Biodiversity Science NSF-IGERT Doctoral Texas A&M University
810 Eller O&M Bldg. MS 3147 College Station, TX 77843 USA [email protected]
2
LGL Ecological Research Associates, Inc 4103 S Texas Ave #211 Bryan Texas 77802 USA
3Belize Fisheries Department P.O. Box 148 Belize City Belize
1
ABSTRACT
Several artisanal fisheries across the Caribbean have historically targeted recurrent and massive fish
spawning aggregations (FSAs) of valuable snappers. For example, artisanal fishers have harvested mutton
snapper (Lutjanus analis) from the Gladden Spit (Belize) FSA site since the 1950s. Catches have
contributed considerably to national food and economic securities. Faced with rising illegal foreign
fishing, and concerned about the vulnerability of FSA to overexploitation, the Government of Belize
partnered with stakeholders from southern Belize to co-manage the area, declaring a multi-use marine
reserve at Gladden Spit in 2000. In 2010-2012, we engaged with stakeholders to holistically evaluate the
status of the fishery, re-construct its socio-ecological history (1950-2011), and analyze all existing
quantitative fishery data (1991-2010), in addition to new data collections from intensive collaborative
field work in 2011. We show that catch per unit effort, individual sizes, and sex ratios have been
relatively constant throughout the recent history of the fishery (1999-2011). Analyses also captured a
sharp reduction in total landings and fishing effort in the 1990s, parallel to a rapid growth in the tourism
industry. Although annual landings have fluctuated over time, this FSA fishery has persisted for over 60
years and landings are highly dependent on external socio-economic factors, the life-history strategies of
mutton snapper, and the resilience of the species to environmental stressors. We suggest that the mutton
snapper fishery at Gladden Spit can persist, so long as the existing locally-driven resource monitoring and
adaptive co-management continue to guide conservation and management.
KEYWORDS: Reef fish spawning aggregations, co-management, Small-scale fisheries, data-poor
fisheries, Fisher knowledge
101
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
ABUNDANCE AND DISTRIBUTION OF THE MARSH CLAM RANGIA CUNEATA IN THE
MISSION-ARANSAS NATIONAL ESTUARINE RESEARCH RESERVE
ABUNDANCIA Y DISTRIBUCIÓN DE LA MARISMA ALMEJA RANGIA CUNEATA EN LA
MISSION-ARANSAS NATIONAL ESTUARINE RESEARCH RESERVE
ABONDANCE ET DISTRIBUTION DU MARAIS CLAM RANGIA CUNEATA DANS LA
MISSION-ARANSAS NATIONAL ESTUARINE RESEARCH RESERVE
JANA GRAY, MARIA RODRIGUEZ1, SHANNA MADSEN2, and WES TUNNELL1
1
Harte Research Institute 5757 S Staples St Apt 4619 Corpus Christi, Texas 78413 USA
[email protected]
2
Environmental Cooperative Science Center 750 Channel View Dr. Port Aransas TX 78373 USA 1
102
ABSTRACT
Rangia cuneata, are brackish water clams that act as key indicator species of freshwater inflow in Texas
coastal watersheds. They are more abundant at the mouth of rivers where they enter into bays. The
Mission-Aransas National Estuarine Research Reserve (MANERR), established in 2006, is one of the
newest in the National Estuarine Research Reserve (NERRS) system. Located about 30 miles north of
Corpus Christi, TX, its main purpose is to provide relatively natural settings for long term research. It is
important to know abundance and distribution of R. cuneata to determine habitat quality in coastal
watersheds. The objectives of this project were to determine whether the clams are present in the
MANERR, and, if present, determine preliminary distribution and abundance. This study was conducted
throughout June and July of 2013. The Aransas and Mission River systems were surveyed. A dredge was
used every mile up the river from the mouth, and live and dead R. cuneata were enumerated, when found.
Once a bed of live clams was located, quadrat sampling was used. There were no beds found in the
Mission system. In Aransas River, however, 3 beds were found and surveyed. At each site, 5 quadrats
were taken, and any extra clams found were measured and collected. The data collected did not yield a
clear picture of abundance and distribution, however, R. cuneata are present in small refuge populations
during the current extended drought. Future research should be conducted to determine more detailed
abundance and distribution.
KEYWORDS: Rangia cuneata, freshwater inflow
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
FISHING DERBIES FOR INVASIVE LIONFISH: A TOOL FOR PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT AND
POPULATION CONTROL
DERBIES DE PESCA DE PEZ LEÓN INVASOR: UNA HERRAMIENTA PARA LA
PARTICIPACIÓN PÚBLICA Y EL CONTROL DE LA POBLACIÓN
CONCOURS DE PÊCHE POUR LES POISSONS-PAPILLONS INVASIVE: UN OUTIL POUR
L'ENGAGEMENT DU PUBLIC ET LE CONTRÔLE DE LA POPULATION
STEPHANIE GREEN1 and LAD AKINS2
Oregon State University Department of Zoology 3029 Cordley Hall Corvallis, Oregon 97331-2914 USA
[email protected]
2
Reef Environmental Education Foundation 98300 Overseas Highway Key Largo Florida 33037 USA
1
ABSTRACT
Indo-Pacific lionfish (Pterois volitans/ P. miles) have established dense populations throughout the
Western Atlantic, Caribbean, and Gulf of Mexico. This marine predator invasion is now among the most
destructive in history, and resource managers are actively devising strategies to suppress their
populations. An effective tool for increasing local awareness of the invasion is the creation of lionfish
fishing derbies, but whether derbies are an effective means to control local lionfish populations, and the
area over which they may affect control, remain unknown. We evaluated the magnitude and scale of
lionfish population suppression achieved during single day fishing derby events located in Green Turtle
Cay, Bahamas and in Key Largo, Florida held over a two year period (2012-2013). Using pre- and postderby in-water assessments of lionfish density, measurements of derby catch, and surveys of derby
participant fishing effort and location, we found that derby participants affected a greater than 60%
reduction in lionfish densities within the 100-150km2 derby areas, compared with pre-derby levels.
Crucially, population suppression was isolated to the area where the derby occurred. The size distribution
of lionfish observed in both derby areas was significantly smaller in the second year of the study
compared with the first, providing further evidence that derbies are 'fishing down' local invasive
populations. Our work indicates that these single day events can be an effective strategy for suppressing
the invasion at a local scale. The results of this effort may be used to better inform resource managers and
lionfish control programs throughout the region.
KEYWORDS: Pterois volitans, outreach and education, fishing tournament, coral reefs, invaive species
control
103
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
ADVANCING COASTAL COMMUNITY SUSTAINABILITY AND RESTORING CORAL
REEFS AND ERODED COASTAL AREAS IN THE CARIBBEAN WITH SMALL-SCALE
WAVE ENERGY BUOYS
AVANZANDO SOSTENIBILIDAD DE COMUNIDADES COSTERAS Y RESTAURANDO LOS
ARRECIFES DE CORAL Y LAS ZONAS COSTERAS EROSIONADAS EN EL CARIBE CON
BOYAS DE ENERGÍA DE LAS OLAS DE PEQUEÑA ESCALA
FAIRE PROGRESSER LA DURABILITÉ DES COLLECTIVITÉS CÔTIÈRES ET
RESTAURATION DES RÉCIFS CORALLIENS ET DES ZONES CÔTIÈRES ÉRODÉES DANS
LES CARAÏBES AVEC DE LA PETITE ËCHELLE ËNERGIE DES VAGUES BOUÉES
DAVID GUGGENHEIM1, PER RESEN STEENSTRUP2, and MARY PAUL SMITH JESPERSEN3
Ocean Doctor P.O. Box 53090 Washington, DC 20009 USA [email protected]
2
Resen Energy Strandvejen 194H Charlottenlund 2920 Denmark
3
Royal Danish Embassy 3200 Whitehaven St. Washington DC 20008 USA
1
104
ABSTRACT
Most Caribbean nations depend almost exclusively on imported petroleum for electricity generation,
leaving them vulnerable to the volatility of international oil prices. The problem is compounded in small,
remote coastal communities which are typically reliant upon small, inefficient diesel generators, energy
from which is the most expensive to produce. Given their profound vulnerability to the climate impacts of
fossil fuel consumption, including sea level rise and the frequency and strength of storm events,
Caribbean nations have a strong vested interest in shifting to renewable energy sources. Small leveroperated pivoting-float (LOPF) buoys generate electricity using wave energy and present an opportunity
to provide coastal communities with reliable, clean energy without the need for large-scale deployment,
major transmission infrastructure or prohibitive capital investment. Electricity generation from LOPF
buoys is already cost-competitive with diesel generation: A typical 5kW buoy can realize a return on
investment in 3-5 years. LOPF buoys can be installed in waters with a depth from 5- 50 m of water depth
and can generate sufficient power even in moderate wave heights of 0.5-1 m. LOPF buoy technology can
also help with costal coral reef restoration efforts. Connected to an underwater metal lattice, LOPF buoys
can provide the necessary current to significantly accelerate the accretion of calcium carbonate from
seawater, resulting in the rapid creation of a foundation upon which coral reef communities can naturally
rebuild. Such underwater structures are also being used as an alternative to jetties and groins to prevent
erosion and help beaches restore themselves.
KEYWORDS: coral reefs, energy, restoration, buoy, Caribbean
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
AUTOMATIC FISH CLASSIFICATION IN UNDERWATER VIDEO
CLASIFICACIÓN AUTOMÁTICA DE PECES EN VIDEO SUBMARINO
CLASSIFICATION AUTOMATIQUE DE POISSON DANS LA VIDÉO SOUS-MARINE
MADHURI GUNDAM1, DIMITRIOS CHARALAMPIDIS1, GEORGE IOUP1, JULIETTE IOUP1, and
CHARLES THOMPSON2
1
University of New Orleans Department of Electrical Engineering New Orleans, LA 70148 USA
[email protected]
2
NOAA Southeast Fisheries Science Center Stennis Space CenterMississippi 39529 USA
ABSTRACT
Underwater video is currently being used by many scientists within NMFS to observe, identify, and
quantify living marine resources. Processing of video sequences is typically a manual process performed
by a human analyst. Partial automation of this time consuming and labor intensive analysis process will
make data from underwater video more cost effective and available in a more timely fashion. This work
introduces a technique for automatic fish classification in underwater video. The technique is based on a
series of processing steps. Background processing is used to separate moving objects from the still
background. Object tracking is used in order to associate different views of the same object found in
consecutive frames. This step is especially important since successfully recognizing and classifying one
of the views as a species of interest allows marking all views in the sequence as that particular species.
Feature extraction using Fourier Descriptors is used to extract characteristic information from the shape of
each identified object. Finally, a nearest neighbor classifier is used to classify identified objects as one of
the species of interest. Results demonstrate the performance of the proposed technique in terms of correct
classification and false alarms for three species, namely trigger fish, red grouper, and yellow tail snapper.
KEYWORDS: Computer classification, trigger fish, grouper, snapper, underwater video, background
subtraction, tracking
105
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
DIGESTION RATE ANALYSIS OF FISH PREY ITEMS IN LIONFISH (PTEROIS VOLITANS)
ANÁLISIS DE LA TASA DE DIGESTIÓN DE LAS PRESAS DE PESCADO EN EL PEZ LEÓN
(PTEROIS VOLITANS)
ANALYSE DU TAUX DE DIGESTIO DES PROIES DE POISSON DANS LIONFISH (PTEROIS
VOLITANS)
CHELSEA HARMS
University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez Department of Marine Sciences PO Box 9000 Mayaguez, PR 00681
USA [email protected]
106
ABSTRACT
Feeding ecology studies have provided valuable insight into the impacts of lionfish on the native reef fish
communities of the Western Atlantic and Caribbean. The lionfish are known to consume over 70 fish
species, but their relative abundance as lionfish prey is strongly site specific. However, the majority of
these studies have been based on morphological identification, usually of partially digested specimens.
Morphological identification can be biased and prone to human error, depending on the digestive level of
the prey item. Additionally, lionfish feed during crepuscular hours, while many lionfish collections occur
at opportune times for researchers and scientists, which usually do not correlate with feeding. The
aforementioned points support the need for quantifying digestion rates for more accurate feeding ecology
studies or for understanding existing biases. This study analyzed the digestion rate of known teleost prey
items in lionfish stomachs, over a given period of time, to provide an estimate of digestion rate at basal
metabolism. Three size classes of lionfish were examined, utilizing ten or more individuals per size class.
Time intervals of 30 minutes to an hour were used to identify digestion rate. Approximately 5+ hours are
required before a known fish prey item is deemed unrecognizable to the species level. Additionally, this
rate is likely dependent on lionfish size and prey size. Faster digestion rates are predicted for more active
lionfish. Studies utilizing morphological identification should structure their experimental design to
incorporate this information to obtain a higher percentage of undigested prey items for analysis.
KEYWORDS: lionfish, digestion, feeding ecology
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
STAKEHOLDER LED CO-MANAGEMENT GOVERNANCE REGIMES: THE NEW
PARADIGM FOR MARINE PROTECTED AREAS IN GRENADA, WEST INDIES
STAKEHOLDER LLEVÓ COGESTIÓN REGÍMENES DE GOBIERNO: EL NUEVO
PARADIGMA PARA LAS ÁREAS MARINAS PROTEGIDAS EN GRENADA, WEST INDIES
PARTIES PRENANTES A CONDUIT LES RÉGIMES DE GOUVERNANCE DE COGESTION:
LE NOUVEAU PARADIGME POUR LES AIRES MARINES PROTÉGÉES À LA GRENADE,
DANS LES ANTILLES
OLANDO HARVEY1 and ROLAND BALDEO2
Sandy Island Oyster Bed Marine Protected Area Hillsborough Carriacou, Grenada
[email protected]
2
Grenada Fisheries Department Melville Street St. George's Grenada
1
ABSTRACT
Fisheries management in the Eastern Caribbean has traditionally been characterized by Government led
top-down governance regimes. Small Island Developing States (SIDS) such as Grenada lack the resources
to effectively and consistently conduct surveillance and enforcement activities at all protected or
conservation areas. It has therefore become imperative to develop governance systems that are
compliance based and rely on the resources users and stakeholder to sustainably manage these resources.
Within the past few decades, there has been a global shift from the conventional top-down government
driven governance system to a more holistic bottom-up, stakeholder driven co-management arrangements.
In order for stakeholder led co-management to be successful, three critical criteria must be met. Firstly, all
legitimate stakeholders must be given an opportunity to participate; secondly, there must be a clear and
shared understanding of the objectives; and thirdly, there must be a genuine devolution of power to the
stakeholder organization established to manage the resources. As part of the Caribbean Challenge,
Grenada has pledged to protect 25% of its near-shore marine and coastal areas by the year 2020. This
paper focuses on the governance arrangement utilized over the past three years for the management of
three of Grenada‟s declared marine protected areas. Particular attention is given to lessons learnt; that is,
what worked and what did not work using the co-management approach.
KEYWORDS: Co-management, Marine Protected Area, Governance, Fisheries Management
107
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
BEHAVIOR, HYPERSTABILITY, AND POPULATION DECLINES OF AN AGGREGATING
MARINE FISH
COMPORTAMIENTO HIPERESTABILIDAD Y LA POBLACIÓN DISMINUYE DE UNA
AGREGACIÓN DE PECES MARINOS
COMPORTEMENT HYPERSTABILITÉ ET LE DÉCLIN DES POPULATIONS D'UN POISSON
MARIN DE L'AGRÉGATION
SCOTT HEPPELL1, BRICE SEMMENS2, CHRISTY PATTENGILL-SEMMENS3, PHILLIPPE BUSH4
CROY MCCOY4, and BRADLEY JOHNSON4
1
Oregon State University Department of Fisheries and Wildlife 104 Nash Hall Corvallis, OR 97330 USA
[email protected]
2
Scripps Institute of Oceanography San Diego CA USA
3
Reef Environmental Education Foundation Key Largo FL USA
4
Cayman Islands Department of Environment Georgetown Grand Cayman Cayman Islands
108
ABSTRACT
Collapses of marine fish populations are a global concern. Some collapses are attributed to hyperstability,
where catch per unit effort remains stable while the population declines. Hyperstability is difficult to
detect until after a population is depleted, thus nearly all such studies on the hyperstability phenomenon
are retrospective. Using whole-island acoustic arrays to track an endangered, aggregating reef fish on two
Caribbean islands, we demonstrate for the first time behavioral mechanisms that might lead to
hyperstability. We show that: (1) every reproductive-aged fish aggregates each year, (2) older, more
fecund fish aggregate longer, (3) individuals will visit multiple aggregation sites during the spawning
period, yet every fish always aggregates and spawns at a single location, and (4) overfishing extends the
time spent aggregating, increasing vulnerability to harvest as the population declines. This latter finding is
supported by historic accounts from other aggregation sites throughout the Caribbean. Taken together, our
results demonstrate that aggregation sites are a surprisingly complete and persistent geographic bottleneck
for aggregating species, and this bottleneck is a feature that intensifies with depletion. Our results
highlight both the extreme vulnerability of local populations to harvest but the potential for even heavily
harvested aggregations to recover.
KEYWORDS: Nassau grouper, overharvest, recovery, mechanisms of hyperstability, acoustic monitoring
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
¿QUÉ PAPEL JUEGAN LAS DIATOMEAS EN LA ALIMENTACIÓN DEL CARACOL
ROSA STROMBUS GIGAS?
WHAT IS THE ROLE OF DIATOMS IN FEEDING OF QUEEN CONCH, STROMBUS GIGAS?
QUEL EST LE ROLE DES DIATOMÉES DANS L'ALIMENTATION DU LAMBI, STROMBUS
GIGAS?
OSCAR HERNÁNDEZ1, MARTHA ENRÍQUEZ DÍAZ1, IRMA PÉREZ GARCÍA1, MARIANA
NOGUEZ NUÑEZ2 y DALILA ALDANA ARANDA1
1
CINVESTAV IPN km 6 antigua Carretera a Progreso Mèrida Yucatan, Mèxico
[email protected]
2
Posgrado en Ciencias del Mar y Limnología, Universidad Nacional ACINVESTAV IPN Km. 6 Antigua
Carretera a Progreso Mérida Yucatán 97310 México
RESUMEN
Strombus gigas habita de aguas a 60 m de profundidad, asociado a praderas marinas y diversos fondos
arenosos. Sus poblaciones están sobreexplotadas, especie protegida por CITES y desde los años 80 se
trabaja en su gestión pesquera y domesticación acuícola. Para juveniles se han formulado algunas dietas,
desconociéndose aún sus requerimientos nutricionales. El objetivo de este estudio fue conocer el papel de
las diatomeas en la alimentación de S. gigas y cómo hipótesis: Es S. gigas es una especie selectiva en su
alimentación. Se analizaron heces de caracoles en la mañana (8am) y tarde (2pm) y sedimentos, con
microscopía óptica y electrónica. Los caracoles colectados en la mañana, no tuvieron producción de
heces, sólo en la tarde. La riqueza específica de diatomeas fue: 94, en sedimento 62 y en heces 44. Los
géneros con mayor número de especies en heces: Amphora (17), Cocconeis (11) Mastogloia y Navicula
(9) y las más abundantes: Paralia capitata (72%) y Seminavis robusta (19.3%). Las heces presentaron
además foraminíferos, cladoceros y copépodos. El sedimiento tuvo como especies dominantes: Seminavis
robusta y Paralia capitata. El análisis de similitud mostró diferencia en la abundancia de diatomeas en
sedimento entre horas, pero no en los caracoles. El análisis de abundancia relativa mostró que P. capitata
se distribuye homogeneamente en sedimento y caracoles, mientras S. robusta presentó variación. Los
resultados muestran el papel importante de las diatomeas en la alimentación de S. gigas y la probable
selectividad de esta especie, aunque los resultados aún no sean concluyentes
PALABRAS CLAVES: feeding, habitat, diatoms, behavior, Queen conch
109
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
BIOGEOGRAPHY OF TRANSIENT REEF FISH SPAWNING AGGREGATIONS IN THE
CARIBBEAN: A SYNTHESIS FOR FUTURE RESEARCH AND MANAGEMENT
BIOGEOGRAFÍA DE PECES ARRECIFALES QUE FORMAN AGREGACIONES DE DESOVE
TRANSITORIAS EN EL CARIBE: UNA SÍNTESIS PARA INVESTIGACIÓN Y MANEJO EN
EL FUTURO
BIOGÉOGRAPHIE DE POISSONS DE RÉCIF QUI FORMENT ASSOCIATIONS DE FRAI
TRANSITOIRES AU CARAÏBE: UNE SYNTHÈSE POUR LA RECHERCHE ET GESTION
FUTURES
WILLIAM HEYMAN1, SHINICHI KOBARA2, SIMON PITTMAN3, and RICHARD NEMETH4
1
LGL Ecological Research Associates, Inc. 4103 S Texas Ave #211 Bryan, TX 77802 USA
[email protected]
2
Department of OceanographyTexas A&M University College Station TX 77843-3146 USA
3
Biogeography Branch, Center for Coastal Monitoring and AssessmentNational Oceanic and
Atmospheric Administration 1305 East-West Highway Silver Spring MD 20910 USA
4
University of the Virgin IslandsCenter for Marine and Environmental Studies 2 John Brewer’s Bay St.
Thomas USVI 00802 USA
110
ABSTRACT
In order to address the data gap on the biogeography of transient fish spawning aggregations (tFSAs), we
convened the workshop, “Characterization and prediction of transient reef fish spawning aggregations in
the Gulf and Caribbean Region”, as part of the 2009, 62nd Annual Gulf and Caribbean Fisheries (GCFI)
meeting in Cumaná, Venezuela. The workshop, sponsored by National Science Foundation‟s Virgin
Islands Experimental Program for Stimulating Competitive Research (VI EPSCoR), included over 50
participants from 18 countries around the Caribbean. An online follow-up survey was administered to
gather participant-contributed data. A synthesis of the workshop results, couched with an extensive
literature review, is provided herein. This review synthesizes the latest advances in the study of tFSAs in
the Wider Caribbean to: 1) illustrate the current state-of-knowledge; 2) highlight gaps in our
understanding of the geography and ecology of aggregation sites; and 3) suggest future research needs
and conservation strategies. We have compiled multidisciplinary data on 108 tFSAs across 14 States and
Territories in the Wider Caribbean and reviewed the full range of approaches and technologies applied to
study tFSAs. Existing research and associated hypotheses are grouped and examined by data type. We
propose a multi-tiered research framework that provides an incremental approach to information
gathering at individual sites and suites of sites. We advocate applying the framework to facilitate
consistent and coordinated data collection and monitoring across a Wider Caribbean network of tFSAs.
KEYWORDS: Spawning aggregation, Caribbean, fisheries management, reef fish, biogeography
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
LET THEM COME TO YOU: IMPROVING ASSESSMENT AND MANAGEMENT OF DATA
POOR FISHERIES IN THE SNAPPER-GROUPER COMPLEX
DÉJELOS LLEGAR A USTED: MEJORANDO LA EVALUACIÓN Y MANEJO DE
PESQUERÍAS DEFICIENTES EN DATOS EN COMPLEJOS DE ESPECIES PARGO-MERO
LAISSEZ-LES VENIR À VOUS: AMÉLIORANT L'ÉVALUATION ET LA GESTION DES
PÊCHERIES PAUVRES EN DONNÉES DU COMPLEXE VIVANEAUX-MÉROUS
WILLIAM HEYMAN1, SHINICHI KOBARA2, AND PABLO GRANADOS-DIESELDORFF3
1
LGL Ecological Research Associates, Inc. 4103 S Texas Ave #211 Bryan, TX 77802 USA
[email protected]
2
Department of OceanographyTexas A&M University College Station Texas 77843-3146 United States
3
Department of GeographyTexas A&M University College Station Texas 77843-3147 United States
ABSTRACT
U.S. fisheries are considered some of the best managed in the world. Yet over half of the nation‟s stocks
or stock complexes have not had stock assessments so their overfished or overfishing status is unknown.
In the Gulf and Caribbean region, governance capacity is limited and fisheries management decisions are
often made with little information. How can this situation be addressed? Managers of salmon fisheries
have taken advantage of their life-history strategy to increase sampling efficiency for stock assessments.
Since fish return to their natal creeks to spawn each year, intensive studies of the stock structure can be
conducted efficiently in time and space during spawning runs. Following the same logic, we pose that
fisheries managers faced with snapper and grouper assessment of many species that aggregate to spawn,
should invest stock assessment resources at the time and location of these spawning aggregations. If it is
assumed that some portion of the stock comes to spawn each year, accurate counts at multiple sites can
offer direct measures of the overall population size. Similarly, age, length, and sex frequency data, and
size-specific fecundity can be gathered efficiently at spawning aggregation sites. Recent findings indicate
that many spawning sites share common geomorphological characteristics, (i.e. reef promontories on
shelf edges) and that many sites serve multiple members of the snapper-grouper complex. Assessing
many data poor stocks might be accomplished efficiently by monitoring multi-species spawning sites
through grouper and snapper spawning seasons. Shift the paradigm - let them come to you.
KEYWORDS: Data-poor fisheries, stock assessment, spawning aggregation, snapper-grouper complex,
fisheries
111
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
ASSESSING FISH COMMUNITIES OF SIX REMNANT CORALGAL REEFS OFF THE
SOUTH TEXAS COAST
EVALUACIÓN DE COMMUNIDAD PECES DE SEIS REMANENTES CORALGAL
ARRECIFES DE LA COASTA SUR DE TEJAS
EVALUATION DES COMMUNAUTÉS POISSONEUSES DANS SIX RÉCIFS CORALIENS
ÉTEINTS DE LA CÔTE SUD DU TEXAS
DAVID HICKS1, LIANA LERMA1, JONATHAN LE1, THOMAS C. SHIRLEY2, JOHN W.
TUNNELL2, REBEKAH RODRIGUEZ1, and ANDRES GARCIA1
1
University of Texas Brownsville Biological Sciences One West University Drive Brownsville, Texas
78520 USA [email protected]
2
Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi Department of Life Sciences 6300 Ocean Drive Corpus Christi,
Texas 78412
112
ABSTRACT
Community composition and abundances of fish species were examined from six south Texas banks
including from north to south Baker, Aransas, Dream, Blackfish, Mysterious, and a previously
undescribed bank. These mid-shelf banks are relic coralgal reefs that existed off the south Texas coast
approximately 21,000 to 12,000 years BP but were drowned and buried as a result of Pleistocene
deglaciation and subsequent rise in sea level. Today, the remnant peaks of these reefs protrude 1 to 24 m
above the surrounding sediment from depths of 68 to 84 m with buried portions extending 20 to 30 m
beneath the sea floor. Enumeration and identification of fish species was accomplished by reviewing
video footage from an ROV deployed from the R/V Falkor of the Schmidt Ocean Institute in September
2012. Multiple ROV transects were made across each of the relic banks. Fish abundances were
standardized (relative percentages) to account for differences in sampling effort among the banks.
Community assessments were limited at Mysterious Bank and Blackfish Ridge due to low visibility
resulting from a nepheloid layer suspended across surveyed terraces. The numerically predominant fish
species were Chromis insolata, Stegastes sp., Chromis scotti, Pronotogrammus martinicensis, Lutjanus
campechanus, and Rhomboplites aurorubens. Baker had the highest species richness (31), followed by
Aransas (28), Dream (23) and the undescribed bank (14). Community similarity was highest among the
northernmost banks and distinct from the southernmost bank.
KEYWORDS: Natural reef, deepwater, relic reef, ROV, reef fishes
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
USING FISHERY-INDEPENDENT SURVEYS TO ESTIMATE DENSITIES OF QUEEN
CONCH, STROMBUS GIGAS, POPULATIONS IN ST. CROIX, U. S. VIRGIN ISLANDS
USANDO ENCUESTAS INDEPENDIENTES DE LA PESQUERIA PARA ESTIMAR LAS
DENSIDADES DEL CARACOL ROSA, STROMBUS GIGAS, EN ST. CROIX, E.E.U.U. ISLAS
VÍRGENES
À L’AIDE DE SONDAGES INDÉPENDAMMENT POUR ESTIMER LA DENSITÉ DE LAMBI,
STROMBUS GIGAS, À SAINTE-CROIX, USA ÎLES VIERGES
HILL RONALD and JENNIFER DOERR
NOAA Fisheries Service 4700 Avenue U Galveston, Texas 77551 USA [email protected]
ABSTRACT
Conventional stock assessment methods have been ineffective for determining the population status of
queen conch throughout the Caribbean, mainly due to the lack of fishery-independent data. We examined
queen conch populations on the northeastern coast of St. Croix, U. S. Virgin Islands, using a radial survey
sampling technique with sample sites stratified by depth, habitat type, and management regime,
encompassing both open and closed fishing areas. We completed 503 radial surveys and located 4773
conch, representing a cumulative density of approximately 302 conch per hectare. Densities of conch
were highest in open fishing areas outside of Buck Island Reef National Monument (BIRNM) boundaries
due to larger areas of available seagrass habitat and high numbers of juvenile conch. Densities of adult
conch were highest inside the BIRNM on macroalgae and sand where many were observed mating and
laying egg masses. The St. Croix East End Marine Park had the lowest densities of conch, despite an
abundance of apparently suitable habitat. Overall length frequencies showed a bimodal distribution,
driven largely by conch found within the BIRNM. Length distributions by habitat were variable but
showed a trend toward larger conch in reef, macroalgae, and sand habitats compared to a more even
distribution in seagrass.
KEYWORDS: Queen conch, U.S. Virgin Islands, radial survey, density, habitat
113
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
LINKAGES BETWEEN HABITATS ARE ESSENTIAL FOR REEF FISHES
CONEXIÓNES ENTRE HÁBITATS SON ESENCIALES PARA PECES DEL ARRECIFE
LINKAGES ENTRE HABITATS SONT ESSENTIELS POUR POISSONS DE RÉCIF
RONALD HILL, THOMAS MINELLO, and JENNIFER DOERR
NOAA NMFS Southeast Fisheries Science Center 4700 Avenue U Galveston, TX 77551 USA
[email protected]
114
ABSTRACT
In coral reef ecosystems, different habitat types interact to support key life stages of juvenile fishery
species and other nekton (mobile fishes, shrimps, crabs, and lobsters). Quantitative comparisons of
nekton densities in adjoining habitat types are useful for estimating habitat use and supporting delineation
of essential fish habitat (EFH). Most comparative studies, however, have examined only a few habitat
types potentially available to nekton, focus on SCUBA-depth strata, or use different assessment methods
in different habitats that cannot be readily compared. We used two methods, visual census transects and
lift nets, concurrently, to compare nekton densities and size classes during two temporally separate
periods, June and October, in four adjoining shallow water coral reef habitat types in waters bordering the
Virgin Islands National Park and Coral Reef Monument, St. John, USVI. Density measures and species
compositions differed between sampling methods although some consistencies were seen. Species
richness and densities varied by season and habitat and size-specific habitat use was documented.
KEYWORDS: Essential Fish Habitat, coral reefs, seagrass, mangrove, reef fishes
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
BIOLOGY, STATUS AND CURRENT MANAGEMENT OF THE CARIBBEAN SPINY
LOBSTER (PANULIRUS ARGUS) IN ANTIGUA AND BARBUDA
BIOLOGÍA, ESTADO Y ACTUAL ADMINISTRACIÓN DE LA LANGOSTA ESPINOSA DEL
CARIBE (PANULIRUS ARGUS) EN ANTIGUA Y BARBUDA
BIOLOGIE, L'ÉTAT ACTUEL ET LA GESTION DE LA LANGOUSTE BLANCHE DES
CARAÏBES (PANULIRUS ARGUS) À ANTIGUA-ET-BARBUDA
IAN HORSFORD, HILROY SIMON, MARK ARCHIBALD, JOHN WEBBER and TREVOR JOSEPH
Fisheries Division Point Wharf Fisheries Complex St. John's Antigua
[email protected]
ABSTRACT
Catch and effort and biological data were collected from commercial fishing trips, at-sea stop and search,
and processing plants in Antigua and Barbuda. The objectives were to: 1) determine important fisheryrelated biological parameters for the spiny lobster (size of maturity, breeding periods, length-weight
relationships, etc.); 2) appraise previous and current management regimes (minimum size, compliance
with regulations, open access versus limited entry); and 3) determine trends (catch and effort, carapace
length, etc.) and status of the fishery. In terms of size, sexual dimorphism was detected, with male
lobsters being significantly larger than females (p < 0.05). The mean size of recruitment into the SCUBA
fishery was significantly larger than for the trap fishery (p < 0.05); however in both cases the mean value
was greater than the minimum legal size of 95 mm carapace length. The size of female maturity was also
larger than the minimum legal size and defined as the size at which 50% of females have mated (i.e., bear
spermatophore) plus those that were egg-bearing. Despite this it was considered important to maintain the
current minimum size regime given that it was already a widely accepted harmonised management
measure throughout the member states of the Organization of Eastern Caribbean States. In terms of status
and trends, no significant negative trends were detected for mean size of lobster landed or mean catch per
unit effort. Based on the fore mentioned results, the lobster fishery was considered sustainable at the
current level of fishing, if growth-overfishing is minimises.
KEYWORDS: Caribbean spiny lobster, Antigua and Barbuda, fisheries management, maturity, Panulirus
argus
115
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
THE CURRENT STATUS OF MARINE PROTECTED AREAS IN THE WESTERN CENTRAL
ATLANTIC
EL ESTADO ACTUAL DE LAS ÁREAS MARINAS PROTEGIDAS EN EL ATLÁNTICO
CENTRO-OCCIDENTAL
L'ÉTAT ACTUEL DES AIRES MARINES PROTÉGÉES DANS L'ATLANTIQUE CENTREOUEST
SHANNAN HURLEY
Old Dominion University 5115 Hampton Blvd. Norfolk, VA 23529 U.S. [email protected]
116
ABSTRACT
The effectiveness and coverage of marine protected areas (MPAs) in the Western Central Atlantic is of
high concern in relation to conserving biodiversity in the region. Past analyses of MPAs in this region
have been conducted, however, in light of large-scale initiatives to expand coverage and management
capacity such as the Caribbean Challenge, it is essential to understand the current status. This study
compiled data for 41 nations and territories from public access online databases and completed analyses
using ArcGIS and Microsoft Excel for a total of 1,011 MPAs. Results show that over the most recent
decade (2003-2012) the average rate of MPA implementation was 6 per year while the previous decade
(1993-2002) the average rate was 20 per year, indicating a significant decline. In addition, 57% of the 41
nations/territories have not implemented MPAs over the past decade and two nations continue to remain
without MPAs (Guyana and Sint Maarten). Only 7% of the MPAs are completely no take and 2% have
partial no take areas. In addition, information pertaining to management capacity is unreported for nearly
half of all MPAs. A total of 28 nations/territories have unreported management authorities for half or
more of their MPAs; 10 of these countries have no reported management for all of their MPAs. Results of
this study identifies areas where management capacity building should be focused. On top of this, the
transparency of available information pertaining to current and prospective management plans should be
increased.
KEYWORDS: MPA, Caribbean, Atlantic
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
MITOCHONDRIAL GENOME ORGANIZATION AND PHYLOGEOGRAPHIC ANALYSES IN
MITHRAX SPINOSISSIMUS (CRUSTACEA: BRACHYURA), AN IMPORTANT SPECIES FOR
ARTISANAL FISHERIES IN THE CARIBBEAN SEA
ORGANIZACIÓN DEL GENOMA MITOCONDRIAL Y ANÁLISIS FILOGEOGRÁFICOS EN
MITHRAX SPINOSISSIMUS (CRUSTACEA: BRACHYURA), UNA ESPECIE IMPORTANTE
EN PESQUERIAS ARTESANALES DE CRUSTÁCEOS EN EL MAR CARIBE
L´ORGANISATION DU GÉNOME MITOCHONDRIAL ET ANALISES
PHYLOGEOGRAPHIQUES DANS MITHRAX SPINOSISSIMUS (CRUSTACEA:
BRACHYURA), UNE ESPÈCE IMPORTANT EN PÊCHERIES ARTISANALES DU LA MER
DES CARAÏBES
JULIO HURTADO, NESTOR CAMPOS, and EDNA MARQUEZ
Universidad Nacional De Colombia Sede Medellin Calle 59a 63-20 Medellin, Antioquia 0500100
Colombia [email protected]
ABSTRACT
Here, we show the development and evaluation of bioinformatic analyses for the mitochondrial genome
assembly, and for the detection of mitochondrial molecular markers for phylogeographic studies in the
Caribbean king crab Mithrax spinosissimus (Brachyura: Decapoda: Mithracidae). This crab is an
overexploited species that inhabit coral and rocky reef ecosystems from the Caribbean sea and the Florida
Keys in USA. The purpose of this work is focused in the conservation genetics of this species because of
their ecological -biological control of benthonic algae- and economical -in artisanal fisheries in the
caribbean sea-, features that they play into the ecosystems where they inhabit. Collections of M.
spinosissimus muscle tissue were taken from October 2011 to March 2012, in three different coral and
rocky reef ecosystems in Colombia. Genome sequencing and assembly from one of the Colombian
specimens were obtained by using the NGS technology GS-FLX 454. Mitochondrial DNA genome
organization was performed and it was compared with information from genetic databases -GenBank,
NCBI. We found 13 protein-coding mitochondrial genes, two rRNAs, 22 tRNAs, and a putative
mitochondrial control region. We also amplified sequences from the mitochondrial regions COI and
control region (1200 bp each, approximately), and we found too a preliminary population genetic
structure of M. spinosissimus in the Colombian islands. We expect to generate data from the molecular
ecology and evolutionary aspects of M. spinosissimus to be useful in conservation genetics for this
species. Also, we expect to carry out management recommendations derived from the population
structure analyses.
KEYWORDS: Mitochondrial genome assembly, phylogeographic studies, Mithrax spinosissimus, coral
and rocky reef ecosystems, Caribbean Sea
117
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
ACCIONES IMPLEMENTADAS PARA EL CONTROL DEL PEZ LEÓN (PTEROIS SP.) EN EL
PARQUE NACIONAL ARRECIFE DE PUERTO MORELOS, QUINTANA ROO, MÉXICO
IMPLEMENTED ACTIONS TO CONTROL LIONFISH (PTEROIS SP.) IN THE "PARQUE
NACIONAL ARRECIFE DE PUERTO MORELOS", QUINTANA ROO, MÉXICO
ACTIONS MIS EN ŒUVRE A CONTRÔLER LE LIONFISH (PTEROIS SP.)SUR LE “PARQUE
NACIONAL ARRECIFE DE PUERTO MORELOS”, QUINTANA ROO, MEXIQUE.
SELENE ERANTZCANI JACOBO CABRAL, y ELPIS JOAN CHÁVEZ CALDERÓN
Parque Nacional Arrecife de Puerto Morelos CONANP Calle Matamoros #7 esquina Miguel Hidalgo
Puerto Morelos, Quintana Roo 77501 México [email protected]
118
RESUMEN
A partir de los primeros registros de la invasión del pez león en el Caribe Mexicano (2009), se han
tomado medidas para el conocimiento y diagnóstico de la especie. En el Parque Nacional Arrecife de
Puerto Morelos (PNAPM) se incrementaron los esfuerzos para el control y monitoreo de esta especie
invasora, reduciendo su efecto sobre las especies nativas y los arrecifes de la zona. Las acciones
implementadas mediante el Programa de control de pez león en el área, son resultado de una estrecha
colaboración entre el personal del Parque con apoyo del gobierno y asociaciones civiles que forman parte
de una integración social entre la cooperativa de pescadores y la comunidad en general, promoviendo la
captura y comercialización de la especie, generando conciencia entre la sociedad y así mismo
incrementando el consumo. Las capturas se realizan dentro y fuera del polígono del Parque Nacional con
la utilización de arpón, equipo de buceo SCUBA y buceo libre, con profundidades de 30 a 150 pies. Entre
el año 2011 y 2012 se han capturado más de 25 000 ejemplares con tallas promedio (LS) de 371 y 439 cm
y pesos de promedio de 22 y 23 cm respectivamente. En total se tienen registradas más de 10 toneladas de
pez entero de la cuales 3 toneladas se comercializaron como filete.
PALABRAS CLAVES: Puerto Morelos, pez león, integración, control, captura
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
POPULATIONS GENETIC STUDY OF THE CORALS ACROPORA PALMATA AND
ACROPORA CERVICORNIS OF GUADELOUPE (FRENCH WEST INDIES) IN VIEW OF
THEIR PRESERVATION
ESTUDIO DE LA GENÉTICA DE POBLACIONES DE CORALES ACROPORA PALMATA Y
ACROPORA CERVICORNIS DE GUADELOUPE (ANTILLAS FRANCESAS) PARA SU
CONSERVACIÓN
ÉTUDE DE GÉNÉTIQUE DES POPULATIONS DES CORAUX ACROPORA PALMATA ET
ACROPORA CERVICORNIS DE GUADELOUPE (PETITES ANTILLES) EN VUE DE LEUR
CONSERVATION
AURÉLIEN JAPAUD1, CÉCILE FAUVELOT2, and CLAUDE BOUCHON1
Universite des Antilles et de la Guyane LABEX CORAIL DYNECAR EA 926 BP 592 Pointe-à-Pitre
cedex, Guadeloupe 97159 Guadeloupe (FRANCE) [email protected]
2
Centre IRD de Nouméa UNIT 227 COREUS BPA 5 Nouméa Nouvelle-Calédonie 98848 France
1
ABSTRACT
In the Caribbean, Acropora palmata (Lamarck, 1816) and A. cervicornis (Lamarck, 1816) are major coral
species for reef bioconstruction. Since the 80‟s, the populations of these species are decreasing and are
now classified as “critically endangered species” by the International Union for Conservation of Nature
(IUCN). To implement the development of an efficient and sustainable restoration method of the
endangered populations, the genetic status of populations should be known. Recent studies, mainly
conducted on the reefs of Florida and the Greater Antilles concerned the structure and the dynamics of
Acropora populations, while the genetic status of the populations in the Lesser Antilles remain unknown.
In this context, for these two species, a genetic study of some populations was realized on five reefs of
Guadeloupe (French West Indies). Results of this study suggested that the populations were genetically
distinct and had a larval recruitment on a spatial limited scale and that they need local conservation
measures. In addition, results show that A. cervicornis populations are rare and genetically undiversified.
However, a small genetic divergence between some individuals of these species and for the first time, the
presence of the hybrid A. prolifera colonies on one reef, would suggest that the introgression of some
genes from A. palmata to A. cervicornis could give an evolutionary potential to the genus Acropora.
KEYWORDS: Caribbean corals, population genetic, Acropora palmata, Acropora cervicornis
119
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
FISH COMMUNITY STRUCTURE AND ABUNDANCE ON TEXAS ARTIFICIAL REEFS: A
PRELIMINARY ASSESSMENT
ESTRUCTURA COMUNITARIA DE PECES Y ABUNDANCIA DE TEXAS LOS ARRECIFES
ARTIFICIALES: UNA EVALUACIÓN PRELIMINAR
STRUCTURE DE LA COMMUNAUTÉ DE POISSONS ET DE POISSONS ABONDANCE SUR
TEXAS RÉCIFS ARTIFICIELS : UNE ÉVALUATION PRÉLIMINAIRE
JENNIFER JARRELL WETZ, MATTHEW AJEMIAN, and GREGORY STUNZ
Harte Research Institute Texas A & M University - Corpus Christi 6300 Ocean Drive Unit 5869 Corpus
Christi, TX 78412 USA [email protected]
120
ABSTRACT
With the exception of the southwest Florida coast, the majority of the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) is devoid of
large expanses of natural hard bottom. Generally, the benthic environments are characterized by clay,
sand, or silt material. This lack of complex habitat has led to a great dependence on artificial reefs by
fishermen and divers as these structures generally produce higher quantities of marine life than bare
bottom habitats. The state of Texas has one of the largest rigs-to-reefs programs in the United States, and
has reefed 140 oil and gas platforms since 1990. Despite several decades of reefing, there have been few
assessments of fish populations using these artificial structures. We are currently intensively monitoring
15 offshore artificial reefs along the Texas coastal bend. These sites vary in structure and relief and
include toppled rigs, cut-off rigs, concrete culverts, liberty ships, and barges. Our surveys combine the use
of remotely operated vehicle (ROV), SCUBA, and vertical longlines to quantify the abundance and
diversity of fishes inhabiting these reefs. In our first year of assessment we observed >50 fish species,
including invasive lionfish, Pterois volitans, and a variety of commercially and recreationally exploited
snappers, groupers, and jacks. Year 1 data also suggest that reef type influences fish community structure
and abundance patterns. Future efforts include a comparison of gear selectivity and performance at select
sites and continued reef fish monitoring across the coastal bend region. These studies aim to guide
developers on best reefing practices.
KEYWORDS: artificial reef, platforms, ROV, fish community
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
SPECIES-SPECIFIC FISH FEATURE EXTRACTION USING GABOR FILTERS
EXTRACCIÓN ESPECÍFICA DE LA ESPECIE PESCADO CARACTERÍSTICA CON GABOR
FILTROS
EXTRACTION DES SPÉCIFICITÉS PROPRES À L'ESPÈCE DE POISSON EN UTILISANT
DES FILTRES GABOR
ARJUN KUMAR JOGINIPELLY1, DIMITRIOS CHARALAMPIDIS2, GEORGE IOUP3, JULIETTE
IOUP3 and CHARLES H THOMPSON4
1
University of New Orleans 6232 Waldo Drive New Orleans, LA 70122 United States
[email protected]
2
University of New Orleans, Department of Electrical Engineering, New Orleans, LA 70122 United States
3
University of New Orleans, Department of Physics, New Orleans, LA 70148 United States
4
NOAA Southeast Fisheries Science Center Stennis Space CenterMS 39529 United States
ABSTRACT
Fish recognition and classification are challenging when performed on video data obtained in noncontrolled environments (NCE‟s) such as in natural waters. Many NOAA Fisheries surveys use
underwater cameras to gather video data for this purpose, which facilitate the analysis of fish populations.
Since the amount of data is large, manual data analysis is insufficient. Automatic processing tools are
necessary. Most techniques that extract features from fish are in two categories. In the first, features are
specific to fish but not necessarily to a particular species. Yet, such measurements are often unreliable
when extracted from video obtained in NCE‟s, since they strongly depend on the aspect of fish with
respect to the camera. In the second, features are generic and may include texture and shape descriptors.
Such features do not target specific species of interest. In this paper, we present an automatic technique
using Gabor filters to extract characteristic features from two important species, namely, Epinephelus
morio (which has a vertical band located at the tale) and Ocyurus chrysurus (which has a long horizontal
line that runs across the body). The proposed algorithm is tested on 200 frames, each containing several
fish and non-fish regions. The detection rate is 70.6% for Epinephelus morio and 80.3% for Ocyurus
chrysurus, while 23.5% of the undetected Epinephelus morio cases do not have a visible tail band, and
16.7% of the undetected Ocyurus chrysurus cases do not have a visible straight body line. The false alarm
rates are 3.8% and 2.1%, respectively.
KEYWORDS: Automated fish classification, automated fish feature extraction, image processing,
Epinephelus morio, Ocyurus chrysurus
121
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
INDO-PACIFIC LIONFISHES (PTEROIS VOLITANS/MILES) INVADE THE FLOWER
GARDEN BANKS NATIONAL MARINE SANCTUARY IN THE NORTHWEST GULF OF
MEXICO
LOS PECES LEÓN (PTEROIS VOLITANS/MILES) DEL OCÉANO INDO-PACÍFICO INVADEN
EL SANTUARIO MARINO NACIONAL FLOWER GARDEN BANKS EN EL NOROESTE DEL
GOLFO DE MÉXICO
LIONFISHES INDO-PACIFIQUE (PTEROIS VOLITANS/MILES) ENVAHISSENT LA FLOWER
GARDEN BANKS SANCTUAIRE MARIN NATIONAL DANS LE NORD-OUEST DU GOLFE
DU MEXIQUE
MICHELLE JOHNSTON, RYAN ECKERT, JOHN EMBESI, MARISSA NUTTALL EMMA
HICKERSON, and GEORGE SCHMAHL
NOAA Flower Garden Banks NMS 4700 Avenue U Galveston, TX 77551 USA
[email protected]
122
ABSTRACT
Indo-Pacific lionfishes (Pterois volitans and P. miles) are the first invasive marine fishes to become
established in the Western Atlantic Ocean and Caribbean Sea. Lionfishes, with their venomous spines,
insatiable appetites, wide habitat distribution, and prolific reproduction, are a serious threat to native
fishes and coral reef communities. Since the introduction of these species into the Western Atlantic in the
late 1980s, lionfishes have spread and become established throughout the Western Atlantic and
Caribbean, and were first recorded in the Gulf of Mexico in 2009. In late 2010, lionfishes were observed
at Sonnier Bank and nearby oil and gas platforms. By mid 2011, lionfishes were observed on all three
banks comprising the Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary (FGBNMS), which harbors the
northernmost coral reefs in the continental United States. We document the appearance and subsequent
spread of lionfishes within the FGBNMS, as well as the surrounding banks and artificial structures in the
Northwest Gulf of Mexico. We assessed lionfish diet with stomach content analysis, and analyzed
changes in native fish communities at the FGBNMS with long-term monitoring visual fish survey data.
Between 2011 and 2012, lionfish sightings increased tenfold within the FGBNMS. While fish biomass at
the FGBNMS remains high, the full invasion is likely still developing and negative impacts on the reef
community may not be recognized for several years. Lionfish impacts, combined with pre-existing
stressors such as overfishing and global climate change, may cause cascading changes in the food chain
and coral reef communities in the region.
KEYWORDS: Lionfish, marine sanctuary, invasion, Gulf of Mexico
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
GENERATING FISHERIES MANAGEMENT ADVICE IN DATA-LIMITED SITUATIONS:
EXAMPLES FROM THE U.S. SOUTH ATLANTIC AND CARIBBEAN
GENERANDO RECOMENDACIONES PARA EL MANEJO DE LA PESCA EN CASOS DE
DATOS LIMITADOS: EJEMPLOS DEL ATLÁNTICO SUR DE LOS ESTADOS UNIDOS Y
DEL CARIBE
PRODUIRE DES AVIS DE GESTION POUR LES PÊCHERIES EN SITUATIONS DE
DONNÉES LIMITÉES: EXAMPLES DE LA FAÇADE ATLANTIQUE-SUD DES ÉTATS-UNIS
ET DES CARAÏBES
MANDY KARNAUSKAS1, NICK FARMER2, ELIZABETH BABCOCK3, MARGARET MILLER1,
DAVID MCCLELLAN1, and JEAN WIENER4
1
National Marine Fisheries Service Southeast Fisheries Science Center 75 Virginia Beach Drive Miami,
FL 33149 USA [email protected]
2
National Marine Fisheries Service Southeast Fisheries Science Center Southeast Regional Office, St.
Petersburg, FL 33701 USA
3
Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, Department of Marine Biology and Fisheries
4600 Rickenbacker Causeway Miami FL 33149 USA
4
Fondation pour la Protection de la Biodiversité Marine B.P. 642 Port-au-Prince Haiti
ABSTRACT
While the southeastern United States and Caribbean generally suffer from a paucity of fisheries data with
which to carry out formal stock assessments, management advice can sometimes be obtained with limited
data, provided they contain sufficient resolution over space or time. Here we present two case studies,
which were originally motivated by the need to generate management advice under severe data
limitations. The first example focuses on the impact of the Haitian fishery at Navassa Island, where a
SCUBA fish monitoring survey was carried out over the span of a decade. Community-level indicators of
ecosystem status were estimated using a Bayesian framework which accounted for the artifacts of
sampling. Despite the small sample size and the relatively short time series, significant trends emerged
and these were in agreement with anecdotal observations of the level of fishing pressure. The second
example relates to the spatial management of two rarely-encountered grouper species in the South
Atlantic. While a plethora of data sources are available for this region, these data sets are largely
incoherent in both space and time, and detection rates of the study species are extremely low. By
incorporating all data into a generalized linear modeling framework, we were able to produce a map of
probability of occurrence across the entire South Atlantic. These results are being used to guide the design
of marine reserves intended to protect these species. Both of the methodologies presented here could be
applied to other fisheries in the region where similar data limitations exist.
KEYWORDS: data-limited fisheries, size spectra, marine reserve, Bayesian statistics, SCUBA survey
123
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
THE GULF OF MEXICO SHRIMP PROCESSING SECTOR AND ADAPTION TO
INCREASING IMPORTS
EL SECTOR PROCESADOR DE CAMARONES DEL GOLFO DE MÉJICO Y SU
ADAPTACIÓN AL AUMENTO DE LAS IMPORTACIONES
LES PROCESSEURS DE CREVETTE DU GOLFE DU MEXIQUE ET LEUR ADAPTATION À
L’AUGMENTATION DES IMPORTATIONS
WALTER KEITHLY1, MICHAEL TRAVIS2, and HUA WANG1
Louisiana State University 101 Woodin Hall Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 United States
[email protected]
2
NOAA Fisheries 75 Virginia Beach Drive Miami FL 33149 United States
1
124
ABSTRACT
The shrimp industry is by far the largest income generator among the Gulf of Mexico commercial
fisheries. Since the 1990s, however, it economic viability has rapidly deteriorated due, primarily, to an
increasing import base and a concomitant decline in the price of the harvested product. The harvesting
component of the industry has responded to the economic decline by significantly reducing effort
primarily via a large decline in the number of vessels targeting shrimp. While the impacts on the
harvesting sector associated with increasing imports and declining output price have been theoretically
and empirically analyzed in a number of studies, the impacts on the processing sector have not been
considered in great detail. On one hand, domestic shrimp processors may benefit from higher imports as
they present an additional source of raw material that can potentially be used in domestic processing
activities. However, imported processed shrimp may also compete directly with domestically processed
product. Direct competition between imported and domestically processed shrimp becomes more likely as
overseas processors increasingly move to value-added processing activities. The purpose of this paper is
to examine the impact of imported shrimp on the Gulf of Mexico shrimp processing sector. The analysis
will be conducted by product form and with an emphasis placed on changes in marketing margins and
subsequent changes in market structure.
KEYWORDS: Shrimp, processing, adaption
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
LIMITATIONS ASSOCIATED WITH ESTABLISHING A CATCH SHARE PROGRAM IN A
DATA POOR FISHERY: A CASE STUDY OF THE PUERTO RICAN DEEP WATER SNAPPER
FISHERY
LES DÉFIS ASSOCIÉES LA MISE EN PLACE D'UN PROGRAMME DE PARTAGE DES
CAPTURES DANS UNE PECHERIE AUX DONNÉES LIMITÉES: UNE ETUDE DE CAS DU
ROUGET ET MÉROU DES EAUX PROFONDES PORTORICAIN
ESRETOS ASOCIADOS CON EL ESTABLECIMIENTO DE UN PROGRAMA DE
PARTICIPACIONES DE CAPTURA EN UNA PESQUERIA DE DATOS ESCASOS: EL CASO
DE LA PESQUERIA DE PARGOS Y MEROS DE AGUAS PROFUNDAS PUERTORRIQUE?
WALTER KEITHLY1, JUAN AGAR2, FLAVIA TONIOLI3, MANUEL VALDÉS PIZZINI4 and
MIGUEL ROLÓN5
1
Louisiana State University 101 Woodin Hall Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 United States
[email protected]
2
Social Science Research Group, NOAA Social Science Research Group,Southeast Fisheries Science
Center, National Marine Fisheries Serv Miami FL 33149 United States
3
Cooperative Institute, NOAA Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies
(CIMAS),Rosenstiel School of Marine and Miami FL 33149 United States
4
University of Puerto Rico Mayagüez Puerto Rico 00681-9266 United States
5
Caribbean Fisheries Management Agency 268 Munoz Rivera Ave., Suite 1108 San JuanPuerto Rico
00918-1920 United States
ABSTRACT
The paper describes the experience of the first attempt to establish a catch share program in the U.S.
Caribbean. It also examines the reasons behind fishermen?s hesitancy to participate in the deep-water
snapper catch share program. Our analysis shows that these programs may not be a suitable management
tool for the U.S. Caribbean given high transaction costs. High decision-making costs were the main
impediments for the establishment of the program. However, the process may have been a positive
experience because it encouraged fishermen and managers to work together to find solutions suited for
their local circumstances.
KEYWORDS: catch share program, management, snapper, U.S. Caribbean
125
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
GULF OF MEXICO RED SNAPPER IFQ PROGRAM SURVEY ASSESSMENT: CHANGE IN
ATTITUDE OF THE FISHERMEN
EVALUACIÓN DEL PROGRAMA DE CUOTAS DE PESCA EN LA PESQUERÍA DE PARGOS
ROJO DEL GOLFO DE MÉJICO: CAMBIO DE PERSPECTIVA DE LOS PESCADORES
EVALUATION DE L’ENQUÊTE SUR LE PROGRAMME DE QUOTAS DE PÊCHE
INDIVIDUELS POUR LE ROUGET DU GOLFE DU MEXIQUE: CHANGEMENT
D'ATTITUDE DES PÊCHEURS
WALTER KEITHLY1, CAROLINE BOEN1, and JUAN AGAR2
Louisiana State University 101 Woodin Hall Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 United States
[email protected]
2
Social Science Research Group, NOAA Social Science Research Group,Southeast Fisheries Science
Center, National Marine Fisheries Serv Miami FL 33149 United States
1
126
ABSTRACT
On January 1, 2007 the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council implemented the red snapper
individual fishing quota (IFQ) program to reduce overcapacity and mitigate, to the extent possible, derbyfishing conditions. The program also sought to increase market stability, eliminate fishing seasons,
increase flexibility for fishing operations, facilitate enforcement, improve safety at sea, and enhance the
net social, economic, and biological benefits from fishery. This paper discusses the findings of a mail
survey used to investigate fishermen‟s attitudes and perceptions towards the program to assist in the
Council mandated 5 year review of the IFQ program. The study found that participants with large
shareholdings tended to be very satisfied with the IFQ program, whereas those with small shareholdings
were the least satisfied with the program. About 65% of respondents stated that they did not make any
major capital investments or dis-investments since the onset of the program. The study also found that the
industry believed that the IFQ program had reduced derby-fishing conditions. Additionally, medium and
large shareholders, as well as western Gulf shareholders, agreed that the IFQ program had increased
harvesting flexibility and decreased crowding on fishing grounds.
KEYWORDS: individual fishing quota, red snapper, shareholders
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
UNDERSTANDING THE STAKEHOLDERS IN THE CARIBBEAN SPORTFISHING
COMMUNITY: THE POTENTIAL FOR SPORTFISHING DEVLOPMENT IN THE
CARIBBEAN
CÓMO COMPRENDER A LOS ACCIONISTAS DE LA COMUNIDAD DE PESCA
DEPORTIVA DEL CARIBE: EL POTENCIAL PARA DESARROLLO DE LA PESCA
DEPORTIVA EN EL CARIBE
COMPRENDRE LES INTERVENANTS DE LA COMMUNAUTÉ DE PÊCHE SPORTIVE DES
CARAÏBES : LE POTENTIEL DE DÉVELOPPEMENT DE LA PÊCHE SPORTIVE DANS LES
CARAÏBES
MICHAEL KELLY, PETER CHAIBONGSAI, ROXANE DE WAEGH, and NICOLE BESEMER
The Billfish Foundation PO Box 8787 Fort Lauderdale, FL 33310 USA
[email protected]
ABSTRACT
Sportfishing, a sustainable form of ecotourism, can bring socioeconomic benefits to local economies as
and conserve local marine resources. Caribbean nations show great potential to capture these benefits by
expanding or promoting their areas, but this is dependent on having effective and responsible
management of gamefish (highly migratory) species. TBF is engaged with stakeholders to collect relevant
data to demonstrate the potential for the development of sportfishing in Caribbean nations and raise
awareness of the benefits that sportfishing can accrue. Discourse with relevant stakeholders and local
officials are also intended to encourage their active participation in fisheries management issues and
engage officials to promote sportfishing and conservation in their respective nations. Highlighting the
potential for nations to capture these many benefits as well as relevant fisheries management issues is also
intended to ensure that nations maximize socioeconomic benefits for stakeholders through responsible use
of their marine resources. TBF also intends to demonstrate that sportfishing offers a much more viable,
sustainable means of accruing benefits for its citizens than some of the current practices in place in many
Caribbean nations.
KEYWORDS: Sportfishing, Caribbean, conservation, gamefish
127
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
LEARNING FROM GLOBAL MPA NETWORKS: SEEKING GREATER INVOLVEMENT OF
SMALL-SCALE FISHING COMMUNITIES IN MPA DESIGN, IMPLEMENTATION AND
MANAGEMENT
APRENDIENDO DE LAS REDES DE AMP GLOBAL: BUSCANDO MAYOR PARTICIPACIÓN
DE LAS COMUNIDADES PESQUERAS EN PEQUEÑA ESCALA DE MPA DISEÑO,
IMPLEMENTACIÓN Y GESTIÓN
APPRENDRE DES RÉSEAUX D'AMP GLOBAUX: RECHERCHER UNE PLUS GRANDE
IMPLICATION DES COMMUNAUTÉS DE PÊCHE À PETITE ÉCHELLE DANS MPA
CONCEPTION, LA RÉALISATION ET LA GESTION
ZAIDY KHAN1, DAVON BAKER2, and CHRISTOPHER BARTHOLOMEW3
1
Foundation of the People of the South Pacific I CERMES, UWI St Geroge St Geroge, Grenada
[email protected]
2
Ministry of Carriacou and Petite Martinique Affairs & Local GoverSIOBMPA Carriacou Carriacou
Grenada
3
Fisher Boat builder L’Esterre Bay Grenada
128
ABSTRACT
Fishing provides the main source of income for communities adjacent to Sandy Island/Oyster Bed Marine
Protected Area (SIOBMPA), Grenada. Because they are banned from areas where they traditionally
fished, fishers view SIOBMPA as a system created to benefit persons with tourism interest, at the expense
of fishers‟ livelihood. Fishers‟ apathy is due partly to them not being integrally involved in the planning
and set-up of the protected area. Central to these processes are national governance arrangements, with
limited considerations for localized economic diversification. Alternative livelihood options for
SIOBMPA are now being discussed. However, community organization, social attachment, and
cohesiveness are crucial to the success of such efforts. Learning from global MPA networks, such as
locally managed marine areas and fisheries livelihood networks from the Asia, Pacific and even Latin
America, is important for start-up MPAs, and Ministry of Carriacou and Petite Martinique Affairs
(Grenada) representative to the MPA board embraced the opportunity to learn of proven examples where
communities officially organize to manage marine and coastal resources, when he participated in a Global
Learning Network session at the IUCN World Conservation Congress. That workshop provided first-hand
knowledge on sustainable ways to tackle the challenges of coastal resource management commonly faced
by fishing communities in developing countries. The Ministry‟s MPA representative now keenly works
towards developing community empowerment and leadership in MPA management and fishers networks,
and seeksto foster hands-on community and fishers‟ involvement in fisheries livelihood enhancement
projects. He is, furthermore, working to refine co-management arrangements and policies.
KEYWORDS: MPA network, community based, co-management , livelihood
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
AUTOMATIC FISH COUNTING IN UNDERWATER VIDEO
CUENTA AUTOMÁTICA DE PECES EN VIDEO SUBMARINO
COMPTAGE AUTOMATIQUE DE POISSON DANS LA VIDÉO SOUS-MARINE
HAZEM KHANFER1, DIMITRIOS CHARALAMPIDIS1, E. J. YOERGER2, GEORGE IOUP2,
JULIETTE IOUP2, and CHARLES THOMPSON3
1
University of New Orleans Department of Electrical Engineering New Orleans, LA 70148 USA
[email protected]
2
University of New Orleans Department of Physics New Orleans, Louisiana 70148 USA
3
NOAA Southeast Fisheries Center Stennis Space Center Mississippi 39529 USA
[email protected]
ABSTRACT
Underwater video is currently being used by many scientists within NMFS to study fish populations and
to do a census of species. The Southeast Fisheries Science Center uses such systems to assess populations
of reef fish in the Gulf of Mexico. The manual nature of this analysis is time consuming and labor
intensive. The goal is to develop software tools and algorithms to automate fish counting in underwater
video. The main step is to recognize the presence of fish in the images and track the locations of
individual fish from frame to frame. Recognizing the presence of fish is achieved via a histogram
thresholding technique. Tracking is performed using a simple linear motion model. This allows automated
counting of the number of fish in a time segment and exporting information about each fish. The relative
size and shape of each individual fish changes as its location and viewed aspect change. However, most
of the fish imaged will be moving against a more or less stationary background, and that motion is used to
aid in detection. Enumerating fish targets imaged during a given time period requires tracking the location
of each individual through the subset of images where it appears so that it is not counted multiple times.
After each region containing fish is isolated, region growing is used. This makes possible the accurate
counting of the number of fish and rejection of isolated regions which are not fish. Results demonstrate
the performance of the proposed fish counting technique.
KEYWORDS: Computer counting, underwater video, background subtraction, tracking, census
129
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
COMMUNITIES AT NEARBY ARTIFICIAL AND NATURAL REEFS, SIMILAR OR NOT?
LAS COMUNIDADES EN LOS ARRECIFES ARTIFICIALES Y NATURALES CERCANAS,
SIMILARES O NO?
LES COMMUNAUTES A RECIFS ARTIFICIELS ET NATURELS A PROXIMITE,
SIMILAIRES OU PAS?
KELLY KINGON1, CHRIS KOENIG1, CHRIS STALLINGS2, KARA WALL3, RYLAND TAYLOR1,
and TYLER SCHENCK1
1
Florida State University Coastal and Marine Laboratory 3618 Highway 98 St. Teresa, FL 32358 USA
[email protected]
2
University of South Florida, College of Marine Science 140 7th Ave S St. Petersburg Florida 33701
United States
3
University of South Florida Florida State University Florida State University
130
ABSTRACT
The ecological function of artificial reefs is highly debated and the capacity for them to mimic nearby
natural reef communities is largely unknown. This study seeks to uncover the differences between reef
fishes and sessile invertebrate colonizers found at artificial reefs and nearby natural reefs. To evaluate the
communities, a 1 km x 1 km area was mapped using sidescan sonar around sites with known artificial and
natural reef habitats. These maps revealed the hard structures present and the surrounding seascape within
four sampling zones off the coast of the Florida panhandle (south of Dog Island). Five artificial, five high
relief (>0.5 m) and five low relief (<0.5 m) natural reefs were randomly selected using the map data in
each of the four sampling zones. These sites were surveyed seasonally using rotating, stationary drop
cameras to assess the fish species present and their relative abundances. Invertebrate colonizers were
quantified from quadrat photos taken along three 30 m transects at select sites of each habitat type
(artificial, natural high relief, natural low relief) in each zone. Preliminary results suggest there are
differences between natural and artificial reef communities and even between different types of artificial
and natural reef structures. The relationships between habitat and community appear to be complex but
the methods used in this study will reveal some potential explanations for the patterns identified. The
importance of these hard bottom structures to fishes moving offshore when temperatures decline in the
fall from the adjacent estuary will also be uncovered.
KEYWORDS: artificial reefs, hard bottom habitat, reef fish, sidescan sonar, Gulf of Mexico
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
DISCRIMINATION OF CHEMICAL SIGNATURES IN OTOLITHS OF JUVENILE
YELLOWFIN TUNA (THUNNUS ALBACARES) FROM NURSERY AREAS IN THE ATLANTIC
OCEAN
DISCRIMINACIÓN DE SEÑALES QUÍMICAS EN LOS OTOLITOS DE JUVENILES RABIL
(THUNNUS ALBACARES) DEL ÁREAS DE CRÍADERO EN EL OCÉANO ATLÁNTICO
COMPARAISON DES SIGNATURES CHIMIQUES DES OTOLITHES DE JUVÉNILES DE
THONS JAUNES (THUNNUS ALBACARES) PROVENANT DE DIFFÉRENTES NURSERIES
DE L'OCÉAN ATLANTIQUE
LARISSA KITCHENS and JAY ROOKER
Texas A&M University at Galveston Texas A&M University 200 Seawolf Parkway Galveston, TX 77553
United States [email protected]
ABSTRACT
Yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares) are highly migratory cosmopolitan fish that are currently managed as
a single panmictic stock in the Atlantic Ocean; however, our understanding of the migration patterns and
connectivity of Atlantic populations is minimal. Naturally occurring chemical tracers in otoliths provide
valuable information that is widely used to classify populations and reconstruct environmental histories of
fishes. The aim of this study is to evaluate the otolith microchemistry of young-of-the-year (YOY)
yellowfin tuna to determine whether chemical signatures are distinct across different putative spawning
areas in the Atlantic Ocean. YOY yellowfin tuna otoliths were collected from 5 locations in the Atlantic
Ocean (Gulf of Mexico, Brazil, Martinique, Dominican Republic, and Gulf of Guinea) in 2012 and 2013
and trace elemental and stable isotopic analyses will be conducted to investigate regional variation in the
chemical composition of otoliths. In this paper, we present preliminary results from the first year of our
study and evaluate the feasibility of using these natural tracers to discriminate juveniles from different
nursery areas. This research is ongoing and we will extend our sampling into 2014 and 2015 at all
locations. After we establish our baseline of natal signatures, these data will be used to assign adult
yellowfin tuna from the Gulf of Mexico to their nursery of origin. Results of this study will ultimately
provide an improved understanding of the stock structure and movement of yellowfin tuna in the Atlantic
Ocean.
KEYWORDS: yellowfin tuna, trace elements, stable isotopes, otolith chemistry, Atlantic Ocean
131
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
BONEFISH POND NATIONAL PARK RESTORATION: INCREASED MANAGEMENT
EFFECTIVENESS THROUGH COMMUNITY RESTORATION PROJECTS
PARQUE NACIONAL 'BONEFISH POND': MAYOR EFICACIA DE LA GESTIÓN A TRAVÉS
DE PROYECTOS DE RESTAURACIÓN DE LA COMUNIDAD
PARC NATIONAL 'BONEFISH POND': AUGMENTATION DE L'EFFICACITÉ DE LA
GESTION À TRAVERS LES PROJETS DE RESTAURATION COMMUNAUTAIRES
LINDY KNOWLES1, CRAIG DAHLGREN2, FELICITY BURROWS3, AGNESSA LUNDY3, AND
JANEEN BULLARD4
1
Bahamas National Trust Retreat Gardens Village Road Nassau, NP N4105 The Bahamas
[email protected]
2
Perry Institute of Marine Science, Vermont USA
3
The Nature Conservancy Colonial Hill Plaza, Thompson Blvd Nassau New Providence CB 11398,The
Bahamas
4
Nassau, New Providence, The Bahamas
132
ABSTRACT
In the Bahamas the ecological importance of mangrove is often neglected. Though mangroves are the
natural protection of the coastal habitat, they are often dredged for marinas or filled to create hard land for
further development. Mangrove habitats are also often dumping grounds. Prior to its establishment as a
national park managed by the Bahamas National Trust, the area that became the Bonefish Pond National
Park (BPNP) was used in precisely this way. This coastal wetland system is situated on the southern
portion of New Providence, the densely populated capital of the Bahamas. It was used as a copper
burning site, a dump site for debris, a launching site for boats and for fishing. BPNP is over 1,000 acres of
coastal mangrove habitat. It serves as an important nursery habitat for the nearby offshore reefs providing
shelter for commercially important fish during their most vulnerable stage of life. Since its establishment
as a national park in 2002 a number of restoration projects were conducted in the BPNP to improve its
effectiveness as a nursery habitat for nearby offshore reefs. These projects have helped return the area to a
more pristine condition through improving tidal flows that were previously obstructed, removing invasive
plants, increasing suitable fish habitat and increasing education to visitors, neighbouring residents and
potential users to the area. These projects have been possible through public, private and community
based groups coming together to help increase the management effectiveness of the Park; preserving its
important ecological services.
KEYWORDS: Coastal wetlands, restoration, national park, fisheries, Caribbean Challenge Initiative
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
COMPARISONS OF AGE AND GROWTH PARAMETERS OF RED SNAPPER (LUTJANUS
CAMPECHANUS) AT AN ARTIFICIAL REEF AND AT A NATURAL SHELF-EDGE REEF
COMPARACIÓN ENTRE LA EDAD Y LOS PARÁMETROS DE CRECIMIENTO DEL
HUACHINANGO (LUTJANUS CAMPECHANUS) TANTO EN UN ARRECIFE ARTIFICIAL
COMO EN UN ARRECIFE NATURAL AL BORDE DE LA PLATAFORMA CONTINENTAL
LES COMPARAISONS DE L'ÂGE ET DES PARAMÈTRES DE RED SNAPPER (LUTJANUS
CAMPECHANUS) À UN RÉCIF ARTIFICIEL CROISSANCE ET À UN REEF
CONSERVATION NATURAL EDGE
MARSHALL KORMANEC
LSU 4049 Claycut Rd. Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70806 United States [email protected]
ABSTRACT
Red snapper is an important recreational and commercial finfish in the northern Gulf of Mexico. Red
snapper inhabit several different habitat types: low-relief artificial structures, toppled and standing oil and
gas platforms, and natural banks located on the mid-shelf and the shelf-edge. Red snapper populations are
currently managed as a single stock both east and west of the Mississippi River. Nieland et al. (2007)
reported a decline in ages of red snapper across the Louisiana commercial fishery indicating the
population may be overfished and undergoing overfishing. The Gulf of Mexico Fisheries Management
Council has set of a goal of reaching maximum sustainable yield by 2032. This study will compare age
structure of red snapper from both a low-relief artificial habitat and a natural shelf edge bank, respectively
in the East Cameron Oil Lease Planning Area (n=135) and at Bright Bank (n=92). Otoliths were collected
from red snapper at each habitat over a period of three years with quarterly research trips. The otoliths
were sectioned and read using marginal increment analysis according to Beckman et al (1988). This study
will address differences in size-at-age, weight-at-age, and the age distribution at each habitat. Previous
studies have reported significant differences in age and growth parameters between artificial habitats and
natural banks. This analysis will help define biological reference points as well as the quality and role of
both habitats. Unbiased age estimates will give fishery managers tools to make informed decisions about
the best methods to regulate the red snapper fisheries.
KEYWORDS: Red snapper, habitat, artifical, age, growth
133
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
EVALUATING MPA SUCCESS AS A FUNCTION OF MANAGEMENT
LA EVALUACIÓN DEL ÉXITO MPA COMO UNA FUNCIÓN DE GESTIÓNE
VALUATION DU SUCCÈS DES AMP EN TANT QUE BUT DE GESTION
FABIAN KYNE
University of West Indies Discovery Bay Marine Lab Discovery Bay, Jamaica [email protected]
134
ABSTRACT
Overfishing continues to be one of the most acute threats to biodiversity within the insular Caribbean,
with Jamaica‟s near shore resources unable to sustain fisheries at current levels of exploitation. Stocks on
Jamaica‟s north coast have been so severely depleted that few fish survive for more than a year and fewer
still long enough to recruit. In 2010, the Jamaican government designated several coastal areas of
ecological and fisheries importance as Special Fisheries Conservation Areas (SFCAs) to alleviate the
stresses posed to reefs and facilitate in the recovery of reef fish populations. Data was collected using a
series of underwater visual censuses, fisher and management perspectives across locations in Discovery
Bay, Boscobel and Portland over successive sampling periods in 2011 and 2013. The purpose was to
assess the status of reef fish assemblages before and after the establishment of an SFCA and evaluate
whether different management approaches had an effect on local fisheries resources. Results indicated
statistically significant differences between locations inside and outside of the newly designated SFCAs
and increases in fish density, biomass and diversity were clearly identified over time. Short term recovery
was observed within the sanctuaries but several management challenges still need to be overcome before
full benefits can be realised. Tougher enforcement, stricter regulation and further engagement with local
communities and resources users is required to establish viable long term management solutions for the
future sustainable governance of Jamaica's reef systems.
KEYWORDS: Jamaica, marine protected areas, fish sanctuaries, overfishing, sustainability
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
THE REEF FISHERY IN ST.VINCENT
LA PESQUERÍA DE ARRECIFE DE SAN VICENTE
LE RÉCIF DE PÊCHE DE ST. VINCENT
SHAMANTI LABBAN1, KRIS ISAACS2, and PROF. HAZEL OXENFORD1
UWI CERMES Cave Hill St. Michael Bridgetown, Barbados [email protected]
2
Fisheries DivisionMinistry of Fisheries Lower Bay Kingstown St. Vincent and the Grenadines
1
ABSTRACT
This study seeks to address some of the significant information gaps relating to the reef fishery of the
main island of St. Vincent. Data on fishers, fishing practices, fishing effort, catches and marketing were
collected largely by interviewing reef fishers using a standardised questionnaire. Landing sites around the
entire island were visited and approximately 60% of reef fishers identified at each site were interviewed.
There are approximately 250 reef fishers in St. Vincent concentrated around the landing sites and reef
fishing is the primary source of income for most. The common fishing gears utilised are the handline (3-9
hooks) and the palangue which carries 30-400 hooks and is left to soak for up to two hours unattended.
Other gears include the trammel net, spearguns and fish traps. The predominant boat type used is the
pirogue; fishing takes place approximately 10-20 km from the landing sites and around the Grenadine
islands of Bequia, Mustique and Balliceaux. A crew of 2-3 is typical of the reef fishery and reef fishing is
done all year, three to six days a week. The most commonly caught fish include snapper, grouper, cavalli,
barracuda, amber fish and butter fish. Typical catch rates are an estimated 3700 kg per fishing vessel
annually. Most fishers indicated that the size and the abundance of the reef fish are declining.
KEYWORDS: reef, fishery
135
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
MONITORING AND EVALUATION OF SMALL-SCALE FISHERIES MANAGEMENT USING
SIMPLE PERFORMANCE INDICATORS
GESTIÓN DE MONITOREO Y EVALUACIÓN DE LA PESCA EN PEQUEÑA ESCALA
UTILIZANDO LOS INDICADORES DE DESEMPEÑO SIMPLES
GESTION DE SUIVI ET D'ÉVALUATION DE LA PÊCHE ARTISANALE AU MOYEN
D'INDICATEURS DE PERFORMANCE SIMPLES
DERRICK LASHLEY
University of the West Indies CERMES Burke's Road Brittons Hill St. Michael, Barbados
[email protected]
136
ABSTRACT
Small-scale fisheries (SSF) are often overlooked in government planning and policy making but they
make significant contributions to the global economy and specifically the economies of developing
countries. Recent acknowledgement of the cumulative importance of SSF has made their monitoring and
management areas of priority worldwide. SSF, however, present numerous challenges because of their
diversity, connectivity and complexity. Monitoring systems for SSF management must take these factors
into account, and be adaptable to cope with their dynamics. Pomeroy et al. (2004), in asking “How is
your MPA doing?” (HIYMPAD), suggest in their approach to marine protected area (MPA) management
that in order for effective management to take place there is a need to deliberately integrate monitoring
and evaluation into the process so that the benefits of adaptive management are fully realized. Despite
MPAs and SSF being quite different, an approach similar to HIYMPAD is being investigated in this study
through a set of indicators developed to evaluate SSF management effectiveness. Based on the findings
from research conducted in Barbados, the feasibility of introducing an approach to monitoring and
evaluating SSF management effectiveness will be explored. With an ecosystem perspective on
performance and using simple indicators linked to goals and objectives, the aim will be to see if
HIYMPAD can be adapted to SSF management in situations where there is low capacity for SSF
monitoring, evaluation and management coupled with a need to provide easily understood information for
decision-making.
KEYWORDS: Small-scale fisheries, indicators, management, evaluation, monitoring
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
LIONFISH BYCATCH IN THE FLORIDA KEYS COMMERCIAL SPINY LOBSTER FISHERY
EL PEZ LEÓN CAPTURA INCIDENTAL EN LOS CAYOS DE FLORIDA LANGOSTA PESCA
COMERCIALLES
PRISES ACCIDENTELLES APPARAISSANT DANS LES FLORIDA KEYS COMMERCIAL
LANGOUSTE PÊCHE
DOMINIQUE LAZARRE
University of Miami 4600 Rickenbacker Causeway Miami, FL 33133 United States of America
[email protected]
ABSTRACT
The emergence of lionfish as a bycatch species in deep water fishing grounds of the commercial spiny
lobster fishery indicates a need to extend the efforts to monitor and cull lionfish present to deep water
habitats. Catch data was collected from a commercial lobster vessel to determine the geographic
distribution, length frequency, catch rates of lionfish, as well as the potential impacts on lobster catch
rates. Locations and depths were recorded for each trap sampled; and each organism caught was identified
and measured. Lionfish were present in 21.4% of the traps; with mean catch rate of 0.38 fish/trap. Mean
catch rates of legal lobsters decrease from 1.82 to 0.59/trap when lionfish are present. Traps provide a low
effort/high yield option for culling lionfish in deeper waters that are not targeted by normal removal
efforts. While this method could be helpful in reducing lionfish numbers, lionfish presence leads to
reduce lobster catch rates, negatively impacting fisher profits.
KEYWORDS: Lionfish, invasive, lobster fishery, bycatch, impacts
137
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
QUANTIFY OYSTER (CRASSOSTREA VIRGINICA) HABITAT BY COUPLING ACOUSTIC
TECHNOLOGIES WITHIN TEXAS BAYS AND ESTUARIES
CUANTIFICARHÁBITAT DE OSTRAS (CRASSOSTREA VIRGINICA) MEDIANTE EL
ACOPLAMIENTO DE LAS TECNOLOGÍAS ACÚSTICAS EN BAHÍAS Y ESTUARIOS DE
TEXAS QUANTIFIER
HUÎTRE HABITAT (CRASSOSTREAVIRGINICA) EN COUPLANT TECHNOLOGIES
ACOUSTIQUES À L'INTÉRIEUR DU TEXAS BAIES ET LES ESTUAIRES
BRYAN LEGARE
Texas Parks and Wildlife 1502 FM 517 East Dickinson, TX 77539 USA [email protected]
138
ABSTRACT
(Crassostrea virginica) reefs occur in shallow turbid waters along the Texas coast and are an important
component of Texas estuaries, providing a wide array of ecosystem services. Oysters are the State‟s
second largest commercial fishery and Texas Parks and Wildlife Department (TPWD) data indicate that
the oyster industry contributed more than $57,600,000 to the State‟s economy in 2010. Mapping oyster
reefs is a key component of managing oysters. The turbid waters in which oysters reside do not allow for
use of remote sensing data from satellites imagery and lidar. To quantify the extent of the oyster habitat
within Texas estuaries, the TPWD couples two hydro acoustic technologies: a bathymetric side scan sonar
(Teledyne Benthos C3D) and single beam echo sounder (Biosonics DTX). Simultaneously collected, we
utilize the echo sounder data to classify the side scan imagery. To accomplish the classification of habitat
from echo sounder data we utilized raster reclassification (ArcGIS 10.2) was used to relay the habitat
value provided by the echo sounder to the image captured by the side scan sonar. Point locations of
oysters were obtained from the reclassified raster and point density analysis identified areas of high and
lower density oyster habitat. The habitats were ground truth by sampling within the habitats identified.
Coupling side scan sonar and habitat classifying echo sounders and relating them through raster
reclassification in ArcGIS has proved to be an effective unbiased way of quantifying oyster habitats
within Texas estuaries.
KEYWORDS: Oyster, GIS, habitat, acoustic, side scan
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
COMPREHENSIVE ARTIFICIAL REEF PROGRAM MEETS FLORIDA STAKEHOLDER
NEEDS
PROGRAM COMPRESIVO DE ARREECIFE ARTIFICIAL EN FLORIDA QUE SATISFACE
NECESIDADES DE LAS PARTES INTERESADAS
COMPREHENSIVE ARTIFICIAL PROGRAMME RESPOND A LA FLORIDA DES
INTERVENANTS DOIT
BILL LINDBERG1, JOHN STEVELY STEVELY2, CHUCK ADAMS1, and BRYAN FLUECH3
1
University of Florida PO Box 110600 Gainesvlille, FL 32653 US [email protected]
2
Florida Sea Grant 1303 17th St. W. Palmetto FL 34221 U.S
3
Florida Sea Grant 14700 Immokalee Rd Naples FL 34120 U.S.
ABSTRACT
Artificial reefs are very popular with U.S. recreational fishers and divers, and are used to enhance
commercial harvests internationally. Florida has one ofthe largest artificial reef programs in the nation,
with 33 counties having local programs. To date, there have been approximately 2,500 deployments of
various materials along the Florida Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico coasts. The Florida Sea Grant Program
has developed a comprehensive extension and research program to provide artificial reef program
coordinators and stakeholders with technical information that will enable them to plan, construct, and
manage reefs in an efficient and environmentally responsibel manner possible. Sea Grant extension
activities have included a number of statewide and regional conferences and workshops to provide the
best possible technical information to the artificial reef community. Research has been conducted on the
ecological function and potential fishery management implications. Furthermore, economic analyses have
been conducted to document angler and diver utilization of reefs and the economic activity generated by
artificial reef use.
KEYWORDS: artificial reefs
139
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
RATIONALE AND EVALUATION OF AN ARTIFICIAL REEF SYSTEM DESIGNED FOR
ENHANCED GROWTH AND SURVIVAL OF JUVENILE GAG, MYCTEROPERCA
MICROLEPIS
JUSTIFICACIÓN Y EVALUACIÓN DE UN SISTEMA DE ARRECIFES ARTIFICIALES
DISEÑADOS PARA UN MAYOR CRECIMIENTO Y SUPERVIVENCIA DE JUVENILES DEL
MERO GAG, MYCTEROPERCA MICROLEPIS
JUSTIFICATION ETÉVALUATIOND'UNSYSTÈME DE RÉCIFSARTIFICIELS CONÇUS
AFIN D’AMÉLIORER LA CROISSANCEET LA SURVIEDES JUVÉNILES DE GAG,
MYCTEROPERCA MICROLEPIS
WILLIAM LINDBERG1 and JON DODRILL2
Fisheries & Aquatic Sciences, School of Forest R University of Florida 7922 NW 71st Street Gainesville,
Florida 32653 USA [email protected]
2
Artificial Reef Program, Division of Marine Fisheries ManagementFlorida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission 620 South Meridian Street, Box 4B2 Tallahassee Florida 32399-1600 USA
1
140
ABSTRACT
The Steinhatchee Fisheries Management Area (SFMA) is a federally permitted, large-area artificial reef
system in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico, designed and constructed to test a bottleneck hypothesis for
juvenile gag. Gag have a spatially stage-structured life history, with juveniles (ages 1-4) occupying patch
reefs on the shallow continental shelf. Prior experiments demonstrated density-dependent habitat selection
and growth, with the tension between mortality risk and growth potential favoring available shelter as a
primary element of habitat quality. The SFMA is 259 km2 on the shallow shelf, enhanced with 500
“conservation reefs” designed and randomly distributed to improve growth rates and survivorship of
juvenile gag. The SFMA is not a “no-take marine protected area”. Instead, locations of small conservation
reefs are not publicly known, which in combination with small reef size and wide dispersion is a passive
constraint on directed fishing. The evaluation plan involves monitoring reefs offshore that bracket the
region, a tagging study and comparisons of gag growth and mortality rates between the SFMA and
adjacent, unenhanced shelf areas. Those parameter estimates will be inputs for spatial modeling of habitat
effects on gag population dynamics.
KEYWORDS: artificial reef, bottleneck hypothesis, spatial dynamics, habitat quality
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
STAKEHOLDER PERSPECTIVES ON GOLIATH GROUPER MANAGEMENT IN FLORIDA
PERSPECTIVAS DE LOS INTERESADOS EN LA GESTIÓN DE GUASA EN FLORIDA
INTERVENANTS PERSPECTIVES SUR LA GESTION MÉROU GÉANT EN FLORIDE
KAI LORENZEN1, JOY HAZELL2, JESSICA SUTT1, BRYAN FLUECH3 and MARTHA MONROE1
1
University of Florida 7922 NW 71st Street Gainesville, FL 32653 USA [email protected]
2
Florida Sea Grant 3406 Palm Beach Blvd Ft Myers FL 33916 USA
3
Florida Sea Grant 14700 Immokalee Rd Naples FL 34120 USA University of Florida GainesvilleFL
32611 USA
ABSTRACT
The goliath grouper Epinephelus itajara, historically overfished throughout its range, has recovered
substantially in US waters since a harvest moratorium was put into place in 1990. The perspectives of
diverse stakeholders on the goliath grouper and its management were investigated using an online survey
of 5882 respondents and a facilitated workshop. Goliath grouper were commonly encountered by reef
fishers and recreational divers around the Florida coast. Commercial reef fishers considered goliath
encounters undesirable or neutral, while over half of recreational fishers and a large majority of nonspearfishing divers found encounters desirable. Many commercial reef and recreational spear fishers have
modified their location choice and fishing practices to minimize incidental catch of goliath and
depredation of catch by goliath from fishing gear. Commercial reef and recreational spear fishers
perceived negative impacts of goliath on biodiversity, while recreational anglers and sightseeing divers
perceived a positive contribution of goliath to. Commercial and recreational fishing stakeholders on
average disagreed with the harvest moratorium and preferred opening a strictly regulated fishery, while
sightseeing divers and members of conservation organizations strongly agreed with the moratorium. A
limited take for research was viewed neutrally by all groups. The workshop provided further, in-depth
consideration of stakeholder perspectives.
KEYWORDS: Goliath grouper, stakeholders, survey, participation, co-management
141
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
EXAMINING CURRENT MERCURY CONCENTRATIONS IN NORTHERN GULF OF
MEXICO RED DRUM
AL EXAMINAR LAS CONCENTRACIONES DE MERCURIO ACTUALES EN EL NORTE
DEL GOLFO DE MÉXICO RED DRUM
EXAMEN CONCENTRATIONS DE MERCURE ACTUELS DANS LE NORD DU GOLFE DU
MEXIQUE TAMBOUR ROUGE
CRYSTAL LOU ALLEN HIGHTOWER and SEAN P. POWERS
University of South Alabama 5871 USA Drive North, LSCB 25 Mobile, AL 36688-0002 USA
[email protected]
142
ABSTRACT
Mercury (Hg) is a toxic metal that bioaccumulates in tissues of long-lived fishes and can pose health risks
to humans when consumed in large quantities. While the accumulation of Hg in marine fishes in the Gulf
of Mexico (GOM) has been established, Hg levels above the United States Environmental Protection
Agency (USEPA) methylmercury criterion (0.3 ppm) and the United States Food and Drug
Administration (FDA) action limit (1.0 ppm) have only recently been reported for Red Drum (Sciaenops
ocellatus). Recent studies of Hg concentrations in Red Drum from Florida and Texas waters showed
larger size classes accumulated Hg to levels above acceptable USEPA and FDA limits; however, Hg
levels for large Red Drum were lacking from the north central region of the GOM. Our study examined
total Hg in north central GOM Red Drum and compared Red Drum total Hg to that of other GOM
species. Results indicated mean total Hg was 0.67 ppm and 0.47 ppm for fishery independent and fishery
dependent collections, respectively. Approximately 80% of all Red Drum in this study had tissues
containing concentrations greater than the EPA criterion and 5% were above the FDA action limit. The
allowable catch limits for all GOM states except Florida include large sizes and present the possibility for
human consumption of high total Hg concentrated Red Drum. Understanding concentrations of Hg in
GOM Red Drum is essential to effectively include this public health issue in management strategies.
KEYWORDS: Sciaenops ocellatus, mercury, bioaccumulation, biomagnification, management
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
LITERATURE REVIEW AND GAP ANALYSIS ON THE SOURCES AND EFFECTS OF NONEXTRACTIVE STRESSORS ON CORAL REEF ECOSYSTEMS
REVISIÓN DE LA LITERATURA Y EL ANÁLISIS DE LAS DEFICIENCIAS EN LAS
FUENTES Y LOS EFECTOS DE LOS FACTORES DE ESTRÉS NO EXTRACTIVOS EN LOS
ECOSISTEMAS DE ARRECIFES DE CORAL
REVUE DE LA LITTÉRATURE ET ANALYSE DE L'ÉCART SUR LES SOURCES ET LES
EFFETS DES FACTEURS DE STRESS NON EXTRACTIVES SUR LES ÉCOSYSTÈMES DES
RÉCIFS CORALLIENS
LAURA LOUON1 and MANOJ SHIVLANI2
University of Miami 4600 Rickenbacker Causeway Miami, Florida 33149 USA [email protected]
2
NTVI 10600 SW 131 Court Miami FL 33186 United States
1
ABSTRACT
This study reviews literature as it relates to non-extractive activities and their impacts on coral reef
ecosystems, including tourism-related activities such as trampling, snorkeling and diving, and boating,
and coastal development-related effects such as sedimentation, habitat alteration, and nutrient
enrichment.The study then utilizes Geographic Information Systems to conduct a gap analysis as it relates
to areas/regions, stressors, and trends, thereby identifying areas/regions that may be under-represented in
non-extractive activities studies and lacking in appropriate management actions and listing the stressors
that may be yet poorly understood and thus warranting greater research and management efforts.
KEYWORDS: Coral reefs, non-extractive activities, recreation, gap analysis, coral reef management
143
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
ASPECTOS POBLACIONALES DE LAS JAIBAS ROJA (CALLINECTES BOCOURTI) Y AZUL
(C. SAPIDUS) DE LA ZONA NOROCCIDENTAL DE LA CIÉNAGA GRANDE DE SANTA
MARTA, CARIBE COLOMBIANO
POPULATION ASPECTS OF BLUNTTOOTH SWIMCRAB (CALLINECTES BOCOURTI) AND
BLUE CRAB (C. SAPIDUS) FROM CIENAGA GRANDE DE SANTA MARTA NORTHWEST
AREA, COLOMBIAN CARIBBEAN
ASPECTS DE LA POPULATION DE CRABE CHANCRE (CALLINECTES BOCOURTI) ET DE
CRABE BLEU (C. SAPIDUS) ZONE NORD-OUEST DE CIÉNAGA GRANDE DE SANTA
MARTA, CARAÏBES COLOMBIENNES
GERMÁN LOZANO-BELTRÁN1, PAMELA REÁTIGA-AGUILAR1, y GLORIA DE LEÓNMARTÍNEZ2
1
Centro de Investigaciones Científicas Universidad Simón Bolívar Carrera 54 N° 58-28 Barranquilla,
Atlántico Colombia [email protected]
2
Universidad del Magdalena Santa Marta Magdalena Colombia
144
RESUMEN
Se determinaron aspectos poblacionales en jaibas roja (Callinectes bocourti) y azul (C. sapidus)
procedentes de la zona noroccidental de la Ciénaga Grande de Santa Marta, Caribe colombiano,
desembarcadas en una planta de proceso durante el periodo seco de 2013 para contribuir con información
biológica en la adopción de medidas de administración de la pesquería. Fueron examinados 217
ejemplares, 193 C. bocourti y 24 C. sapidus. Los parámetros biométricos registrados fueron los
establecidos en el Protocolo de captura de información pesquera, biológica y socio-económica en
Colombia. Para C. bocourti, ABEL fue 8,15 cm, Lca 4,76 cm, Pt 95,3 g y la proporción macho: hembra
fue 1:3,8. Para C. sapidus, ABEL fue 9,38 cm, Lca 5,04 cm, Pt 125 g y la proporción macho: hembra fue
1:1. La maduración sexual en C. bocourtimuestra que el 67,5% eran hembras maduras, 30% madurando y
2.5% inmaduras, mientras que el 76,5% de los machos eran adultos y el 23,5% juveniles. En C. sapidus,
el 75% de las hembras eran maduras, el 8,3% estaban madurando y 16,7% inmaduras, mientras que el
66,7% de los machos eran adultos y el 33,3% juveniles. Se concluye preliminarmente que C. bocourti
continúa siendo la especie de mayor presencia en el área y presenta amplia dominancia de hembras. Los
datos biométricos registrados para las dos especies, están por debajo de reportes anteriores para esta zona
y al comparar estos promedios con ejemplares en actividad reproductiva, se encuentra una probable
maduración a tallas menores, posible indicador de que se está presentando sobre-explotación del recurso y
que las especies han adoptado este mecanismo como protección de sus poblaciones.
PALABRAS CLAVES: Callinectes, Jaiba, Aspectos poblacionales, Ciénaga Grande de Santa Marta
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
BIOMASS OF PARROTFISHES (SCARIDAE) AND SURGEONFISHES (ACANTHURIDAE)
INCREASED SIGNIFICANTLY FOLLOWING BERMUDA’S FISH POT BAN
BIOMASA DE LOS PECES EN FAMILIAS SCARIDAE Y ACANTHURIDAE AUMENTADO
CONSIDERABLEMENTE DESPUES LA PROHIBICIÓN DE LAS NASAS EN BERMUDA
LA BIOMASSE DES FAMILLES DE POISSON SCARIDAE ET ACANTHURIDAE A
CONSIDÉRABLEMENT AUGMENTÉ ENSUITE L’INTERDICTION DES PIÈGES À POISSON
AUX BERMUDES
BRIAN E. LUCKHURST1 and SHAY O'FARRELL2
2-4 Via della Chiesa Acqualoreto, Umbria 05023 Italy [email protected]
2
School of Biological Sciences, Goddard Building University of Queensland Brisbane, Queensland 4072
Australia
1
ABSTRACT
Following the fish pot ban in Bermuda in 1990, a fishery-independent diver census program was
established to monitor the expected recovery of reef fish populations. A modified form of the BohnsackBannerot visual census protocol was used. The dominant herbivore species on Bermuda‟s reefs are
parrotfishes (Scaridae) and surgeonfishes (Acanthuridae) and these populations were released from
fishing mortality when the ban took effect. As line fishing was still permitted after the ban, populations of
predators such as groupers and snappers continued to be exposed to fishing pressure. Census data
collected over nine years indicated that the biomass of parrotfishes (five species) and surgeonfishes (two
species) increased by factors of 2.67 and 3.37 respectively, with substantial recoveries occurring in six
species but not in striped parrotfish (Scarus iserti). There was also a significant increase in body size of all
herbivores except blue tang (Acanthurus coeruleus). In contrast, there was no significant increase in the
biomass of the coney (Cephalopholis fulva), an abundant small grouper, as line fishing pressure continued
to exert fishing mortality on this population.
KEYWORDS: Fish pot ban, Scaridae, Acanthuridae, Coney, Bermuda.
145
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
ESTABLISHING ACROPORA CORAL NURSERIES THROUGHOUT THE BAHAMAS
EL ESTABLECIMIENTO DE CORAL ACROPORA VIVEROS LARGO DE LAS BAHAMAS
ÉTABLIR ACROPORA PÉPINIÈRES CORAIL DES BAHAMAS
AGNESSA LUNDY and FELICITY BURROWS
The Nature Conservancy Northern Caribbean Program #6 Colonial Hill Plaza Thompson Blvd Nassau,
BA P O Box CB 1 The Bahamas [email protected]
146
ABSTRACT
Across the Caribbean and Florida, coral reefs are declining as a result of human induced and natural
elements. To help restore degraded Acropora reefs throughout the Bahamas, The Nature Conservancy‟s
Northern Caribbean Program has begun establishing and maintaining in-water coral nurseries. Currently
there are two coral nurseries – one located in the southwest area of New Providence and in Central
Andros Island. Adapting the method developed by Ken Marks, fragments of opportunity are identified in
the wild, collected and reared in the nursery for up to two years, then outplanted to selected restoration
areas. Outplant sites will provide an opportunity for cross fertilization between genetically distinct
populations that would otherwise not reproduce naturally due to their separate domestic sites. It is
expected that the nurseries will lead to an increase in Acropora larval production. The Conservancy will
also conduct genetic testing to determine connectivity between corals in the USVI, Florida, and the
Bahamas to facilitate better management of the coral reef network in the region. Genetic testing will also
help to identify the most resilient Acroporid coral genomes and the optimum environmental factors which
foster the best coral reef recovery. The nurseries will therefore make available a “bank” of corals that can
help repair Acropora reefs damaged by ship groundings, and other human induced factors as well as
major storm events.
KEYWORDS: Acropora, Coral Nursery, Bahamas, Caribbean
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
ASSESSMENT OF THE BREEDING SUCCESS OF RED-BILLED TROPICBIRDS ON ST
EUSTATIUS
EVALUACIÓN DEL ÉXITO DE LA REPRODUCCIÓN DEL AVE RABIJUNCO
ETÉREO EN LA ISLA DE SAN EUSTAQUIO
EVALUATION DU SUCCÈS REPRODUCTEUR DU PHAÉTON À BEC ROUGE À SAINTEEUSTACHE
HANNAH MADDEN and ANDREW ELLIS
STENAPA National Parks Office Gallows Bay, St Eustatius [email protected]
ABSTRACT
We assessed the breeding success of Red-billed Tropicbirds Phaethon aethereus on St. Eustatius,
particularly in relation to predation at the nest. We conducted weekly surveys at five sites during 20122013 and measured chick and adult morphometrics. Apparent nest success ranged from 55-100% across
five breeding areas, while apparent fledge success ranged from 63-100% at those same locations. We
used cameras and baited rat traps to document the presence of predators at nest sites. Predation rates
captured on cameras were low (ca. 200 images of predators from ca. 263,000 images over 11 weeks).
Cameras documented cats and rats at accessible nests. Although we could not confirm the cause of egg
loss or the death of some chicks, the presence of cats and rats suggests that additional effort be expended
to accurately measure their impact.
KEYWORDS: Tropicbird, St Eustatius, nesting, predation
147
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
FROM OPEN ACCESS FISHERY TO TERRITORIAL USE RIGHTS IN FISHERIES (TURF)
SYSTEMS: A SOCIO-ECONOMIC PERSPECTIVE ON THE IMPLICATIONS FOR THE
ARTISANAL FISHING SECTOR POSED BY THE TRANSITION BETWEEN SYSTEMS OF
GOVERNANCE
DESDE PESQUERÍA DE ACCESO ABIERTO A LOS DERECHOS DE USO TERRITORIAL EN
(TURF) SISTEMAS DE PESCA: UNA PERSPECTIVA SOCIO-ECONÓMICA SOBRE LAS
CONSECUENCIAS PARA EL SECTOR DE LA PESCA ARTESANAL REPRESENTA LA
TRANSICIÓN ENTRE LOS SISTEMAS DE GOBIERNO
DE LA PÊCHE EN LIBRE ACCÈS POUR DROITS D'USAGE TERRITORIAUX EN MATIÈRE
DE PÊCHES (DUTP) SYSTÈMES: UN POINT DE VUE SOCIO-ÉCONOMIQUE SUR LES
IMPLICATIONS POUR LE SECTEUR DE LA PÊCHE ARTISANALE POSÉE PAR LA
TRANSITION ENTRE LES SYSTÈMES DE GOUVERNANCE.
BEN MAHARAJ and ASHA SINGH
Institute of Marine Affairs Hilltop Lane Chaguaramas, Trinidad and Tobago [email protected]
148
ABSTRACT
The artisanal fishing sector of Trinidad has developed within a governance regime of open access to
shared resources. An examination of available fisheries and socioeconomic data between 1998 and 2009
shows that artisanal fisheries are valuable; providing jobs and revenues while simultaneously contributing
to resilience of local coastal communities. Contribution to local economic growth is evident as fishing
sites are set in the poorest parts of this island and have direct and indirect economic impacts.
Unfortunately this regime is unsustainable in its present form leading to the overexploitation of various
species of fish. In response, the Government of the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago is considering the
introduction of a Territorial Use Rights in Fisheries (TURF) system by replacing existing laws with
comprehensive primary legislation in the form of the Draft Fisheries Management Bill 2011. Considering
the measures proposed by this bill, this paper discusses the implications to the artisanal fisheries. The
findings reveal that under the present system of governance, the introduction of a system in which rights
are given to specific groups of fishers in return for restricting access to resources will have impacts on the
communities presently benefiting from the industry. While a business as usual approach will have
detrimental ecological effects in the long term, any introduction of new fisheries legislation must
reconcile with and consider the value, contribution and characteristics of the artisanal fisheries-a
component which is sparingly considered in the proposed bill.
KEYWORDS: artisanal fishing, Trinidad and Tobago, Territorial User Rights in Fisheries Sys, local
impacts, open access
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
ASSESSING EMERGING REGIONAL OCEAN GOVERNANCE ARRANGEMENTS IN THE
WIDER CARIBBEAN REGION
EVALUAR EMERGENTES ACUERDOS REGIONALES DE LOS OCÉANOS EN LA REGIÓN
DEL GRAN CARIBE
ÉVALUER ÉMERGENTS ARRANGEMENTS DE GOUVERNANCE DES OCÉANS
RÉGIONAUX DANS LA RÉGION DES CARAÏBES
ROBIN MAHON1, LUCIA FANNING2, and PATRICK MCCONNEY3
Centre for Resource Management and Environmnetal University of the West Indies Cave Hill St.
Michael , Barbados [email protected]
2
Marine Affairs ProgramDalhousie University Halifax Nova Scotia Canada
3
CERMESUniversity of the West Indies Cave Hill Campus St. Michael Barbados
1
ABSTRACT
Many initiatives and institutions aimed at addressing transboundary ocean governance in the Wider
Caribbean Region (WCR) have emerged over the past several decades. These were assessed during the
Transboundary Diagnostic Analysis (TDA) process for the Caribbean Large Marine Ecosystem (CLME)
Project, which took place in two phases between 2006 and 2013.While there has been considerable
activity towards regional ocean governance, initiatives have suffered from fragmentation and other
weaknesses. The CLME Project chose to focus much of its attention on strengthening regional ocean
governance in the WCR. The approach involved developing a conceptual framework for regional ocean
governance, conducting a number of assessments and „learning by doing‟ activities within the context of
this framework, and ultimately developing a regional ocean governance operationalization framework for
adoption by the concerned states. This sequence of activities is described and evaluated. The proposed
regional ocean governance framework comprises a nested set out governance arrangements that may
focus on particular issues or geographical area. The framework recognises that while the wider Caribbean
region is a single Large Marine Ecosystem many issues must be dealt with at multiple geographical and
organisational skills (to achieve subsidiarity). Many parts of the framework already exist but need to be
strengthened and better linked to each other. A particular weakness is the lack of an overarching
coordinating and policy development mechanism for oceans in the region. Options for, and constraints to,
the establishment of such a mechanism are considered.
KEYWORDS: Institutions, governance, regional, EBM, policy
149
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
ASSESSMENT OF GOVERNANCE ARRANGEMENTS FOR PEDRO BANK, JAMAICA
EVALUACIÓN DE LOS MECANISMOS DE GOBERNANZA DE PEDRO BANK, JAMAICA
ÉVALUATION DES MÉCANISMES DE GOUVERNANCE POUR PEDRO BANK, JAMAÏQUE
ROBIN MAHON
Centre for Resource Management and Environmnetal University of the West Indies Cave Hill St. Michael,
Barbados [email protected]
150
ABSTRACT
Pedro Bank, lying about 100 km south of Jamaica is two-thirds the size of Jamaica (8,040 km2). Two of
the three cays on the southeast edge of the bank are inhabited by fishing communities. Pedro Bank
supports valuable conch, lobster and reef fish fisheries. The purpose of this governance assessment is to
dissect and display the governance arrangements for the major living marine resource issues identified for
the bank and to examine their degree of integration for an ecosystem approach. The assessment focussed
mainly on the governance arrangements or architecture, but included a preliminary assessment of
functionality according to several basic principles. Six key living marine resource issues requiring
governance were identified for on Pedro Bank: (1) Finfish fishing, conch fishing, lobster fishing, seabird
and sea turtle biodiversity, land-based pollution on marine ecosystems, marine-based pollution. The first
observation is that there is the need to clarify the individual governance arrangements for the six issues
and make them known to all stakeholders. A second observation is that the governance arrangements for
the six issues do not appear to be well integrated at either the policy level or the management level. The
recommended the long-term perspective for the Pedro Bank is as a Fisheries Management Area (FMA) as
provided for in the new Fisheries Act. With regard to the assessment of functionality, stakeholders did not
perceive the processes as being highly functional with regard to the principles examined.
KEYWORDS: Policy, EBM, reefs, management, offshore bank
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
STROMBUS GIGAS (MOLLUSCA: STROMBIDAE): DEVELOPMENT OF MITOCHONDRIAL
AND NUCLEAR MOLECULAR MARKERS FOR POPULATION GENETICS AND GENOMICS
STROMBUS GIGAS (MOLLUSCA: STROMBIDAE): DESARROLLO DE MARCADORES
MOLECULARES MITOCONDRIALES Y NUCLEARES PARA GENÉTICA Y GENÓMICA DE
POBLACIONES
STROMBUS GIGAS (MOLLUSCA: STROMBIDAE): DÉVELOPPEMENT DE MARQUEURS
MOLÉCULAIRES MITOCHONDRIAUX ET NUCLÉAIRES POUR LA GÉNÉTIQUE DES
POPULATIONS ET DE LA GÉNOMIQUE
EDNA JUDITH MÁRQUEZ FERNÁNDEZ1, ERICK RICHARD CASTRO GONZÁLEZ2, JUAN
PABLO ISAZA AGUDELO3, and JUAN FERNANDO ALZATE RESTREPO3
1
Universidad Nacional de Colombia, sedee Medellín Calle 59A No 63 – 20 Medellín, Antioquia Colombia
[email protected]
2
Secretaría de Agricultura y Pesca, Archipiélado San Andrés Avenida Francisco Newball, Edificio Coral
Palace Isla de San Andrés Colombia
3
Universidad de Antioquia, Centro Nacional de Secuenciación Genómica Sede de Investigación
Universitaria - SIU Torre 1, sotano 2, S2-1 Medellin Antioquia Colombia
ABSTRACT
This work reports the complete mitochondrial genome of the marine gastropod Strombus gigas, obtained
by 454 pyrosequencing, and the development of molecular markers with potential application in the
population genetics and genomics. Coding sequences and gene synteny were similar to some species of
the infraorder Litorinimorpha. In silico analysis of two mitochondrial regions previously published
showed a great similitude among queen conchs from the Colombian San Andres Archipelago and
Mexico. A high AT content region was variable among Colombian San Andres Archipelago populations
showing its ability to reveal genetic diversity to small scales. This approach also revealed a great source
of potentially amplifiable microsatellites some of them were experimentally tested for polymorphism.
This is the first report of the complete mitochondrial genome of S. gigas and gives the first insights about
the mitochondrial diversity of this snail in the San Andres, Providencia and Santa Catalina Archipelago.
KEYWORDS: Next generation sequencing, mitochondria, microsatellites, genomics, genetics
151
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
GESTIÓN COORDINADA EN UNA ZONA BAJO RÉGIMEN ESPECIAL DE USO Y
PROTECCIÓN EN EL ÁREA MARINA DEL PARQUE NACIONAL GUANAHACABIBES,
CUBA
COORDINATED MANAGEMENT IN A ZONE UNDER SPECIAL USE AND PROTECTION IN
THE MARINE AREA OF THE GUANAHACABIBES NATIONAL PARK, CUBA
DANS UNE ZONE SOUS-UTILISATION DANS LE DOMAINE MARITIME PARC NATIONAL
GUANAHACABIBES, CUBA.
LÁZARO MÁRQUEZ LLAUGER y DORKA COBIÁN ROJAS
Parque Nacional Guanahacabibes ECOVIDA Villa Bolívar, No. 8 Sandino, P. del Río 24120 Cuba
[email protected]
152
RESUMEN
Se presentan las experiencias relativas a la gestión coordinada en la zona bajo régimen especial de uso y
protección en el área marina del Parque Nacional Guanahacabibes, en la cual se excluyen todas las
prácticas de pesca comercial y el uso de artes masivas. El trabajo destaca los impactos más significativos
que se han producido en la conservación de la biodiversidad marina como resultado de 10 años de gestión
participativa que ha involucrado los esfuerzos de las entidades turísticas, las autoridades del gobierno y
las comunidades locales, bajo la coordinación de la administración del área protegida. Se muestran los
principales resultados obtenidos por la ejecución de los programas de investigación científica y monitoreo
dirigidos a ecosistemas prioritarios y a especies claves, que han permitido el diseño de acciones de
manejo y el mantenimiento de la zona de exclusión de pesca. Se expone la zonificación funcional del
área, haciendo énfasis en los elementos evaluados para la propuesta de una zona de pesca de subsistencia
para el uso sostenible de los recursos marinos por parte de las comunidades locales y se destaca la
señalización del área mediante la colocación de boyas de marcación de límites y boyas de amarre en los
puntos de buceo y en las zonas de fondeo. Se abordan los aspectos básicos relacionados con la valoración
de servicios ecosistémicos marino-costeros como resultado de un proceso participativo con intervención
de las comunidades, actores del desarrollo económico local e instituciones científicas.
PALABRAS CLAVES: Gestión coordinada, Zonificación funcional, Servicios ecosistémicos
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
CE QUE LE DÉVELOPPEMENT DES DCP A UN RÉEL EFFET SUR LE REDÉPLOIEMENT
DE LA PÊCHE SUR LES RESSOURCES AU LARGE?
DOES FAD DEPLOYMENT HAVE A REAL EFFECT ON FISHING REDEPLOYMENT
TOWARDS OFFSHORE RESOURCES?
TIENE LA COLOCACIÓN DE DCP UN REAL EFECTO SOBRE LA REDISTRIBUCIÓN DE
LA PESCA HACIA LOS RECURSOS EN MAR ADENTRO?
EST
1
2
HELOÏSE MATHEU , LIONEL REYNAL , ANDREW MAGLOIRE1, et OLIVIER GUYADER3
1
Ifremer, Fisheries Division, Fisheries Roseau, Roseau, Dominique [email protected]
2
Ifremer, Pointe Fort, Le Robert, Martinique
3
Ifremer, Centre de Brest, Brest, France
RÉSUMÉ
A partir de 1960, la région Caraïbes cherche à développer la pêche des grands poissons pélagiques du
large en particulier pour réduire l‟exploitation trop intense des plateaux insulaires. Le Dispositif de
Concentration de Poissons (DCP) est perçu comme un moyen d‟exploiter ces ressources. Le présent
papier tente de répondre à cette question : le développement des DCP a-t-il permis de redéployer l‟activité
de pêche vers les ressources du large et ainsi de réduire l‟effort sur les plateaux insulaires ? Pour y
répondre, le développement de la pêche aux DCP est comparé entre 3 îles (Guadeloupe, Dominique,
Martinique). Il montre qu‟en Guadeloupe et en Martinique 300 navires pratiquent la pêche autour des
DCP soit respectivement 39 et 33 % des navires actifs, alors que 59 et 61 % des pêcheurs professionnels
font de la pêche à la nasse. A la Dominique, 45 % des navires font du DCP et seulement 15 % de la nasse.
Une comparaison avec le nord-ouest de la Martinique, montre que la largeur du plateau insulaire ne peut
expliquer cette différence. Dès l‟approche du plein développement de la flottille DCP, une amorce de
repli sur le plateau se manifeste en Martinique. Trois raisons sont évoquées par les pêcheurs et examinées
ici, pour expliquer cette évolution: la saturation du marché en produit pélagique, l‟irrégularité de la pêche
aux DCP (saisonnalité des prises et des courants entrainant l‟immersion des DCP) et l‟augmentation du
coût du carburant. Tous ces éléments suggèrent que le développement de la pêche aux DCP ne peut
entrainer une réduction de l‟effort de pêche sur le plateau que si des mesures de régulation de la flottille
sont simultanément mises en œuvre.
MOTS CLÉS: DCP, ressources, exploitation, effort de pêche, plateau insulaire
153
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
PORTRAIT OF THE DEEP WATER SNAPPER FISHERY IN PUERTO RICO DURING 19882012
SEMBLANZA DE LA PESQUERÍA DE PARGOS DE AGUAS PROFUNDAS EN PUERTO RICO
DURANTE 1988-2012
UN PORTRAIT DE LA PÊCHE DE LA CREVETTE VIVANEAUX À PUERTO RICO AU
COURS DE 1988-2012
DANIEL MATOS-CARABALLO1, LUIS RIVERA-PADILLA1, JESÚS LEÓN-FERNÁNDEZ1,
GLIZETTE O. ARROYO-MORALES2, and LUCIA T. VARGAS-DINIZARD
1
DNER Fisheries Reseach Laboratory P.O. Box 3665 Mayaguez, PR 00681 USA
[email protected]
2
Universidad Adventista de las Antillas P.O. Box 118 Mayaguez PR 00681-0118
154
ABSTRACT
The deep water snapper has been the most important finfish fishery in Puerto Rico since 1970‟s. During
the mentioned 1970-1990, there were approximately 25 fishing vessels 40 feet length or larger dedicate to
deep water snapper fishery. From 1990‟s to the present there was observed that approximately 100
fishing vessels of 22-25 feet length has been used successfully for the deep water snapper fishery. This
fishing activity occurs around the Puerto Rico. The fishing time duration of the fishing trip is
approximately 10-12 hours. There are five species of deep water snapper in Puerto Rico, silk snapper
Lutjanus vivanus, blackfin snapper Lutjanus bucanella, queen snapper Etelis oculatus, vermillon snapper
Rhomboplites aurorubens and cardinal snapper Pristipomoides macrophthalmus. During the 1970-1990,
silk snapper was the most important species of deep water snapper landed in pounds in Puerto Rico.
However, since 1995, the queen snapper has been the most important landed species in pounds. Thus
Since 2005, the deep water snapper fishery was protected by the Department of Natural and
Environmental Resources (DNER) and the NOAA Fisheries DNER. Both agencies established a yearly
closed season from October 1st to December 31st. This paper will show the trends in deep water snappers
landings data, biostatics data and fishing census for deep water snapper during 1988-2012. Also, we will
discuss the closed season to protect the resources established by NOAA Fisheries and the DNER and the
trend observed after five years of the closed season establishment.
KEYWORDS: Deep water snapper fisheries, landings, Puerto Rico
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
MARINE PROTECTED AREAS, REEF RESILIENCY AND THE PREVALENCE OF CORAL
DISEASES & COMPROMISED REEF HEALTH IN THE CAYMAN ISLANDS, NORTH WEST
CARIBBEAN
AREAS PROTEGIDAS MARINAS, RESILIENCIA Y PREVALENCIA DE LAS
ENFERMEDADES CORALINAS Y LA SALUD EN PELIGRO DE LOS ARRECIFES DE LAS
ISLAS CAIMAN, CARIBE DEL NOROESTE
AIRES PROTÉGÉES MARINES, RÉSILIENCE ET PRÉDOMINANCE DES MALADIES
CORALLIENNES ET LA SANTÉ COMPROMISE DES RECIFS DES ÎLES CAÏMANS,
CARAIBES DU NORD OUEST
CROY MCCOY1, KATIE HILLYER2 and JOHN TURNER2
Department Of Environment, Cayman Islands Bangor University, UK ,Cayman Islands
[email protected]
2
Bangor University, UK
1
ABSTRACT
Coral bleaching and disease are recognized as major drivers of coral reef decline globally and are
increasing in prevalence, regularity and severity with global climate change. Marine Protected Areas
(MPAs) are a leading strategy in the conservation of biodiversity and are increasingly being used with the
new aim of enhancing resilience in the face of global climate change. This study compared the prevalence
of bleaching, disease and compromised health states in scleractinian (stony) and milleporid (fire) corals at
60 monitoring sites, within and outside of MPAs within the Cayman Islands, to determine if resilience
was increased (and therefore prevalence lower) within MPAs. Overall, the study found that the
Caymanian MPAs did not enhance the resilience of reef building corals to bleaching and disease, with the
prevalence of white plague actually higher within MPA sites overall (MPA: 1.31% ± 0.39 S.E., nonMPA: 0.88% ± 0.22 S.E.). However, the prevalence of compromised health states and growth anomalies
were reduced within MPA sites. Disease prevalence was patchy and varied according to island and aspect.
Prevalence was highest on Cayman Brac and Little Cayman (combined disease: 13.10% ± 1.19 S.E. and
10.91% ± 1.53 S.E.), on southern coasts. Key diseases and hosts were typical of the wider Caribbean;
white plague, yellow band disease, dark spot disease and dark spot syndrome, were recorded at the
highest prevalence within important reef building species. Mean bleaching prevalence during the study
was low (3.97% ± 0.56 S.E.), with an increase at the deep sites (6.52% ± 0.94 S.E.).
KEYWORDS: Marine protected areas, coral disease, reef resilience, bleaching, Cayman Islands
155
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
LIONFISH CONTROL IN U.S. NATIONAL PARKS
CONTROL DE LIONFISH EN PARQUES NACIONALES DE LOS ESTADOS UNIDOS
LE CONTRÔLE DE LIONFISH DANS LES PARCS NACIONAUX DES ETATS UNIS
CLIFF MCCREEDY, VANESSA MCDONOUGH, and C. ANNA TOLINE
National Park Service 1201 Eye Street, NW Washington, DC 20005 USA [email protected]
156
ABSTRACT
This presentation will review strategies adopted by U.S. National Parks to monitor and control lionfish
and mitigate lionfish impacts on protected resources. Lionfish have been detected in seven National
Parks in Florida, Mississippi and the U.S. Virgin Islands. In 2012, U.S. National Park Service adopted a
Lionfish Response Plan with input from park managers and biologists, NOAA, Reef Environmental
Education Foundation, and Simon Fraser University. The plan has specific actions to prevent or mitigate
resource impacts, to protect health and safety for staff and visitors, and to communicate the lionfish story
to partner organizations and the public. Parks are implementing local plans suited to resource conditions
and available funding and capacity. This paper will review the NPS national plan and compare these
local approaches. For example, Biscayne National Park near Miami, Florida adopted a random sampling
design to monitor lionfish abundance and density across park waters and habitats, including seagrass,
coral reefs and artificial structures. This monitoring and removal effort is yielding information on the
progression of the lionfish invasion since 2009. Other parks are using different approaches working with
local partners. This presentation will share experiences for marine protected area managers and others in
this field.
KEYWORDS: lionfish, marine protected area, invasive species
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
DEPREDATION OF CATCH BY BOTTLENOSE DOLPHIN (TURSIOPS TRUNCATUS) AND
OBSERVATION OF ATLANTIC SPOTTED DOLPHIN (STENELLA FRONTALIS) IN THE
GULF OF MEXICO COMMERCIAL REEF FISH FISHERY
DEPREDACIÓN DE LA CAPTURA POR DELFINES MULARES (TURSIOPS TRUNCATUS)Y
OBSERVACIÓN DE DELFINES MOTEADOS DEL ATLÁNTICO (STENELLA FRONTALIS)
EN EL GOLFO DE MÉXICO COMERCIAL PESCA PECES DE ARRECIFE
DÉPRÉDATION DES CAPTURES PAR GRANDS DAUPHINS (TURSIOPS TRUNCATUS) ET
D'OBSERVATION DE LA DAUPHINS ATLANTIQUE TACHETÉS (STENELLA FRONTALIS)
DANS LE GOLFE DU MEXIQUE COMMERCIAL POISSONS DE RÉCIF PÊCHE
KIMBERLY MCGLAUN and WILLIAM MCGLAUN
Texas Sealife Center 14220 South Padre Island Drive Corpus Christi, Texas 78418 USA
[email protected]
ABSTRACT
Several species of marine mammals are known to interact with commercial fishing operations in the Gulf
of Mexico. Depredation can have negative consequences for fisherman through loss of fish, bait, or gear
which devalues catch and can result in injury to marine mammals through gear entanglement or
retaliatory actions of fisherman. Depredation of catch by bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) was
observed from June 2011 to March 2012 while onboard commercial reef fish fishing vessels in the
Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) off the coast of Texas and Florida (n=177 sets, 489 hours). Atlantic
spotted dolphins (Stenella frontalis) were near fishing vessels however none were observed depredating
or directly interacting with vessels. Depredation of catch by bottlenose dolphins occurred during 12.2% of
fishing time and during 20.9% of sets. Of 124 total bottlenose dolphins sighted 120 were observed
depredating catch. Atlantic spotted dolphins were near fishing vessels 0.91% of fishing time. Data was
analyzed using ANOVA and post hoc tests with dependent variables of statistical management zone
(SMZ) and fishing gear or target fishery. There were no differences in depredation among gear types
(p=0.6163, F=0.49). Juvenile dolphins were observed more in SMZ 6, near Tampa, Florida than in other
SMZs (p=0.0004, F=4.85, n=177). Atlantic spotted dolphins were seen more frequently in SMZ 5 and 6
than in other SMZs (p=0.0357, F=2.45, n=177). Bottlenose dolphins were commonly sighted near fishing
vessels off the coast of Texas and Florida and when present both adults and juveniles frequently
depredated catch of commercial reef fish vessels.
KEYWORDS: Fisheries interaction, marine mammals, Lutjanidae, Delphinidae
157
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
A MIXED MANAGEMENT APPROACH - ARTIFICIAL REEFS AND FISH SANCTUARIES TOWARDS FISHERIES ENHANCEMENT
UN ENFOQUE DE GESTIÓN MIXTA - ARRECIFES ARTIFICIALES Y SANTUARIOS DE
PECES - A INCREMENTAR LA PESCA
UNE APPROCHE DE GESTION MIXTE - RÉCIFS ARTIFICIELS ET LES SANCTUAIRES DE
POISSONS - VERS LA MISE EN VALEUR DES PÊCHES
MICHELLE MCNAUGHT
The CARIBSAVE Partnership 2 1/2 Kingsway, Unit 27 Devon House East Kingston, 19 Jamaica
[email protected]
158
ABSTRACT
Traditionally wildlife management was either Custodial or Manipulative Management both of which,
though acceptable are highly subjective. Artificial reefs are a common example of manipulating a fish
population arguably by aggregating fish or increasing the biomass. However, if the artificial reef is
deployed within a protected area (custodial), then the outcome is more important than the mechanism.
With Jamaica‟s inshore fisheries severely depleted, its Government has taken steps towards reversing this
by implementing 14 Special Fishery Conservation Areas or fish sanctuaries. One such is the Bluefields
Bay SFCA where artificial reefs were deployed towards enhancing its fisheries populations. In this reef
limited sanctuary, 350 modules of EcoReefs®, designed to mimic elk horn corals, were anchored in a
section (~416m2 in area) of sand patch completely surrounded by seagrass, at a depth of approximately
8m. The baseline survey showed a low fish species richness and density of 2 and 0.014fish/ m2
respectively. Whilst post deployment at 6 and 7 months the fish species richness and densities increased
significantly to 16 and 6.72 fish/ m2 and 17 and 13.65 fish/ m2 respectively. Two years later the density
is sustained and this exceptional large gathering of fish remains protected from the threats of fishers while
being able to attain larger body sizes and in turn increased fecundity. This coupled with the „spill over‟
effect; the artificial reef can function to generate income from eco-tourism to the benefit of the fishers and
other community members whilst sustainably financing the management of this community-based
sanctuary.
KEYWORDS: Fish sanctuary, artificial reef
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
DEVELOPMENT OF JUVENILE BLUE CRAB (CALLINECTES SAPIDUS) GROWTH
MODELS
DESARROLLO DE MODELOS DE CRECIMIENTO JUVENIL CANGREJO AZUL
(CALLINECTES SAPIDUS)
DÉVELOPPEMENT DU CRABE BLEU JUVÉNILE (CALLINECTES SAPIDUS) MODÈLE DE
CROISSANCE
LAILA MELENDEZ1, GEORGE GUILLEN2, and GLEN SUTTON3
University of Houston Clear Lake, School of Science and Computer Engineering 2700 Bay Area Blvd.
Houston, Texas 77058 United States [email protected]
2
University of Houston Clear Lake, Environmental Institute of Houston, Houston, Texas 77058 United
States
3
Texas Parks and Wildlife DepartmentCoastal Fisheries Division Dickinson Marine Laboratory 1502
Pine Ave. Dickinson Texas 77539 United States
1
ABSTRACT
Blue crabs (Callinectes sapidus) live in estuaries along the east coasts of North and South America. They
are an important species in Gulf of Mexico estuaries supporting important commercial and recreational
fisheries while providing critical ecosystem services including serving as a critical food item for many
federally and/or state listed species including Whooping cranes and Kemps Ridley turtles. The abundance
of blue crab is in turn influenced by predation, fisheries, and changes in freshwater inflow. Declines in the
population levels of blue crabs can lead to potential negative impacts on species which prey on the
juveniles and adults. Therefore understanding the growth of early juvenile stages of blue crab is needed to
estimate critical life history parameters and for development of stock assessment models for management.
However, determination of blue crab growth parameters is complicated by an inability to age individuals
directly, discontinuous growth, and the influence of environmental conditions. Furthermore, the tracking
of growth through time using traditional externally applied tags cannot be accomplished because of the
molting process. We used internally implanted coded wire tags (CWT) in a mark recapture study to
monitor growth of crabs released into the wild. Data collected during the study was used to describe and
parameterize growth processes across different size classes and environmental conditions. Various models
are presented that describe the growth of juvenile blue crab. Methods developed and used in this study
should be applicable to other subtropical and tropical crustacean species utilized in commercial and
recreational fisheries.
KEYWORDS: blue crab, growth, modeling, Callinectes sapidus, juvenile
159
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
PRELIMINARY STUDY OF HALOPHILA STIPULACEA, AN INVASIVE SPECIES OF
MARINE MAGNOLIOPHYTA IN GUADELOUPE ISLAND (LESSER ANTILLES)
ESTUDIO PRELIMINAR DE HALOPHILA STIPULACEA, UNA ESPECIES INVASORA DE
FANERÓGAMA MARINA EN LA ISLA DE GUADELOUPE (ANTILLAS MENORES)
ÉTUDE PRÉLIMINAIRE DE L’ESPÈCE INVASIVE DE MAGNOLIOPHYTE MARIN,
HALOPHILA STIPULACEA, EN GUADELOUPE (PETITES ANTILLES)
JULIE MELLINGER, YOLANDE BOUCHON-NAVARO, SÉBASTIEN CORDONNIER, and
CLAUDE BOUCHON
Universite des Antilles et de la Guyane LABEX CORAIL Équipe DYNECAR EA 926 BP 592 Pointe-àPitre, Guadeloupe 97159 Guadeloupe (France) [email protected]
160
ABSTRACT
The invasive marine Magnoliophyta Halophila stipulacea, originating from the Indian Ocean and the Red
sea, was first observed in the Antilles, in 2002, in Grenada and reached Guadeloupe in 2011.
Cartographies by video transect have shown that the species preferentially settled in sheltered areas on
sandy to muddy sediments. H. stipulacea has largely colonized the bottoms of the bays of the leeward
coast of Guadeloupe, from 3 to 55 m. Where present, this species has replaced indigenous species such as
Syringodium filiforme and Halophila decipiens. The seagrass formed by H. Stipulacea presented linear
growth rates varying from 0.9 ± 0.3 to 1.4± 0.1 cm per day according to the site. The maximum recorded
horizontal growth rate reached 7 cm per day. These values can explain the expansion success of this
invader. According to the sites, total biomass (dry weight of leaves, rhizomes and roots) fluctuated from
172.6 ± 37.0 g.m-2 to 308.8 ± 84.8 g.m-2. Roots are short and the plant is weakly anchored in the sediment.
This characteristic confers to this plant a low resistance to currents and surge. The leaf length varied
between 3.8 ± 0.1 cm and 4.4 ± 0.1 cm. The small size of the leaves does not offers an important potential
shelter to the associated macrofauna.A preliminary study of the macrofauna (> 2 mm) associated to this
new species was performed with an epibenthic sledge completed by underwater visual surveys. A total
of148 invertebrates and 69 fish species were identified.
KEYWORDS: Halophila stipulacea, Marine Magnoliophyta, invasive species, linear growth, associated
fauna
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
SPATIAL DIFFERENTIATION OF DOLPHINFISH (CORYPHAENA HIPPURUS)
MOVEMENTS RELATIVE TO THE BAHAMIAN ARCHIPELAGO
DIFERENCIACIÓN ESPACIAL DE LOS MOVIMIENTOS DORADO (CORYPHAENA
HIPPURUS) EN RELACIÓN CON EL ARCHIPIÉLAGO DE LAS BAHAMAS
LA DIFFÉRENCIATION SPATIALE DES MOUVEMENTS CORYPHÈNE (CORYPHAENA
HIPPURUS) PAR RAPPORT À L'ARCHIPEL DES BAHAMAS
WESSLEY MERTEN1, RICHARD APPELDOORN1, and DONALD HAMMOND2
1
University of Puerto Rico Department of Marine Sciences PO Box 9000 Mayaguez, PR 00680 United
States [email protected]
2
Cooperative Science ServicesDolphinfish Research Program
ABSTRACT
We used a combination of conventional mark and recapture data (n=35 recaptures), satellite data (n=2
transmitters), and surface drifter data (n=144) to examine dolphinfish (Coryphaena hippurus) movements
relative to the Bahamian archipelago. Movement speeds and headings were dependent upon the location
of tagging. Movements within the Bahamas were to the south within the archipelago in the Tongue of the
Ocean (TOTO), Northeast Providence Channel, and Exuma Sound (ES), ranging from 4-23 days at liberty
(DAL). However, the majority of dolphinfish released in the TOTO showed little net dispersal (< 1 km)
after 5-77 DAL with only 3 movements to locations outside. Emigration from the Bahamas toward the
U.S. east coast was not random and occurred most frequently for fish released north of Great Abaco and
Eleuthera Islands; fish were recaptured near Cape Canaveral, FL, Charlestown, SC, Wilmington and
Hatteras Bight, NC, and southeast of George‟s Bank after 14-58 DAL. Fishery-dependent and
independent movements, and surface drifters, revealed dolphinfish enter the Bahamas via the Northwest
Providence Channel in the west, north of the Little Bahama Bank, northeast of Eleuthera to Long Island,
and east from north or south of Grand Turk, Turks and Caicos. Understanding the movements of
dolphinfish relative to the Bahamas should facilitate regional stock assessments by revealing regional
stock connectivity in space and time. Importantly, these observations are potentially key for
understanding large scale dolphinfish movements and stock structure in the northwest Atlantic and
northern Caribbean.
KEYWORDS: Dolphinfish, movements, migrations, Bahamian Archipelago, mark and recapture
161
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
BUILDING A COLLABORATIVE STRATEGY FOR THE ASSESSMENT OF DATA
DEFICIENT FISHERIES IN THE CARIBBEAN REGION
CONSTRUCCIÓN DE UNA ESTRATEGIA PARA LA EVALUACIÓN DE PESQUERIAS CON
DEFIECIENCA EN DATOS EN LA REGION DEL CARIBELA
CONSTRUCTION D’UNE STRATÉGIE COLLABORATIVE SUR L'ÉVALUACION DE
PÊCHERIES DÉFICIENTES EN DATA AUX RÉGION DES CARAÏBE
WILLIAM MICHAELS1, NANCIE CUMMINGS1, MANDY KARNAUSKAS1, JAMES BERKSON1,
and ALEJANDRO ACOSTA2
1
NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service NMFS Office of Science & Technology 1315 East West Hwy,
SSMC3, F/ST4 Silver Spring, MD 20910 USA [email protected]
2
Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission Fish and Wildlife Research Institute 2796 Overseas
Hwy Ste 119 MarathonFL 33050 USA [email protected]
162
ABSTRACT
Increasing needs by fisheries managers to establish harvest controls to sustain fishery resources have
shifted priorities to meet the minimum stock assessment requirements for each fishery. To achieve an
optimal data collection system of managed resources, managers acknowledge the need to address data
deficiencies that exist for many fisheries. This is particularly true for the Caribbean region where
essentially all of the stock assessments are considered as data limited. In addition to the challenges of
limited survey capabilities, managers and assessment scientists must address sampling and modeling
uncertainties in an environment with complexity in species diversity, life history parameters, and habitats
that are difficult to sample. The Caribbean is further complicated by the diversity of fisheries, lack of
technical capacity, and political complexity. Furthermore, the biological and technical challenges of
assessing artisanal fisheries are not small-scale issues because of the connectivity of stocks across the
Caribbean jurisdictions. For these reasons, scientists and resource managers must work collaboratively on
improving the science to safeguard the health and sustainability of fishery resources and their habitats in
the Caribbean region. A collaborative capacity building strategy for enhanced survey capabilities is the
ultimate goal, yet the most immediate benefits can be obtained by evaluating and developing the analytic
tools to conduct assessments of data deficient fisheries. The political will for capability building is not
only driven by mandates to achieve sustainable fishery resources, but also requires partnership and
consensus on how best to improve the science for policy decisions.
KEYWORDS: Data-limited, stock assessment, fishery management, Gulf of Mexico, Caribbean
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
ECONOMIC ACTIVITIES WHICH STRENGTHEN THE SOCIAL COHESION AMONG
FISHERMEN AND PROMOTE THE CO-MANAGEMENT
ACTIVIDADES ECONOMICAS QUE PORTALECEN LA COHESION SOCIAL ENTRE
PESCADORES Y PROMUEVEN EL CO-MANEJOLES
ACTIVITES ECONOMIQUES QUI RENFORCENT LA COHESION SOCIALE ENTRE LES
PECHEURS ET PROMOUVOIR LA COGESTION
NARIAKI MIKUNI1 and JENNIFER HOWARD2
JICA 23 Brazil Street Castries, St.Lucia [email protected]
2
Fisheries Division Kingstown St. Vincent and the Grenadines
1
ABSTRACT
To increase sustainability and profitability of FAD fisheries in the fishing community of Barrouallie,
within the framework of CRFM/JICA collaboration of the Caribbean Fisheries Co-management project
(CARIFICO), the Fisheries Division of the St. Vincent and the Grenadines and Japan International
Cooperation Agency (JICA) have started a pilot activity focusing on the introduction and development of
co-management. Co-management is considered an effective way of fisheries management and the social
cohesion among fishermen is identified as an important attribute contributing to the success of comanagement. However, in Barrouallie, the question is how to strengthen the social cohesion. In this
study, an approach to strengthen the social cohesion is identified from the experience of Okinawa in
Japan, that is the social cohesion is strengthened by the economic activities they share, which include
marketing of fish, fuel and fishing gear supply, financial service, and by the management of fisheries
centers which provide landing and marketing facilities, fishermen?s locker and workshop. To verify this
approach, fisheries cooperatives in Okinawa, which are main fisher organizations to conduct those
activities and co-management, are studied, and questionnaire survey of Okinawa fishermen are
implemented. The applicability of this approach to Barrouallie is also verified by questionnaire survey of
Barrouallie fishermen. Finally, to verify the effectiveness of this approach, following to this study,
monitoring indicators are suggested for Barrouallie pilot activity, which will apply this approach and
continue for five years.
KEYWORDS: co-management
163
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
PRELIMINARY ANALYSIS OF REEF FISH SETTLEMENT PATTERNS IN ELEUTHERA,
BAHAMAS
EL ANÁLISIS PRELIMINAR DE LOS PATRONES DE ASENTAMIENTO DE PECES DE
ARRECIFE EN ELEUTHERA, BAHAMAS
L'ANALYSE PRÉLIMINAIRE DE LES MODÈLES D'ÉTABLISSEMENT DES POISSONS DE
RÉCIFS À ELEUTHERA, BAHAMAS
SKYLAR MILLER, HENRI VALLES, and HAZEL OXENFORD
University of the West Indies The Cape Eleuthera Institute CERMES Cave Hill Campus Cave Hill, St
Michael BB 11000 Barbados [email protected]
164
ABSTRACT
Little is known about the settlement dynamics of reef fishes in Eleuthera island, The Bahamas. In this
study, standard monitoring units for the recruitment of fishes (SMURFs) were used to describe temporal
and spatial settlement patterns of reef fishes near Cape Eleuthera. SMURF units were deployed at study
sites across various habitats including deep (18 m) continuous reef, and shallow (3 m) patch reef areas to
test for differences in settlement across locations. Up to eight units were sampled weekly at each site from
April through July, 2013. Collections at all sites yielded a total of 325 recently settled (< 2 cm) reef
fishes. More than half of these were retrieved from sites in continuous reef habitat and further analysis of
the most abundant taxa suggested species-specific habitat associations. Barred cardinalfish (Apogon
binotatus) and goldspotgoby (Gnatholepis thompsoni) were more often collected at continuous reef sites,
while beaugregory damselfish (Stegastes leucostictus) were found only in collections taken from patch
reef sites. No association with lunar cycles was observed for these species; however, recently settled A.
binotatus and S. leucostictus did not appear until late May and early June, respectively, suggesting that
settlement for some reef fish is seasonal in Eleuthera.
KEYWORDS: Reef fish, settlement patterns, standard monitoring unit, Bahamas
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
EFECTO DE LAS VEDAS EN LAS POBLACIONES DE TORTUGAS MARINAS EN CUBA.
CASO DE ESTUDIO: SUR DE LA ISLA DE LA JUVENTUD
EFFECT OF SEASON CLOSURES ON POPULATIONS OF SEA TURTLES IN CUBA. CASE
STUDY: SOUTH OF ISLA DE LA JUVENTUD
LES EFFETS DE LE CLOTUREÉ DE SAISON SUR LES POPULATIONS DE TORTUES
MARINES A CUBA. CAS ÉTUDIÉ: SUD DE ISLA DE LA JUVENTUD
FELIX MONCADA, RAFAEL TIZOL, GONAZLO NODARSE, y YOSVANI MEDINA
Centro de Investigaciones Pesqueras Ministerio de la Industria Pesquera 5ta Ave y 248 Barlovento,
Santa Fé Havana, Cuba [email protected]
RESUMEN
Las tortugas marinas constituyeron un recurso pesquero para Cuba hasta el 2007, cuya pesquería estaba
controlada por varias medidas regulatorias para la protección y conservación de estas especies,
recomendadas por el Centro de Investigaciones Pesqueras. Teniéndose en cuenta que estas medidas deben
evaluarse para conocer sus efectos en la recuperación de las poblaciones, y que el monitoreo llevado a
cabo durante 30 años en la playa ¨El Guanal¨ (sur de la Isla de la Juventud), posibilita analizar el impacto
de algunas de estas medidas sobre la anidación en esa playa, este trabajo tiene como objetivo, determinar
el efecto de las vedas establecidas sobre las poblaciones anidadoras de tortugas verde y caguama en el sur
de la Isla de la Juventud. Con este propósito, se realizó un análisis de la captura (comportamiento para el
periodo, y por periodo de veda) y la anidación (para cada especie por periodo) en cuatro etapas: PVI
(1982-1987), PV2 (1988-1994), PV3 (1995-2007) y PV4 (2008-2011), que representan un periodo de
veda diferente. Se comprobó que la variación anual de la captura de tortuga verde y caguama muestra
para todo el periodo una disminución en el tiempo para ambas especies vinculadas con las vedas
establecidas, mientras que en la anidación se observó una variación de la anidación para ambas especies
según las vedas.
PALABRAS CLAVES: Season closures, catch, loggerhead turtles, sea turtles, green turtle
165
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
ARE SMALL-ISLAND DEVELOPING STATES FISHERIES’ REALLY THAT VULNERABLE
TO CLIMATE CHANGE?
ES REALMENTE LA PESCA EN LOS PEQUEÑOS ESTADOS INSULARES EN DESARROLLO
TAN VULNERABLE AL CAMBIO CLIMÁTICO?
LES PÊCHERIES DES PETITS ETATS INSULAIRES EN DÉVELOPPEMENT SONT-ELLES
RÉELLEMENT SI VULNÉRABLES FACE AUX CHANGEMENTS CLIMATIQUES?
IRIS MONNEREAU, ROBIN MAHON, PATRICK MCCONNEY, and LEONARD NURSE
CERMES/UWI CERMES/UWI Cave Hill Campus St. Michael, Barbados BB11000
[email protected]otmail.com
166
ABSTRACT
Small-Island Developing States (SIDS) are expected to be disproportionally affected by climate change
due to their social, economic and geographical characteristics – such as limited size, proneness to natural
hazards, low-lying areas, and low adaptive capacity. In recent years various vulnerability assessments of
national fisheries to potential climate change impacts have been carried out. These studies (see e.g.
Allison et al., 2009 and Hughes et al., 2012), however, scarcely include SIDS despite the particular
importance of fisheries in these countries. This study has replicated, with slightly modified methods, the
2009 vulnerability assessment by Allison et al. (2009) with most recent data and has broadened the
analysis to include nearly all coastal states in the world including all, except one, Small-Island
Developing States. This study assesses the outcome and relevance of this vulnerability assessment for
SIDS and discusses a possible new framework integrating the advances in the field of national level
vulnerability studies that have been made since the previous assessment.
KEYWORDS: SIDS, climate change, vulberability assessment, fisheries, Caribbean
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
GULFBASE AS A TOOL TO FOSTER RESEARCH COLLABORATIONS AND BETTER
DISASTER PREPAREDNESS
GULFBASE COMO UNA HERRAMIENTA PARA FOMENTAR LA COLABORACIÓN EN
INVESTIGACIÓN Y UNA MEJOR PREPARACIÓN PARA LOS DESASTRES
GULFBASE COMME UN OUTIL POUR FAVORISER LES COLLABORATIONS DE
RECHERCHE ET UNE MEILLEURE PRÉPARATION AUX CATASTROPHES
FABIO MORETZSOHN, JOHN W. TUNNELL, JR., and LARRY MCKINNEY
Harte Research Institute Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi 6300 Ocean Drive, Unit 5869 Corpus
Christi, TX 78412-5869 USA [email protected]
ABSTRACT
GulfBase is a portal on research resources in the Gulf of Mexico, developed in 2002 by the Harte
Research Institute, Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi. Its goal is to provide free access to
information on the Gulf to researchers, policy makers and the public, to insure the long-term sustainable
use and conservation of the Gulf of Mexico. It currently contains information on over 2300 researchers,
493 institutions, 500 projects, 583 conferences and events related to the Gulf, besides hundreds of islands,
reefs, bays, etc. GulfBase hosts several databases, including the Biodiversity of the Gulf of Mexico
(BioGoMx) database, a comprehensive biotic inventory covering over 15,000 species. The Deepwater
Horizon oil spill in 2010 has made clear the need to know what resources are available, who are the
experts are, and to be better prepared for disasters. As a result, several new “products” are coming to
GulfBase, including: 1) BioGoMx partnered with IUCN Red List to augment information on Gulf species
and develop a directory of experts; 2) inventory of ocean assets (research vessels, ROVs, gliders, etc.), in
partnership with the Gulf of Mexico University Research Collaborative (GOMURC), to increase
collaborations and for improved response to ocean events; and 3) Directory of Education and Outreach
(E&O) Professionals, in collaboration with the Gulf of Mexico Alliance (GOMA). Additionally, a new
website with new features is expected to be released in early 2014.
KEYWORDS: Research, collaboration, disaster preparedness, conservation, online portal
167
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
MOVEMENT AND HABITAT USE OF SUBADULT RED DRUM (SCIAENOPS OCELLATUS)
AND SPOTTED SEATROUT (CYNOSCION NEBULOSUS) IN THE MISSION-ARANSAS
NATIONAL ESTUARINE RESEARCH RESERVE
MOVIMIENTO Y USO DEL HABITAT DE LOS SUBADULTOS DE TAMBOR ROJO
(SCIAENOPS OCELLATUS) Y CORVINA PINTA (CYNOSCION NEBULOSUS) EN LA
RESERVE NACIONAL DE INVESTIGACIÓN ESTUARIO DE MISSION-ARANSAS
MOUVEMENT ET UTILISATION DE L`HABITAT PAR LES SUB-ADULTES DE OMBRINE
OCELLÉE (SCIAENOPS OCELLATUS) ET DE ACOUPA PINTADE (CYNOSCION
NEBULOSUS) DANS LA RÉSERVE NATIONALE DE RECHERCHE ESTUARIENNE DE
MISSION-ARANSAS
DAVID MOULTON
Texas A&M University at Galveston Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi P.O. box 1675 Galveston, TX
77554 USA [email protected]
168
ABSTRACT
Red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus) and spotted seatrout (Cynoscion nebulosus) are highly sought-after game
fish providing economic and recreational value to the Gulf of Mexico. Information regarding movements,
essential habitat, and habitat connectivity is needed for effective management and conservation of both
species, as well as the habitat they utilize. A VEMCO VR2W Positioning System (VPS) array consisting
of 20 VR2W passive acoustic receivers was deployed in June and July 2013 to encompass approximately
350m2 of the Mission-Aransas National Estuarine Research Reserve (TX) and a variety of habitat types
including shoal grass (Halodule wrightii), turtle grass (Thalassia testudinum), manatee grass
(Syringodium filiforme), drift macroalgae, oyster reef, marsh edge, and unvegetated bottom. Subadult red
drum (n=15) and spotted seatrout (n=15) were implanted with VEMCO V9 acoustic transmitters and
tracked within the array for a maximum of 28 days. A total of 48,292 detections were recorded: 13,433
for red drum and 34,859 for spotted seatrout. Position data were analyzed at two spatial resolutions to
yield species comparisons of residency as well as temporal and tidal patterns of movement and habitat
use. Time-difference-of-arrival analysis for simultaneous detections of the same transmission by three or
more receivers allowed fine-scale (+/- 3 m) estimation of fish position, which was coupled to satellite
imagery and ground observation to determine specific habitat usage. Centers of activity over varying time
scales were also estimated to assess spatial and temporal differences in movements and utilization of
habitat groups within the array.
KEYWORDS: Species-habitat relationships, acoustic telemetry, center of activity, game fish, VR2W
positioning system
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
USING VOLUNTEER EDUCATORS TO ENHANCE MPA OUTREACH: LESSONS LEARNED
UTILIZANDO EDUCADORES VOLUNTARIOS PARA AUMENTAR LA SENSIBILIZACIÓN
AMBIENTAL EN AMPS: LECCIONES APRENDIDAS UTILISER ÉDUCATEURS
BÉNÉVOLES POUR ACCROÎTRE LA SENSIBILISATION ENVIRONNEMENTALE DANS
LES ZPM: LEÇONS APPRISES
LISA MULCAHY1, ROBERTO CARBALLO2, ISAIAS MAJIL3, and EMMA DOYLE4
1
MarEPOsa P.O. Box 553 South Beach, OR 97366 USA [email protected]
2
Belize Ministry of Forestry, Fisheries and Sustainable Developmen Second Floor, West Block Building,
Independence Plaza Belmopan Belize
3
Belize Ministry of Fisheries Princess Margaret Drive P.O. Box 148 Belize City Belize
4
GCFI, P.O. Box 21655 Charleston SC 29413-1655 USA
ABSTRACT
Education and outreach activities can promote environmental stewardship and help build awareness and
understanding of marine protected areas (MPAs). Education is an essential component of building
compliance and enhancing MPA enforcement, but marine reserves often lack the necessary staff, time,
experience and funding. Recent experience in Belize shows volunteer educators can be a useful resource
for building MPA education and outreach efforts. In CaMPAM‟s Caribbean MPA Management Capacity
Assessment, Belize Fisheries Department staff managing South Water Caye Marine Reserve (SWCMR)
identified outreach and education as the priority area for capacity building and assistance. Given
implementation funding for activities with schools via a GCFI-NOAA Cooperative Agreement, the MPA
manager called for an expert volunteer to first help design a new outreach and education plan for
SWCMR. Once in the field, the volunteer conducted a needs assessment with local schools. A Reef
Keeper Workbook and a presentation about SWCMR were created. These were piloted in the classroom,
guest lectures were given by MPA staff and outdoor environmental activities were held for school
students. An informal learning assessment was made indicating student knowledge and understanding
about MPAs improved. The project was completed with minimal use of MPA staff time and resources,
yet it resulted in increased visibility for the reserve, meaningful contact with local schools, and materials
and activities that can be built upon in future. Lessons learned about the steps in working with education
volunteers can help enhance the success of other such MPA education programs in the Caribbean.
KEYWORDS: Volunteer, education, marine protected areas, Belize, South Water Caye
169
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
MAPPING THE SOUTH TEXAS BANKS
MAPEAR LOS BANCOS DEL SUR DE TEXAS
CARTOGRAPHIER LES RIVES SUD DU TEXAS
HARRIET NASH and JOHN W. TUNNELL, JR.
Harte Research Institute Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi 6300 Ocean Dr. Unit 5869 Corpus
Christi, TX 78412 USA [email protected]
170
ABSTRACT
Biodiversity data are critical for marine conservation planning, but biological surveys, particularly in
offshore locations, are resource intensive and dependent on favorable conditions at sea. In areas with few
biological data, abiotic variables are used as surrogates for marine biodiversity. The South Texas Banks
are hard-substrate sites with bathymetric relief on the continental shelf in the northwestern Gulf of
Mexico where biological data are sparse. This study focused on 12 outer-shelf South Texas Banks that
support ecological connectivity among nearshore and offshore, hard-bottom, natural and artificial sites.
High-resolution multibeam echosounder data were used to create maps and a dataset of geomorphic
variables to be used via multivariate statistical analyses as an abiotic surrogate for biodiversity patterns.
The detailed site maps are important tools to guide future studies, such as identification of reef fish
spawning sites and biodiversity trends. The statistical approach produced a ranking tool to guide
prioritization of future biological explorations and site selection for design of marine protected areas. A
minimum of five of the South Texas Banks is proposed for place-based protection. Similar methodology
can be applied to other regions of the Gulf of Mexico to identify sites for inclusion in the International
Gulf of Mexico Marine Protected Area Network.
KEYWORDS: South Texas Banks, multibeam bathymetry, hard bottom habitat, marine protected areas
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
TEMPORAL PATTERNS AND BEHAVIOURAL CHARACTERISTICS OF AGGREGATION
FORMATION AND SPAWNING IN THE BERMUDA CHUB (KYPHOSUS SECTATRIX)
LOS PATRONES TEMPORALES Y LAS CARACTERÍSTICAS DE COMPORTAMIENTO DE
LA FORMACIÓN DE AGREGACIÓN Y DESOVE EN EL BERMUDA CHUB (KYPHOSUS
SECTATRIX)
LES TENDANCES TEMPORELLES ET LES CARACTÉRISTIQUES COMPORTEMENTALES
DE LA FORMATION DE L'AGRÉGATION ET DE LA PONTE DANS LA BERMUDA CHUB
(KYPHOSUS SECTATRIX)
RICHARD S. NEMETH and ELIZABETH KADISON
University of the Virgin Islands Center for Marine and Environmental Studies 2 John Brewer's Bay St.
Thomas, USVI 00802-9990 US Virgin Islands [email protected]
ABSTRACT
This paper provides detailed descriptions of aggregation formation and mass spawning of the Bermuda
chub (Kyphosus sectatrix). Spawning coloration and gamete release of K. sectatrix was observed and
filmed at the Grammanik Bank, a deep spawning aggregation site used by many different species located
on the southern edge of the Puerto Rican shelf 10 km south of St. Thomas, United States Virgin Islands.
Underwater visual surveys using technical Nitrox and closed circuit re-breathers were conducted from
December 2002 to March 2013 and documented spatial and temporal patterns of movement and
aggregation formation along 1.5 km of mesophotic reef. The largest aggregations of K. sectatrix (> 200
fish) were observed on the Grammanik Bank January to March from 0 to 11 days after the full moon with
peak abundance from 60 to 80 days after the winter solstice across all survey years. Aggregation
formation of K. sectatrix coincided with the spawning season of Nassau (Epinephelus striatus) and
yellowfin (Mycteroperca venenosa) groupers. These spatial and temporal patterns of aggregation
formation and spawning suggest that K. sectatrix, an herbivore, may also be a transient aggregating
species. On several occasions chubs were observed both pair spawning and mass spawning. Color
patterns and behaviours associated with aggregation and spawning are described. This represents the first
report of a Kyphosid species aggregating to spawn and illuminates a portion of the poorly understood life
history of the Bermuda chub.
KEYWORDS: Spawning aggregation, spawning coloration, reproductive behavior, Kyphosidae, Virgin
Islands
171
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
¿CÓMO ES EL COMPORTAMIENTO DEL CARACOL ROSA, STROMBUS GIGAS Y CÓMO
UTILIZA SU HÁBITAT?
WHAT DOES THE QUEEN CONCH, STROMBUS GIGAS BEHAVIOR AND HOW IT USES ITS
HABITAT?
COMMENT EST-IL LE COMPORTEMENT DU LAMBI, STROMBUS GIGAS ET COMMENT
IL UTILISE SON HABITAT?
MARIANA NOGUEZ NÚÑEZ1 y DALILA ALDANA ARANDA2
Instituto de Ciencias del Mar y Limnología Unam. Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados
Puerto de Abrigo s/n, Sisal. Carretera Antigua a Progreso, Km. 6, A.P. 73 Cordemex, C.P. 97310,
Mérida, Hunucmá , Yucatán 97351 México [email protected]
2
Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN Carretera Antigua a Progreso, Km. 6, A.P. 73
Cordemex, Carretera Antigua a Progreso, Km. 6, A.P. 73 Cordemex, C.P. 97310 Merida Yucatán 97310
México
1
172
RESUMEN
Strombus gigas tiene importancia pesquera en el Caribe, pero sus poblaciones están sobreexplotadas,
trabajándose su acuacultura y repoblación. Su comportamiento y uso del hábitat ha sido poco estudiado
(Berg, 1975; Stoner, 2002 y Bissada et al., 2010). El objetivo de este trabajo: Conocer el uso del hábitat y
comportamiento de S. gigas y sus variaciones estacionales, mensuales y diurnas en adultos y juveniles.
Las actividades de comportamiento y hábitat se observaron de 8-17h en transectos de 100 m (eneronoviembre 2012), contabilizando caracoles: reposo, movimiento, alimentación y cópula-desove. Con
marcado-recaptura, se determinó el área utilizada.hora-1 (8, 12 y 16h) en secas y lluvias. El análisis del
comportamiento estacional mostró diferencia significativa del reposo entre nortes y secas-lluvias en
adultos. Alimentación y movimiento fueron diferentes en lluvias con respecto a secas y nortes en adultos.
Los juveniles se alimentan y se mueven diferentemente en las tres épocas. A nivel mensual, la
alimentación, movimiento, reposo y cópula presentaron diferencias significativas. Reposo en adultos
presentó un pico en marzo-julio y en juveniles este se observó: enero-febrero y octubre-diciembre. La
alimentación fue similar en juveniles y adultos. La alimentación y movimiento en un ciclo diurno mostró
diferencias, aumentando de 10 a 14 h. El reposo es alto de 8-10h. Los caracoles utilizan un área de 0.86
m2.h-1, aumentando en lluvias a 1.1 m2 y disminuyendo en secas (0.55 m2). El área utilizada por un
caracol en el día varía significativamente, de 0.44m2 (8h) a 1.67m2.h-1 (16h). Conocer el uso del hábitat y
sus variaciones diurnas, estacionales en las diferentes fases del ciclo de vida son valiosas para adecuar los
programas de conservación, y cultivo de esta especie.
PALABRAS CLAVES: Comportamiento, mensual, diurno, estacional, caracol rosa
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
CASTING DEEPER AND MORE WIDELY TO PERFORM STOCK-SPECIFIC FISHERIES
ASSESSMENTS WHEN DATA ARE SPARSE
AL LANZAR MAS PROFUNDA Y EXTENSAMENTE PARA EVALUAR EL ESTADO DE
LAS POBLACIONES DE PECES CUANDO LOS DATOS SON ESCASOS
JETANT PLUS DE PROFONDEUR ET À GRANDE ÉCHELLE POUR ÉVALUER L'ÉTAT
DES STOCKS DE POISSONS LORSQUE LES DONNÉES SONT RARES
JOSH NOWLIS
Bridge Environment, 9721 20 Ave NE, Seattle, WA 98115 USA [email protected]
1
th
ABSTRACT
Until recently, efforts to assess and manage fisheries have been directed primarily at a minority of stocks
with relatively rich conventional data resources. In its most recent amendment, the US fisheries law
clarified that all stocks need annual catch limits, prompting interest in how to manage the majority of
fish stocks, which have not yet been formally assessed. These stocks are disproportionately represented
in the tropics, where few formal assessments have ever been conducted. Recent proposed approaches
have focused on life history correlates in the hopes of determining stock status without local data. I
propose alternative approaches. We can cast deeper by supplementing conventional data with ecological
and economic datasets that are not normally considered in the assessment process. We can cast more
widely by considering ranges of potential status and examining them in terms of risk management. In
doing so, fundamental trade-offs among performance characteristics are identified and analyzed across a
range of policy options. Examples of these approaches will be provided from several stocks from the US
Caribbean. The spiny lobster fishery has potential to be formally assessed using conventional techniques
if data from the local fishing community are included. The red hind and yellowtail snapper fisheries lack
sufficient data for a formal conventional approach. However, inclusion of non-conventional data and
examination of all data in a risk management framework allow us to evaluate the likely sustainability of
recent catch levels. These analyses highlight that we can give far more useful scientific advice to
managers of data-poor fisheries.
KEYWORDS: Data-poor fisheries, Caribbean fisheries, spiny lobster, red hind, yellowtail snapper
173
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
COMPOSICION Y ESTRUCTURA TROFICA DE LA COMUNIDAD DE PECES DE LOS
ARRECIFES DEL BANCO DE CAMPECHE, GOLFO DE MÉXICO
COMPOSITION AND TROPHIC STRUCTURE OF THE FISH COMMUNITIES OF THE
BANK OF CAMPECHE REEFS, GULF OF MEXICO
COMPOSITION ET STRUCTURE TROPHIQUE DES COMMUNAUT?S DE POISSONS DE LA
BANQUE DU CAMPECHE R?CIFS, GOLFE DU MEXIQUE
ENRIQUE NUNEZ1, CARLOS GONZALEZ-SALAS2, HORACIO PEREZ-ESPAÑA3, y LAFFONLEAL
1
Universidad Autonoma del Carmen Dependencia de Ciencias Naturales calle 56, 4 col. Benito Juarez
Ciudad del Carmen, Campeche 24180 Mexico [email protected]
2
Universidad Autonoma de Yucatan Carretra Xmacuitl km 25 Merida Yucatan
3
Universidad VeracruzanaCEP-Boca del Rio Boca del Rio Veracruz Mexico
174
RESUMEN
Al oeste-noroeste de la Peninsula de Yucatan en el Golfo de Mexico se localiza el Banco de Campeche
con formaciones arrecifales sobresalientes principalmente de tipo plataforma. El objetivo de la
investigaci?n fue describir la composici?n y estructura tr?fica de la comunidad de peces de estos arrecifes.
Mediante censos visuales en transecto (50x2 m) se registr? el n?mero y talla aproximada de los individuos
de cada especie de pez identificada. Un total de 116 especies de peces arrecifales de 28 familias fueron
registradas en 197 transectos realizados. El numero promedio de especies registradas por transecto fue de
19. La abundancia promedio fue de 215 individuos por transecto y de 1832 individuos por estacion de
muestreo. La densidad promedio fue de 1.8 ind/m2. Las especies de peces que se alimenta de plantas y
detritus fueron las mas importantes (32% del total identificadas). Tomando en cuenta la abundancia, los
peces zooplanctafagos fueron marcadamente dominantes (64% del total de individuos). Analisis
multivariado de varianza muestran que no existe diferencia significativa en la composicion de la
comunidad de peces entre arrecifes, pero si (P<0.05) entre la zonas expuestas a las corrientes y protegidas
de cada arrecife. Es dificil suponer movimientos migratorios de peces adultos entre arrecifes por las
grandes distancias entre ellos, pero si transporte de larvas, ya que el patr?n general de la Corriente del
Golfo en esta zona es en sentido este-oeste y pudiera haber un aporte de larvas de una fuente com?n como
el Arrecife Alacranes o el Mar Caribe.
PALABRA CLAVES: Composicoion de la comunidad, estructura trofica, Conectividad
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
ESTUDIO DE LA CADENA DE MERCADO DEL CONSUMO NACIONAL DE CARACOL
REINA (STROMBUS GIGAS) EN HONDURAS
MARKET CHAIN STUDY FOR NATIONAL COSUMPTION OF QUEEN CONCH (STROMBUS
GIGAS) IN HONDURAS
ÉTUDIER CHAÎNE NATIONALE DU MARCHÉ DE LA CONSOMMATION STROMBE
GÉANT (STROMBUS GIGAS) AU HONDURAS
MAYRA NUNEZ1 y STEPHEN BOX2
Centro de Ecologia Marina Edificio Florencia Oficina 401-403 Tegucigalpa, FMO Honduras
[email protected]
2
Smithsonian Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce, 701 Seaway Drive, Fort Pierce, Florida 34949
Fort Pierce Florida USA
1
RESUMEN
El caracol reina es de larga vida y de crecimiento lento, convirtiéndolo vulnerable a la explotación
insostenible; por estas razones fue incluido en Apéndice II de CITES. El caracol es utilizado en
restaurante y en la gastronomía local, especialmente en las sopas de mariscos y ceviche. La pesquería de
caracol llego a convertirseen la segunda más importante para Honduras seguida de la pesca de langosta,
luego de la decisión delcierre de esta pesquería en el país; el gobierno cumpliendo los requisitos de
CITES inició el "Programa de Investigación Científica del Caracol Reina del Caribe" siendo este año el
séptimo y no cuenta aún con ningún plan de gestión o un dictamen de extracción. La cadena de mercado
del caracol es abastecida legalmente por el estudio científico, y es vendido a plantas procesadoras de
pescado certificadas por el gobierno para comprar caracol a estos barcos del estudio. El producto de mejor
calidad es exportado a Estados Unidos, que presenta la mayor demanda de exportación, como también
hay exportaciones a Guatemala y a El Salvador, se cree que estas exportaciones provienen de
desembarques ilegales fuera de muelle. La captura ilegal de Guatemala y Honduras forma un 20% del
total de exportaciones de caracol registradas por Belice. El caracol que deriva la de pesca artesanal por
subsistencia, proviene mayormente de Islas de la Bahía, Tela y Ceiba, la cual abastece a restaurantes,
hoteles y mercados de la zona.Con nuevas alternativas de comercio de pesca sostenible (captura de
caracol por apnea), y creando comercios con otras especies sostenibles se evitaría la sobreexplotación y el
comercio ilegal de caracol dando nuevas oportunidades de mercado al país.
PALABRAS CLAVES: Caracol reina, cadena de mercado, pesca ilegal, pesca sostenible
175
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
FISH COMMUNITIES ASSOCIATED WITH BENTHIC BIOLOGICAL ZONES AT THE
FLOWER GARDEN BANKS NATIONAL MARINE SANCTUARY AND OTHER BANKS IN
THE NORTHWESTERN GULF OF MEXICO
LAS COMUNIDADES DE PECES ASOCIADAS CON LAS ZONAS BIOLÓGICAS
BENTÓNICAS EN EL SANTUARIO MARINO NACIONAL FLOWER GARDEN BANKS Y
OTROS BANCOS EN EL NOROESTE DEL GOLFO DE MÉXICO
L’ASSOCIATION DES COMMUNAUTÉS DE POISSONS DANS LES SECTEURS
BIOLOGIQUE BENTHIQUE AU FLOWER GARDEN BANKS NATIONAL MARINE
SANCTUARY ET D’AUTRES RIVES DANS LE NORD-OUEST DU GOLFE DU MEXIQUE
MARISSA F. NUTTALL, EMMA L. HICKERSON, RYAN J. ECKERT, JOHN A. EMBESI
MICHELLE A. JOHNSTON, and GEORGE P. SCHMAHL
Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary 4700 Ave U Bldg 216 Galveston, TX 77551 USA
[email protected]
176
ABSTRACT
The Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary (FGBNMS) is comprised of three uplifted salt
dome features located in the northwestern Gulf of Mexico (East Bank, West Bank, and Stetson Bank),
between 70-115 miles offshore of Galveston, Texas. These features represent three of dozens of reefs and
banks in the Northwestern Gulf of Mexico. The banks rise from the surrounding seafloor at
approximately 55-145 m and crest between 17-21 m of the sea surface, and support well-developed
benthic communities throughout. Distinct biological zones describing the habitats within FGBNMS have
been developed, including coral reef, coral community, coralline algae (including coralline algae reefs
and algal nodules), deep coral, soft bottom, brine seep, and mud volcano. Each of these biological zones
harbors a distinct and characteristic benthic community. This study presents the addition of fish
community data associated with these biological zones, linking dominant fish species to each habitat.
While the data presented here originates from surveys at the three banks located within FGBNMS,
extensive remotely operated vehicle surveys of nearby locations by the sanctuary and partners indicate
these biological zones and associated fish communities possess a wider applicability to the many reefs
and banks of the northwestern Gulf of Mexico.
KEYWORDS: Northwestern GoMex, biological zones, fish community, benthic community
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
ECOLOGÍA TRÓFICA DEL GUABINO (PISCES: ELEOTRIDAE) EN EL MAR CARIBE
CORDOBÉS, COLOMBIA
TROPHIC ECOLOGY OF GUABINO (PISCES: ELEOTRIDAE) IN THE CORDOBA’S
CARIBBEAN SEA, COLOMBIA
TROPHIQUE ÉCOLOGIE DU GUABINO (PISCES: ELEOTRIDAE) DANS LA MER DES
CARAÏBES DE CORDOBA, COLOMBIE
CHARLES W. OLAYA-NIETO, MIRLEY MORALES-MONTESINO, y JORGE QUIROGAGONZÁLEZ
Laboratorio de Investigación Biológico Pesquera- Universidad de Córdoba Km 1, carretera a Chinú
Carrera 23 No 2A - 20, Piso 2 Lorica, Córdoba Colombia [email protected]
RESUMEN
Se estudió la ecología trófica del Guabino en el mar Caribe Cordobés, Colombia, analizando estómagos
de individuos capturados entre enero y diciembre, con tallas entre 20.0-38.1 cm de longitud total (LT) y
peso total (WT) entre 68.0-538.0 g. Se estimó el Coeficiente de vacuidad, Grado de digestión, Frecuencia
de ocurrencia, Frecuencia numérica, Gravimetría y el Índice de importancia relativa (IIR). El 58.6 % de
los estómagos se encontró vacío y el 11.7 % de las presas estaban frescas, 73.3 % medio digeridas y 15.0
% digeridas. Se identificaron tres grupos alimentarios: Peces, Crustáceos y Otros, siendo Peces el grupo
más frecuente (69.6 %), encontrándose en casi todos los meses del año, excepto en mayo, el más
abundante (66.7 %) y con mayor composición en peso (86.9 %). El IIR presentó valores de 60.5 % para
Peces. Los resultados obtenidos permiten inferir que el Guabino es un pez de hábitos alimenticios
carnívoros con tendencia piscívora.
PALABRAS CLAVES: Alimentación, Dieta, Hábitos alimentarios, Mar Caribe
177
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
A STUDY OF RESOURCE STATUS OF VIRGIN ISLANDS SPINY LOBSTERS THROUGH A
COLLABORATION BETWEEN THE CARIBBEAN COUNCIL AND VIRGIN ISLANDS
FISHERMEN
UN ESTUDIO DE LA SITUACIÓN DE LOS RECURSOS DE LAS ISLAS VÍRGENES DE
LANGOSTAS A TRAVÉS DE UNA COLABORACIÓN ENTRE EL CONSEJO DEL CARIBE Y
LAS ISLAS VÍRGENES DE LOS PESCADORES
UNE ÉTUDE DE L'ÉTAT DES RESSOURCES DES ÎLES VIERGES LANGOUSTES GRÂCE À
UNE COLLABORATION ENTRE LE CONSEIL ET CARAÏBES ÎLES VIERGES PÊCHEURS.
DAVID OLSEN1, JOSH NOWLIS2, and BRYAN BRYAN1
St. Thomas Fishermen's Association 8168 Crown Bay Marina, Ste. 310 St. Thomas, VI 00802 USA
[email protected]
2Bridge Environmental 947 NE Boat Street Seattle WA 98105 USA
1
178
ABSTRACT
Virgin Islands spiny lobster resources were evaluated through a cooperative research project between the
Caribbean Fishery Management Council (CFMC) and Virgin Islands Fishermen. Virgin Islands fishermen
tagged over 5,000 spiny lobsters, carried out observers who measured entire catches and recaptured nearly
10% of the lobsters tagged. Additionally, historic data on landings and port sampling were assembled and
analyzed for status of resources. The results were used to provide resource management recommendations
to the CFMC.
KEYWORDS: Spiny lobster, Virgin Islands, fishermen, collaboration
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
MANAGEMENT OF ST. THOMAS GROUPER FISHERY
MANEJO DE LA ST. THOMAS MERO PESQUERÍA
GESTION DE LA PÊCHE ST. THOMAS GROUPER
DAVID OLSEN1, JOSH NOWLIS2, and RICHARD NEMETH3
St. Thomas Fishermen's Association 8168 Crown Bay Marina, Ste. 310 St. Thomas, VI 00802 USA
[email protected]
2
Bridge Environmental 947 NE Boat Street Seattle WA 98105
3
University of the Virgin Islands St. Thomas USVI 00803
1
ABSTRACT
St. Thomas Grouper landings have been nearly constant since the 1980s seldom deviating more than one
standard deviation from the mean. St. Thomas fishermen report that following the protection of the Hind
Bank MCD in 1999, they are catching more and larger fish. In 2010 the Caribbean Fishery Management
Council set an allowable catch limit of 51,999 lbs based on recent average landings. In 2013 the CFMC
announced that the ACL had been exceeded and that the fishery would be closed in December of 2013.
Fishermen asked whether this quota was appropriate to the fishery and necessary to protect the resource?
The St. Thomas Fishermen‟s Association commissioned a resource evaluation. Based on the results, the
STFA proposes that quotas be set annually based on a census of the spawning aggregation. This approach
was presented at the August 2013 CFMC meeting. An evaluation of this approach is presented.
KEYWORDS: Grouper, Virgin Islands, management, fishery
179
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
COMPOSICIÓN ISOTÓPICA DE 15N Y 13C DEL TEJIDO DE ESPONJAS COMO INDICADOR
DEL IMPACTO DE AGUAS RESIDUALES HUMANAS SOBRE LOS SISTEMAS
ARRECIFALES DE LA ISLA DE SAN ANDRÉS, CARIBE COLOMBIANO
ISOTOPIC COMPOSITION OF 15N AND 13C IN SPONGE TISSUES AS AN INDICATOR OF
HUMAN SEWAGE IMPACTS ON REEF SYSTEMS AT SAN ANDRES ISLAND, COLOMBIAN
CARIBBEAN
COMPOSITION ISOTOPIQUE DU 15N ET 13C DANS LES TISSUS DES ÉPONGE COMME UN
INDICATEUR DE L'IMPACT DES HUMAINES EAUX USÉES SUR LES RÉCIFS SYSTÈMES
DE L'ÎLE DE SAN ANDRES, CARAÏBES COLOMBIENNES.
CARLOS ANDRES OROZCO TORO, SVEN ZEA, y ALFREDO ABRIL-HOWARD
Universidad Nacional de Colombia - Sede Caribe Casa 1 Apartamento 1 Las Gaviotas San Andres Isla,
San Andres Colombia [email protected]
180
RESUMEN
El aumento de la densidad poblacional y desarrollo urbanístico sin planificación durante las últimas 5
décadas, sumado al vertimiento de aguas residuales sin control al mar, ha expuesto los sistemas
arrecifales de gran parte del mundo, del mar Caribe en general, y de San Andres isla en particular, a un
constante estrés. No obstante, algunas especies de organismos como las esponjas aparentemente se ven
beneficiados a través de diferentes estrategias fisiológicas, permitiendo su uso como indicadores
biológicos de contaminación. El análisis de isotopos estables de nitrógeno (δ15N) se ha convertido en una
poderosa herramienta para discriminar las fuentes de N natural y antropogénico en ambientes marinos.
Así mismo la δ13C es usada para determinar la dieta de los organismos a través de la caracterización de
los recursos alimentarios asimilados. Considerando que la alimentación de las esponjas se basa
fundamentalmente en la gran cantidad de agua que puede circular por su sistema acuífero, y en la
capacidad y eficiencia de retener y asimilar partículas y materia orgánica disuelta mediante diferentes
procesos metabólicos, se estudió la δ15N y δ13C del tejido de tres especies de esponjas como indicador del
efecto de la eutroficación crónica de sistemas arrecifales en función de la oferta de nutrientes. Los
resultados muestran diferencias en δ15N y δ13C entre el tejido interno y externo de al menos dos de las
especies de esponjas, las cuales se conocen son mixotróficas por la presencia de fotosimbiontes. También
se pudo determinar que las estaciones cercanas a la principal fuente de descargas presentan mayores
valores de δ15N mostrando similitud con registros de diversos autores respecto a sistemas arrecifales bajo
la influencia de aguas residuales de origen antropogénico.
PALABRAS CLAVES: Isótopos, Bioindicadores, Eutroficación, Esponjas, Arrecifes
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
PATTERNS OF RARITY OF REEF FISHES IN THE CARIBBEAN BASIN
LOS PATRONES DE RAREZA DE LOS PECES DE ARRECIFE EN LA CUENCA DEL CARIBE
LES MODÈLES DE LA RARETÉ DES POISSONS DE RÉCIF DANS LE BASSIN DES
CARAÏBES
CHRISTY PATTENGILL-SEMMENS1 and BRICE SEMMENS2
Reef Environmental Education Foundation (REEF) 5263 Yost Place San Diego, CA 92109 United States
[email protected]
2
Scripps Institution of Oceanography 9500 Gilman Drive La Jolla CA 92039-0202 US
1
ABSTRACT
Rare species are an important conservation target, and can provide key insights regarding the processes
driving patterns in regional diversity. However, while many studies of Caribbean reef fish assemblages
have examined patterns in richness, few have focused specifically on the rarity. The abundance and
composition of rare species within assemblages may be influenced by evolutionary history, biogeography,
and habitat specificity within taxa. Anthropogenic impacts may also influence the prevalence of rare
species. We use observations from the Reef Environmental Education Foundation (REEF) Fish
Monitoring Project to characterize patterns in rarity throughout the Caribbean basin. The REEF Fish
Monitoring Project is a large, multi-decadal citizen science effort that has generated over 120,000 diver
hours of reef fish species observations across the Caribbean. Using these data, we assess rarity patterns
throughout the region, and compare these to expectations based on species ecology, evolutionary
histories, and habitat characteristics.
KEYWORDS: Reef fish, diversity, Reef Environmental Education Foundation, citizen science, rarity
181
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
ECOLOGICAL FUNCTION OF ARTIFICIAL VERSUS NATURAL REEFS IN THE
NORTHERN GULF OF MEXICO
FUNCIÓN ECOLÓGICA DE ARRECIFES NATURALES Y ARTIFICIALES EN LA ZONA
NORTE DEL GOLFO DE MÉXICO
FONCTION ÉCOLOGIQUE DE ARTIFICIELLE VERSUS RÉCIFS NATURELS DANS LE
NORD DU GOLFE DU MEXIQUE
WILLIAM F PATTERSON III and JOSEPH TARNECKI
University of South Alabama University of South Alabama 101 Bienville Blvd. Dauphin Island, Alabama
36528 United States [email protected]
182
ABSTRACT
Reef fish communities were sampled from June 2009 through August 2010 in the northern Gulf of
Mexico (GOM) to test for differences in reef fish ecology at natural (n = 23) versus artificial (n = 26)
reefs. Communities were sampled with a micro remotely operated vehicle (ROV), and fish were sampled
with hook and line to provide tissue samples for trophic and aging analyses. There were significant
differences in community structure (PERMANOVA, p < 0.001) between reef types, with natural reefs
having higher diversity while artificial reefs had higher fish density but over a much smaller spatial scale.
Species-specific total length, as scaled by lasers attached to the ROV, was similar between reef types for
all species except amberjack, which were nearly 20% larger on artificial reefs. Predominant diet or
trophic position could not be inferred from stomach content analysis for most species due to small sample
size. However, red snapper (n = 496), vermilion snapper (n = 113), red porgy (n = 57) and tomtate (n =
39) had similar diets between habitat types. Stable isotope analysis revealed similar trophic position
(d15N and d13C) for most species between habitat types, but several species had lower d34S at natural
reef sites, thus indicating a greater contribution of benthic prey. Results provide information on how
artificial reefs function ecologically versus as fishing habitat. Furthermore, data collected in 2009-10
provide an important baseline to evaluate potential effects of the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill and
invasive lionfish on northern GOM reef fishes.
KEYWORDS: Reef fish, ROV, community structure, trophic structure
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
USING PRESENT-DAY DETAILS OF CORAL-REEF FISHERS’ HARVEST, INCLUDING
TAXONOMIC AND SIZE-STRUCTURE, TO SUPPORT ECOSYSTEM-BASED FISHERIES
MANAGEMENT IN MONTECRISTI NATIONAL PARK, DOMINICAN REPUBLIC
EL USO DE DETALLES ACTUALES DE LA COSECHA DE PESCADORES DE ARRECIFES
CORALINOS, INCLUSO DETALLES TAXONÓMICAS Y DE LOS TAMAÑOS, PARA
INFORMAR EL MANEJO DE PESCARÍAS CON ENFOQUE AL ECOSISTEMA EN EL
PARQUE NACIONAL DE MONTECRISTI
EN UTILISANT LES COORDONNÉES ACTUELLES DE LA RÉCOLTE DE LA PÊCHE DES
RÉCIFS CORALLIENS, Y COMPRIS DES DÉTAILS TAXONOMIQUES ET TAILLES, POUR
INFORMER LA MANIPULATION DES PESCARÍAS AVEC L'APPROCHE PAR
ÉCOSYSTÈME DANS LE PARC NATIONAL MONTECRISTI
TYLER PAVLOWICH1 and GILLIAN BRITTON2
6182 Steele Hall Hanover, NH 03755 US [email protected]
2
Dartmouth College
1
ABSTRACT
In the absence of extensive historical fisheries data and information on ecological condition, present-day
“snapshots” of these factors can be compared to generalizations from similar fisheries to provide initial
management guidance. Here, we present a study that examines artisanal fishers‟ catch, and uses details of
species composition and size structure to inform ecosystem-based management. This study was
conducted in the community of Buen Hombre, located within Montecristi National Park, Dominican
Republic. The artisanal coral-reef fishery is accessed by approximately 30 fishermen each day. Principal
fishing methods are spearfishing while either freediving or compressor diving, in addition to some fish
traps and hand lines. Between June and August of 2013, we collected 60 videos of daily harvests. Videos
were used to identify fish to family level and count the number of individuals harvested. Using batch
weights and videos, we are able to determine or estimate the following characteristics of the catch: total
biomass, total number of fish, biomass by family, number of fish per family, and the average size per
individual fish. The size of harvested fish can be compared to known relationships between size and
growth, reproductive potential, and ecological function, such as grazing in herbivorous fish. In the context
of EBM, these comparisons can be used to weigh the impacts of various fishing practices and fishing
effort on growth overfishing, reproductive overfishing, or functional overfishing – i.e. altering fish
populations to where they cannot adequately perform their ecological function.
KEYWORDS: Data-limited, EBM, coral-reef fisheries, size structure
183
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
SUCCESSES AND CHALLENGES IN ACHIEVING SUSTAINABILITY IN GULF AND
CARIBBEAN FISHERIES: A CONSERVATION PERSPECTIVE
UN ANÁLISIS CONSERVACIONISTA DE LOS AVANCES Y DIFICULTADES PARA
LOGRAR UNA PESCA SOSTENIBLE EN GOLFO Y EL CARIBE.
SUCCÈS ET DÉFIS DANS L'ATTEINTE DE LA DURABILITÉ DES PÊCHERIES DU GOLFE
DU MEXIQUE ET DES CARAÏBES: UNE PERSPECTIVE DE CONSERVATION
ROBIN PELC
Monterey Bay Aquarium 886 Cannery Row Monterey, CA - Califor 93940 United States
[email protected]
184
ABSTRACT
The Monterey Bay Aquarium Seafood Watch program provides sustainability ratings for seafood in order
to help consumers and businesses make choices for healthy oceans. The Seafood Watch program defines
sustainable seafood as seafood from sources that can maintain or increase production without
jeopardizing the structure and function of affected ecosystems. Our recent assessments of Gulf of Mexico
and Caribbean fisheries highlight both dramatic successes, and some remaining challenges, of achieving
this goal of sustainability in the region. In general, there has been progress rebuilding previously depleted
stocks, demonstrating management‟s commitment to ending overfishing. However, bycatch of protected
and vulnerable species remains a concern in some fisheries. The selectivity of harvest methods and
management of bycatch plays a large role in determining Seafood Watch recommendations for Gulf and
Caribbean species. In many cases, proven technological solutions to bycatch problems exist and, if fully
implemented and enforced, could help mitigate or eliminate significant bycatch concerns. Future attention
to these areas could help fisheries achieve recognition as Seafood Watch “best choices” or “good
alternatives,” which may provide improved market access for fishermen.
KEYWORDS: Sustainable fisheries, bycatch, fishery management
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
SOCIO-ECONOMIC ASSESSMENTS IN THE CARIBBEAN: SYNTHESIS OF CERMESIMPLEMENTED SOCMON PROJECTS
EVALUACIONES SOCIO-ECONÓMICOS EN EL CARIBE: SÍNTESIS DE LOS PROYECTOS
SOCMON CERMES IMPLEMENTADAS
ÉVALUATIONS SOCIO-ÉCONOMIQUES DANS LES CARAÏBES: LA SYNTHÈSE DES
PROJETS DE SOCMON CERMES MISES EN ŒUVRE
MARIA PENA1, PATRICK MCCONNEY1, and PETER CHAMI2
CERMES University of the West Indies Cave Hill Campus, St. Michael, - BB 11000 Barbados
[email protected]
2
Department of Computer Science, Mathematics and PhysicsUniversity of the West Indies Cave Hill
Campus St. Michael BB11000 Barbados
1
ABSTRACT
A number of socio-economic assessments and monitoring programmes have been implemented at coastal,
fisheries and Marine Protected Area (MPA) sites throughout the Caribbean as components of Global
Socio-economic Monitoring Initiative for Coastal Management (SocMon) projects implemented by the
Centre for Resource Management and Environmental Studies, at The University of the West Indies, Cave
Hill Campus, Barbados. Goals and objectives for assessment and monitoring have focused on differing
socio-economic aspects of these sites including collection of baseline data to inform marine conservation
and sustainable use of resources; assessment and monitoring of primary socio-economic activities;
assessment of current and potential alternative livelihood activities and options; informing management
planning and development of management strategies; determining trends in perceptions and attitudes
towards MPAs, their management and impact on surrounding communities; collecting data for
monitoring impacts of present and proposed development in coastal areas as well as to guide strategies to
mitigate the impacts of planned development on MPAs; developing core indicators to assist with
decision-making and effective management of MPAs; and developing socio-economic profiles of
fisheries. This paper synthesizes eighteen SocMon studies from 2005-2013 to determine inter alia
regional awareness of people‟s dependence on costal and marine resources, perceptions of resource
conditions, threats to marine resources, use levels, status of governance and common SocMon variables
used for assessment and monitoring in the English-speaking Caribbean. Quantitative and qualitative data
have been used to build a socio-economic picture of coastal sites and MPAs in the region.
KEYWORDS: Socio-economic monitoring, Caribbean, coastal, fisheries, MPAs
185
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
IMPACTS OF OIL SPILL DISASTERS ON MARINE FISHERIES AND THEIR HABITATS IN
NORTH AMERICA - A NEW BOOK OF CURRENT DEEPWATER HORIZON RESEARCH
INCLUDING REVIEWS OF THE EXXON VALDEZ AND IXTOC I SPILLS
IMPACTOS DE DESASTRES DE DERRAMES DE HIDROCARBUROS A LAS PESQUERÍAS
MARINAS Y SUS HÁBITATS EN AMÉRICA DEL NORTE - UN NUEVO LIBRO DE
INVESTIGACIÓNES CORRIENTES SOBRE DEEPWATER HORIZON INCLUYE RESEÑAS
DE DERRAMES DE EXXON VALDEZ Y IXTOC I
IMPACTS DES MARÉES NOIRES CATASTROPHIQUES SUR LES PÊCHERIES MARINES
ET LEURS HABITATS EN AMÉRIQUE DU NORD - UN NOUVEAU LIVRE PORTANT SUR
LES RECHERCHE EN COURS SUR LES CONSÉQUENCES DE L'ACCIDENT DU
DEEPWATER HORIZON Y COMPRIS DES REVUES DES MARÉES NOIRES CAUSÉES PAR
L'EXXON VALDEZ ET L'IXTOC I
MARK PETERSON1, BRIAN ALFORD2, and CHRIS GREEN3
Department of Coastal Sciences The University of Southern Mississippi 703 East Beach Drive Ocean
Springs, MS 39564 USA [email protected]
2
Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Baton Rouge LA 70808 USA
3
Aquaculture Research StationLouisiana State University Agricultural Center Baton Rouge LA 70820
USA
1
186
ABSTRACT
The 2010 Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill was one of the largest marine spills in the world (McNutt
et al. 2011), leaked 7.94 x 108–1.11 x 109 L of crude oil into the northern Gulf of Mexico, and lasted for
84 days. The estimated peak flow was 1.552 x 107 L d-1 (Ryerson et al. 2012). At its maximum, the
surface expression of the discharge covered 62,159 km2 (Norse and Amos 2010). This response included
use of 2.9 x 106 L of Corexit dispersant (Place et al. 2010) that was applied at the surface and the 1500 m
deep subsurface leak at the wellhead. At the 2010 American Fisheries Society (AFS) meeting in
Pittsburgh, a symposium was held to address response, recovery and research efforts following this
historic spill. Subsequently, the editors of this new book, brought together experts researching the Exxon
Valdez, Ixtoc I and DWH spills at the 2011 AFS meeting in Seattle for a symposium. This forum
presented timely information regarding large-scale oil disaster impacts to North American marine
ecosystems. There are 15 chapters of peer-reviewed manuscripts presented in three sections:
Ecotoxicology of fishes impacted by oil-derived compounds, Oil impacts to physical habitat in coastal
ecosystems, and Population and community dynamics following oil spill disasters. The estimated release
date for the book, which will be published by CRC Press, is January-February 2014.
KEYWORDS: Deepwater Horizon, Gulf of Mexico, Book, fisheries, habitats
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
VISUALIZING HYPOXIA IN THE NORTHERN GULF OF MEXICO
VISUALIZACIÓN DE HIPOXIA EN EL GOLFO NORTE DE MÉXICO
VISUALISATION DE L'HYPOXIE DANS LE NORD DU GOLFE DU MEXIQUE
AARON PILNICK, GEORGE BOSARGE, and SEAN POWERS
Dauphin Island Sea Lab 101 Bienville Blvd Dauphin Island, Alabama 36528 United States
[email protected]
ABSTRACT
Hypoxic waters with critically low levels of dissolved oxygen are well established in coastal regions in
the Northern Gulf of Mexico (NGOM). These dead zones, largely associated with massive freshwater
outflows from river systems such as the Mississippi and Atchafalaya deltas, have the potential to disrupt
biological systems including some of the nation‟s most productive and important fisheries. Hypoxia was
discovered East of the Mississippi in the NGOM in 2011; however, much of the spatial and temporal
extent of this dead zone has yet to be fully quantified. In July of 2012 and 2013 we recorded surface and
bottom dissolved oxygen, temperature, and salinity values using a SeaBird CTD (conductivity,
temperature, depth instrument) at a subset of 56 total stations located East of the Mississippi River.
Despite not finding hypoxic conditions (<2 mg/l) in 2012 and 2013, the lowest dissolved oxygen (3.10
mg/l) and salinity (20.26 psu) levels were recorded at stations proximal to Biloxi Marsh, Mississippi.
Preliminary analysis indicate that the 2011 opening of the Bonnet Carre spillway may have enabled
hypoxic conditions to develop because of a substantial influx of nutrient rich freshwater into the Biloxi
Marsh Area. We tracked this influx by using satellite imagery to analyze changes in chlorophyll
concentrations and surface salinity levels. Cumulatively, these data indicate that elevated nutrient levels
and water column stratification from the spillway outflow in addition to high summer surface
temperatures potentially caused the 2011 dead zone east of the Mississippi.
KEYWORDS: Hypoxia, NGOM, oxygen, chlorophyll, salinity
187
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
EFFORTS TO DEVELOP A LIONFISH-SPECIFIC TRAP FOR USE IN BERMUDA WATERS
LOS ESFUERZOS PARA DESARROLLAR UNA TRAMPA ESPECIAL PARA EL PEZ LEÓN
PARA SU USO EN EL ENTORNO MARINO DE LAS BERMUDAS
LES EFFORTS POUR DÉVELOPPER UN PIÈGE SPÉCIALISÉ POUR POISSON-LION POUR
L'UTILISATION EN MILIEU MARIN DES BERMUDES
JOANNA PITT and TAMMY TROTT
Department of Environmental Protection Government of Bermuda 3 Coney Island Road, St. Georges
CR04 Bermuda [email protected]
188
ABSTRACT
The invasive lionfish population in Bermuda is expanding but is presently concentrated in deeper waters
(30–60m) inaccessible to volunteer cullers. However, lionfish have been caught as bycatch in commercial
lobster traps set at these depths since at least 2003. The Department of Environmental Protection is
therefore working to develop a lionfish-specific trap for commercial fishers to facilitate large-scale, longterm removal of this species from deeper waters. This approach is necessary because Bermuda does not
allow „fish pots‟. GoPro Hero2 cameras with external controller cards from Cam-Do and deepwater
ScoutPro HH2 housings from Group B are currently being used to assess lionfish presence in the areas
where the offshore lobster trap fishery operates, and to monitor their ingress and behaviour in standard
commercial lobster traps. Using these insights, the traps and deployment protocols used by the
commercial lobster fishery will be modified to increase the catch of lionfish, reduce the catch of spiny
lobster, and maintain the low levels of finfish bycatch for which this standardized trap was developed.
Proposed modifications include shading the traps, varying the funnel shape and varying baiting practices.
It is anticipated that a lionfish trap fishery would operate alongside the lobster fishery from September
through December, when offshore conditions are favorable. If lobster bycatch can be sufficiently reduced,
the lionfish trap fishery could potentially operate during the summer closed season, but the need to protect
brooding female lobsters must take priority over expanding the lionfish trapping season if lobster bycatch
remains an insurmountable issue.
KEYWORDS: Lionfish, trap, Bermuda
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
PREPARING FOR ECOSYSTEM-BASED MANAGEMENT: A FISHERY-INDEPENDENT
SAMPLING PROGRAM FOR REEF FISH IN THE NORTHERN GULF OF MEXICO
PREPARANDO UNA ADMINISTRACION BASADA EN EL ECOSYSTEMA: PESQUERIA
INDEPENDIENTE CON UN PROGRAMA DE MUESTRAS DE PEZCADOS DE ARRECIFE EN
EL NORTE DEL GOLFO DE MEXICO
PRÉPARATION À LA GESTION ÉCOSYSTÉMIQUE: UN PROGRAMME
D'ÉCHANTILLONNAGE INDÉPENDANT DE LA PÊCHE POUR LES POISSONS DE RÉCIF
DANS LE NORD DU GOLFE DU MEXIQUE
SEAN POWERS and J. MARCUS DRYMON
University of South Alabama Dauphin Island Sea Lab 101 Bienville Blvd Dauphin Island, AL 36528 US
[email protected]
ABSTRACT
The shift in resource management from single-species foci to a broader ecosystem framework has been
championed by many researchers and is now reflected in policy mandates by several countries. Utilizing
the fish and invertebrate community that occur on or near natural and artificial reef bottom in the northern
Gulf of Mexico, which support many economically important species whose management is highly
controversial, we developed a fishery independent survey that assesses multiple exploited species at
various trophic levels. Cognizant of the limited resources available to fisheries independent sampling, we
designed our assessment to focus on measuring parameters of the ecosystem with a direct and proximate
connection to exploited species that cannot be measured by remote sensing (e.g. primary production).
Key elements of our design are: (1) a randomized sampling back-bone, (2) detailed knowledge of the
sampling universe through habitat mapping, (3) measurement of exploited and non-exploited species
through synoptic sampling using multiple gears, many of which are used by the fisheries, whose
selectivity can be assessed, (4) the ability to collect specimens for age determination, and (5)
measurement of trophic linkages through stable isotope or gut content analysis. Using this approach, we
successfully monitored all major offshore life stages of exploited species (e.g., red snapper, gray
triggerfish, vermilion snapper, and greater amberjack), their predators (e.g., sharks) and their prey (e.g.
shrimp, crabs, small baitfish) for three years, 2010-2013. Using these data, we assess the connection
between artificial and natural habitat coverage and fisheries biomass.
KEYWORDS: Multi-gear, trophic interactions, longline, habitat mapping
189
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
MANAGEMENT AND CONSERVATION OF REEF BIODIVERSITY AND REEF FISHERIES
PILOT PROJECT: A SUCCESSFUL CLME PILOT PROJECT IN THE SEAFLOWER MPA
MANEJO Y CONSERVACIÓN DE LA BIODIVERSIDAD EN LOS CORALES Y SU
BIODIVERSIDAD ASOCIADA: UN PROYECTO PILOTO EXITOSO DE CLME EN EL AMP
SEAFLOWER
PROJET PILOTE GESTION ET CONSERVATION DE LA BIODIVERSITÉ RÉCIFALE ET
DES PÊCHERIES DE RÉCIFS : UN PROJET PILOTE RÉUSSI DU CLME DANS L'AMP DE
SEAFLOWER
MARTHA PRADA, OPAL BENT, ELIZABETH TAYLOR, and ERICK CASTRO
CORALINA Blue Dream Ltd Km 26 via San Luis San Andres Island, Colombia [email protected]
190
ABSTRACT
During 1.5 years CORALINA conducted five major activities in order to maintain the coral reef
biodiversity and its long-term productivity as outlined within the reef fish and biodiversity CLME pilot
project, under the coordination of UNEP office in Jamaica. The first activity focused on the
sstrengthening of Integrated Ecosystem Based Management by conducting three scientific expeditions
articulating the collaborative work and support from more than five organizations. The expeditions
provided information needed to better understand the reef complexity and its application in the integrated
resource management. The second activity looked at the strengthening of collaborative enforcement
mechanisms done by analyzing current fishing regulations and by training authorities and stakeholders in
EBM and reef fish conservation; by seeking voluntary compliance through greater and more practical
education and training; and by developing more collaborative inter-institutional work regarding
enforcement and surveillance. Public Awareness, education, and outreach were the focus of the third
activity. Formal lessons and educational packages on key MPA species such as spiny lobster, queen
conch, snappers, sharks, parrot fishes and lion fish were generated. To complete this cycle, a regional
“exchange of lessons learned” we organized with the participation of people from San Pedro Bank,
Jamaica; and Haiti-Dominican Republic northern transboundary area, Grenada beside a broad
participation from Colombia. Best Management Practices, the fifth activity, were demonstrated by
building, deploying and monitoring six modules made of empty queen conch shells with the participation
of artisanal fishermen and the overall objective of increasing reef fish recruitment in the South-SouthWest atoll.
KEYWORDS: Seaflower MPA, CLME pilot project, reef biodiversity
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
GENOMIC TOOLS FOR ASSESSMENT OF NATURAL AND ARTIFICIAL REEFS AND
FORMATION OF A JOINT HRI AND TAMU-CC MARINE GENOMICS CORE FACILITY
HERRAMIENTAS GENÓMICAS PARA LA EVALUACIÓN DE LOS ARRECIFES
NATURALES Y ARTIFICIALES Y LA FORMACIÓN DE UN HRI Y TAMU-CC CONJUNTA
INSTALACIÓN DE GENÓMICA MARINAS
OUTILS GÉNOMIQUES POUR L'ÉVALUATION DES RÉCIFS NATURELS ET ARTIFICIELS
ET LA FORMATION D'UN CONJOINTE HRI ET TAMU-CC FACILITÉ DE GÉNOMIQUE
MARINS
JONATHAN PURITZ, CHRISTOPHER HOLLENBECK, TREVOR KRABBENHOFT, DEREK
HOGAN, DAVID PORTNOY, CHRISTOPHER BIRD, and JOHN GOLD
Harte Research Institute 6300 Ocean Drive Corpus Christi, TX 78412- 5869 USA [email protected]
ABSTRACT
Next-generation sequencing and associated technologies have transformed genetics and its applications in
biology. Instead of a handful of genetic markers, populations/species/individuals can now be screened at
thousands of genetic markers spread across an entire genome. The unprecedented increase in number of
easily accessed genetic markers allows dramatic increases in precision and power of estimating traditional
population genetic parameters (e.g., genetic variability, connectivity, divergence) and, more importantly,
now allows elucidation of adaptive portions of the genome (i.e., genes responding to selection and
adaptation). Here, we focus on Restriction Site Associated DNA Sequencing (RADseq), a widely used
approach that easily can be applied to non-model organisms, and provide a brief outline of the RADseq
methodology. Examples from ongoing research projects at HRI and TAMUCC will then be discussed to
demonstrate the utility of RADseq to answer a wide variety of questions in different marine species.
KEYWORDS: NGS, RAD, connectivity, evolution, molecular ecology
191
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
DEEP REEF FISH ASSEMBLAGES OF THE NORTH-CENTRAL AND NORTHEASTERN
GULF OF MEXICO
ASOCIACIONES DE PECES ARRECIFALES DE PROFUNDIDAD EN LAS PORCIONES
NORCENTRAL Y NORORIENTAL DEL GOLFO DE MEXICO.
ASSEMBLAGES DES POISSONS DE RÉCIFS PROFONDS DANS LE CENTRE-NORD ET LE
NORD-EST DU GOLFE DU MEXIQUE
ANDREA QUATTRINI1 and STEVE ROSS2
1
Temple University 1900 N 12th St Philadelphia, PA 19122 US [email protected]
2
University NC WilmingtonCenter for Marine Science 5600 Marvin Moss Lane Wilmington NC 28409
192
ABSTRACT
Demersal fishes associated with deep coral and hardbottom reefs (> 300 m) can often be characteristic of
the reef habitats, differing from the fauna found on surrounding soft substrata. To examine whether fish
assemblages in the northern Gulf of Mexico and along the West Florida slope were distinct with respect
to habitat, video data collected using ROVs and submersibles were coupled with collections by otter
trawls and chevron traps deployed in 2008-2010. A total of 72 demersal fishes were observed and
collected across five sites at depths of 300-750 m. At least 38 species of demersal fishes were observed in
the video, 53% of which were observed only in deep reef habitat that consisted of rock outcrops with
attached corals and Lophelia pertusa bioherms. Dominant reef-characteristic species
includedHyperoglyphe perciformis, Hoplostethus occidentails, and Grammicolepis brachiusculus. Other
reef-associated species included Anthias woodsi, Epinephelus niveatus, and Gephyroberyx darwinii.
Additional species were collected with otter trawls and traps surrounding the reefs; 34 were unique to
these collections and not confirmed in video. Dominant off-reef species included Dibranchus atlantics,
Nezumia aequalis, Coelorhinchus caribbaeus, and Bembrops gobiodes. Few species were abundant in
both off-reef and reef areas, with the exception of Laemonema goodebeanorum and Helicolenus
dactylopterus, which were two of the most abundant species across the sites surveyed. Of note, several
range extensions for the Gulf of Mexico were documented, including Centrodraco acanthopoma
andIdiastion kyphos. Further macro-habitat scale analyses are being conducted to determine whether
habitat-specific associations of fishes occur on a smaller scale.
KEYWORDS: Deep-sea, demersal, cold-water coral
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
CORAL BLEACHING IN ARRECIFES DE COZUMEL NATIONAL PARK COZUMEL,
MEXICO, AFTER THE PASSING OF TROPICAL STORM RINA IN OCTOBER 2011
CORAL BLANQUEADO EN PARQUE NACIONAL ARRECIFES DE COZUMEL COZUMEL,
MÉXICO, TRAS EL PASO DE LA TORMENTA TROPICAL RINA EN OCTUBRE DE 2011
CORAIL BLANCHI EN PARC NATIONAL RÉCIFS DE COZUMEL COZUMEL, LE
MEXIQUE, APRÈS LE PAS DE L'ORAGE TROPICAL LUTTE EN OCTOBRE 2011
NORMAN QUINN and BARBARA KOJIS
Tropical Discoveries PO Box 305731 St Thomas, VI 00803 US Virgin Islands [email protected]
ABSTRACT
Extensive bleaching of Montastrea annularis spp. group and several other scleractinian species occurred
on the reefs within the Arrecifes de Cozumel National Park of Cozumel after the passage of
Hurricane/Tropical Storm Rina. Bleaching was noted at depths of 10 - 40m and in a variety of
scleractinian species. Considering that local dive guides had not observed bleaching prior to the storm and
the sea surface temperature did not exceed the local bleaching threshold, it is likely that the extensive
rainfall associated with Rina lowered salinity sufficiently via subsurface freshwater springs to cause
bleaching in susceptible species. This suggests the necessity to monitor not only subsurface sea
temperature but also subsurface salinity in localities where freshwater springs occur.
KEYWORDS: Hurricanes, coral damage, salinity, coral bleaching, marine protected area
193
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
HABITAT CHARACTERISTICS OF FLYINGFISH (FAMILY EXOCOETIDAE) LARVAE IN
THE NORTHERN GULF OF MEXICO
CARACTERÍSTICAS DEL HÁBITAT DE PECES VOLADORES (FAMILIA EXOCOETIDAE)
LARVAS EN DEL NORTE GOLFO DE MÉXICO
CARACTÉRISTIQUES DE L’HABITAT DES LARVES DE POISSONS VOLANTS (FAMILLE
EXOCOETIDAE) DANS LE NORD DU GOLFE DU MEXIQUE
LANDES RANDALL and JAY ROOKER
Texas A&M University at Galveston 200 Seawolf Parkway OCSB Bldg 3029 Galveston, Texas 77553
USA [email protected]
194
ABSTRACT
Flyingfish occupy a crucial link in pelagic food webs, and understanding their distribution and abundance
can lead to an improved understanding of their population dynamics. The aim of the present study is to
characterize the distribution and abundance of larval flyingfish (family Exocoetidae) and more
specifically the species Prognichthys occidentalis in the northern Gulf of Mexico. Here, we report on
summer ichthyoplankton cruises conducted in the northern Gulf of Mexico (NGoM) during 2009-2011.
Samples were collected using neuston nets towed through the upper meter of the water column in the
outer shelf and slope waters of the NGoM. Over the three year sampling period, a total of 12,646
flyingfish larvae were collected and 77% of the total catch was comprised of P. occidentalis. Interannual
variation was detected with densities of flyingfish larvae higher in 2009 and 2010 (14.9 and 10.0 larvae
1000m2, respectively) than 2011 (2.7 larvae 1000m2). Flyingfish larvae were present in each month and
year along our sampling transect, and percent frequency of occurrence ranged from 56% in July 2011 to
100% in June 2010, suggesting that flyingfish represent a common and important component of the
ichthyoplankton assemblage in the NGoM. Generalized additive models were used to evaluate the
influence of oceanographic conditions on the density of all flyingfish larvae and P. occidentalis. The
overall flyingfish density model indicates that abundance of larvae increased in waters with lower
temperatures and negative sea surface height, which corresponds to frontal boundaries and cyclonic
features in the NGoM.
KEYWORDS: Flyingfish, Gulf of Mexico, distribution, Prognichthys occidentalis, Generalized additive
models
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
MITOCHONDRIAL DNA VARIATION IN QUEEN CONCH STROMBUS GIGAS FROM
ARCHIPELAGO OF SAN ANDRES, OLD PROVIDENCE AND SANTA CATALINA, SEA
FLOWER BIOSPHERE RESERVE
VARIACI?N DEL ADN MITOCONDRIAL DEL CARACOL PALA STROMBUS GIGAS EN EL
ARCHIPIELAGO DE SAN ANDRÉS, PROVIDENCIA Y SANTA CATALINA, RESERVA DE
BIOSFERA SEA FLOWER
LA VARIATION DU ADN MITOCHONDRIEL DU LAMBI STROMBUS GIGAS DANS
L´ARCHIPEL SAN ANDRES, PROVIDENCIA ET SANTA CATALINA RESERVE DU
BIOSPHERE SEA FLOWER
JOSE DAVID RANGEL MEDRANO1, ERICK CASTRO2, and EDNA MARQUEZ1
Universidad Nacional de Colombia, sede Medell Calle 59A No 63 - 20 - Nucleo El Volador , Medell
Colombia [email protected]
2
Secretaria de Agricultura y Pesca Avenida Francisco Newball. Edificio Coral Palce Isla de San
Colombia
1
ABSTRACT
Queen Conch Strombus gigas is a large gastropod of significant economic importance across the Greater
Caribbean region and currently considered as a commercially threatened species. To complement the
genetic connectivity patterns for this specie through the Caribbean region, a primer pair flanking an AT
rich mitochondrial region obtained from whole genome shotgun sequencing of S. gigas genome was used
for assess the genetic diversity of queen conch populations from Archipelago of San Andres, Old
Providence and Santa Catalina (ASPSC). Average nucleotide and haplotype diversity within S. gigas
were found to be high. The neighbor joining tree of these haplotypes showed the presence of two different
mitochondrial groups suggesting the possibility that two mitochondrial lineages of S. gigas are distributed
through the ASPSC atolls. Remain to explore whether these haplotypic differences explain the high
intrapopulation diversity previously reported in queen conchs from ASPSC and the distribution of these
two mitochondrial groups in other Caribbean regions which would be crucial for selecting better fishery
management rules.
KEYWORDS: Population genetics, Sea Flower Biosphere Reserve, Mitochondrial DNA, Genetic
diversity,
195
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
AGE AND GROWTH OF EPINEPHELUS MORIO FROM SOUTHERN GULF OF MEXICO
EDAD Y CRECIMIENTO DE EPINEPHELUS MORIO DEL SUR DEL GOLFO DE MÉXICO
AGE ET CROISSANCE D’EPINEPHELUS MORIO DANS LE SUD DU GOLFE DU MEXIQUE
XIMENA RENAN, CARLOS ZAPATA, and THIERRY BRULÉ
CINVESTAV-IPN Unidad Merida Antigua Carretera a Progreso K. 6 Cordemex. merida, Yucatan 97310
Mexico [email protected]
196
ABSTRACT
Epinephelus morio(red grouper) is the most important grouper species in southern Gulf of Mexico,
contributing from 1999 to 2009 with 58% to 61% (% gutted weight) of total captured volume. CPUE data
shows grouper landings decline from 19,886 tonnes (T) in 1972 to 6,212 T in 2011. Red grouper is
considered as near threatened specie by IUCN and its fishery overexploited and in danger of collapse.
During 1996 - 1999, 420 red groupers were captured using long line by artisanal and industrial Mexican
fishing fleets. Otoliths were up through the gills-removed, alcohol cleaned and stored dry. Age
determination was performed by assigning annuli based on the number of opaque zones from the otolith
core to the otolith margin, in left sagittae thin sections. Individuals ranged in size from 39.0 - 89.0 cm (LF)
and in age from 2 - 14 years. Age-7 fish were the most numerous in the sample (N = 106), followed in
frequency by age-6 (N = 99), age-8 (N = 51) and age-5 (N= 45), representing 71.6 % of total specimens.
Young fish with age-2 and age-3 (each one N= 1) and older fish with age-13 and age-14 (N= 3, N= 1
respectively) were poorly represented. Edge-type analysis confirmed the formation of a single growth
annulus per year, recording the smallest marginal increment values between July (0.6241 mm) and
August (0.64421 mm). The relationship between furcal length and age was described by von Bertalanffy
growth model: LF= 79.49[1- exp (0.18 (t -0.997))].
KEYWORDS: Red grouper, otoliths, age, growth
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
TRANSLATING SCIENTIFIC DATA TO KNOWLEDGE: EDUCATING STAKEHOLDERS ON
TRAP IMPACTS
TRADUCIENDO DATOS CIENTÍFICOS AL SABER: EDUCANDO PARTES INTERESADAS
SOBRE LOS IMPACTOS DE TRAMPAS
TRADUIRE LES DONNÉESSCIENTIFIQUES EN CONNAISSANCES: L'ÉDUCATION DES
PARTIES CONCERNÉES SUR LES EFFETS DU PIÈGE
GABRIELLE F. RENCHEN and THOMAS R. MATTHEWS
Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commissio 2796 Overseas Hwy Suite 119 Marathon, FL 33050
United States [email protected]
ABSTRACT
Trap fishing is one of the most common activities in the Florida Keys. Traps have been identified as a
source of lobster mortality, marine debris, entanglement of cetaceans and sea turtles, and loss of coral, but
public awareness and recognition of these impacts is limited. The State of Florida has attempted to
address these environmental impacts through three management efforts: the Lobster Trap Certificate
program, gear modifications, and derelict trap removal. In recognition of the limitations of the
management actions, state researchers have conducted extensive cooperative research with commercial
fishermen to understand the nature of trap interactions with the environment. As our next step, we will
conduct an educational outreach program to translate data to knowledge, making information on trap
impacts more accessible to the stakeholder community. The stakeholder community is comprised of a
broad audience including commercial and recreational fishermen, dive operators, and the conservation
minded public. We will conduct a series of workshops for commercial fishermen, seminars for the general
public, and utilize social media to reach a broader cross-section of the stakeholder community. It is
anticipated that the primary challenges to the education campaign will be effectively engaging diverse
stakeholder groups and overcoming a culture that is resistant to change. The goal is to determine if
expanding knowledge of trap induced environmental damage will allow managers and stakeholders to
develop solutions that will reduce trap impacts and loss, thus promoting sustainable fishing practices and
resource protection.
KEYWORDS: Lobster traps, environmental impacts, outreach, education
197
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
INVENTORY OF CRUSTACEANS, MOLLUSCS AND ECHINODERMS IN GUADELOUPE
AND SAINT-MARTIN, FRENCH WEST INDIES: AN EXCEPTIONAL, UNDERESTIMATED
BIODIVERSITY
INVENTAIRE DES CRUSTACÉS, ÉCHINODERMES ET MOLLUSQUES DE GUADELOUPE
ET SAINT-MARTIN AUX ANTILLES FRANÇAISES: UNE BIODIVERSITÉ
EXCEPTIONNELLE MÉCONNUE
INVENTARIO DE LOS CRUSTÁCEOS, MOLUSCOS Y EQUINODERMOS EN GUADALUPE
Y SAN MARTÍN, ANTILLAS FRANCESAS: UNA BIODIVERSIDAD EXCEPCIONAL
DESCONOCIDA
ROMAIN RENOUX1 and ALICE LEBLOND2
Reserve Naturelle Saint-Martin 803 res Acacias Anse Marcel Saint-Martin - French West Indies, 97150
FRANCE [email protected]
2
Parc National De La Guadeloupe Montéran Saint Claude Guadeloupe 91720 FRANCE
1
198
ABSTRACT
1,500 mollusc species, 350 decapod crustacean species, 81 echinoderm species and 30 species new to
science : those are the first results of the inventories carried out in Guadeloupe and Saint-Martin in 2012,
that are already confirming the exceptional biodiversity of those French overseas territories. Those
inventories led by the National Park of Guadeloupe and the Saint-Martin National Nature Reserve were
funded by the French Ministry of Ecology and the European Union. French and American universities,
the French National Museum of Natural History and the Florida Museum of Natural History have
combined their efforts and know-how to complete this unprecedented scientific mission successfully. A
total of 60 scientists, naturalists and protected areas managers and staff have worked in the field for over a
month.Numerous sampling techniques have been implemented to prospect each ecological niche, day and
night (underwater vacuum filtering and brushing baskets, dredging, baited traps, yabby pumps and soil
sifting). Thus, marine protected areas managers will be provided with baselines to build conservation
actions upon. Researchers aim to establish a “new generation” collection with molecular sequencing that
will feed in scientific publications. The taxonomic groups that have been surveyed through these
campaigns play a key role in the functioning of tropical marine ecosystems, and there is a need to build a
better knowledge of their diversity to preserve them better. In that regard, complimentary inventories of
marine biodiversity must be developed, including other poorly studied compartments (deep sea) but also
other groups (sponges, bryozoans and ascidians).
KEYWORDS: biodiversity, inventories, MPA, Saint Martin, Guadeloupe
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
HYDROACOUSTIC AND VIDEO SURVEYS AT TOPPLED AND STANDING PETROLEUM
PLATFORMS IN THE NORTHERN GULF OF MEXICO: COMMUNITY STRUCTURE AND
IMPLICATIONS FOR FISHERIES MANAGEMENT
ESTUDIOS HIDROACÚSTICOS, VÍDEO EN PERMANENTE DERROCADO Y
PLATAFORMAS DE PETRÓLEO EN EL NORTE DEL GOLFO DE MÉXICO: ESTRUCTURA
DE LA COMUNIDAD Y LAS CONSECUENCIAS PARA LA ORDENACIÓN DE LA PESCA
HYDROACOUSTIQUES ET VIDÉO DES ENQUÊTES À RENVERSÉ PERMANENT ET
PLATES-FORMES PÉTROLIÈRES DANS LE NORD DU GOLFE DU MEXIQUE :
STRUCTURE DE LA COMMUNAUTÉ ET LES IMPLICATIONS POUR LA GESTION DE LA
PÊCHE
EMILY REYNOLDS and JAMES H. COWAN JR.
Louisiana State University Dept. of Oceanography and Coastal Sciences 2231 Energy Coast Env.
Building Baton Rouge, LA 70803 USA [email protected]
ABSTRACT
There has been relatively little study of the efficacy of decommissioned oil and gas platforms as artificial
reef habitats for various species of fish in the Gulf of Mexico. A variety of fish species have been
reported to occur on these structures; but the species biomass distribution and community structure has
not been studied thoroughly. Hydroacoustic and video surveys are being conducted quarterly during a
two-year study from June 2013 to June 2015 to gain information about the differences between the
community structures of the two toppled and two standing platforms located approximately 130 km off
the coast of Louisiana in the northern Gulf of Mexico, at 90 m depth. The decommissioned platforms in
our study are a part of the Louisiana Artificial Reef Program (LARP) and have been in place since 2002.
Stereo-cameras will be utilized for the video surveys, allowing us to post-process the lengths and
frequencies of the fishes recorded. Hydroacoustics will be used to define the spatial distribution of fish
biomass. Determination of the community structure differences between the sites will allow for further
understanding of how artificial reef structures in the Gulf of Mexico impact the ecology of the fish
communities. Additional data collection will allow us to gain more knowledge both about these
structures and their roles and applications for management of fisheries in the Gulf of Mexico.
KEYWORDS: Artificial reef, biomass, species, ecology, fisheries
199
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
IMPACTS OF RECREATIONAL AND ARTISANAL FISHERIES, CAYMAN ISLANDS,
CARIBBEAN
IMPACTOS DE LA PESCA RECREACIONAL Y ARTESANAL, ISLAS CAIMAN, CARIBE
L'IMPACT DE LA PÊCHE RÉCRÉATIVE ET ARTISANALE AUX ÎLES CAÏMANS,
CARAIBES
LAURA RICHARDSON1, RHIANNON MEIER2, CROY MCCOY1, and JOHN TURNER2
Cayman Islands Department of Environment, Bangor University, UK PO Box 10202 , KY1-1002
Cayman Islands [email protected]
2
Bangor University, UK
1
200
ABSTRACT
To examine the potential impact of recreational and artisanal fisheries on reef ecosystems in the Cayman
Islands (where there is no commercial fishing), the level of fishing pressure was investigated by using
structured questionnaires directed at fishers. Illegal fishing pressure was investigated using marine
enforcement officer reports spanning 1993-2010. Within a monthly period, fishers reported catching
14,968 fish on Grand Cayman and 5205 fish on the Sister Islands (88% and 80% of which were reef fish,
respectively). The mean catch size was 72 (±SD 152) fish month-1 on Grand Cayman, and catch size was
significantly higher for respondents targeting reef fish than for those targeting pelagic species (MannWhitney U test, P <0.01). The mean number of days spent fishing month-1 ranged between 5.1 (±SD 6.5)
and 8.4 (±SD 7.4). While Lutjanids were caught in greatest numbers, of greatest concern were the
numbers of herbivores extracted. Fishing effort was non-uniformly distributed around the islands (Chisquare tests, P <0.01) being aligned closely with fringe reefs, populated areas and shore access points.
Poaching in the MPAs and other illegal fishing activities remain an issue, with the queen conch
(Strombus gigas) representing the major target organism. Despite major support for the idea of marine
environmental management, over 50% of interviewed fishers believed that enforcement of marine park
laws is currently inadequate. The impacts of artisanal and recreational fishing is often overlooked; this
study indicates that both practices are significant in the Cayman Islands, with the potential to influence
reef resilience and ecosystem functioning.
KEYWORDS: Recreational fishery, artisanal fishery, questionnaires, fisheries management, Cayman
Islands
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
CAYMAN ISLANDS MARINE PROTECTED AREAS, ENHANCING A 27 YEAR LEGACY
LAS AREAS PROTEGIDAS MARINAS DE LAS ISLAS CAIMAN, MEJORANDO UN LEGADO
DE 27 AÑOS
LES AIRES PROTÉGÉES DES ÎLES CAÏMANS, L' AMÉLIOREMENT D'UN HÉRITAGE DE
27 ANS
LAURA RICHARDSON1, CROY MCCOY1, GINA EBANKS-PETRIE1, TIM AUSTIN1 JEREMY
OLYNIK1, JAMES BYRNE2, and JOHN TURNER3
1
Cayman Islands Department of Environment Bangor University, UK , Cayman Islands
[email protected]
2
The Nature Conservancy
3
Bangor University, UK
ABSTRACT
Marine Protected Areas may be a viable solution for survival of coral reef communities, providing refugia
from overfishing and habitat degradation, increasing resilience against stressors from invasive species and
climate change. MPAs are predicted to benefit adjacent areas by larval export and net migration. The
Cayman Islands Department of Environment, in collaboration with Bangor University, Wales and The
Nature Conservancy, through a three-year Darwin Initiative project has conducted a detailed review of the
current Marine Protected Areas of the Cayman Islands to determine whether they are optimal in size and
area, appropriately located, and provide maximum resilience in the face of present day threats.
Established in 1986, the no-take areas are distributed around each island, covering approximately 14% of
Cayman‟s shallow shelf. MPA performance has been assessed at 62 sites around all three Islands on
standard reef health parameters. Results suggest that MPAs maintain a degree of reef resiliency in
Cayman. However, the Islands have experienced declines in reef health reflecting regional trends, notably
extensive hard-coral mortality, substantial loss of acroporid branching corals and key grazer Diadema
antillarum, and changes in reef fish communities. In order to address present day local and regional
threats, a comprehensive process of MPA enhancement planning was undertaken which incorporated a
locally defined Marine Ecological Gap Analysis (including creation of an Environmental Risk Surface,
identification of conservation targets, and generation of optimum conservation model outputs using
Marxan), socio-economic/biological decision support tools, extensive stakeholder liaison and
consideration of internationally recommended best practices for MPA network design.
KEYWORDS: Marine protected areas, MPA design and planning, stakeholder collaboration, fisheries
management, Cayman Islands
201
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
ESTIMATING MARINE RESERVE EFFECTS THROUGH QUANTIFICATION OF MACROALGAL BIOMASS, CAYMAN ISLANDS
ESTIMACION DE LOS EFECTOS DE LAS RESERVAS MARINAS POR MEDIO DE LA
CUANTIFICACION DE BIOMASA DE MACROALGAS, ISLAS CAIMAN
ESTIMATION DES EFFETS DES RESERVES MARINES EN RELATION A LA
QUANTIFICATION DE LA BIOMASSE DE MACROALGUES
LAURA RICHARDSON1, CROY MCCOY1, and JOHN TURNER2
Department of Environment, Cayman Islands, Bangor University, UK , Cayman Islands
[email protected]
2
Bangor University, UK
1
202
ABSTRACT
Marine protected areas (MPAs) are widely considered to aid resiliency to hard-coral/macroalgal phase
shifts. To determine the effectiveness of an established marine reserve in Grand Cayman, algal biomass
was compared within and outside the reserve. Between November-December 2010, macroalgae was
extracted from five 0.25m2 quadrats at 12 shallow reef sites at an 8-10m depth (4 sites MPA, 8 nonMPA), samples identified to genus and weighed to attain mean biomass measures per site. A total dryweight of 544.45g was collected (mean biomass at sites ranged from 3.47-6.26g West-MPA; 3.80-5.90g
North-non-MPA; and 6.82-26.05g South-non-MPA), with Dyctiota, Halimeda, Lobophora, filamentous
turf algae and other turfing algae comprising total biomass at most sites. Reserve effect was not detected
(P>0.05), though variability between sites based on aspect differentials were observed. Biomass was
significantly higher in the South than North and West (P<0.05), which exhibited similar biomass values
(P>0.05). Species composition varied between sites with southern sites displaying a significantly different
algal community structure (P<0.05), driven by comparatively minimal biomass of Lobophora,
consistently large proportion of Halimeda and a greater biomass of turf algae than the North and West.
Differences in biomass around the island may indicate natural variation between reefs of different
exposures determining habitat complexity, reef fish populations, nutrient levels and available spores for
algal recruitment. Intra-habitat variation may be responsible for concealing reserve effect in the West.
Similarly, algae around the island may have reached a „size refuge‟ whereby keystone herbivores no
longer graze upon them and thus minimal „effect‟ would be evident.
KEYWORDS: Marine protected areas, macroalgae, phase shift, extraction, Cayman Islands
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
EVALUACIÓN DE LA CAPACIDAD DE AGREGACIÓN DE LAS “CASITAS” (REFUGIOS
ARTIFICIALES) PARA LANGOSTA PANULIRUS ARGUS EN LA ZONA COSTERA DE
CELESTÚN, YUCATÁN, MÉXICO
ASSESSMENT OF AGGREGATION CAPACITY OF "CASITAS" (ARTIFICIAL SHELTERS)
FOR LOBSTER PANULIRUS ARGUS IN THE COASTAL AREA OF CELESTUN, YUCATAN,
MEXICO
ÉVALUATION DE LA CAPACITÉ D'AGRÉGATION DES “CASITAS” (REFUGES
ARTIFICIELS) POUR LANGOSTA PANULIRUS ARGUS DANS LA ZONE CÔTIÈRE DE
CELESTÚN, YUCATÁN, LE MEXIQUE.
VERONICA RIOS, DAVID DE ANDA, y JUAN CARLOS ESPINOZA
Instituto Nacional de Pesca Calle 25 #31 Joaquin Ceballos Merida, Yucatan 97070 México
[email protected]
RESUMEN
Las “casitas” (refugios artificiales) han sido largamente utilizadas en las pesquerías de langosta P. argus
de Cuba y el Caribe mexicano. Debido al éxito que ha tenido el uso de estas estructuras en las pesquerías
de langosta, en años recientes se han introducido también en Belice y en la costa de Yucatán. En 2005 se
introdujeron 120 casitas en Celestún Yucatán, con el fin de agregar langostas en áreas cercanas a la costa
con poca disponibilidad de refugios naturales y además con miras a disminuir los riesgos que representa
para la salud, el buceo con compresor. El objetivo de este trabajo fue hacer una primera evaluación de la
capacidad de agregación de estas casitas. Durante la veda de langosta 2012 se hicieron cuatro campañas
de buceo y se revisaron un total 94 estructuras (80%). Se registro el tipo de fondo y se tomaron
parámetros físico-químicos de los sitios, se contó el número de langostas observadas, se midieron los
organismos y se registró la flora y fauna asociada. El 90% de las estructuras se encontraron en fondo
compuesto por arena y pastos y el 10% en fondo de conchuela y pastos. En el 54% de las casitas se
observaron entre 1 y 8 langosta (2±2.5 promedio), la longitud media de las langostas fue de 12 cm de
longitud abdominal y el peso medio de 100 g. Las especies encontradas dentro de las “casitas” con mayor
frecuencia fueron: tiburón gata Ginglymostoma cirratum, chacchí Haemulon plumieri y ángel
Pomacanthus arcuatus . El número de langostas promedio observadas y la riqueza específica de las
“casitas” fue menor a valores observados en refugios naturales rocosos de zonas aledañas.
PALABRAS CLAVES: Casitas, refugios artificiales, langosta, Panulirus argus, costa de Yucatan
203
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
AN ANALYSIS OF THE SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION AND IMPACTS OF RECREATIONAL
LOBSTER DIVING AND SPEAR FISHING ACTIVITIES IN BERMUDA
UN ANÁLISIS DE LA DISTRIBUCIÓN ESPACIAL Y LOS IMPACTOS DE LA PESCA DE LA
LANGOSTA Y LA PESCA SUBMARINA PARA EL OCIO EN LAS BERMUDAS
UNE ANALYSE DE LA DISTRIBUTION SPATIALE ET LES IMPACTS DE LA PÊCHE DE
LANGOUSTE ET DE LA PÊCHE AU HARPON POUR LES LOISIRS DANS LES BERMUDES
MORVEN ROBERTSON1 and JOANNA PITT2
Environment Department University of York Heslington York, YO10 5DD United Kingdom
[email protected]
2
Department of Environmental ProtectionGovernment of Bermuda 3 Coney Island Road St. Georges
CR04 Bermuda
1
204
ABSTRACT
Bermuda is a small, densely populated oceanic island with a broad range of marine stakeholder groups,
and recreational fishing in its various forms is an important part of the local lifestyle. Spatial data
gathered during a recent survey of recreational fishing was analysed using Geographical Information
Systems (GIS) to produce a geospatial map of recreational fishing intensity. A more detailed analysis of
lobster diving and spear fishing activities utilised reported catch and effort data from these two groups of
licensed recreational fishers. The distribution of catches was mapped in GIS using the grid-based
reporting system for these fisheries. Further, spear fishing catches at the species level were compared to
published geospatial maps of target species density. Profiles of these specialized user groups were
developed based on their reported catch and effort, information from the recreational fishing survey and a
targeted questionnaire. It was interesting to note skewed distributions of catch and effort even within
these specialized sectors. Data indicate that recreational lobster divers and spear fishers in Bermuda do
not appear to be having a large impact on local marine resources, as these in-water fisheries have a small
number of participants who typically have small catches. However, these very specialised resource users
utilise particular areas and have a high stake in the management of Bermuda‟s marine environment.
Accordingly, they should be given due consideration during marine spatial planning. This analysis will
inform management, help prioritise enforcement activities and contribute to the development of a marine
spatial plan for Bermuda waters.
KEYWORDS: Recreational fishing, lobstering, spear fishing, Bermuda, marine spatial planning
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
MANEJO DE LA PESQUERÍA PEPINO DE MAR CON ENFOQUE ECOSISTÉMICO EN LA
COSTA DE YUCATÁN, MÉXICO
MANAGEMENT OF THE FISHERY, SEA CUCUMBER WITH ECOSYSTEMIC APPROACH
TO THE COAST OF YUCATAN, MEXICO
GESTION DE LA PÊCHE, CONCOMBRE DE MER AVEC L'APPROCHE ÉCOSYSTÉMIQUE
DE LA CÔTE DU YUCATÁN, MEXIQUE
LUIS ALFONSO RODRIGUEZ GIL, CARLOS FRANCISCO REYES-SOSA, JOSÉ LUIS
GIORGANA-FIGUEROA, y SARA LUZ NAHUAT-DZIB
Instituto Tecnológico de Mérida Km. 5 Carretera a Progreso Mérida, Yucatán 97118 México
[email protected]
RESUMEN
A principios de 2013, se otorgan los primeros permisos de pesca comercial, para la explotación de pepino
de mar, Isostichopus badionotus y Holothuria floridana, en el estado de Yucatán, con base a estudios
científicos con el enfoque tradicional de pesca. En la temporada 2006-2007 se otorgaron 6 permisos para
pesca de fomento, el interés comercial del sector pesquero llevó a la expedición de 176 permisos con un
total de 557 unidad de pesca en 2013, la cuota inicial fue de 556 t la cual se incrementó a 1671 t,
respectivamente. Los permisos otorgados en 2013 tienen una vigencia de 2 años, con un período de pesca
de 12 días y una cuota de 250 kg/ lancha, aplicando como medida precautoria una veda con temporalidad
indefinida para las especies, con base a la estimación de biomasa. Los permisos de pesca establecen que
los pescadores y buzos sean de las mismas comunidades de la zona de pesca. Este enfoque ha generado,
pesca ilegal, procesamiento clandestino, conflicto de intereses en el sector pesquero y las autoridades.
Ante esta situación, se propone un enfoque ecosistémico procurando área marinas protegidas, que
involucre la superposición de la productividad en la población, la conservación de la biodiversidad y los
aspectos socioeconómicos. Proponiendo zonas de no pesca y/o, rotación de áreas cerradas a pesca;
estandarización del proceso de secado y servicios turísticos de buceo que mejore sus ingresos y calidad
de vida, conjuntamente con las comunidades de pescadores dentro de las áreas protegidas, aledañas y las
autoridades.
PALABRAS CLAVES: Pepino de mar, Isostichopus badionotus, enfoque ecosistémico, áreas protegidas,
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Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
LOS INCONVENIENTES DE LA CONVERSIÓN DE PESO VIVO A PESO PROCESADO EN
EL SEGUIMIENTO DE LAS CUOTAS DE LA PESQUERÍA DEL PEPINO DE MAR,
ISOSTICHOPUS BANIODOTUS, EN EL ESTADO DE YUCATÁN, MÉXICO
DRAWBACKS OF THE CONVERSION OF PROCESSED WEIGHT TO LIVE WEIGHT IN
THE TRACKING OF SEA CUCUMBER FISHING QUOTAS, ISOSTICHOPUS BANIODOTUS,
IN THE STATE OF YUCATAN, MEXICO
INCONVÉNIENTS DE LA CONVERSION DE POIDS TRANSFORMÉ EN POIDS VIF DANS LE
SUIVI DE CONCOMBRE QUOTAS DE PÊCHE EN MER, ISOSTICHOPUS BANIODOTUS,
DANS L'ÉTAT DU YUCATAN AU MEXIQUE.
LUIS ALFONSO RODRIGUEZ GIL, CARLOS FRANCISCO REYES-SOSA, JOSÈ LUIS
GIORGANA-FIGUEROA, SARA ALICIA NAHUAT-DZIB, y ROBERTO ZAMORA-BUSTILLOS
Instituto Tecnológico de Mérida Km. 5 Carretera a Progreso Mérida, Yucatán 97118 México
[email protected]
206
RESUMEN
Como se establece en la Carta Nacional Pesquera de México de 2012, el Instituto Nacional de la Pesca de
México (INAPESCA), con la finalidad de dar seguimiento y control de las cuotas asignadas a la pesquería
del pepino de mar en el estado de Yucatán, determinó y utilizó la conversión de peso vivo a peso
procesado en el año 2012. Las fases del proceso comprenden, 1) eviscerado, 2) pre-cocido que varía en un
rango de 35 a 44 minutos, 3) salado, 4) segundo cocimiento y 5) secado. En cada etapa de proceso se
determina la conversión porcentual de peso vivo a peso procesado. Los principales problemas son las
discrepancias entre lo que declaran los procesadores y el dictamen de los inspectores. Además, no existe
un proceso estandarizado y no se ha determinado de manera proximal la pérdida de peso durante el
proceso, esto genera detención del producto y multas por exceder la cuota. Finalmente, aunado a los
esfuerzos que efectúan las autoridades pesqueras para un mejor manejo del pepino, en cuanto al
seguimiento y control de cuotas; si se desea determinar de manera indirecta el peso vivo; se presenta una
propuesta, donde se contempla la necesidad de establecer de manera estandarizada los parámetros
adecuados para determinar las condiciones de cada una de las etapas del proceso de secado; en la que
participen los representantes encargados del proceso de secado de pepino de la comunidad de pescadores
que se les haya otorgado permisos de pesca conjuntamente con las autoridades de pesca.
PALABRAS CLAVES: Pepino de mar, secado de pepino, factores de conversión a peso vivo,
Isostichopus baniodotus
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
ASSESSMENT OF THE SEA CUCUMBER FISHERY IN BELIZE
ESTADO DE LA PESQUERÍA DE PEPINOS DE MAR EN BELICE
STATUT DE LA PÊCHE DE CONCOMBRE DE MER À BELIZE
ARLENIE ROGERS
University of Belize Environmental Research Institute Stann Creek Extension University of Belize, Stann
Creek Extension Belmopan, Belize [email protected]
ABSTRACT
The high demand for sea cucumbers in Asian markets and the increasing need for alternative livelihoods
in Belize led to the creation of a new fishery. This paper assesses the socioeconomics, population
structure, distribution, and abundance of two species of sea cucumber (Isostichopus badionotus, and
Holothuria mexicana). Sea cucumbers have been fished in Belizean waters for the past 20 years but
legally only since 2009. It is now a popular fishery where 13% of respondents noted sea cucumber fishing
as their primary fishing activity. With a Total Allowable Catch of 182,750 pounds per annum, the rush
has created new markets and prices. Although fishers know very little about the sea cucumbers, they
noticed a decrease in catch and the need to travel farther to fish. To assess the density, abundance and
distribution, 32 randomly selected sites along the coast of Belize were surveyed in 2012. Mean length was
20.5 cm for H. mexicana and 22 cm for I. badionotus. Mean adult weight was 562 g for H. mexicana and
346g for I. badionotus while body wall data for H. mexicana was 487 g. The largest number of
individuals ranged from 170-300 cm for H. mexicana and 140-220 cm for I. badionatus. A total of 124 H.
mexicana individuals and 108 I. badionatus were quantified, with mean densities of 12.9 and 1.8 ind./ha
respectively.
KEYWORDS: Socioeconomic, sea cucumber, Belize, abundance, density
207
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
DESCRIPCIÓN DE LA PESQUERÍA, EN EL ARCHIPIÉLAGO DE SAN ANDRÉS,
PROVIDENCIA Y SANTA CATALINA, RESERVA DE LA BIOSFERA SEAFLOWER
DESCRIPTION OF THE FISHERY, IN THE ARCHIPELAGO OF SAN ANDRES,
PROVIDENCIA AND SANTA CATALINA, BIOSPHERE RESERVE SEAFLOWER
DESCRIPTION DE LA PÊCHE, DANS L'ARCHIPEL DE SAN ANDRÉS, PROVIDENCIA ET
SANTA CATALINA, RÉSERVE DE LA BIOSPHÈRE SEAFLOWER
ANTHONY ROJAS, HEINS BENT, y HUGO WILSON
Secretaria de Agricultura y Pesca Av. Francisco Newball, Edif. Coral Palace San Andres Isla, San
Andres Colombia [email protected]
208
RESUMEN
La Actividad pesquera en el Archipiélago de San Andrés, Providencia y Santa Catalina, Reserva de
Biosfera Seaflower, es desarrolla a escala artesanal e industrial, y se caracteriza por ser multiespecífica en
las especies capturadas, empleando varios tipos de artes y métodos de pesca en varios tipos de flotas
pesqueras. La pesca está dirigida a tres principales recursos: Peces de escama, langosta espinosa
(Panulirus argus) y el caracol pala (Strombus gigas). En la pesca Artesanal se utiliza como arte principal
la línea de mano y Anzuelo con varios sub-métodos, le sigue el palangre vertical, el Buceo con arpón y
por ultimo las nasas de pescado. Por su parte la pesca industrial emplea como artes: el palangre vertical, el
palangre horizontal de fondo y las nasas de langosta. La producción realizada por la flota industrial entre
el 2001y el 2005 oscila entre los 300 - 350 tn anuales para Peces de escamas y, a partir del 2006 la
captura no sobrepasa los 200 tn; siendo para el 2012 valores de extracción de 117 tn. Para el 2012 la
producción de langosta Espinosa fue de 133 tn. Se cuenta con poca información sobre la composición de
especies de peces de escamas en las capturas industriales, la cual está dirigida a su la mayor parte a la
extracción de peces de la familia Lutjanidae y Serranidae. Para la Pesca Artesanal la producción entre el
2004 y el 2006 oscila entre 100 y 110 tn para peces de escamas, sin embargo desde el 2007 se evidencia
un incremento de hasta 100% de la captura. Captura que corresponden en su mayor parte a las familias:
Lutjanidae, Serranidae, Carangidae y Scombridae.
PALABRAS CLAVES: Pesqueria, San Andres Islas, Seaflower, industrial, artesanal
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
DISTRIBUCIÓN Y ABUNDANCIA DE LA DE LA LANGOSTA ESPINOSA “PANULIRUS
ARGUS”, EN EL SECTOR SUR DEL ÁREA MARINA PROTEGIDA DE LA RESERVA DE
BIOSFERA SEAFLOWER
DISTRIBUTION AND ABUNDANCE OF THE SPINY LOBSTER “PANULIRUS ARGUS”, IN
THE SOUTHERN SECTOR OF THE MARINE PROTECTED AREA OF THE SEAFLOWER
BIOSPHERE RESERVE
DISTRIBUTION ET L'ABONDANCE DE LA LANGOUSTE PANULIRUS ARGUS, DANS LE
SECTEUR SUD DE LA ZONE DE PROTECTION MARINE DE LA RÉSERVE DE BIOSPHÈRE
SEAFLOWER
ANTHONY ROJAS1, LEONARDO ARANGO2, LUIS SANTOS2, JAIRO MEDINA2, y HEINS BENT1
1
Secretaria de Agricultura y Pesca Av. Francisco Newball, Edif. Coral Palace San Andres Isla, San
Andres Colombia [email protected]
2
Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Sede Caribe San Luis, Free Town San Andres Isla San Andres
RESUMEN
La langosta espinosa Panulirus argus es uno de los principales recursos pesqueros del archipiélago de
San Andrés, Providencia y Santa Catalina. Los Cayos del sur (Cayo Bolívar y Cayo Albuquerque) son las
zonas de mayor influencia de los pescadores artesanales de San Andrés. Recientemente, se ha notado una
disminución de las capturas provenientes de Cayo Bolívar, probablemente como resultado del aumento en
la frecuencia e intensidad de pesca. Con el objetivo mejorar el conocimiento de la abundancia y
distribución de este organismo nos y dar una aproximación al estado del recurso, se realizaron en los
cayos Bolívar (34 estaciones) y Alburquerque (38 estaciones) monitoreos de distribución y abundancia de
la langosta espinosa mediante reconocimientos visuales en trayectos errantes a profundidades menores de
20 metros. Se determinó la densidad para cada tipo de fondo y con ayuda de técnicas geoestadísticas,
como el “kriging”, se analizaron las variables correlacionadas espacialmente correspondientes a la
información obtenida del tipo de fondo en los cuales se encontraba langosta. La desidad estimada para la
langosta fue de 0.7 Ind/ha para el cayo bolívar y 3.36 Ind/ha para Bolívar; siendo el sustrato “Arenas con
escombros coralinos” con mayor número de langosta avistadas para ambos cayos. Las densidades
estimadas están por debajo de valores reportadas para otras áreas del Caribe como México y Cuba. Es
mucho lo que falta por conocer acerca de la especie en cuestión; es necesario hacer énfasis en el estudio
del número, tamaño y estructura por área de las poblaciones de aguas profundas para estimar el verdadero
estatus poblacional.
PALABRAS CLAVES: Langosta Espinosa, Distribucion, Abundancia, SEAFLOWER, Densidad
209
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
USING FISHERY-INDEPENDENT SURVEYS TO ESTIMATE DENSITIES OF QUEEN
CONCH, STROMBUS GIGAS, POPULATIONS IN ST. CROIX, U. S. VIRGIN ISLANDS
USANDO ENCUESTAS INDEPENDIENTES DE LA PESQUERIA PARA ESTIMAR LAS
DENSIDADES DEL CARACOL ROSA, STROMBUS GIGAS, EN ST. CROIX, E.E.U.U. ISLAS
VIRGENES
À L’AIDE DE SONDAGES INDÉPENDAMMENT POUR ESTIMER LA DENSITÉ DE LAMBI,
STROMBUS GIGAS, À SAINTE-CROIX, USA ÎLES VIERGES
RONALD HILL and JENNIFER DOERR
NOAA Fisheries Service 4700 Avenue U Galveston, Texas 77551 USA [email protected]
210
ABSTRACT
Conventional stock assessment methods have been ineffective for determining the population status of
queen conch throughout the Caribbean, mainly due to the lack of fishery-independent data. We examined
queen conch populations on the northeastern coast of St. Croix, U. S. Virgin Islands, using a radial survey
sampling technique with sample sites stratified by depth, habitat type, and management regime,
encompassing both open and closed fishing areas. We completed 503 radial surveys and located 4773
conch, representing a cumulative density of approximately 302 conch per hectare. Densities of conch
were highest in open fishing areas outside of Buck Island Reef National Monument (BIRNM) boundaries
due to larger areas of available seagrass habitat and high numbers of juvenile conch. Densities of adult
conch were highest inside the BIRNM on macroalgae and sand where many were observed mating and
laying egg masses. The St. Croix East End Marine Park had the lowest densities of conch, despite an
abundance of apparently suitable habitat. Overall length frequencies showed a bimodal distribution,
driven largely by conch found within the BIRNM. Length distributions by habitat were variable but
showed a trend toward larger conch in reef, macroalgae, and sand habitats compared to a more even
distribution in seagrass.
KEYWORDS: Queen conch, U.S. Virgin Islands, radial survey, density, habitat
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
GULF OF MEXICO DATA ATLAS: DIGITAL DATA DISCOVERY AND ACCESS
ATLAS DE DATOS DEL GOLFO DE MEXICO: DESCUBRIMIENTO Y ACCESO A DATOS
DIGITALES
ATLAS DE DONNEES DU GOLFE DU MEXIQUE: DECOUVERTE ET L’ACCES AUX
INFORMATIONS DIGITALES
KATHRYN ROSE, RUSS BEARD, FRED ZEILE, and ANGELA SALLIS
NOAA/National Coastal Data Development Center 1021 Balch Blvd , USA Stennis Spac 39529
[email protected]
ABSTRACT
The Gulf of Mexico Data Atlas is an online data discovery and access tool that allows users to browse a
growing collection of ecosystem-related datasets visualized as map plates. Thematically, the Atlas
provides updated long-term assessments of the physical, biological, environmental, economic and living
marine resource characteristics that indicate baseline conditions of the Gulf of Mexico. These data
provide crucial support to restoration and monitoring efforts in the Gulf. A multi-agency executive
steering committee including members from international, federal, state, and non-governmental
organizations was formed to guide Atlas development and to contribute data and expertise. The Atlas
currently contains over 230 maps in 70 subject areas. Each map plate is accompanied by a descriptive
summary authored by a subject matter expert and each data set is fully documented by metadata in
Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC)-compliant standards. Source data are available in native
formats and as web mapping services (WMS). Datasets are also searchable through an accompanying
Map Catalog and RSS feed. The Gulf of Mexico Data Atlas is an operational example of the philosophy
of leveraging resources among agencies and activities involved in geospatial data as outlined in the US
Department of Interior and FGDC "Geospatial Platform Modernization Roadmap v4 - March 2011". We
shall continue to update and add datasets through existing and new partnerships to ensure that the Atlas
becomes a truly ecosystem-wide resource.
KEYWORDS: Gulf of Mexico, ecosystem, restoration, geospatial, data access
211
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
TROPHIC ETHOLOGY OF THE LIONFISH PTEROIS VOLITANS IN GUADELOUPE ISLAND
(LESSER ANTILLES)
ÉTHOLOGIE ALIMENTAIRE DU POISSON-LION PTEROIS VOLITANS EN GUADELOUPE
(PETITES ANTILLES)
ETOLOGÍA ALIMENTAR DEL PEZ LEÓN PTEROIS VOLITANS EN GUADELOUPE
(ANTILLAS MENORES)
THIBAUD ROSSARD, YOLANDE BOUCHON-NAVARO, SÉBASTIEN CORDONNIER, and
CLAUDE BOUCHON
Universite des Antilles et de la Guyane LABEX Corail Équipe DYNECAR EA 926 BP 592 Pointe-à-Pitre,
Guadeloupe 97159 France [email protected]
212
ABSTRACT
The lionfish Pterois volitansis an invasive species introduced in Florida in the 1980‟s. Lionfishes were
first reported in Guadeloupe in 2010. The lack of predators allowed that invader to reach high densities
that threaten local assemblages of reef fishes. In order to study their potential impact in Guadeloupe
Island (Lesser Antilles), the trophic ecology of lionfishes was investigated through the study of stomach
contents. A total of 355 fishes from 5,5 cm to 33,9 cm (TL) were examined. The preys were characterized
by their percentage in frequency, in numbers and in biomass. In Guadeloupe, teleost preys were present in
87% of stomachs, the remains being shrimps (44% of stomachs). The most important fish families in
biomass were Pomacentridae (59,9%), Mullidae (13,4) and Labridae (6,2%). Moreover, lionfish feeding
ethology exhibits a important ontogenic variation, shifting from a Crustacean dominated diet for young
fishes to a piscivorous diet for fishes whose size exceeds 10 cm (TL). In addition, Acanthurid and Scarid
fishes are poorly consumed by lionfish, which does not corroborate the hypothesis that lionfish could
contribute to the depletion od herbivorous fishes on Caribbean reefs.
KEYWORDS: Pterois volitans, feeding habits, Guadeloupe Island, Caribbean
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
ACOUSTIC TRACKING OF YELLOWTAIL PARROTFISH (SPARISOMA RUBRIPINNE) AT
SPAWNING AGGREGATIONS IN REEF BAY, ST. JOHN USVI
SEGUIMIENTO ACÚSTICO DE COLA AMARILLA LORO (SPARISOMA RUBRIPINNE) EN
AGREGACIONES DE DESOVE EN REEF BAY, ST. JOHN USVI
SUIVI ACOUSTIQUE DE JAUNE PERROQUETS (SPARISOMA RUBRIPINNE) À FRAYÈRES
À REEF BAY, ST. JOHN ÎLES VIERGES AMÉRICAINES
ASHLEY RUFFO1 and RICHARD NEMETH2
Center for Marine and Environmental Science University of the Virgin Islands #2 John Brewers Bay St
Thomas, USVI 00802 USA [email protected]
ABSTRACT
Yellowtail parrotfish (Sparisoma rubripinne) have been historically documented since the 1960s to gather
at a fish spawning aggregation (FSA) site at a reef promontory (65 ft) on the western border of Reef Bay,
St John, USVI. S. rubripinne aggregate to spawn year-round on a daily basis and during afternoon hours
only; however, visitation rates by individual fish is unknown. The main objective of this study was to
determine the frequency and duration of FSA visitation for acoustically tagged individuals (N = 25)
through a passive array of hydroacoustic receivers (12 Vemco VR2Ws). About half (12 of 25) of tagged
individuals frequented the historical FSA and two new sites were discovered within Reef Bay, one
northwest of the historical site and one on the eastern border of the bay. No individuals visited all three
sites, but individuals did frequent either the western or the eastern side of the bay. Five fish visited both
western FSA sites, two fish visited only the northwestern site, and five fish visited only the eastern site.
Individuals did not display a consistent pattern for FSA visitation or duration.
KEYWORDS: Spawning aggregation, parrotfish
213
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
QUANTIFICATION AND CLASSIFICATION OF GARBAGE PRESENCE AND MARINE
DEBRIS ALONG THE COASTS OF THE VERACRUZ, VERACRUZ, MEXICO
CUANTIFICACIÓN Y CLASIFICACIÓN DE LA PRESENCIA DE BASURA Y DESECHOS
MARINOS ENCONTRADOS EN LAS COSTAS DE VERACRUZ, VERACRUZ, MÉXICO
QUANTIFICATIONET LA CLASSIFICATION DE LA PRÉSENCE DE DÉCHETS ET DÉBRIS
MARINS SUR LES CÔTES DE LA VERACRUZ AU MEXIQUE
BLAKE RUPE
University of Iowa 733 Michael Street Apt. 23 Iowa City, IA 52246 USA [email protected]
214
ABSTRACT
Marine debris on coastal shores has many detrimental effects to ecosystems, including hazards to the
health and safety of marine life, as it often entangles or is ingested by seabirds, marine fish, and
mammals. Debris has varying effects locally; in certain cities in Mexico, garbage presence has caused
severe levels of impacts to the coastal zone. This study is aimed at supporting marine researchers and
conservation efforts in Mexico by addressing the issues of debris presence along the coastal zone of
Veracruz via assessing how much and what types of marine debris is present. Veracruz is of particular
importance, as it home to a system of 17 coral reefs that are protected by the government. These
protection efforts and the health of these reef ecosystems are thwarted by the high amounts of refuse and
debris on local beaches. Garbage collection occurred between May, 2013 and June, 2013 along three
separate collection sites of varying composition. The total area for collection was 1.06 miles of rocky and
sandy shores. Debris abundance ranged between .01 pounds/meter and .55 pounds/meter, while this
varied according to collection site. A total of 1806 pounds was collected, the majority (over 90%) of
which were recyclable materials, such as glass, plastics, rubber, paper, cardboard, and aluminum. The
most abundant type of refuse collected was glass. This study provides a baseline for future debris
scholarship and conservation efforts on the coasts of Veracruz, Mexico, and the Caribbean.
KEYWORDS: Garbage presence, marine debris, Mexico, Veracruz reef system, collection
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
WANT TO KNOW ABOUT FISH AGGREGATIONS GLOBALLY? WE HAVE A WEB
DATABASE!
¿QUIERES SABER SOBRE LAS AGREGACIONES DE PECES A NIVEL MUNDIAL?
TENEMOS UNA BASE DE DATOS WEB!
VOUS VOULEZ CONNAÎTRE LES AGRÉGATIONS DE POISSONS AU NIVEAU MONDIAL?
NOUS AVONS UNE BASE DE DONNÉES WEB!
MARTIN RUSSELL1 and LEATH MULLER2
Science and Conservation of Fish Aggregations (S 215/1000 Ann St Fortitude Valley, Qld 4006 Australia
[email protected]
2
SCRFA Townsville 4810 Australia
1
ABSTRACT
The first and only global database on fish aggregations has been developed by Science and Conservation
of Fish Aggregations (SCRFA). It contains information on fish aggregations including biological and
habitat characteristics, current status, management, traditional knowledge and exploitation history. Over
the past 12 years, we have been developing this comprehensive tool to assist in understanding fish
aggregations. The database has a unique record entering process whereby records can be entered via a
drop down and multiple selection menus. These parameters have been developed to keep a consistent
dataset that can be easily analysed. Newly entered records undergo quality checking before being made
available on the searchable web database. The database now has over 900 records available in table form
or for visualisation using Google Earth.
KEYWORDS: Aggregation, database, spawning, fish, reproduction
215
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
SAD FAREWELL TO C. LAVETT-SMITH’S ICONIC NASSAU SPAWNING AGGREGATION
SITE
ADIOS TRISTE A LA AGREGACION FAMOSA DE MERO CHERNA CONOCIDA POR LA
DESCIPCION DE C. LAVETT-SMITH
L'AGREGATION ICONIQUE DU MEROU NASSAU DESCRIT POUR C. LAVETT-SMITH EST
DISPARU
YVONNE SADOVY1, BRAD ERISMAN2, and CASUARINA MCKINNEY-LAMBERT3
University of Hong Kong Science and Conservation of Fish Aggregations, School of Biological Sciences,
Pok Fu Lam Road Hong Kong, 0000 China [email protected]
2
Scripps Institution of Oceanography San Diego California USA
3
Bahamas Reef Environment Educational Foundation (BREEF) Building 4, Unit 1 Caves Village West
Bay St. Nassau Bahamas
1
216
ABSTRACT
In January 1971, C. Lavett Smith, a renowned North American ichthyologist, witnessed a spectacular
event off the coast of Bimini, Bahamas. He witnessed a massive gathering of Nassau groupers about to
spawn of somewhere between 30,000 and 100,000 fish. His was the very first underwater observation of a
reef fish spawning aggregation reported in the scientific literature and the largest ever reported for the
species. The site has not been revisited by scientists since this first report. Given that the Nassau grouper
is currently being assessed under the Endangered Species Act, USA, SCRFA felt it was timely to
resurvey the site. In January 2013, Brad Erisman joined Casuarina McKinney-Lambert to revisit Smith's
site. Between 25-30 January over the full moon phase when the species is known to aggregate, Brad and
Casuarina re-surveyed an extensive area covering 4.5 linear miles that encompasses Smith‟s 1971 survey
area. Dr. Smith kindly advised us for this project. Over 6 days of surveys they found only 5 Nassau
groupers, none of which showed any evidence of spawning. Local fishermen commented that the
aggregation had disappeared by the early 1980s and that grouper had not been a focus of seasonal fishing
in the area for a long time. There were no fishermen to be seen. We sadly concluded that the site reported
by Smith, an important baseline for the species, was long gone.
KEYWORDS: Aggregation , Nassau, disappeared, The Bahamas
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
ANALYSIS OF FISHERMEN PERFORMANCE IN SMALL-SCALE FISHERIES OF THE
YUCATAN COAST, MEXICO
ANÁLISIS DE LA EFICIENCIA DEL PESCADOR EN LAS PESQUERÍAS DE PEQUEÑA
ESCALA DE LA COSTA DE YUCATÁN, MÉXICO
ANALYSE DE LA PERFORMANCE DES PÊCHEURS ARTISANAUX DANS LA CÔTE DE
YUCATAN, MEXIQUE
SILVIA SALAS1, ALICIA SALDAÑA1, and ANTHONY CHARLES2
CINVESTAV Unidad Mérida Km 6 Antigua Carretera a Progreso Mérida, Yucatán 97310 México
[email protected]
2
Saint Mary's University 923 Robie Street Halifax Nova Scotia B3H 3C3 Canada
1
ABSTRACT
Fishing efficiency has been measured in many different ways, including successful fishing trips. “This
success”, according to different scientists, in addition to the performance of fishers, depends on the state
of the exploited resources and on climatic conditions. Hence, under the assumption that changes in fishing
efficiency may reflect changes in resource abundance and availability, a performance index analysis
contrasting two periods (1992 and 2010) was undertaken. Fishing communities in the Yucatan coast were
considered as a case study. Information from log-books provided by fishing cooperatives of those
communities was used to undertake such analysis. Data includes information of daily catch per fishers
and species; information on species prices was also obtained. Categories were defined according to catch
and landed value of the main target species (lobster, octopus, and grouper): above average, average and
below average. Results showed differences between fishing years and communities. During 1992 a high
percentage of fishermen were distributed on the average and above the average in the analyzed
communities. In 2010 a high percentage of fishermen were observed below the average. These results
suggest decrease on fishermen performance between the analyzed years. Differences between
communities in terms of landed value were defined by the selection of target species in their fishing trips
as differences in prices of species are important. We discussed these results under the current
management framework and suggest some indicators that could help to monitor resource exploitation.
KEYWORDS: Fishers‟ Performance, small-scale fisheries, Yucatán, fishing efficiency
217
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
PILOT ASSESSMENT OF THE SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION OF ARTISANAL FISHING
VESSELS IN THE SOUTHEASTERN MEXICO THROUGH VMS. CHALLENGES AND
OPORTUNTIES
EVAÑUACIÓN PILOTO DE LA DISTRIBUCIÓN ESPACIAL DE EMBARCACIONES
ARTESANALES EN EL SURESTE DE MÉXICO A TRAVÉS DE UN SISTEMA DE
MONITOREO SATELITAL. RETOS Y OPORTUNIDADES
EVALUATION PILOTE DE LA DISTRIBUTION SPATIALE DES BATEAUX ARTISANAUX
DANS LE SUD-EST DU MEXIQUE À L’AIDE D’UN SYSTÈME DE SURVEILLANCE DES
NAVIRES PAR SATELLITE. DÉFIS ET OPPORTUNITÉS
SILVIA SALAS, JORGE EUAN-ÁVILA, EDGAR TORRES-IRINEO, DANIEL QUIJANO,
LEOPOLDO PALOMO, and EVA CORONADO
CINVESTAV Unidad Mérida Km. 6, Antigua Carretera a Progreso, Apdo. Postal 73-CORDEMEX.
Mérida, Yucatán 97310 México [email protected]
218
ABSTRACT
In Mexico, as in many other countries, an increase in fishing effort and a decrease in catches is becoming
the rule more than the exception. This scenario demands to learn more about the spatial distribution of the
fleet and their operations. Better understanding on the fleet dynamics can help to address externalities and
other problems faced by fisheries, including illegal fishing. Through international agreements, Mexico
has adopted vessel monitoring systems (VMS) since 2004. However, this system has been implemented
only for industrial fleets due to technical and economical features, and recently became mandatory for
artisanal fleets. The challenges to cover a large and complex fleet should not be dismissed though. In
2010, a pilot project was undertaken, including development and implementation of a monitoring system
for artisanal fleet in the Southeastern Mexico. We present preliminary results from this project addressing
the spatial distribution of the artisanal fleet in four states from the study region. Variables associated to
fishing activities from geographic coordinates of fishing trips (e.g., speed, distance, time) were estimated.
A summary of trends on the areas of concentration of the fleet and frequency of trips were analyzed. The
potential use of VMS for artisanal fisheries is stressed after this study. It could offer important
information for fisheries management, given the complexity of artisanal fisheries (variety of target species
and use of multiple gears). We discuss the challenges and the potential use of VMS for the artisanal
fisheries management in the region.
KEYWORDS: Spatial distribution, artisanal fleet, vessel monitoring system, fleet dynamics, Southeastern
Mexico
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
ENHANCHING STEWARDSHIP WITHIN FISHERFOLK ORGANISATION
ADMINISTRACIÓN DE ENHANCHING DENTRO DE ORGANIZACIÓN FISHERFOLK
GESTION D'ENHANCHING DANS L'ORGANISATION FISHERFOLK
CORETTA SAMUELS and PATRICK MCCONNEY
Center for Resource Management and Environmental The University of the West Indies Cave Hill
Campus BB 11000 Bridgetown, Barbados [email protected]
ABSTRACT
Small-scale fisheries are dynamic and evolving socio-economic sectors throughout the world, often
employing labour intensive harvesting, processing and distribution technologies to exploit marine and
inland fishery resources to meet the demands of international and domestic markets. These interactions
are typically embedded within a variety of often poorly documented institutional arrangements for
stewardship that govern or guide the management of fisheries systems through community or
organisational collective action. The paucity of research in this area within small-scale fisheries has
resulted in major gaps in knowledge and information. Our understanding of marine fisheries stewardship
by individuals, organisations and communities in the Caribbean is not well developed. Understanding
collective action and the roles that fisherfolk organisations may play in stewardship is essential given an
increasing interest in co-management, other means of fisheries governance and the ecosystem approach to
fisheries (EAF). The attention now being paid to the Caribbean Network of Fisherfolk Organisations
(CNFO) by the Caribbean Regional Fisheries Mechanism (CRFM) and other organisations is evidence of
this trend. Understanding the roles that fisherfolk organisations may play will be critical to success. This
research examines the nature of stewardship in fisherfolk organisations in Guyana and Dominica, and the
potential for enhancing stewardship within them by investigating individual and collective action that
may lead to improved management of resources to the benefit of the fishing industry.
KEYWORDS: Small-scale fisheries, stewardship, fisherfolk organisation, collective actions
219
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
TEMPORALIDAD Y ESFUERZO REPRODUCTIVO DEL CARACOL STROMBUS GIGAS
EFFORT AND REPRODUCTIVE SEASONALITY AND SPAWNING OF THE QUEEN CONCH
STROMBUS GIGAS
EFFORT AN SAISONNALITÉ DE LA REPRODUCTION DU LAMBI STROMBUS GIGAS
PABLO ALBERTO SANTANA y LUZ MARÍA DALILA ALDANA-ARANDA
Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN Km. 6 carretera antigua a Progreso S/N
Mérida Yucatán 97310 México [email protected]
220
RESUMEN
Con la finalidad de estudiar la actividad reproductiva del Caracol rosa, Strombus gigas, se realizaron
monitoreos con el método de transecto lineal, registrándose abundancia de organismos, cópulas, desoves
y masas ovígeras libres. Se registraron temperatura, salinidad y oxígeno disuelto. Los muestreos se
realizaron semanalmente de enero-octubre de 2013 y diario en julio, con observaciones cada hora de 8am
a 6pm. Se calcularon media y varianza de desoves, cópulas y masas ovígeras y un análisis de correlación
de Spearman entre parámetros fisicoquímicos y actividad reproductiva. La media diaria y mensual de
abundancia de caracoles fue de 17.97±7.61 individuos/100m2. Se registraron 33 caracoles copulando, 405
desoves y 98 puestas libres. El pico de frecuencia de cópulas fue de julio-septiembre. La frecuencia de
desove por hembra vario desde 1 (79.01%), 2 (13.58%), 3 (5.67%), 4 (1.48%) y hasta 5 veces (0.24%),
con una periodicidad entre desove y desove de 1 a 7 días. La cópula se asoció en mayor proporción con el
oxígeno (35%), mientras que el desove con la temperatura (38%). Se determino que S. gigas tiene una
área específica para la reproducción y en gran mayoría tiene una sola cópula y un desove durante un ciclo
anual. Se determino que el desove por inicia a las 11:08 am (±1.2 h), con una duración de 16 minutos
(desoves parciales) hasta 29.5 h (desoves completos). Se demuestra que la Caleta de Xel-Há funciona
como un sitio clave para la conservación de S. gigas con una zona de agregación para su reproducción.
PALABRAS CLAVES: Strombus gigas, spawning frecuency, seasonality, reproductive activity,
copulation
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
MADUREZ SEXUAL, ESTACIONALIDAD REPRODUCTIVA Y OVOPOSICIÓN DEL
CARACOL BUSYCON PERVERSUM (LINNEÉ, 1758) EN LA PLATAFORMA CONTINENTAL
DE YUCATÁN, MÉXICO
SEXUAL MATURITY, REPRODUCTIVE SEASONALITY AND OVIPOSITION OF THE
LIGHTNING WELK BUSYCON PERVERSUM (LINNEÉ, 1758) IN THE CONTINENTAL
SHELF OF YUCATÁN, MEXICO
MATURITE SEXUELLE, SAISON DE LA REPRODUCTION ET PONTE DE LA COQUILLE
BUSYCON PERVERSUM (LINNÉE, 1758) SUR LE PLATEAU CONTINENTAL DU YUCATAN,
MEXIQUE
JOSEFINA SANTOS-VALENCIA1, MARTHA ENRÍQUEZ DÍAZ2, y DALILA ALDANA ARANDA2
1
Instituto Nacional de Pesca. Centro Regional de Carretera a Chelem Blvd. del pescador sin número,
Puerto de abrigo-Yucalpetén Progreso de Castro, Yucatán 97320 México [email protected]
2
Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados IPN Km. 6 Antigua Carretera a Progreso Merida
Yucatan 97310 Mexico
RESUMEN
El caracol trompillo Busycon perversum es un gasterópodo de concha grande con abertura y torsión hacia
la izquierda. Es una especie común en la Bahía de Campeche situada al oeste de la Península de Yucatán,
México. Esta especie es abundante y constituye la segunda en importancia en la pesquería de caracol en
esta región. La biología reproductiva de esta especie es muy importante para proponer medidas de
regulación pesquera, con este fin, se realizaron muestreos de la población por medio de transectos lineales
y buceo autónomo de abril de 2009 a marzo de 2010. Los machos alcanzaron la madurez sexual a los
190mm y las hembras a los 210mm. La proporción de hembras se incrementó de acuerdo con la talla,
dominando las hembras en las tallas mayores, lo cual podría sugerir hermafroditismo protándrico. El
periodo reproductivo se presentó de mayo a diciembre con mayor intensidad de julio a septiembre,
coincidiendo con el decremento de la temperatura del agua. El mayor evento de ovoposición se observó
de agosto a septiembre. Las puestas están constituidas por cápsulas ovígeras ovales en forma de cadena.
En cada puesta se contaron de 54 a 137 cápsulas, cada una con diámetro de 27mm y 47 embriones en
promedio.
PALABRAS CLAVES: Madurez sexual, Período reproductivo, Ovoposición, Protandría, Busycom
221
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
EVALUACIÓN DE LA BIOMASA DE POBLACIÓN DE PULPO (OCTOPUS MAYA) EN LA
PENÍNSULA DE YUCATÁN, 2012
OCTUPUS (OCTOPUS MAYA) BIOMASS EVALUATION IN THE YUCATAN PENINSULA
DURING 2012
EVALUATION DE LA BIOMASSE DE LA POPULATION DE POULPE (OCTOPUS MAYA)
DANS LA PENINSULE DU YUCATAN, 2012.
JOSEFINA SANTOS-VALENCIA1, GABRIELA GALINDO CORTÉS2, y ÁLVARO HERNÁNDEZ
FLORES2
1
Instituto Nacional de Pesca. CRIP Yucalpeten Carretera a Chelem Blvd. del pescador sin número,
Puerto de abrigo-Yucalpetén Progreso de Castro, Yucatán 97320 México [email protected]
2
Instituto Nacional de Pesca. CRIP Veracruz Ejercito Mexicano # 106 Col. Exhacienda Ylang Ylang
Boca del Río Yucatan 94298 Mexico
222
RESUMEN
En México, la pesca de pulpo ocupa el cuarto lugar nacional por su volumen y valor. El 94% de la
producción la aportan los estados Yucatán y Campeche, siendo Octopus maya la especie mayoritaria. Se
realizó una evaluación poblacional de la especie mediante dos indicadores de abundancia: 1) Dependiente
de la pesquería, mediante el monitoreo del recurso en diez puertos pesqueros del litoral de Yucatán en las
temporadas de pesca 2007-2012, aplicando un Análisis de Población Virtual y 2) Independiente de la
pesquería, mediante 50 campañas de muestreo a bordo de embarcaciones comerciales, aplicando el
método de área barrida para la estimación de la densidad de organismos (pulpos/m2). Los resultados
muestran que la estructura de edades en la captura comercial varía desde 1 mes hasta 18 meses; los
machos mayormente representados fueron de 4 meses de edad y las hembras entre 4 y 5 meses de edad.
En la temporada de pesca 2012, la biomasa del stock desovante, así como los niveles de reclutamiento
mensuales alcanzaron los niveles máximo de la serie disponible con 12,000 t y 7,700,000 individuos,
respectivamente, entre septiembre y octubre en relación directa con el índice de abundancia
independiente, para posteriormente disminuir a los valores más bajos de la serie. Esto último puede estar
relacionado con los altos niveles de captura mensual en la temporada de captura, excediendo en un 68% la
cuota de captura. Estos valores pueden afectar la fracción de la población que sobrevive a la temporada de
captura y reproduce en los meses posteriores, produciendo niveles de abundancia bajos del recurso
durante 2013.
PALABRAS CLAVES: Biomasa, Pulpo, Reclutamiento, Pesqueria, Análisis Población Virtual
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
NASSAU GROUPER (EPINEPHELUS STRIATUS) FISH SPAWNING AGGREGATIONS IN
THE US CARIBBEAN
AGREGACIONES REPRODUCTIVAS DEL MERO CHERNA (EPINEPHELUS STRIATUS) EN
EL CARIBE DE JURISDICCIÓN EEUU
MÉROU (EPINEPHELUS STRIATUS) ZONES DE FRAI DANS LES CARAÏBES US
MICHELLE SCHARER-UMPIERRE1, RICHARD NEMETH2, EVAN TUOHY3, CLOUSE
KIMBERLY3, MICHAEL NEMETH4, and RICHARD APPELDOORN3
1
Dept. Marine Science Univ. of Puerto Rico P.O.Box 1442 Boqueron, Puerto Rico 00622 Puerto Rico
[email protected]
2
Center for Marine and Environmental Studies, University of the Virgin Islands 2 John Brewer’s Bay St.
Thomas US Virgin Islands 00802-9990 USA
3
Department of Marine Sciences, University of Puerto Rico P. O. Box 9000 Mayagüez Puerto Rico
00681-9000 P
4
P. O. Box 1442 BoqueronPR 00622 Puerto Rico
ABSTRACT
The Nassau grouper was an economically and ecologically important species of Caribbean coral reefs but
is now listed as “Endangered” by the IUCN. In Puerto Rico and the US Virgin Islands stocks have
declined dramatically and several spawning aggregations were fished to extinction. However, two sites
within the US EEZ have recently been found with Nassau grouper aggregating during the reproductive
season, the Grammanik Bank (GB) and Bajo de Sico (BDS). For the 2012-2013 spawning season a joint
study was conducted for the two sites to characterize and assess these spawning aggregations. At both
sites, visual census and passive acoustic techniques were used to estimate spawning population size and
compare the temporal patterns of the aggregations. At BDS simultaneous acoustic (Vemco) tags and a
grid of passive acoustic recorders were employed to describe the spatial dynamics. Preliminary results
showed the maximum number of Nassau grouper observed at BDS was approximately half of that at GB.
Passive acoustic data (BDS only) coincided with the survey data but with much greater temporal
resolution and coverage. Nassau grouper that were surgically implanted with tags at depth by rebreather
divers seem to be residents of the BDS seamount. The occurrence of fish at the main spawning site as
determined from preliminary analysis of passive acoustic data coincided with the detected presence of
internally tagged fish This study provides an analysis of multiple technologies applied to studying
endangered spawning aggregations.
KEYWORDS: Nassau grouper, Puerto Rico, USVI, courtship-associated sound, tagging
223
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
MANAGEMENT APPLICATIONS OF BLACK GROUPER (MYCTEROPERCA BONACI)
SOUNDS AT SPAWNING AGGREGATIONS
APLICACIONES DE GESTIÓN DE LOS SONIDOS DE GUAJIL PRIETO (MYCTEROPERCA
BONACI) EN LAS AGREGACIONES REPRODUCTIVASLES
APPLICATIONS DE GESTION DU LES SONS DO MÉROU NOIR (MYCTEROPERCA BONACI)
DANS ZONES DE FRAI
MICHELLE SCHARER-UMPIERRE1, TIMOTHY ROWELL2, MICHAEL NEMETH3, and RICHARD
APPELDOORN4
1Dept. Marine Science Univ. of Puerto Rico P.O.Box 1442 Boqueron, Puerto Rico 00622 Puerto Rico
[email protected]
2Scripps Institution of OceanographyUniversity of California San Diego La Jolla CA 92093 USA
3P. O. Box 9000 Mayagüez Puerto Rico 00681-9000 Puerto Rico
4Department of Marine Sciences, University of Puerto Rico
224
ABSTRACT
The black grouper, Mycteroperca bonaci, is an important component of Atlantic fisheries. Their
reproductive behavior involves spawning aggregations that concentrates their populations making them
vulnerable yet easy to assess during this time. Passive acoustic and synchronous video recordings were
made at two spawning aggregation sites to study the sounds associated to reproductive behaviors of M.
bonaci. A characteristic sound produced during courtship displays involves behaviors commonly
observed for groupers of this genus at spawning aggregations. Courtship-associated sounds quantified
over the spawning season at Mona Island, Puerto Rico revealed seasonality and periodicity. Most of the
daily sound production occurred during a period of two hours prior to sunset. The highest rates of sound
production lasted for a period of ten days with a peak 10 d after full moon with lunar periodicity over
three consecutive months (January to March). The maxima in courtship-associated sounds were within the
reported season of reproduction in the Caribbean (December to March), but prior to seasonal management
regulations in the US Caribbean EEZ waters (February to April). Passive acoustics provide an additional
manner to measure the temporal variability of reproductive activity and to evaluate current management
strategies (seasonal bans or marine reserves), which are critical for the recovery of threatened groupers.
KEYWORDS: Black grouper, courtship-associated sounds, spawning aggregation, management, Mona
Island
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
SEASONAL RELATIONSHIPS OF CALORIC DENSITY AND LIVER WEIGHT OF RED
SNAPPER ON NATURAL HARD-BOTTOM BANKS AND ARTIFICIAL REEFS IN THE
NORTHWESTERN GULF OF MEXICO
RELACIONES ESTACIONALES DE LA DENSIDAD CALÓRICA Y EL PESO DEL HÍGADO
DE PARGO ROJO EN LOS BANCOS DE FONDOS DUROS NATURALES Y ARRECIFES
ARTIFICIALES EN EL NOROESTE DEL GOLFO DE MÉXICO
LES RAPPORTS SAISONNIÈRES DE DENSITÉ CALORIQUE ET POIDS DU FOIE DE
VIVANEAU SUR DUR NATUREL BAS-BANQUES ET LES RÉCIFS ARTIFICIELS DANS LE
NORD-OUEST DU GOLFE DU MEXIQUE
BRITTANY SCHWARTZKOPF and JAMES COWAN, JR.
Louisiana State University 2195 Energy, Coast, and Environment Building Baton Rouge, LA 70802
United States of America [email protected]
ABSTRACT
Information was gathered on seasonal variation of two condition factors of red snapper, Lutjanus
campechanus, taken from the Louisiana (LA) continental shelf banks. Red snapper were collected from
September 2011 to October 2013 from three natural banks on the LA shelf, those being Jakkula, McGrail,
and Bright, and one artificial reef in the East Cameron Artificial Reef Planning Area. The two condition
factors chosen were the liver-somatic index (LSI) and caloric density. LSI was calculated as the
proportion of liver weight to eviscerated body weight. Caloric density of fish muscle tissue was estimated
directly with a Parr 6200 oxygen bomb calorimeter. In general, LSI began to increase from DecemberMarch, peaked in May, and declined thereafter until October. LSI differed between natural and artificial
reefs, and the LSI was higher in females, indicating more energy invested towards reproduction. The
caloric density of red snapper exhibit a similar pattern to that of the LSI, but the trends were not as clear,
owing to significant annual variability. The caloric density was higher in 2012 compared to 2013,
indicating that red snapper were able to store more energy within their muscle tissues in 2012. The caloric
density of red snapper from the sites with coral substrate (Bright and McGrail) was generally lower from
that of the non-coral substrate sites (Jakkula and East Cameron). Red snapper appear to be using energy
stores from both the liver and muscle tissue for reproduction and the site-specific differences seen may be
attributable to dietary and environmental factors.
KEYWORDS: Caloric density, Liver-somatic index, Red snapper, Gulf of Mexico
225
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
MITOCHONDRIAL DNA (MTDNA) HAPLOTYPE DIVERSITY OF THE INVASIVE
LIONFISH IN BARBADOS
ADN MITOCHONDRIAL (ADNMT) DIVERSITÉ DES HAPLOTYPES DE LA LIONFISH
ENVAHISSANTES À LA BARBADE
ADN MITOCONDRIAL (ADNMT) DIVERSIDAD HAPLOTIPO DE PEZ LEÓN INVASIVA EN
BARBADOS
SHEKIRA SEALY, HAZEL OXENFORD, AND DARREN BROWNE
Centre for Resource Management and Environmental St. Michael , Bb11000 Barbados
[email protected]
226
ABSTRACT
Incorporating the order of events of the Indo-Pacific lionfishes (Pterois volitans and P. miles) invasion of
the Western Central Atlantic (WCA) using sightings with population genetics has given an opportunity to
examine the dispersal and marine connectivity across phylogenetic breaks which separate the USA east
coast, the Bahamas and the northwest and southwest Caribbean; however this has not been examined for
the eastern Caribbean. Genetic analyses of the invasive lionfish in Barbados to assess mtDNA d-loop
haplotype diversity will aid in filling this gap in the understanding of the invasion and connectivity of
WCA biogeographic zones. In this study we examine the genotypes of the newly settled lionfish
population in Barbados to determine their species, source population(s) and the spatial and/or temporal
distribution of successful settlers, using samples collected from the time of their first sighting in
November 2011 to August 2013. Mitochondrial control region sequences are being analysed using
Arlequin v. 3.5 to provide important data on the progression of the lionfish invasion in Barbados and
significantly contribute to the broader study of the population genetics of the dispersal of the invasive
lionfish at the regional level.
KEYWORDS: Invasive species, lionfish, mitochondrial control region, Pterois miles, Pterois volitans
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
FINFISHERIES ASSOCIATED WITH DEEP-SEA SPONGE-CORAL ECOSYSTEMS OFF THE
SOUTHEASTERN U.S.
PESQUERÍAS ASOCIADAS CON ESPONJAS Y CORALES ECOSISTEMAS DE LAS
PROFUNDIDADES MARINAS FUERA DE LOS EE.UU. DEL SUDESTE
PÊCHES ASSOCIÉS AUX ÉPONGES ET DE CORAIL ÉCOSYSTÈMES DE LA MER
PROFONDE AU LARGE DU SUD-EST AMÉRICAIN
GEORGE SEDBERRY1, MYRA BROUWER2, CLAUDIA FRIESS3, ADAM LYTTON4, KELLY
ROBINSON5, and BYRON WHITE4
1
Southeast Atlantic, Gulf of Mexico, and Caribbea NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries 10
Ocean Science Circle Savannah, GA 31411 USA, [email protected]
2
South Atlantic Fishery Management Council 4055 Faber Place Drive Suite 201 North Charleston, SC
29405 USA
3
The Ocean ConservancyTexas Office 106 E. 6th St. Suite 400 Austin, TX 78701 USA
4
Marine Resources Research Institute, PO Box 12559 Charleston, SC 29422 USA
5
Cornell University Ithaca, NY USA
ABSTRACT
A deepwater (>300m) demersal fishery developed off the southeastern U.S. in the 1980s, targeting
wreckfish (Polyprion americanus) in sponge-coral and hard-bottom habitat. Declining populations and
increasing regulations in shallow-water fisheries provided incentive for fishermen to develop alternatives.
Rapid expansion in the wreckfish fishery led to a management plan that includes gear restrictions, a
spawning closure, an annual catch limit and individual quotas for the commercial fishery. The plan was
amended recently to include a bag limit, seasonal closure and annual catch limit for the recreational
sector. U.S. management has resulted in a small sustainable fishery for wreckfish, in contrast to other
parts of its wide range where the fishery has collapsed. Several species that are economically important in
other parts of the world are caught with wreckfish in the U.S. but no management has been developed for
them, as they are considered bycatch. Blackbelly rosefish (Helicolenus dactylopterus), red bream (Beryx
decadactylus) and barrelfish (Hyperoglype perciformis) are, like wreckfish, desirable species that grow
slowly and are long-lived (30, 69, 85 and 78 years, respectively). Because of their biology and limited
habitat, they can be easily overfished. Genetic studies on some of these species show connectivity
between the U.S. and other areas of the world where they are fished in targeted fisheries. Those fisheries
could result in depletion of U.S. stocks if local recruitment is dependent on distant populations. Regional
management should be developed for the U.S. that considers all of the species landed and fisheries in
other parts of their range.
KEYWORDS: Polyprionidae, Berycidae, Scorpaenidae, Centrolophidae, Blake Plateau
227
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
BIOLOGÍA REPRODUCTIVA DE LA ANCHOVA MUGIL INCILIS HANCOCK, 1830 EN EL
MAR CARIBE CORDOBÉS, COLOMBIA
REPRODUCTIVE BIOLOGY OF PARASSI MULLET MUGIL INCILIS HANCOCK, 1830 IN
THE CORDOBA´S CARIBBEAN SEA
BIOLOGIE DE LA REPRODUCTION DE ANCHOVA MUGIL INCILIS HANCOCK, 1830 DANS
LA MER DES CARAÏBES DE CORDOBA, COLOMBIE
FREDYS F. SEGURA-GUEVARA1, GLENYS TORDECILLA-PETRO2, y CHARLES W. OLAYANIETO1
1Laboratorio de Investigación Biológico Pesquera- Universidad de Córdoba Km 1, carretera a Chinú
Carrera 23 No 2A - 20, Piso
2Lorica, Córdoba Colombia
228
RESUMEN
Para estudiar la biología reproductiva de la Anchova en el mar Caribe Cordobés, se colectaron 356
individuos entre enero y diciembre 2007, cuyas tallas y pesos oscilaron entre 18.9-45.0 cm de longitud
total y 62.0-718.0 g. Se estimó proporción sexual, índices de madurez sexual, época de desove, talla
media de madurez sexual, diámetro de ovocitos maduros y fecundidad. Se encontraron 219 hembras, 132
machos y 5 individuos indiferenciados, por lo que la proporción sexual hembra: macho observada fue
1.7:1, diferente a lo esperado; con dimorfismo sexual a la talla, puesto que las hembras alcanzan tallas
mayores que los machos. Los índices de madurez sexual muestran que la época de desove se extiende de
febrero a diciembre con picos reproductivos en marzo, junio, agosto y octubre para hembras y abril,
septiembre y noviembre para machos.La talla media de madurez sexual fue estimada en 26.8 cm LT, el
diámetro de los ovocitos fue 569 µ y la fecundidad promedio estimada fue de 250000 ovocitos. Al
relacionar toda esta información se infiere que la Lisa es un pez con desove parcial, época de
reproducción prolongada a lo largo del año, ovocitos pequeños y alta fecundidad.
PALABRAS CLAVES: Fecundidad, Ecología reproductiva, Mugilidae, Colombia
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
AN INSTITUTIONAL ASSESSMENT AND STRENGTHENING INITIATIVE FOR THE
CONSET BAY FISHING COMMUNITY IN BARBADOS
UNA INICIATIVA DE EVALUACIÓN Y FORTALECIMIENTO INSTITUCIONAL PARA LA
COMUNIDAD PESQUERA DE CONSET BAY EN BARBADOS
UNE INITIATIVE D’ÉVALUATION ET RENFORCEMENT INSTITUTIONNELLE POUR LA
COMMUNAUTÉ DE PÊCHEURS DE CONSET BAY À LA BARBADE
NEETHA SELLIAH1, KATHERINE BLACKMAN1, TRAVIS SINCKLER2, PATRICK MCCONNEY1,
DONNA KING-BRATHWAITE2, and SHELLY-ANN COX1
1
CERMES The University of the West Indies Cave Hill Campus St. Michael Bridgetown, BB11000
Barbados [email protected]
2
Policy Research, Planning and Information UnitMinistry of Environment and Drainage 1st Floor S.P.
Musson Building Hinks Street, Bridgetown BB11144 Barbados
ABSTRACT
This paper reports on one component of the project “Up-scaling Sustainable Resource Management in
Coastal Watershed Communities of Barbados‟ National Park and System of Open Spaces”which focused
on conducting apreliminary institutional assessment and strengthening initiative inthe fishing community
in Conset Bay, St. John, Barbados. The project was acollaborative effort by the Government of Barbados,
United Nations Environment Programme and The University of the West Indies. Using the Institutional
Analysis and Development (IAD) framework, the past and present governance situation was reviewed
through desktop study and both formal and informal interviews with key fisheries stakeholders and
Conset Bay fisherfolk. The review indicated that while this community is close-knit and socially
cohesive, past initiatives including the establishment of cooperatives and fisherfolk organisations had
failed. Yet, the interest in collective action to form and sustain a fisherfolk organisation remained
relatively strong. In order for fisherfolk to effectively engage with other fisheries governance stakeholders
and resolve existing fisheries issues, the project attempted to assist the community to identify some
governance mechanisms most suited to current conditions. The community determined that an informal
group of interested members was the best option and the Conset Bay advocacy group was formed. A
number of capacity building activities were conducted to engage and strengthen the group. The group set
out to accomplish some specific objectives. The paper concludes with an evaluation of progress – what
was achieved? – what were the lessons learned?
KEYWORDS: Conset Bay, Institutions, fisherfolk, Barbados
229
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
DECADAL CHANGES IN REEF FISH RECRUITMENT AT TURNEFFE ATOLL, BELIZE:
BEFORE AND AFTER LIONFISH INVASION
CAMBIOS DECENALES EN EL RECLUTAMIENTO DE PECES DE ARRECIFE EN EL
ATOLÓN TURNEFFE, BELICE: ANTES Y DESPUÉS DE LA INVASIÓN DEL PEZ LEÓN
DÉCENNALES CHANGEMENTS DANS LE RECRUTEMENT DES POISSONS DE RÉCIF À
ATOLL TURNEFFE, BELIZE: AVANT ET APRÈS L'INVASION DE LA POISSON-LION
JASON SELWYN1, DEREK HOGAN1, ALAN DOWNEY-WALL1, and PAOLO USSEGLIO2
Texas A&M University: Corpus Christi Department of Life Sciences 6300 Ocean Drive Corpus Christi,
Texas 78412 USA [email protected]
2
University of Hawaii: ManoaDepartment of Biology
1
230
ABSTRACT
Invasive lionfish have been shown to have many deleterious effects on native reef fish populations in the
western Atlantic, reducing recruitment by up to 80% and prey fish biomass by 65%. Few studies have
been able to compare baseline fish recruit communities before and after the invasion. With historical data
going back over a decade, we look at the differences in community structure before and after the lionfish
invasion at seven sites around Turneffe Atoll, Belize. Recruitment of 16 species of native reef fishes was
recorded during standard transect surveys at two depths (~4m and ~15m) within each site. Significant
differences in the abundance of some species were found across survey years, with 2002-2004 typically
having similar abundances and 2013 being most different from the others. Nonmetric multidimensional
scaling was used to compare overall community structure. We found differences in the structure of recruit
communities across this decadal time scale; with some species being more frequently observed post
invasion while others were more common prior to the invasion. Its currently unclear if the lionfish
invasion (ca. 2008 at Turneffe) is the primary factor for the observed shift in community structure or if
other factors are the primary driver (e.g. Hurricanes, coastal development, bleaching events etc.). Future
manipulative studies need to be performed to determine the primary causes of the shifts in fish
communities that are currently being observed at Turneffe Atoll.
KEYWORDS: Lionfish impacts, recruitment, coral reefs, community structure, invasive species
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
LINKING RECORDINGS OF FISH VOCALIZATION WITH OBSERVATIONS OF
SPAWNING BEHAVIOR ON A MULTI-SPECIES FISH SPAWNING AGGREGATION
VINCULACIÓN DE LAS GRABACIONES DE VOCALIZACIONES DE PESCADO CON LAS
OBSERVACIONES DEL COMPORTAMIENTO DE DESOVE EN UNA AGREGACIÓN DE
DESOVE DE VARIAS ESPECIES
LIER ENREGISTREMENTS DE VOCALISATION DE POISSON AVEC LES OBSERVATIONS
DU COMPORTEMENT REPRODUCTEUR SUR UNE AGRÉGATION DE FRAI DES
POISSONS MULTI-ESPÈCES
BRICE SEMMENS1, TIMOTHY ROWELL1, PHILLIPE BUSH2, SCOTT HEPPELL3, CHRISTY
PATTENGILL-SEMMENS4, CROY MCCOY2, and BRADLEY JOHNSON2
1
Scripps Institution of Oceanography University of California, San Diego 9500 Gilman Drive La Jolla,
CA 92093-0202 USA [email protected]
2
Department of the EnvironmentCayman Islands Government PO Box 486GT Grand Cayman Cayman
Islands
3
Department of Fish and WildlifeOregon State University 104 Nash Hall Corvallis Oregon 97331 USA
4
Reef Environmental Education Foundation (REEF) PO Box 246 Key LargoFlorida 33037 USA
ABSTRACT
Over the last decade, researchers have increasingly used passive acoustics to discover and monitor fish
spawning aggregations (FSAs) in terms of both species presence and relative abundance. A growing
library of species-specific vocalizations made on spawning sites has aided these survey efforts. However,
because most Caribbean reef FSAs occur at remote locations and in deep (>40 m) water, coupled visual
and acoustic observations during spawning have proven difficult to collect. Since 2002, scientists and
volunteers from the Reef Environmental Education Foundation (REEF) and the Cayman Islands
Department of Environment (CIDOE) have been studying a shallow (30 m) and easily accessible multispecies FSA on the west end of Little Cayman, Cayman Islands, through the Grouper Moon Program
(GMP). In February 2013, GMP personnel deployed a continuously recording passive acoustic
hydrophone at the FSA site, and subsequently monitored nightly spawning behaviors of aggregating
species through both visual surveys and underwater video over a 5-day period. During this period the
hydrophone recorded vocalizations from Nassau grouper (Epinephelus striatus), red hind (Epinephelus
guttatus), black grouper (Mycteroperca bonaci) and yellowfin grouper (Mycteroperca venenosa). Here
we report on the link between temporal patterns in species-specific aggregate vocalizations and
observations of courtship and spawning behaviors.
KEYWORDS: Nassau grouper, Passive acoustics, spawning behavior, fish sounds
231
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
A SOCIAL HISTORY OF THE FLORIDA KEYS COMMERCIAL SPINY LOBSTER FISHERY
AND MANAGEMENT EFFECTS: LESSONS FOR SUSTAINABLE FISHING
COMMUNITIESUNA HISTORIA SOCIAL DE LA PESQUERÍA DE LANGOSTA ESPINOSA
COMERCIAL DE LOS CAYOS DE FLORIDA Y EFECTOS DE GESTIÓN: LECCIONES PARA
LAS COMUNIDADES PESQUERAS SOSTENIBLESUNE
HISTOIRE SOCIALE DE LA PÊCHE FLORIDA KEYS COMMERCIAL ÉPINEUX DE
HOMARD ET EFFETS DE GESTION: LEÇONS POUR LES COMMUNAUTÉS DE PÊCHE
DURABLES
MANOJ SHIVLANI
Northern Taiga Ventures, Inc. (NTVI) 10600 SW 131 Court Miami, Florida 33186-3455 USA
[email protected]
232
ABSTRACT
The Florida Keys spiny lobster fishery has been among the region's most managed fisheries, both in terms
of the overall history of management and the complex of regulatory approaches adopted. Since 1991, the
fishery has been managed using an individual transferable effort (ITE) program, which was supposed to
have reduced capacity and improved efficiency. This study evaluates the growth of the spiny lobster
fishery from its origins as a bait fishery to its rise as the region's most lucrative industry and how
management has shaped effort and participation. The study also analyzes how the present management
approach has affected both the fishery and fishing communities, showing that management efforts
undertaken without care given to the social dimensions of the fishery have weakened the fishing
communities, facilitated waterfront gentrification, and undermined the region's fishing industry. The
study's results have broad implications for fisheries management approaches that fail to address the
importance of social capital and networks and which can have severe, unexpected circumstances on the
sustainability on fishing communities.
KEYWORDS: Spiny lobster, fishing communities, social capital, individual transferable quotas,
gentrification
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
A PARTICIPATORY CO-MANAGEMENT STRATEGY FOR THE USE OF FISH
AGGREGATION DEVICES IN DOMINICA AND ST. VINCENT TO SUSTAIN THE
CARIBBEAN PELAGIC FISHERY AND COMMUNITIES THAT DEPEND ON IT
ESTRATEGIA PARTICIPATORIA DE CO-MANEJO PARA EL USO DE AGREGADORES
ARTIFICIALES QUE PERMITA LA PESCA SOSTENIBLE DE PECES PELÁGICOS EN LAS
COMUNIDALES CARIBEÑAS DE DOMINICA Y SAN VICENTE
UNE STRATÉGIE DE CO-GESTION PARTICIPATIVE DANS L’UTILISATION DES
MÉTHODES D’AGRÉGATION DE POISSONS EN DOMINIQUE ET À ST. VINCENT POUR
SOUTENIR LA PÊCHE PÉLAGIQUE CARIBÉENNE ET LES COMMUNAUTÉS QUI EN
DÉPENDENT
CHARLES SIDMAN1, KAI LORENZEN2, and RIVIERE SEBASTIEN3
Florida Sea Grant 1762 McCarty Drive Gainesville , FL 32611-0400 USA [email protected]
2
Fisheries and Aquatic SciencesUniversity of Florida 7922 NW 71st Street Gainesville FL 32653 USA
3Dominica Fisheries Division, Roseau Fiseries Complex Bayfront Roseau Dominica, West Indies
1
ABSTRACT
Fisheries are an important source of food, income and cultural identity for many Caribbean coastal
communities. While reef fisheries resources in the Caribbean are frequently overexploited, pelagic
resources may generate alternative economic benefits to coastal communities and possibly divert pressure
from reef fish resources. The key to the efficient harvesting of thinly-distributed pelagic fisheries
resources is the use of fish aggregation devices – man-made structures that float on or just below the
surface of the ocean and attract pelagic fish. Historically, FADs were deployed by individual fishers or
close-knit groups who then managed exploitation of the aggregated fisheries resources. More recently,
governments and other organizations have deployed public FADs that are not associated with exclusive
use rights in an attempt to make the technology more widely available. Public FADs may, however, be
exploited less efficiently and also give rise to new conflicts related to crowding of fishers around them.
The Caribbean Regional Fisheries Mechanism, Florida Sea Grant, and the Dominica and St. Vincent and
the Grenadines Fisheries Divisions have partnered to implement an integrated data collection, analysis,
and engagement process to strengthen cooperation among fishers and between fishers and government
stakeholders to support the co-management of FAD fishery resources. The results are being used to
strengthen data collection, enhance local outreach capabilities, and offer recommendations that can assist
the efforts of Dominica, St. Vincent and the Grenadines, and other Caribbean governments to support comanagement of their developing FAD fisheries.
KEYWORDS: Pelagic Fisheries, Socio-economics, Stakeholder Engagement, Fish Aggregation Device
233
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
DESCRIPTION OF THE SPEAR FISHING EFFORT ON THE REEFS OF BARBADOS
DESCRIPCIÓN DEL ESFUERZO DE PESCA SUBMARINA DE LOS ARRECIFES DE
BARBADOS
EFFORT DE PÊCHE SOUS-MARINE DES RÉCIFS DE LA BARBADE
NIKOLA SIMPSON, DAVID GILL, RACHEL TURNER, and HAZEL OXENFORD
CERMES, University of the West Indies Cave Hill St.Michael, Barbados [email protected]
234
ABSTRACT
The spear fishery of Barbados is poorly documented and as such, its importance and contribution to the
island‟s fishing industry is relatively unknown due to the multitude of landing sites and informal sales of
a diverse catch. This study attempts to fill some of the many gaps in the documented knowledge of the
spear fishery, particularly its importance in contributing to the total annual landings of the reef fishery.
Information was gathered through interviews with fishers, participant observation on fishing trips and
measurements of a subsample of catches to characterise the spear fishers in Barbados, describe their
catch, fishing and marketing practices, and estimate the contribution of spear fishing to the reef fishery.
The number of commercial and recreational spear fishers currently active along all coasts of Barbados
was estimated along with the level of livelihood dependence on the fishery.The results of this study will
contribute to on going efforts to understand the importance of the reef fishery and improve the sustainable
management of the island‟s reef resources.
KEYWORDS: Spear fishery, effort, reefs, Barbados, reef fisheries
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
AGE AND GROWTH VALIDATION OF THE COMMON THRESHER SHARK (ALOPIAS
VULPINUS) IN THE NORTHEASTERN PACIFIC OCEAN
VALIDACIÓN DE LA EDAD Y CRECIMIENTO DEL TIBURÓN ZORRO COMÚN (ALOPIAS
VULPINUS) EN EL NORESTE DEL OCÉANO PACÍFICO
VALIDATION DE L'ÂGE ET DE LA CROISSANCE DU REQUIN RENARD
COMMUN(ALOPIAS VULPINUS) DANS L'OCÉAN ATLANTIQUE NORD-EST
NATALIE SPEAR1, R.J.DAVID WELLS1, and SUZANNE KOHIN2
Texas A&M Galveston 1001 Texas Clipper Road Galveston, TX 77553 USA [email protected]
2
Southwest Fisheries Science CenterNational Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 8901 La Jolla
Shores Drive La Jolla CA 92037 USA
1
ABSTRACT
The common thresher shark (Alopias vulpinus) supports important commercial and recreational fisheries
in the northeastern Pacific Ocean. It is a relatively long-lived species with a late age-at-maturity, thus a
comprehensive understanding of the status of the thresher shark population is essential to guiding
sustainable management decisions. The purpose of this study was to use oxytetracycline (OTC) tagging
to validate the band pair deposition rate in thresher shark vertebrae. OTC is absorbed by calcifying
structures in the thresher shark vertebrae so that time-at-liberty can be correlated to the number of band
pairs deposited post tagging for direct validation. OTC tagging occurred off southern California from
1998-2012. A total of 2,137 thresher sharks were tagged with conventional tags and 1,445 of these
animals, ranging in size from 56 to 309 cm fork length (FL), were injected with OTC. Vertebrae from 57
OTC-tagged and recaptured animals ranging from 58 to 168 cm FL at the time of tagging have been
returned. Twenty-six of these samples are from individuals at-liberty for over one year, with a maximum
time-at-liberty of 1,389 days (3.8 years). Annual vertebral band pair deposition rates are currently being
determined and will be used to estimate growth rates of the thresher shark at multiple life stages. This
information can be used to provide accurate age and growth models for the common thresher shark in the
northeast Pacific Ocean and provide information necessary for accurate stock assessments.
KEYWORDS: Age and growth, common thresher shark, oxytetracycline (OTC), validation
235
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
RELATIVE ABUNDANCE AND SIZE STRUCTURE OF RED SNAPPER, LUTJANUS
CAMPECHANUS, ACROSS HABITAT TYPES IN THE NORTHWESTERN GULF OF MEXICO
LA ABUNDANCIA RELATIVA Y ESTRUCTURA DE TALLAS DE PARGO ROJO, LUTJANUS
CAMPECHANUS, A TRAVÉS DE LOS TIPOS DE HÁBITAT EN EL NOROESTE DEL GOLFO
DE MÉXICO
L'ABONDANCE RELATIVE ET LA STRUCTURE DE TAILLE DE VIVANEAU ROUGE,
LUTJANUS CAMPECHANUS, TOUS LES TYPES D'HABITAT DANS LE NORD-OUEST DU
GOLFE DU MEXIQUE
MATTHEW STREICH, MATTHEW AJEMIAN, JENNIFER WETZ, and GREG STUNZ
Harte Research Institute for Gulf of Mexico Stud Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi 6300 Ocean
Drive Corpus Christi, TX 78412 USA [email protected]
236
ABSTRACT
Artificial reef development is a popular management tool used to enhance fish stocks, provide additional
recreational fishing and diving opportunities, and increase the quality or quantity of existing habitat for
marine species. Despite the popularity of artificial reef programs, the impact of this new structured habitat
on economically and ecologically important species is not fully understood. Specifically, few fisheriesindependent surveys regarding the ecological performance of fish on artificial and natural habitats have
been conducted. Therefore, the goal of this study was to evaluate the relative abundance and size structure
of red snapper across three different habitat types (standing petroleum platforms, artificial reefs, and
natural banks) in the northwestern Gulf of Mexico. Between October 2012 and July 2013, we conducted
103 vertical longline drops and captured 396 red snapper ranging from 282 to 735 mm TL. Red snapper
CPUE averaged 0.77 fish/drop/minute and was significantly higher on natural bank habitats (1.01
fish/drop/minute) than artificial reefs (0.61 fish/drop/minute). Mean TL of red snapper differed by hook
size, with larger hooks sampling larger fish. Across habitat types, mean TL was greater on natural and
artificial reefs than standing platforms. The results of our study have important implications for artificial
reef management and recovery of Gulf of Mexico red snapper. Further use of standardized fisheryindependent surveys and additional data regarding habitat specific age and growth will help elucidate the
role artificial reefs play in maintaining reef fish stocks in the region.
KEYWORDS: Artificial reef, relative abundance, size structure, habitat, red snapper
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
ARTIFICIAL REEFS IN THE NORTHWESTERN GULF OF MEXICO AS FISHERIES
HABITAT
ARRECIFES ARTIFICIALES DEL NOROESTE DEL GOLFO DE MEXICO COMO
HÁBITAT PARA LA PESCA
DES RÉCIFS ARTIFICIELS COMME HABITAT POUR LES PÊCHERIES DANS LE
NORD-OUEST DU GOLFE DU MEXIQUE
GREG STUNZ1, JENNIFER WETZ1, MATTHEW AJEMIAN1, MATTHEW STREICH1, DALE
SHIVLEY2, and BROOKE SHIPLEY-LOZANO2
1
Texas A&M University - Corpus Christi Harte Research Institute 6300 Ocean Drive Corpus Christi, TX
78412 USA [email protected]
2
Texas Parks and Wildlife Department Texas Parks and Wildlife Department
ABSTRACT
Artificial reefs are an important marine habitat type supporting a variety of reef fish and associated
populations in the northwestern Gulf of Mexico. These reefs can consist of a variety of materials, but the
most common in this region is oil and gas platforms. After many decades in service entire ecosystems
have developed around the relatively large structures, in what would otherwise be a featureless bottom,
meriting them remaining as reefs. Our research group is encouraging what we consider wise scientific
practices in reefing these structures; however, much work is still needed to determine what makes the
"best" reefs. We have partnered with the Texas Parks and Wildlife Artificial Reef Program to asses fish
community structure associated with artificial reefs at several reef sites varying in depth, distance from
shore, complexity of materials, and number of structures. These also include before-after comparisons of
newly reefed structures. Specifically, we are examining vertical distribution patterns of fish, seasonal
habitat use, and how physical differences among sites (e.g., water depth, distance from shore, type,
number of and complexity of structures) affect species abundance and richness. This presentation will be
an introduction to oil and gas platforms as artificial reefs, the pros and cons of this practice, and set the
stage for a series of technical presentations that will detail our recent results of ROV, diver-based surveys,
and vertical longline fishery independent sampling summarizing two years of research studying these
structures compared to natural banks.
KEYWORDS: Artificial reefs, reef fish, red snapper, Oil and Gas Platforms, ROV
237
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
POPULATION BIOLOGY OF PTEROIS VOLITANS IN THE COASTAL WATERS OF
NORTHEAST FLORIDA
BIOLOGÍA DE LA POBLACIÓNDE PTEROIS VOLITANS EN LASAGUAS COSTERAS DEL
NORESTE FLORIDA
LA BIOLOGIE DES POPULATIONS DES PTEROIS VOLITANS DANS LES EAUX CÔTIÈRES
DU NORDEST FLORIDA
MARYKATE SWENARTON and ERIC JOHNSON
University of North Florida 1 UNF Drive Jacksonville, FL 32084 USA [email protected]
238
ABSTRACT
The Indo-Pacific lionfish (Pterois volitans), a predatory marine invader into the western Atlantic, Gulf of
Mexico, and Caribbean Sea, has caused harm to native species through its‟ proliferation. Scientific
investigations on the impacts of lionfish have been focused predominantly in tropical ecosystems, and no
research has been focused on the southern portion of the South Atlantic Bight. Generally, fish life history
parameters, especially growth rates, vary with a suite of environmental (e.g., temperature), biological and
ecological (e.g., prey availability) factors; and as a result, the population dynamics of lionfish will vary
regionally and among ecosystems. This research aims to provide baseline data on population biology for
lionfish in a new region, including accurate age, growth, and demographic information. Approximately
1000 specimens of lionfish were caught between May and August 2013 off the coast of Jacksonville,
Florida during local tournaments. Length frequency analysis revealed a bimodal population with distinct
cohorts that are growing at an exceptional rate. Analysis of otoliths to precisely measure age and growth
is ongoing. These data will be used to determine lionfish: (1) size at age (2) population age structure and
(3) growth rate in the region. This study will fill key knowledge gaps on population dynamics of lionfish
in the South Atlantic Bight and provides information on age and growth of lionfish necessary to
understanding the impacts lionfish in this region.
KEYWORDS: Lionfish, population dynamics, growth, Florida
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
DIET AND TROPHIC ECOLOGY OF RED SNAPPER, LUTJANUS CAMPECHANUS, ON
NATURAL AND ARTIFICIAL REEFS IN THE NORTHERN GULF OF MEXICO
DIETA Y ECOLOGÍA TRÓFICA DE PARGO ROJO, LUTJANUS CAMPECHANUS, EN LOS
ARRECIFES NATURALES Y ARTIFICIALES EN EL NORTE DEL GOLFO DE MÉXICO
RÉGIME ALIMENTAIRE ET L'ÉCOLOGIE TROPHIQUE DE VIVANEAU, LUTJANUS
CAMPECHANUS, LE NATUREL ET LES RÉCIFS ARTIFICIELS DANS LE NORD DU GOLFE
DU MEXIQUE
JOSEPH TARNECKI1 and WILLIAM PATTERSON III2
University of West Florida Dauphin Island Sea Lab 101 Bienville blvd Dauphin Island, Alabama 36528
United States [email protected]
2
Dauphin Island Sea LabUniversity of South Alabama 101 Bienville blvd Dauphin Island Alabama 36528
United States
1
ABSTRACT
Red snapper were sampled from 2009-2011 at natural (n=35) and artificial (n=28) reef sites as part of a
broader study of reef fish feeding ecology at natural versus artificial reefs in the northern Gulf of Mexico.
Stomachs (n=708) were extracted and their contents preserved for gut content analysis, while muscle
tissue samples (n=200) were dissected and frozen for IR-MS analysis (d13C, d15N, and d34S). Fortyeight percent of stomachs had identifiable prey. An unplanned factor was incorporated into the study
when the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill (DHOS) occurred in summer 2010. Fish length (PERMANOVA,
p=0.028), habitat type (PERMANOVA, p=0.028), and the DHOS (PERMANOVA, p=0.004) all
significantly affected red snapper diet, but interactions between habitat type and the DHOS
(PERMANOVA, p=0.010), and length and the DHOS (PERMANOVA, p=0.020) also were significant.
Diet differences associated with red snapper total length were attributable to ontogenetic shifts among
size classes. The DHOS effect was driven by a decrease in zooplankton contribution to snapper diet and
greater amounts of benthic prey items. Stable isotope data indicated an increase in red snapper trophic
position (15N enrichment, ANOVA, p<0.001) and an increase in benthic versus pelagic prey (34S
depletion, ANOVA, p<0.001) post-spill. Results clearly indicate the DHOS affected red snapper diet and,
potentially, prey resources. Study results also confirm the utility of stable isotope analysis to infer aspects
of reef fish trophic ecology.
KEYWORDS: Red snapper, oil spill, artificial reefs, diet, trophic
239
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
REEF FISH SPAWNING AGGREGATIONS (FSAS) IN THE FLORIDA KEYS: AN UPDATE
REEF AGREGACIONES REPRODUCTIVAS DE PECES EN LOS CAYOS DE FLORIDA:
ACTUALIZACIÓN
POISSONS DE RÉCIF ZONES DE FRAI DANS LES KEYS DE FLORIDE: UNE MISE À JOUR
CHRIS TAYLOR1, TODD KELLISON2, DANIELLE MORLEY3, and ALEJANDRO ACOSTA3
NOAA/NOS/NCCOS CCFHR 101 Pivers Island Road Beaufort, NC 28516 USA [email protected]
2
NOAA/NMFS/SEFSCBeaufort Laboratory 101 Pivers Island Road Beaufort NC 28516 USA
3
FWC/FWRI 2796 Overseas Highway Marathon FL 33050 USA 2FWC/FWRI 2796 Overseas Highway
Marathon FL 33050 USA
1
240
ABSTRACT
Since 2007, we have been surveying historical and reported reef fish spawning agregations (FSAs) in the
Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary. Over the 6 years we have documented geomorphologies
common among several species-specific FSAs. Using coordinated fishery acoustic and diver visual
surveys, we have also found significant elevated densities of fish at some of the reported sites, including
elevated densities of black grouper and cubera snapper, several hundred permit to over 2000 gray
snappers exhibiting (and have confirmed over several years, the absence of fish from other historical
FSAs). While aggregations have been found, spawning has yet to be observed at any aggregation. Since
2012, we implemented a new wide-swath fishery multibeam sonar system that has increased the search
volume in our FSA surveys by orders of magnitude while allowing us to map seafloor topography at the
FSA sites. We will provide an update on this research effort, with specific comments on the importance of
these data to regulatory review process for the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary.
KEYWORDS: Reef fish spawning aggregations, fishery sonar, marine sanctuaries
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
INVASIVE LIONFISH AND CIGUATERA FISH POISONING IN THE GULF AND
CARIBBEAN: WHAT DO WE REALLY KNOW?
PEZ LEÓN INVASOR Y ENVENENAMIENTO POR CIGUATERA PESCADO EN EL GOLFO
Y EL CARIBE: ¿QUÉ SABEMOS REALMENTE?
LIONFISH INVASIVE ET CIGUATERA DANS LE GOLFE ET DES CARAÏBES: QUE
SAVONS-NOUS VRAIMENT?
PATRICIA TESTER1, R. WAYNE LITAKER2, and JAMES MORRIS2
1
NOAA Ocean.Tester 101 Pivers Island Road 381 Gillikin Road Beaufort, NC 28516 USA
[email protected]
2
Center for Coastal Fisheries and Habitat Research, NCCOSNational Ocean Service, NOAA 101 Pivers
Island Road Beaufort North Carolina 28516 USA
ABSTRACT
Ciguatera fish poisoning (CFP) in the Gulf and Caribbean is geographically variable, difficult to diagnose
and is generally managed by local knowledge. CFP is under reported in endemic areas by as much as 90%
and the requirements to report it are not universal or uniform. Anecdotal information about CFP and its
effects are widespread and in some cases confound and contradict scientific explanations. The promotion
of recreational and commercial harvesting of invasive lionfish poses a unique dilemma to the region
where managers are now seeking lionfish-specific data on ciguatoxicity. We describe a current project to
obtain broad-scale ciguatoxin levels for lionfish from the Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico. These data will
be used to further inform managers on the probability of CFP from lionfish in their region. We also
provide the state of science on CFP research including how to identify the microalgae that produce
ciguatoxins, monitoring and detection methods and the challenges and limitations of current ciguatoxin
testing methods.
KEYWORDS: Ciguatera fish poisoning, lionfish, management, detection
241
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
SEAGRASS COMMUNITY RESPONSES TO THE DECLINE IN QUEEN CONCH (STROMBUS
GIGAS) POPULATIONS
RESPUESTAS DE LAS COMUNIDADES DE PASTOS MARINOS A LA REDUCCIÓN DE
POBLACIONES DE CARACOL (STROMBUS GIGAS)
RÉPONSES DES COMMUNAUTÉS D’HERBIERS MARINS À LA RÉDUCTION DES
POPULATIONS DE LAMBI (STROMBUS GIGAS)
ALEXANDER TEWFIK
John G. Shedd Aquarium Daniel P. Haerther Center for Conservation and R 1200 S. Lake Shore Drive
Chicago, IL 60605 United Sates [email protected]
242
ABSTRACT
The crisis in the world‟s fisheries is well documented with the majority of stocks being fully or
overexploited. The consequences of these activities go well beyond a simple decline in target species but
include a number of cascading effects – release of prey species, alteration of trophic dynamics, and
simplification of complex habitats. Queen conchs have been traditionally harvested throughout the region
for centuries and represent a major economic activity supplying the demands of local people, tourism and
export markets. The drastic reductions of Queen conch (Strombus gigas), a naturally abundant component
of shallow-water ecosystems, over the last several decades have given rise to concerns over the future of
these fisheries and associated livelihoods. However, what have not been sufficiently explored are the
potential negative impacts the loss of Queen conch has on ecosystems. My work begins to illustrate the
fundamental shifts in seagrass communities that result from declining Queen conch populations. This
includes alterations in habitat structure and the diversity of consumer functional groups. Such broader
community changes may reduce the potential for recovery of Queen conch populations and associated
livelihoods even under the strictest management regimes.
KEYWORDS: Trophic cascades, shifts, biodiversity, habitats
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
TRAINING OPPORTUNITY AT THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA FOR CARIBBEAN-BASED
FISHERIES AND MARINE RESOURCE PROFESSIONALS
OPORTUNIDADES DE FORMACIÓN DE LA UNIVERSIDAD DE FLORIDA PARA LA PESCA
DEL CARIBE BASADOS Y PROFESIONALES DE RECURSOS MARINOS
POSSIBILITÉ DE FORMATION À L'UNIVERSITÉ DE FLORIDE POUR UNE PÊCHE
CARAÏBES-BASED ET PROFESSIONNELS DES RESSOURCES MARINES
RANDEL THOMPSON1 and CHARLES SIDMAN2
1
Department of Marine Resources C.A. Paul Southwell Industrial park , St Kitts and Nevis
[email protected]
2
Florida Sea Grant University of Florida Gainesville Florida 32611 USA
ABSTRACT
The Sea Grant College Program at the University of Florida, The Billfish Foundation, the Gulf and
Caribbean Fisheries Institute, and the Caribbean Regional Fisheries Mechanism have partnered to offer
Caribbean-based marine resource and fisheries professionals a four-month training opportunity at the
University of Florida, USA. Topics include fisheries management, stock assessment, data analysis
methods, or geospatial technologies. Applicants must possess a bachelor‟s degree and be employed by a
resource management ministry or government agency located in a CRFM member state. Each year, the
successful candidate will be matched with Florida Sea Grant-affiliated faculty at the University of Florida
whose expertise aligns with their professional interests. The selected candidate will apply knowledge
gained to advance an ongoing or proposed project of their choosing that is related to a marine resource or
fishery management need identified by their ministry or government agency. Mr. Randel Thompson, a
fisheries biologist with the St. Kitts and Nevis Department of Marine Resources, was selected as the first
recipient of this fellowship, offered spring 2013. Mr. Thompson applied the skills learned to identify
ways that GIS can aid in the planning and management of fish aggregation devices. Mrs. Anginette
Murray, a marine analyst with the Jamaica Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries, has been selected to
receive the fellowship starting in spring 2014. This training opportunity supports our collective mission to
promote greater collaboration, synergy, and the sharing of knowledge among organizations that manage
and promote the sustainability of shared Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean fishery resources.
KEYWORDS: Fellowship, training opportunity, professional development
243
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
ESTADO ACTUAL Y ADMINISTRACION DE LOS RECURSOS PESQUEROS EN CUBA
CURRENT STATE AND MANAGEMENT OF FISHERIES RESOURCES IN CUBA
SITUATION ACTUELLE ET GESTION DES RESSOURCES DE PECHE EN CUBA
RAFAEL TIZOL1 y ELISA GARCIA2
Centro de Investigaciones Pesqueras 5ta Avenida y 248 Barlovento Havana, Cuba [email protected]
2
Directora de Regulaciones Pesqueras y Ciencias MinisterioMinisterio de la Industria Alimentaria
Avenida 41 e/ 48 y 50 Playa Havana Cuba
1
244
ABSTRACT
La mayor parte de los recursos pesqueros de Cuba se encuentran plenamente explotados y se encuentran
bajo un sistema de manejo y administración que implementa y controla las medidas regulatorias para
lograr la sostenibilidad de la actividad pesquera. Aun así y bajo el efecto de múltiples causas las capturas
de forma general han experimentado un decremento sostenido. Esta situación ha obligado a las
autoridades cubanas a establecer los principios básicos que permitan la sostenibilidad en el tiempo de los
recursos pesqueros sin renunciar a los beneficios económicos que esta actividad significa para el país
garantizando una gestión pesquera participativa que contemple el equilibrio de intereses y orientada a la
conservación y aprovechamiento racional de los recursos.
PALABRAS CLAVES: Fisheries, fisheries policy, Cuba
l
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
PROTECTED AREAS AND FISHING ACTIVITIES IN THE GULF OF MEXICO AND THE
MEXICAN CARIBBEAN. WHAT NEEDS TO BE LEARNED?
ÁREAS PROTEGIDAS Y ACTIVIDADES DE PESCA EN EL GOLFO DE MÉXICO Y EL
CARIBE MEXICANO. QUÉ HAY QUE APRENDER
DES AIRES PROTÉGÉES ET DES ACTIVITÉS DE PÊCHE DANS LE GOLFE DE MEXIQUE
ET DANS LES CARAÏBES MEXICAINES. QU’EST-CE ON DOIT APPRENDRE?
EDGAR TORRES-IRINEO, SILVIA SALAS, JORGE EUAN-ÁVILA, LEOPOLDO PALOMO EVA
CORONADO, and DANIEL QUIJANO
Cinvestav Unidad Mérida Km. 6, Antigua Carretera a Progreso, Apdo. Postal 73-CORDEMEX. Mérida,
Yucatán 97310 México [email protected]
ABSTRACT
The use of exclusion zones as management tools in fisheries for habitat protection and for species
conservation has a long history around the world. The growing popularity of Marine Protected Areas
(MPA) and the potential benefits about species conservation and to environmental aspects is widely
acknowledged. However, little analysis accounting for enforcement and the impact that this protected
zones has on the users of marine resources is less clear. Given the current interest in MPAs, the debate is
also growing. In this study a reflexion on the impact of these protected zones on fishers is placed based on
data collected through a Vessel monitoring system. An analysis was undertaken to assess the level of
incursion fishers make on protected areas; six month of data collected on daily basis, in four states, were
used for such analysis. The results show that fishers can cross these areas for transit or for fishing
activities. The proportion of areas used for fishing varies from state and type of fisheries. Biogeographic
conditions and state of the fisheries in each case can force fishers to “invade” some areas while searching
for their target species. A discussion is presented addressing the need to evaluate the effect of protected
areas on coastal communities and the advantage of involving fishers and communities in the decisionmaking process to implement MPAs.
KEYWORDS: MPAs, Vessel Monitoring System, Gulf of Mexico, Caribbean, fisheries management
245
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
sTRASLOCACIÓN Y REPOBLAMIENTO DEL CARACOL PALA, STROMBUS GIGAS EN EL
SECTOR CENTRO DEL ÁREA MARINA PROTEGIDA SEAFLOWER, COLOMBIA
TRANSLOCATION AND RESTOCKING OF THE QUEEN CONCH, STROMBUS GIGAS IN
THE CENTRAL ZONE OF MARINE PROTECTED AREA SEAFLOWER, COLOMBIA
TRANSLOCATION ET LE REPEUPLEMENT DU LAMBI, STROMBUS GIGAS DANS LA
ZONE CENTRALE DE PROTECTION MARINE SEAFLOWER, COLOMBIE
FORBES TRISHA y HEINS BENT
Secretaria de Agricultura y Pesca-Gobernacion San Andrés , Colombia [email protected]
246
RESUMEN
El caracol pala, Strombus gigas, es una especie con alta importancia histórica, social, cultural y
económica en el Archipiélago de San Andrés, Providencia y Santa Catalina –ASPS (localizados entre 11°
30‟ y 16° 30‟ N y 78° 28‟ y 82° 00‟ W). Sin embargo, durante los últimos años la población del Caracol
Pala en la Isla de providencia (AMP centro Seaflower) ha disminuido considerablemente, siendo la pesca
de individuos juveniles, la extracción del producto en épocas de veda (1 de junio- 31 de octubre) unos de
los posibles causantes. En mayo del 2012, se estimó la densidad y abundancia del recurso mediante
evaluaciones visuales con buceo autónomo (scuba) y se obtuvo una densidad de 6,79 ±20,97 ind.ha-1,
reflejando que no se ha producido una recuperación de la población de la especie en el área. En miras de
promover la recuperación y la conservación de esta especie, el gobierno departamental junto con
instituciones como Coralina, la Universidad Nacional, la AUNAP y fundaciones locales, ha desarrollado
durante los últimos 6 Años actividades de re-poblamiento del caracol pala en la Isla de Providencia, por
medio de traslocación de individuos juveniles, semiadultos y adultos desde el Cayo Serrana y Cayo
Roncador. Como resultado a la fecha se han liberado en la isla de providencia más de 15.000 Caracoles
Juveniles (round Shell) y Adultos (breadth Leaf); se espera que con la continua participación de la
comunidad e nstituciones locales, nacionales e internacionales seguir contribuyendo en la preservación de
este recurso pesquero
PALABRAS CLAVES: Strombus gigas, AMP centro Seaflower, translocación, repoblamiento
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
PELAGIC RECREATIONAL FISHING AND ECONOMIC GROWTH IN COLOMBIA
PESCA RECREATIVA PELÁGICA Y CRECIMIENTO ECONÓMICO EN COLOMBIA
PÊCHE SPORTIVE PÉLAGIQUE ET LA CROISSANCE ÉCONOMIQUE EN COLOMBIE
KRISTINA TROTTA, BRENDAN MACKESEY, PETER CHAIBONGSAI, and ELLEN PEEL
The Billfish Foundation, Nova Southeastern University 715 SW 4TH STREET Apt 4 Fort Lauderdale, FL
Florida 33312 United States [email protected]
ABSTRACT
Recreational highly migratory species (HMS) fisheries can achieve long-term sustainable growth through
domestic and international tourism. Despite the economic opportunities provided by recreational HMS
fishing, socioeconomic impacts have generally been understudied. This report provides a baseline for the
economic importance of recreational HMS fishing in Colombia. Data were gathered for this report
through detailed surveys distributed to recreational anglers in Colombia in the fall of 2012. Survey
responses were analyzed and compared to the results from a similar study performed by The Billfish
Foundation (TBF) in the Northern Caribbean. Findings show that Colombian anglers are willing to spend
a considerable amount of money to pursue sport fish species, and that many opportunities are available to
expand not only the current recreational fishing industry, but also the conservation efforts surrounding
that industry. By expounding upon these results, this report offers insight to recreational HMS fisheries
managers who must tackle significant challenges in developing effective regional management strategies.
The ultimate goal of this report aligns with TBF‟s mission to improve the standing of recreational fishing
and associated tourism industries as an economic priority.
KEYWORDS: Billfish, Colombia, recreational fisheries, economic impacts, HMS
247
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
AN ASSESSMENT OF OFFSHORE PLATFORM DECOMMISSIONING ALTERNATIVES
USING ECOSYSTEM SERVICES
UNA EVALUACIÓN DE OFFSHORE ALTERNATIVAS DESMANTELAMIENTO
PLATAFORMA USAR SERVICIOS DE LOS ECOSISTEMAS
UNE ÉVALUATION DE PLATES-FORMES OFFSHORE DÉMANTÈLEMENT
ALTERNATIVES EN UTILISANT LES SERVICES ÉCOSYSTÉMIQUES
STEPHEN TRUCHON1, LOUIS BRZUZY2, and MARK FONSECA3
1
Shell Projects and Technology 3333 Highway 6 South Houston, TX 77082 USA
[email protected]
2
Shell Exploration and Production Co. 150 North Dairy Ashford Houston Texas 77079 USA
3
CSA Ocean Sciences Inc. 8502 SW Kansas Avenue Stuart Florida 34997 USA
248
ABSTRACT
Offshore platforms can contribute to the productivity of marine ecosystems thereby generating local and
regional economic benefits. These benefits form the basis for incorporating the platform into a Rigs-toReefs program when it is retired. Several of Shell‟s deepwater assets in the Gulf of Mexico have been in
operation for over 35 years and extend to over 1,000 feet deep. Few studies have been published on the
ecology of marine life inhabiting deepwater platforms such as these. To begin to understand the specific
contribution of a platform as a reef, a stratified (across depth down the platform) study was performed on
one of Shell‟s assets using Remotely Operated Vessel (ROV) video footage to assess fish and sessile
biota communities. The study revealed clear depth-related patterns for visually conspicuous epibiota
(Lophelia pertusa) as well as numerous species of reef and pelagic fishes. Data were used to construct a
matrix to rank ecosystem services with respect to several decommissioning alternatives,
including: complete removal, topple in place, and partial removal. The ranking illustrated that a high
level of ecosystem services were provided by the partial removal alternative, in which the upper jacket is
cut to a depth of 85‟ and either placed in a Rigs-to-Reefs program planning area or placed on the seafloor
and alongside the lower portion of the jacket. Information from this study may be used to support the
engineering design process so that ecosystem services are considered when selecting an appropriate
decommissioning alternative.
KEYWORDS: Platform, Rigs-to-Reef; decommissioning; ecosystem services
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
GENETIC POPULATION STRUCTURE OF CARIBBEAN SPINY LOBSTER BETWEEN
ADVECTIVE AND RETENTIVE OCEANOGRAPHIC ENVIRONMENTS
ESTRUCTURA GENÉTICA DE LA POBLACIÓN DE LA LANGOSTA ESPINOSA DEL
CARIBE ENTRE LOS AMBIENTES OCEANOGRÁFICOS DE ADVECCIÓN Y RETENCIÓN
STRUCTURE GÉNÉTIQUE DES POPULATIONS DE LANGOUSTE BLANCHE DES
CARAÏBES ENTRE LES MILIEUX OCÉANOGRAPHIQUES ADVECTION ET DE
RÉTENTION
NATHAN TRUELOVE1, STEVE BOX2, MARK BUTLER IV3, DON BEHRINGER JR4 and
RICHARD PREZIOSI1
1
University of Manchester Faculty of Life Sciences Manchester, M13 9PT United Kingdom
[email protected]
2
Smithsonian National Museum of Natural HistorySmithsonian Marine Station Fort Pierce Florida 34949
USA
3
Old Dominion UniversityDepartment of Biological Sciences Norfolk Virginia 23529 USA
4
University of Florida, School of Forest Resources and Conservation, Gainesville, Florida 32653 USA
ABSTRACT
Understanding ecologically relevant patterns of connectivity, defined as the extent to which populations
in different parts of a species‟ range are linked by the exchange of eggs, larvae, juveniles or adults is an
important factor for helping managers build ecological resilience into marine protected areas. We took
advantage of a recently developed microsatellite multiplex protocol to perform a study of genetic
connectivity in Panulirus argus between advective and retentive oceanographic regions in the Caribbean
sea. We used a biophysical model to predict which oceanographic regions had the highest and lowest
levels of larval self-recruitment within the Caribbean seascape and explored associations between genetic
population structure and dispersal barriers in these locations. Our results suggested that sites in Panama
and Andros Island in the Bahamas, both located in oceanographic regions with large offshore gyres, were
consistently distinct from the rest of the sites in our study. Sites located near the mean surface flow of the
Caribbean current were consistently genetically similar to each other. No evidence of genetic isolation by
distance was found. These findings suggest that oceanographic or environmental drivers rather than
geographic distance more likely influence spatial patterns of geneflow in Caribbean spiny lobsters.
Additional research is required to clarify the temporal levels of genetic connectivity among spiny lobster
populations in advective and retentive oceanographic regions in the Caribbean.
KEYWORDS: Connectivity, conservation, genetics, biophysical, model
249
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
ANÁLISIS PRELIMINAR DE LAS POBLACIONES DE PEPINO DE MAR, HOLOTHURIA
FLORIDANA Y H. MEXICANA, SEGÚN EL MÉTODO DE MARCA-RECAPTURA EN AGUAS
DE LA COSTA DEL ESTADO DE CAMPECHE, MÉXICO
A PRELIMINARY ANALYSIS OF THE POPULATIONS OF SEA CUCUMBER, HOLOTHURIA
FLORIDANA AND H. MEXICO, AS THE MARK-RECAPTURE METHOD IN WATERS OFF
THE COAST OF CAMPECHE, MEXICO
L'ANALYSE PRÉLIMINAIRE DES POPULATIONS DE CONCOMBRES DE MER,
HOLOTHURIA FLORIDANA ET H. MEXIQUE, COMME LA MÉTHODE DE MARQUAGERECAPTURE DANS LES EAUX AU LARGE DES CÔTES DE CAMPECHE, AU MEXIQUE.
ARMIN TUZ-SULUB, ALFONSO AGUILAR-PERERA, and ILEANA ORTEGÓN-AZNAR
Universidad Autonoma de Yucatan A.P. 4-116 Itzimna Merida, Yucatan 97100 Mexico
[email protected]
250
RESUMEN
Las características biológicas del crecimiento somático individual, así como la dinámica poblacional de
las especies de pepino de mar son componentes importantes en el manejo integral para su
aprovechamiento. La técnica de marcaje-recaptura utilizada en la estimación de la tasa de crecimiento en
especies de pepino de mar es recomendado para el estudio de poblaciones tanto de vertebrados como
invertebrados marinos. Para dos poblaciones de pepino de mar distribuidos en aguas de Isla Arena,
Campeche, México; dos tipos de marcaje fueron utilizados en ejemplares silvestres: uno de inserción
interna (michochip de radio frecuencia AVID3001) y otro de inserción intramuscular (Floy T-bar anchor
Tags). Un total de 346 ejemplares de Holothuria floridana y 102 de H. mexicana fueron marcados,
monitoreados y/o recapturados en un periodo de 9 meses (octubre de 2012 a junio de 2013). El rango de
tallas para los ejemplares analizados fluctuó entre los 5.5 a los 22.5 cm LT y entre los 4.5 a los 13.5 cm de
LT para H. floridana y H. mexicana, respectivamente. La porcentaje de recaptura de los individuos
marcados osciló entre el 8 y 14.5 %. La distancia de distribución de los organismos recapturados fue de
1.78 m lineales al día. El crecimiento en biomasa preliminar estimado para Holothuria floridana fue de
6.4 gramos al mes. Estas son algunas características biológicas que contribuyen al aprovechamiento
sostenible de esta nueva pesquería comercial en la región.
PALABRAS CLAVES: Pepino de mar, pesqueria, marca-recaptura, Campeche
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
THE UTILITY OF SIMPLE CORAL REEF FISH COMMUNITY METRICS AS INDICATORS
FOR ECOSYSTEM-BASED FISHERIES MANAGEMENT IN THE CARIBBEAN
LA UTILIDAD DE VARIABLES SENCILLAS DERIVADAS DE COMUNIDADES DE PECES
DE ARRECIFE COMO INDICADORES PARA LA GESTIÓN DE PESCA BASADA EN EL
ECOSISTEMA EN EL CARIBE
L’UTILITÉ DE VARIABLES SIMPLES DÉRIVÉES DES COMMUNAUTÉS DE POISSONS DE
RÉCIF COMME INDICATEURS POUR LA GESTION DE PÊCHE BASÉE SUR
L’ÉCOSYSTÈME DANS LA CARAÏBE
HENRI VALLÈS1 and HAZEL OXENFORD2
Department of Biological and Chemical Sciences University of the West Indies Cave Hill Campus ,
Barbados [email protected]
2
Centre for Resource Management and Environmental StudiesThe University of the West Indies Cave
Hill Campus Barbados
1
ABSTRACT
The usefulness of fish community metrics as indicators for Ecosystem-Based Fisheries Management
(EBFM) has been mostly investigated in temperate systems. Here, we use 415 coral reef-surveys spanning
the Caribbean to assess and compare the potential of four simple fish community metrics, i.e. fish
biomass, fish density, mean fish weight and species richness, to separate fishing effects from natural
variation at both local (10s of kms) and broad (100-1000s of kms) spatial scales. We found that these
metrics differed considerably in redundancy, environmental correlates and the spatial scales underlying
metric-environment associations. Mean fish weight and fish biomass were largely redundant and sensitive
to fishing at both spatial scales, although mean fish weight was better at specifically detecting fishing
effects than fish biomass. Fish density and species richness were also largely redundant but sensitive to
temperature over broad scales and to macro-algae and relief height over local ones. This redundancy was
likely driven by environmental effects on species richness, ultimately affecting fish density. In contrast,
mean fish weight and fish density exhibited little redundancy, indicating that they were driven by
fundamentally different processes. All four metrics were negatively correlated with macro-algae over
broad scales, supporting the value of macro-algae as an indicator of the integrity of entire reef
ecosystems. Finally, most of the metric-fishing covariance operated over broad scales, highlighting the
need for a Caribbean-wide view of resource status to prevent shifting baselines. Our study clarifies the
utility of simple fish community metrics as indicators for EBFM in the Caribbean.
KEYWORDS: Indicators, fisheries, fish metrics
251
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
DISEÑANDO UNA ÁREA DE PESCA ARTESANAL EXCLUSIVA - UNA ALTERNATIVA
VIABLE PARA LOS PUEBLOS DE LA MOSKITIA HONDUREÑA
DESIGNING AN EXCLUSIVE AREA FOR ARTISANAL FISHERIES – A VIABLE
ALTERNATIVE FOR THE COMMUNITIES OF THE MOSKITIA, HONDURAS
LA CONCEPTIOND'UNEZONE EXCLUSIVE DE PÊCHEARTISANALE - UNE
ALTERNATIVE VIABLE POUR LES COMMUNAUTÉS DE LA MOSKITIA AU HONDURAS
DIANA VASQUEZ1, STEPHEN BOX2, and ILIANA CHOLLET3
Centro de Ecologia Marina Edificio Florencia Oficina 401 - 403 Tegucigalpa, FMO Honduras
[email protected]
2
Smithsonian Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce, 701 Seaway Drive, Fort Pierce, Florida 34949
Fort Pierce Florida USA
3
Marine Spacial Laboratory, University of Queensland, St. Lucia, Brisbane, Qld 4072 Australia
1
252
RESUMEN
Los Cayos de La Moskitia Hondureña, son un sistema de 53 cayos arenosos que están rodeados de
arrecifes de coral y pastos marinos.Por décadas, los recursos marinos asociados con estos
ecosistemasprincipalmente la langosta espinosa y el caracol gigante, han sido objeto de aprovechamiento
por parte del sector industrial. Como método de extracción se emplean buzos, principalmente gente
indígena. El buceo para la extracción de langosta es la principal fuente de empleo e ingreso en esta región
postergada del país. Pero también la principal causa de invalidez y muerte. La preocupación por los
costos sociales del buceo, llevó a un acuerdo regional para prohibir la práctica en todo Centro América.
Aunque la medida está orientada a salvaguardar vidas humanas, crea una enorme incertidumbre por la
pérdida de empleos y la vulnerabilidad de la economía local en la región de la Moskitia. En vista que a la
fecha existen pocas alternativas para los pueblos Miskitos, los mismos puebloshan decidido utilizar el
cierre de la pesca industrial de langosta, como oportunidad para desarrollar nuevas pesquerías,
sostenibles, rentables y más seguras.Utilizando ciencia marina, tecnología de punta y el conocimiento
ancestral de los pescadores, se ha diseñado un Área de Pesca en los cayos de la Moskitiaque permitirá de
forma exclusiva la pesca artesanaly el uso preferente de los recursos por las comunidades locales.
Retomando sus prácticas tradicionales mediante métodos que promuevan la conservación de la
naturaleza y los servicios ecosistémicos, así como la promoción del desarrollo económico local, se
asegura la recuperación de las pesquerías y su disponibilidad a futuro, y se mantiene el potencial
económico para los pueblos de la Moskitia.
PALABRAS CLAVES: La Moskitia, pesca artesanal, buceo, comunidades, prácticas tradicionales
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
RESPONSE RATE DECLINE, SURVEY METHODOLOGY, AND IMPLICATIONS FOR
TEXAS FISHERIES MANAGEMENT
CAÍDA ÍNDICE DE RESPUESTA, METODOLOGÍA DE LA ENCUESTA, Y LAS
IMPLICACIONES PARA LA GESTIÓN DE LAS PESQUERÍAS DE TEXAS
BAISSE DES TAUX DE RÉPONSE, LA MÉTHODOLOGIE DE L'ENQUÊTE, ET LES
IMPLICATIONS POUR LA GESTION DES PÊCHES TEXAS
KENNETH WALLEN, ADAM LANDON, GERARD KYLE, and MICHAEL SCHUETT
Texas A&M University Human Dimensions of Natural Resources Lab 2142 TAMU College Station , TX
77843 USA [email protected]
ABSTRACT
Survey instruments are essential tools for gathering socio-demographic and psycho-metric data relevant to
fisheries management. However, recent trends in several social science disciplines show a significant
decrease in response rates, particularly within the context of mail and email surveys. As part of the Texas
Parks and Wildlife Department‟s (TPWD) Statewide Survey of Licensed Anglers our research sought to
a) provide insight on the success of different collection methods as evidenced in response rates, b)
understand the most effective method for acquiring a representative sample of licensed Texas anglers, and
c) develop a socio-demographic profile of response and non-response anglers. Using data collected from
licensed Texas anglers, we conducted an experiment that involved a comparison among three treatment
groups; a) surface mail-only survey distribution (n= 697), b) an email-only invitation (n=784), and c) a
combination of mail-only and email-only invitations (n=407). Effective response rates varied widely
across treatments ranging from 64% for combination mode to 29.9% for email-only and a low of 20% for
the traditional surface mail-only methods. Comparisons of socio-demographics across treatments showed
significant differences in age, gender, income, and ethnicity. The generalizability of data obtained through
survey methods is dependent on the ability of the instrument to capture a representative sample of the
population. Results illustrate the need to consider the efficacy of survey methodology in attempts to
obtain sufficient and representative data intended to inform fisheries management. They also shed light on
the ability of mixed-mode surveys to buoy declining response rates in traditional mail only
methodologies.
KEYWORDS: Anglers, generalizability, non-response, questionnaires, demographics
253
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
QUALITY VERSUS QUANTITY FOR AGGREGATE HOUSEHOLD SEAFOOD
CONSUMPTION AND RELEVANT SOUTHEAST U.S. SPECIES
CALIDAD VERSUS CANTIDAD EN EL CONSUMO DOMÉSTICO AGREGADO DE
MARISCOS Y ESPECIES IMPORTANTES DEL SURESTE DE LOS ESTADOS UNIDOS
LA QUALITÉ CONTRE LA QUANTITÉ DANS LA CONSOMMATION DES FRUITS DE MER
ET AUTRES ESPÈCES PERTINENTES PAR LES MÉNAGES DU SUD-EST DES ETATS-UNIS
D’AMERIQUE
HUABO WANG and WALTER KEITHLY
Louisiana State University 3361 Iowa St. Apt 210 Baton Rouge, LA 70802 US [email protected]
254
ABSTRACT
From February 2005 through January 2006, a NOAA Fisheries Seafood Consumption Survey was
conducted to gather information about household seafood consumption behavior. Based on the 10,798
completed interviews, the objective of the study is to estimate expenditure-based household demand
functions for seafood in aggregate as well as species of importance to the Southeast U.S. harvesting and
processing sectors (e.g., shrimp). Emphasis will be given to the influence of socioeconomic factors and
opportunity costs on the demand for quality. As an outcome of this objective, and based on the hypothesis
that demand for quality is proportional to the level of aggregation (i.e., as one moves from seafood to
shrimp), the study examines whether the demand for quality diminishes in relation to the level of
disaggregation. Completion of this objective will build upon the bivariate model originally proposed by
Dong et al. (1998). The bivariate model utilized the maximum likelihood method to successfully deal
with a truncation problem as well as difficulties of unobserved unit price values. As such, the quality
variation and consumer preference could be simultaneously investigated by this bivariate analysis.
Reference: Diansheng Dong, J.S.Shonkwiler And Oral Capps, Jr. (1998) Estimation of Demand Functions
Using Cross-Sectional Household Data: The Problem Revisited, American Journal of Agriculture
Economics. 80(August 1998):466-473
KEYWORDS: Quality, quantity, seafood
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
EXPRESSION PROFILE OF VENOM PROTEINS IN PTEROIS VOLITANS: IMPLICATIONS
FOR CIGUATOXIN DETECTION
PERFIL DE EXPRESIÓN DE PROTEÍNAS DEL VENENO EN PTEROIS VOLITANS:
IMPLICACIONES PARA LA DETECCIÓN DE CIGUATOXIN
PROFIL D'EXPRESSION DES PROTÉINES DE VENIN DANS PTEROIS VOLITANS:
IMPLICATIONS POUR LA DÉTECTION DE LA CIGUATOXIN
CHRISTIE WILCOX
University of Hawaii Discover Magazine 738 Ekekela Pl Honolulu, Hawaii 96817 United States
[email protected]
ABSTRACT
The fish in the order Scorpaeniformes posses potent venoms that cause neuromuscular and cardiovascular
symptoms through the activation of sodium channels, calcium influx into cells, and the release and
depletion of acetylcholine from presynaptic neurons. Although these venom compounds have the
potential to mimic ciguatoxin in detection bioassays, thus disrupting our ability to accurately test for
ciguatera in venomous species, they are harmless to fish consumers. While it is know that the venom is
present in the spines, no research has sought investigated if venom proteins exist elsewhere in the fish.
Proteins were extracted from the spine, skin, muscle and liver tissues of fish using four buffers used by
previous studies to extract ciguatoxin samples: phosphate-buffered saline, 70% methanol, 100% methanol
and 100% acetone. Western blotting with stonefish antivenom was used to detect the presence of venom
proteins in tissues from invasive Pterois volitans, introduced Cephalopholis argus, and native Acanthurus
triostegus (a non-Scorpaeniformes control). Venom proteins were most highly expressed in the spines of
the venomous Scorpaeniform species, with decreased but detectable expression in skin and muscle
tissues. These proteins were detected strongly in both the saline and 70% methanol extracts, suggesting
the possibility that these proteins or other venom compounds contaminate ciguatoxin tests. The next step
of this research, clarifying the affect of venom toxins on ciguatera bioassays, will increase the accuracy of
ciguatera detection in Scorpaeniform species, potentially expanding the fishery for invasive lionfishes as
well as other commercially relevant Scorpaeniformes.
KEYWORDS: Lionfish, ciguatera, ciguatoxin, Scorpaeniformes, venom
255
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
LAUNCH OF THE UNEP-CEP/CAMPAM MENTORSHIP PROGRAM: USING CARIBBEAN
MPA MANAGEMENT EXPERTISE TO EXPEDITE THE DISSEMINATION OF BEST
PRACTICES
LANZAMIENTO DEL PROGRAMA DE TUTORÍA PNUMA-PAC/CAMPAM: EL USO DE LA
EXPERIENCIA DE GESTIÓN DE AMP DE LA REGIÓN PARA ACELERAR LA DIFUSIÓN DE
LAS MEJORES PRÁCTICAS
LANCEMENT DU PROGRAMME DE TUTORAT PNUE-PEC/CAMPAM: L'UTILISATION DE
L'EXPERTISE DE GESTION DE LA MPA DE LA RÉGION À ACCÉLÉRER LA DIFFUSION
DES MEILLEURES PRATIQUES
RICH WILSON, ALESSANDRA VANZELLA-KHOURI, GEORGINA BUSTAMANTE, and HELENE
SOUAN
Seatone Consulting 515 John Muir Dr., #A-412 San Francisco, CA 94132 USA
[email protected]
256
ABSTRACT
The Wider Caribbean has realized a sharp increase in newly designated MPAs in recent years. Many of
these sites struggle to build management capacity, acquire and train staff, and secure public support for
the sustainable use and conservation of marine resources. In early 2013 senior Caribbean marine resource
professionals gathered in the Dominican Republic to collaboratively design and initiate launch of a
mentorship program that supports peer-to-peer sharing of knowledge, skills and lessons learned in
effective MPA management. Mentoring has long been recognized as an effective means to improve
individual and organizational capacity and performance. The mentorship program represents the newest
addition to the suite of tools and resources brought forth by the Caribbean Marine Protected Area
Managers Network and Forum (CaMPAM). The primary goal is to sustainably enhance professional
capacities of MPA managers and practitioners throughout the region by responding directly to common
training and technical needs. The program will enhance the transfer of new skills into practice from
learning theory combined with demonstration, practice, evaluation during training and both in-situation
and ongoing support. The initiative builds upon the „Training of Trainers Course on Marine Protected
Area Management,‟ CaMPAM‟s flagship training that started in 1999 and has since enhanced
professional development for hundreds of MPA managers across the Caribbean.
KEYWORDS: MPA, mentorship, network, mentor, mentee
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
THE TOTAL ECONOMIC VALUE OF NATURE ON BONAIRE
EL VALOR ECONÓMICO TOTAL DE LA NATURALEZA EN BONAIRE
LA VALEUR ÉCONOMIQUE TOTALE DE LA NATURE SUR BONAIRE
ESTHER WOLFS
WKICS Sabadeco West 230 Santa Barbara, Bonaire 0000 Caribbean Netherlands [email protected]
ABSTRACT
It is crucial to understand how nature contributes to one‟s economy and wellbeing in order to make wellfounded decisions when managing the economy and nature by protecting marine areas. This research was
to deliver sound scientific insights that guide decision-making regarding protecting Bonaire‟s ecosystems
and the management of its economy. By assigning economic values to ecosystem services of Bonaire,
this draws attention to economic benefits of biodiversity and highlights the growing costs of biodiversity
loss and ecosystem degradation. The study addresses the most relevant ecosystems and ecosystem
services for Bonaire and applies a range of economic valuation and evaluation tools. By surveying over
1,500 persons, including tourists, fishermen, local residents, and citizens of the Netherlands, this study
estimated the willingness of individuals to pay for the protection of Bonairean nature. Scenario analysis is
conducted about effective strategies to protect the ecosystems of Bonaire. This study intensively involved
stakeholders, which facilitated data collection while building capacity in applying the concept of
ecosystem services among the target audience. The total economic value of ecosystem services provided
by the marine and terrestrial ecosystems of Bonaire is $105 million per year. In the scenarios it becomes
very clear that it is more efficient to prevent extensive environmental damage than trying to revitalize the
environment while there are still threats at hand. With the current threats unmanaged, the TEV of
Bonairean nature will decrease from $105 million today to around $60 million in ten years time and to
less than $40 million in 30 years.
KEYWORDS: Socio-economic valuation, MPA, willingness-to-pay, Ecosystem services, values
257
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
INCORPORATING GIS INTO SOCIOECONOMIC MONITORING FOR COASTAL
MANAGERS (SOCMON)
LA INCORPORACIÓN DE LOS SIG EN EL MONITOREO SOCIOECONÓMICO PARA LOS
ADMINISTRADORES COSTEROS (SOCMON)
L'INTÉGRATION SIG EN SUIVI SOCIO-ÉCONOMIQUE POUR LES GESTIONNAIRES
CÔTIERS (SOCMON)
JEHROUM WOOD, KIMBERLY BALDWIN, PENA MARIA, and PATRICK MCCONNEY
Centre for Resource Management and Environmental, University of the West Indies, Cavehill Campus
Cavehill Bridgetown, bb14012 Barbados [email protected]
258
ABSTRACT
Understanding the biological and physical parameters of coastal ecosystems and resources is vital for
prudent and adaptive management. But the socio-economic context within which any coastal management
initiative is undertaken also impacts its success or failure. Monitoring the nature, status and trends of
socio-economic characteristics is necessary to determine the most appropriate approaches for successfully
managing both the resources and the human interactions at and around the site. Socioeconomic
Monitoring for Coastal Managers (SocMon), is a global program which provides a practical, yet flexible,
standardised methodology for collecting social and economic monitoring data for coastal management.
The socio-economic information from SocMon can help managers balance sustainable resource use,
protection and conservation with community needs for livelihoods, food security and equitable use of
resources. Although SocMon was not designed explicitly for use with Geographic Information Systems
(GIS), many of the monitoring variables are spatially based. SocMon can be enhanced through spatial
representation of information by incorporating GIS, including stakeholder participation where possible.
The mapping of information and incorporation into a GIS presents an additional method of storing,
analysing and representing some socio-economic variables by providing spatial references locations,
boundaries, trends and changes, regarding resources, people and their interrelationships. This paper sets
out research undertaken in the Caribbean on a standard methodology for efficiently and effectively
assimilating GIS into the SocMon methodology to develop „SocMon Spatial‟ as an enhanced application
for coastal, marine and fisheries management.
KEYWORDS: Caribbean, SocMon, Socio-economic Monitoring, GIS, PGIS
Book of Abstracts – 66th GCFI Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2013
A COMPARISON OF TROPHIC STRUCTURE AMONG ARTIFICIAL REEFS OF THE
NORTHWESTERN GULF OF MEXICO
UNA COMPARACIÓN DE LA ESTRUCTURA TRÓFICA ENTRE LOS ARRECIFES
ARTIFICIALES DEL GOLFO NOROESTE DE MÉXICO
UNE COMPARAISON DE LA STRUCTURE TROPHIQUE PARMI LES RÉCIFS ARTIFICIELS
DU NORD-OUEST DU GOLFE DU MEXIQUE
DANIELLE ZIMMERMANN, MATT AJEMIAN, JENNIFER WETZ, and GREG STUNZ
Harte Research Institute Texas A&M University - Corpus Christi 6300 Ocean Dr. Corpus Christi, TX
78412 United States [email protected]
ABSTRACT
Artificial reefs are man-made structures that are used to create habitat in locations where there is little
natural hard bottom habitat (coral, limestone, etc.). In the Gulf of Mexico, structures used to create
artificial reefs include decommissioned oil and gas platforms, tanks, ships, and concrete. The ecosystem
structure, and consequently the trophic assemblage, can differ among artificial reefs based on differences
in individual site characteristics, such as structure type. This study examined the trophic structure of the
fish community at thirteen artificial reef structures in the northwestern Gulf of Mexico along the Texas
coast. These reef sites were predominately composed of oil and gas platforms (either cutoff or toppled),
but some reefed ships were also included in the analysis. In order to characterize and determine if
differences existed between structure types, we analyzed video data collected using a remotely operated
vehicle (ROV). A trophic level and trophic guild were assigned to each fish species identified using data
from FishBase. No significant differences were found in overall mean trophic level among individual reef
sites and structure types. The two most dominant trophic guilds present at all three structure types (cutoff
rigs, toppled rigs, and ships) were piscivores and invertivores, though this was likely biased by large size
and thus “visibility” of these groups. Additional analyses from on-going surveys should provide a more
comprehensive assessment of artificial reef trophic structure and include characteristics such as structure
age and proximity to other artificial reef or natural bank sites.
KEYWORDS: Artificial reef, trophic level, trophic guild, ROV survey, structure type
259
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